2022–2023 Walden University Catalog (March 2022) 
    
    Dec 01, 2022  
2022–2023 Walden University Catalog (March 2022) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    EDUC 3004 - Curriculum Design♦


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals have the opportunity to gain the fundamental skills needed for planning, designing, and delivering engaging learning experiences. They examine the elements of effective curriculum design, learn how to write measurable learning objectives, and explore tools, technologies, and resources for developing curriculum. They share perspectives and gain practical insight on course concepts through discussions on various topics, such as instructional designer responsibilities in creating effective curriculum, learning objective analysis, assessment formats, and curriculum design proposals. Additionally, education professionals reflect on learning and consider how they can use knowledge gained throughout the course in future personal, academic, and professional future endeavors.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 1014

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3005 - Evaluation and Assessment♦


    (5 cr.)
    Program evaluation and learner assessment are fundamental components to the process of designing effective learning experiences. In this course, education professionals investigate major concepts, principles, and methodologies related to evaluation and assessment. They explore the selection of assessment tools, measurement of learning outcomes, and performance evaluation. Education professionals learn how to use information gained from assessments as a tool for improving learning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3006 - Designing Curriculum♦


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals have the opportunity to gain the fundamental skills needed for planning, designing, and delivering effective learning experiences. They examine the elements of effective curriculum design, and they explore tools, technologies, and resources for developing curriculum. They also discuss the role of instructional designers, course goals and objectives, assessment techniques, and emerging issues in the field. Moreover, education professionals gain practical experience in applying Bloom and Fink taxonomies as well as writing goals and objectives, congruent assessments, learning plans, and instructional steps.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 1014

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3007 - Assessment and Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.)
    Assessment and evaluation are fundamental to the process of designing effective learning experiences. In this course, education professionals investigate major concepts, principles, and methodologies related to evaluation and assessment. They explore the selection of assessment tools, measurement of learning outcomes, and evaluation of performance. Additionally, education professionals learn how to use information gained from assessments as a tool for improving practice.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 1015

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3008 - Diversity in Education♦


    (5 cr.)
    People have different backgrounds, perspectives, and values; similarly, they have different approaches to learning. Individuals who work in educational environments and serve as agents of social change must recognize and honor these differences. Education professionals in this course examine how the need to serve people of differing social groups, cultures, and abilities offers challenges and opportunities in today’s learning environments. They reflect on their attitudes, beliefs, and biases regarding diversity and learn approaches to help ensure equitable access and meaningful learning in a variety of educational settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3009 - Technology and Education♦


    (5 cr.)
    Technology is becoming a central aspect of our everyday lives and has a profound impact on the way we work, play, and learn. In this course, education professionals explore and discuss how our technology-rich world influences different generations of learners and their learning preferences. Through conceptual and application-based assignments, they also learn how to integrate technology into teaching and learning processes to meet the needs of diverse learners as well as how to harness Internet technologies to enhance the work of students by facilitating collaboration, communication, and problem solving.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3010 - 21st-Century Learning♦


    (5 cr.)
    Professionals in all areas of education, such as teaching, workforce training, and policy making, must be cognizant of the knowledge and skills required to adapt to 21st-century-specific change. In this course, education professionals explore the proficiencies essential to navigating the 21st-century learning landscape to position themselves for professional flexibility and success. They examine how the nature of knowledge, literacy, and learning is changing as a result of new technology. Education professionals gain a practical understanding of ways to learn and function effectively in this new, evolving environment through investigations and discussions on emerging research on learning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3011 - Making Connections: Managing and Leading Early Childhood Programs♦


    (2 cr.)
    Managing child development centers in the 21st century requires a complex array of leadership skills and dispositions. In this course, education professionals explore the various types, purposes, and theoretical foundations of child development programs, and they examine the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) core competencies for directors. They engage in discussions and assignments that emphasize the leader’s role in managing the organization as a whole, including overseeing regulatory and business concerns, establishing policies and procedures, and implementing the organization’s mission and vision.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3012 - Making Connections: Fiscal and Personnel Management of Child Development Centers and Programs


    (2 cr.)
    A child development center is a business like any other; it must be operated and staffed with precision. In this course, child development center directors and managers prepare for the financial and human relations aspects of the job. Topics covered include constructing and managing a budget, maintaining accurate financial reports, fund-raising, staffing, personnel management, and professional development.
  
