2011-2012 Walden University Catalog (June 2012) 
    
    Aug 11, 2022  
2011-2012 Walden University Catalog (June 2012) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Ph.D. in Education


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The Ph.D. in Education is a research-focused program that produces outstanding professionals who can address the nation’s most pressing challenges in the field of education. A General Program and specializations in a variety of established and newly emerging fields are available. For students whose particular learning interests are not met by one of the specializations or whose interests are interdisciplinary, The Richard W. Riley College of Education and Leadership also offers a self-designed specialization to meet their unique needs. Educators are expected to come to the program with defined learning goals and challenges and to participate in designing their own program of study.

The Ph.D. in Education learning outcomes will be demonstrated through numerous direct and indirect measures in each of the Ph.D. specializations. 

Learning Outcomes


At the end of this program, the education professional will:

  1. Synthesize content knowledge, concepts, and principles grounded in a specific educational discipline.
  2. Propose interventions based on the analysis of educational needs.
  3. Design and conduct research that is grounded in theory and based on previous research in the field.
  4. Conduct research that positively impacts social change.
  5. Communicate to multiple audiences via effective oral and written formats.
  6. Advocate for social change that integrates diverse perspectives and demonstrates awareness of global interrelationships.

 

Degree Requirements


Specializations


 

 

KAM-Based (Self-Directed Specializations)


General Program; Adult Education Leadership; Community College Leadership; Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment; Early Childhood Education; Higher Education; K-12 Educational Leadership; Special Education; and Self-Designed specializations

  • 96 total quarter credit hours
  • Foundation courses (12 cr.)
  • KAMs and/or courses and Research Sequence (64 cr.)
  • Satisfactory progress in   each quarter
  • Proposal, dissertation, and oral presentations (20 cr.)
  • 16 units of academic residency
  • Minimum 8–10 quarters enrollment
  • ePortfolio

Mixed-Model (KAM-/Course-Based) Specializations


General Program; Adult Education Leadership; Community College Leadership; Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment; Early Childhood Education; Global and Comparative Education; Higher Education; K-12 Educational Leadership; Special Education; and Self-Designed specializations

  • 96 total quarter credit hours
  • Foundation courses (12 cr.)
  • KAMs and/or courses and Research Sequence (64 cr.)
  • Satisfactory progress in all   registrations
  • Proposal, dissertation, and oral presentations (20 cr.)
  • 16 units of academic residency
  • Minimum 8–10 quarters enrollment
  • ePortfolio

Course-Based Specializations


Assessment, Evaluation , and Accountability; Educational Technology; Leadership, Policy, and Change; and Learning, Instruction, and Innovation specializations

  • 96 total quarter credit hours
  • Foundation courses (12 cr.)
  • Courses and Research Sequence (64 cr.)
  • Proposal, dissertation, and oral presentations (20 cr.)
  • 16 units of academic residency
  • Minimum 8–10 quarters enrollment
  • ePortfolio

Core KAMS II–III (24 cr.)


In the core KAMs, students gain a foundation of knowledge and prepare to enhance their professional practice in a constantly changing environment.

Core KAM II: Principles of Human Development (12 cr.)


In KAM II, students explore human development from a variety of perspectives, including those defined by biology, anthropology, and psychology. They examine how culture (e.g., race, nationality, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, and disability) influences human development, and they come to know the individual as part of a larger context in a pluralistic society.

Core KAM III: Principles of Organizational and Social Systems (12 cr.)


In KAM III, students apply social systems theory to examine how different parts of a system interact, in order to analyze and understand education in the context of the larger society. The primary models of structured system theories are presented as a background and theoretical framework for other knowledge areas.

Core Curriculum


Program Data


Walden is committed to providing the information about your program. Please find detailed information for the Ph.D. in Education relating to the types of occupations this program may lead to, completion rate, program costs, and median loan debt of students who have graduated from this program.

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