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    EDUC 3013TL - Culturally Responsive Practice [Tempo Learning®-Specific Course]


    (5 cr.)
    How does culture influence actions, relationships, preferences, language, customs, and even values and beliefs? Why is it vital that early childhood professionals understand the ramifications of bias and stereotyping on children’s identity development? As an early childhood professional, educators can use the information in these competencies to analyze how current policy issues impact diverse populations of children and families in early childhood settings; apply principles of culturally responsive curriculum to promote children’s healthy development and learning; recommend culturally responsible practices to promote meaningful relationships with families; and apply strategies to promote access, equity, and positive social change for young children, families, and the early childhood field.
    Note: This version of EDUC 3013 is only available as part of specific competency-based Tempo Learning® programs.
  
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    EDUC 3050 - Child Development, Motivation, and Learning


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, teacher candidates prepare to understand the social, physical, emotional, and intellectual growth and development of children as related to learning and motivation in the elementary classroom. Teacher candidates explore philosophies and theories of child development and make connections between and among the key topics of development, learning and motivation, and social and cultural diversity. Learning environments and resources (including technology) that support the developmental needs of elementary children are identified and analyzed. In addition, teacher candidates explore the importance of family and community connections to support children’s learning; develop strategies for engaging families in the learning process of their children; and consider the role of children’s interests and personal experiences when planning instruction. Teacher candidates identify typical and atypical developmental patterns; analyze effectiveness of instructional strategies; and consider the role of specialists in supporting children’s growth and development.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 2401

  
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    EDUC 3051 - Collaboration to Support All Learners


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, candidates explore strategies for effective communication and collaboration with colleagues, specialists, families, and community agencies to provide support for all children. Candidates examine collaboration strategies that promote the growth and learning of all children in the elementary classroom, including those with exceptionalities, gifted and talented students, and English language learners. Candidates learn about the roles of all participants in collaborative teams, including coteaching and participating in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) process. Candidates examine the role of the school in supporting all learners within the larger community context. They identify factors in the students’ environments that may affect their growth and learning and explore strategies for effective collaboration with diverse families.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 2402
    • EDUC 3052

  
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    EDUC 3052 - Effective Practices: Planning, Instruction, and Assessment


    (5 cr.)
    To help ensure high levels of learning and achievement for all students, today’s educators must be knowledgeable about learners and learning and well-versed in effective teaching and assessment practices. In this course, education professionals examine the interrelationships between assessment, teaching, and learning as well as effective practices for applying and integrating these critical components in the K–6 classroom. They gain a historical perspective on the standards and accountability movement and examine standards in their state or local setting. They also explore learning theory in the context of today’s challenging educational goals and standards. In this course, education professionals learn and apply research-based practices in effective assessment, curriculum design, and instruction. Through on-site experiences and Virtual Field Experiences, they critically analyze and implement teaching and learning principles and practices that help ensure awareness of the individual and collective needs of students. This course requires a 15 hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 2401

  
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    EDUC 3053 - Community Building for Effective Classroom Management


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals learn to create safe, supportive, and respectful learning environments that promote social-emotional development, self-responsibility, and character to optimize learning for all students. Teachers will learn how to foster a sense of community in the classroom and develop positive relationships with and among students. Age-appropriate skills and strategies for managing dynamic and flexible grouping structures and for teaching conflict resolution will be presented. The course also provides strategies for building positive relationships, fostering motivation, and engaging in effective communication and problem solving with parents and families. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 2401

  
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    EDUC 3054 - Literacy K–6: Instruction and Assessment


    (5 cr.)
    Reading, listening, speaking, and writing are skills essential to success in school and in life. In this course, teacher candidates can examine a wide range of effective instructional and assessment practices that support the development of reading, oral language, and written communication for K-6 students. Teacher candidates use research-based approaches to literacy instruction while implementing a variety of assessment tools to identify students’ difficulties. Teacher candidates use assessment data to create engaging literacy learning experiences at diverse developmental levels. Topics include the incorporation of technology to support and enrich literacy learning, family involvement, and integrating literacy and learning into the content areas This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 2402
    • EDUC 3052

  
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    EDUC 3055 - Social Studies and the Arts K–6: Instruction and Assessment


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, candidates prepare to become effective educators of social studies and the arts. As they plan and implement instruction, candidates integrate the major concepts, themes, and modes of inquiry from social studies and the arts. Emphasis is on developing strategies to help students become effective citizens of a democratic and culturally diverse society. Candidates focus on building connections across disciplines and using the arts to foster student engagement and communication and promote their abilities to construct and apply knowledge. Candidates use multiple assessments to measure student progress and modify instruction to address the needs of all learners in diverse classrooms. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 3053
    • EDUC 3054
    • EDUC 3056
    • EDUC 4010
    • EDUC 4020
    • American or World History

  
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    EDUC 3056 - Integrating Content and Technology to Enhance Learning


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, teacher candidates explore strategies for integrating technology across content areas in order to plan units and lessons that support developmental and curricular goals for elementary students. Candidates create learning experiences that promote student motivation and engagement; support exploration, problem solving, and critical thinking; provide opportunities for collaborative and self-directed learning; and foster content area literacy. Candidates explore a wide variety of technology resources, infusing them in instructional planning to help students learn content and become proficient in the use of technology. Candidates examine effective teaching practices, including formative/authentic assessments and scaffolding techniques to support diverse learners. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 3054

  
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    EDUC 3101 - Professionalism and Advocacy in the Early Childhood Field♦


    (5 cr.)
    The landscape of early care and education is constantly changing. Education professionals in this course examine these changes, focusing on the roles and responsibilities of the early childhood teaching professional in infant/toddler and preschool settings. Education professionals explore the complexities of developmentally appropriate practice and learn what it means to be an advocate for children, their families, and the profession itself. They engage in discussions and assignments that emphasize the importance of keeping up with current research in the field and engaging in professional activities and organizations to ensure continual professional growth and learning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3103 - Guiding Young Children’s Behavior♦


    (5 cr.)
    Proactive guidance and positive, safe learning environments promote healthy child development and learning. Education professionals in this course focus on understanding and fostering social and emotional development in preschool-age children, and they learn strategies for establishing classroom communities in which all children feel safe, valued, and respected. They explore a range of topics, including teaching social skills, routines, and procedures; collaborating with families; preventing and working with challenging behaviors; developing problem-solving abilities; and organizing the classroom setting to support learning, cooperation, and social and emotional growth.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3111 - Making Connections: Foundations of Preschool Teaching


    (2 cr.)
    Professionalism, advocacy, and preschool education provide the focus of the themes, issues, and challenges that education professionals examine in this course. Education professionals make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, controversies, and possibilities related to working in the early childhood field with preschool-age children and their families. Applying course concepts, education professionals consider and explain the role and benefits of play for children and adults, and they summarize their thinking in regard to cultivating healthy development and learning in children through connections with nature.
  
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    EDUC 3112 - Making Connections: Effective Learning Environments


    (2 cr.)
    The development of optimal preschool learning environments and related themes, issues, and challenges provide the framework for this course. Education professionals make connections between the topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, controversies, and possibilities associated with establishing effective preschool learning environments. Through a case study scenario, they apply their knowledge of preschool children as well as concepts learned in the course to describe components that they believe are essential to optimal preschool environments. They also consider and summarize the importance of creativity, how creativity has affected their own lives, and how they would go about fostering creativity in the learning environment.
  
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    EDUC 3202 - Quality Programs for Infants and Toddlers♦


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals have the opportunity to focus on the breadth and depth of the field of infant/toddler care and education, emphasizing characteristics of quality infant/toddler programs. Education professionals learn the foundations of infant/toddler development, the integral role of the infant/toddler professional in fostering children’s growth and ensuring family involvement, and theoretical frameworks key to quality programs. They also explore the components of high-quality environments and what it means to be an advocate for young children, their families, and the profession.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3203 - Infant/Toddler Mental Health♦


    (5 cr.)
    Positive developmental progress in infants/toddlers depends on many factors, including the overall promotion of mental health, prevention of occurrence or escalation of mental health problems, and the effective treatment of mental health needs. Education professionals in this course explore current research in the field of infant/toddler mental health, through which they gain practical insight on protective and risk factors in family environments; social and emotional developmental challenges; developmentally appropriate infant/toddler screening and assessment; diagnostic classification systems for infant/toddler mental health; effective intervention strategies; and collaborative services approaches. Moreover, education professionals apply course concepts through practical assignments, such as the development of a fact sheet designed to educate child development professionals about the importance of the field of infant/toddler mental health.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3204 - Family Cultures of Infants and Toddlers♦


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, education professional experience an overview of the way culture impacts typical conceptions of infant/toddler development and interactions. Education professionals focus on the ability to form healthy working relationships and respectful partnerships with the families of infants and toddlers across a range of cultures. They investigate the meaning of various child-rearing behaviors and how they relate to family expectations and cultural traditions, with the goal of developing culturally appropriate practices. Education professionals also make connections and share perspectives through discussions on related topics, such as cultural differences in caregiving practices, attachment and separation, perspectives on play, and effective communication, among others.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3211 - Making Connections: Foundations of Infant/Toddler Care and Education


    (2 cr.)
    An important role of the child development professional is to understand how to use support services and programs to aid the healthy development and learning of young children and their families. In this course, education professionals examine themes, issues, and controversies central to the field of infant/toddler care and education, and they critically analyze ways to support the healthy development and learning of infants and toddlers through food and nutrition programs, vaccinations, and early intervention services. Education professionals make connections between the topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, challenges, and possibilities that infant/toddler professionals must understand.
  
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    EDUC 3212 - Making Connections: Healthy Infant/Toddler Growth and Development


    (2 cr.)
    Education professionals in this course focus on healthy infant/toddler growth and development as well as related themes, issues, and challenges. They make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, controversies, and possibilities associated with the overall well-being of very young children. Applying course concepts and gaining deeper insight on topics, education professionals also engage in practical writing activities, such as the development of a resource sheet for child development professionals that includes information on factors promoting healthy growth and development.
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 3203 and EDUC 3204)
  
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    EDUC 3301 - School-Age and Adolescent Development♦


    (5 cr.)
    Education professionals in this course gain a fundamental understanding of how school-age children and adolescents develop and learn. They examine typical and atypical cognitive, physical, and social-emotional development as well as the relationship among these developmental domains. They also compare theories of development; develop a presentation that identifies and explains specific strategies, methods, or activities for the promotion of health and well-being in middle childhood; engage in a field study to gain real-world insight on the affective and social development of children between the ages of 6 and 12; and complete an integrative research paper on critical, topical issues related to school-age and adolescent development.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3302 - Making Connections: Professions in the Field of School-Age and Adolescent Development


    (2 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals have an overview of the practices and professions in the field of school-age and adolescent development, including topics such as careers; interpersonal and professional skills; and ethical/legal guidelines needed for working with school-age children and adolescents, families, and other professionals. Education professionals explore a variety of organizations that are devoted to fostering the healthy development of school-age children and adolescents. They also have the opportunity to investigate a profession of their choice to learn the responsibilities and tasks it entails. Additionally, education professionals describe what they perceive to be the professional relationship between ethical and legal obligations as well as the significance of law and ethics in the field of school-age and adolescent development.
  
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    EDUC 3303 - Motivating and Guiding School-Age Children and Adolescents♦


    (5 cr.)
    Educators have a responsibility to guide and motivate as well as to foster self-esteem and resilience in school-age children and adolescents. Education professionals in this course address a continuum of effective strategies needed for working with school-age children and adolescents in group and classroom settings. Such strategies include effective communication, positive guidance, modeling/mentoring, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, fostering self-esteem, promoting resilience, and problem-solving and conflict-resolution skills. They learn to apply theory to practice as they critically analyze several theoretical constructs and consider their implications for working with school-age children and adolescents in group and/or classroom settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3304 - Making Connections: Effective Learning Environments for School-Age Children and Adolescents


    (2 cr.)
    Often times, the setting in which learning occurs is equally important as the material taught and method of teaching. In this course, education professionals examine effective learning environments for school-age children and adolescents. They make connections between key topics and their personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world settings; and future trends, challenges, and possibilities related to the healthy development and learning of school-age children and adolescents. Demonstrating knowledge and applying concepts, education professionals consider and describe how their definition of an effective learning environment has changed as a result of their learning. They also gain real-world insight into how to design effective learning environments by interviewing a professional in the field.
  
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    EDUC 3401TL - Social-Emotional Development and Positive Guidance [Tempo Learning®-Specific Course]


    (5 cr.)
    Early childhood professionals understand how deeply social-emotional development influences children during childhood and for the rest of their lives. In this course early childhood professionals delve into the unique characteristics of the social emotional developmental continuum, explore how to build responsive relationships that foster healthy social-emotional development, immerse themselves in positive guidance strategies to help children become independent and fair problem solvers as members of positive classroom communities, and study how to truly support young children as they practice, learn, and grow to be strong and healthy in their relationships with themselves and with others.
    Note: This version of EDUC 3401 is only available as part of specific competency-based Tempo Learning® programs.
  
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    EDUC 3402TL - Effective Practices for Quality Programs Serving Young Children [Tempo Learning®-Specific Course]


    (5 cr.)
    If education professionals were asked to define quality as it pertains to practices and programs serving young children and families, what would they say? This course provides essential information about how the principles of developmentally appropriate practice, early childhood program standards, pedagogical and organizational models, and effective teaching and leadership practices inform quality programs and family partnerships.
    Note: This version of EDUC 3402 is only available as part of specific competency-based Tempo Learning® programs.
  
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    EDUC 3403TL - Early Literacy [Tempo Learning®-Specific Course]


    (5 cr.)
    From the meaningful relationships that build when sharing stories to the empowering feeling of writing a first word, early literacy is an adventure and an accomplishment. It is essential that early childhood professionals understand developmentally appropriate ways to foster early literacy and literacy learning for children from birth through third  grade. In this course, educators also can become proficient at evaluating children’s literature and analyzing issues and strategies related to the appropriate use of technology to promote literacy learning in young children.
    Note: This version of EDUC 3403 is only available as part of specific competency-based Tempo Learning® programs.
  
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    EDUC 3404TL - Observation, Assessment, and Planning [Tempo Learning®-Specific Course]


    (5 cr.)
    Developing meaningful learning experiences requires understanding children’s specific strengths and challenges. What kinds of assessment methods and strategies will help educators learn this vital information? What do educators need to know about communicating and collaborating with families and other stakeholders to promote meaningful assessment practices? Through the course content, educators can ground themselves in the wisdom and practicality of developmentally appropriate assessment for young children.
    Note: This version of EDUC 3404 is only available as part of specific competency-based Tempo Learning® programs.
  
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    EDUC 4001 - Capstone


    (7 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals have the opportunity to integrate theories of child development, principles of effective early childhood practice, and methods of working with young children and their families. Education professionals engage in projects that demonstrate synthesis and application of this knowledge. Through these projects, they consider the knowledge and skills gained throughout the program and how they can apply them to future work in the early childhood/child development field. They also have the opportunity to research a position in early education, interview a professional in the field, develop a resume and cover letter, and reflect on professional competencies and areas for professional growth.
    Prerequisites
    • Completion of all other required coursework

  
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    EDUC 4004 - Children With Special Needs♦


    (5 cr.)
    Educators understand that all individuals are unique with varying abilities and needs. In this course, education professionals have an overview of exceptionalities in children from birth through adolescence. They engage in coursework that highlights early identification, referral, intervention, inclusion, and the related psychosocial needs of children and their families. They discuss complexities related to labeling children, inclusion, and challenging myths and stereotypes. In addition, education professionals explore federal and state legislation that guides educational requirements.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4005 - Cultural and Linguistic Diversity♦


    (5 cr.)
    An emphasis in this course is the importance of being responsive to the languages and cultures of individual children and their families and communities to support learning and development effectively. Education professionals broaden their understanding of culture as a framework that includes not only language and ethnicity but also gender, socioeconomic status, exceptionalities, family configuration, sexual orientation, personal interests, and many other aspects of one’s individuality. In addition, education professionals reflect on their own cultural frameworks and examine personal attitudes and beliefs.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4006 - Making Connections: Operating Child Development Centers and Programs


    (2 cr.)
    Operating a child development center requires the wearing of multiple hats. The focus in this course is on the day-to-day operational duties that managers and directors must perform to keep the facility running safely and smoothly. Topics include marketing and public relations; facilities management to ensure proper health, nutrition, and safety conditions; and family communication and support. Legal and ethical issues in working with children and families are also explored.
  
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    EDUC 4010 - Mathematics K–6: Instruction and Assessment


    (5 cr.)
    This coherent and rigorous approach to teaching and learning K–6 mathematics focuses on conceptual understanding, procedural skills, and application of mathematical knowledge. Coursework also focuses on helping teacher candidates promote problem-solving and communication skills as the core for teaching numbers and operations, algebra, data analysis, probability, measurement, geometry, and the use of manipulatives across math strands. Themes threaded throughout the course include technology, real-world applications, integrating math with other content areas, and building on the strengths and overcoming the challenges of diverse learners. This course includes 15 hours of field experience.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 3054

  
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    EDUC 4011 - Making Connections: The Individuality of Children


    (2 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals address themes, issues, and controversies related to the special needs and individuality of children. They make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, challenges, and possibilities associated with understanding and meeting the needs of individual children and their families. Through written assignments designed to provide practical application of content, education professionals analyze topical sources focused on disability culture and autism and then make connections, describe how their thinking has changed as a result of their analysis, and summarize new perspectives.
  
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    EDUC 4012 - Making Connections: Living in a Diverse World


    (2 cr.)
    Education professionals in this course examine themes, issues, and challenges specific to living in a diverse society. They make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research and controversies; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends and possibilities related to the areas of social responsibility and cultural and linguistic diversity. They delve deeper into content and share ideas and perspectives through discussions on a range of topics, such as methods to strengthen communities and strategies and challenges of international adoption.
  
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    EDUC 4013 - Motivation and Learning♦


    (5 cr.)
    Motivation is an important precursor to learning; yet, what motivates people of different ages and different backgrounds to participate and persist in learning opportunities varies widely. In this course, education professionals explore foundational theories of motivation and how these impact learning. They investigate applications of theories of motivation to understand what occurs in different learning environments. They also explore how to use these theories to help those who work in educational environments make effective decisions about their practice.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4014 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Education♦


    (5 cr.)
    An understanding of legal and ethical issues that impact the lives and interests of learners is critical to those who work in all types of educational settings. In this course, education professionals examine issues surrounding state and national educational policy; constitutional issues concerning equal opportunity, privacy, and access; and the legal requirements of working with children and adults from different backgrounds. Through activities and discussions, education professionals practice ethical decision making and consider their own beliefs and biases about ethical issues in education.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4015 - Educational Studies Capstone


    (5 cr.)
    Through the capstone experience, education professionals have the opportunity to integrate their understanding of educational concepts and processes learned throughout the program. They complete an integrative project that demonstrates their ability to apply this knowledge to the real world. Education professionals identify professional opportunities in the field of education and make connections between program learning outcomes and their job of interest, thus demonstrating how fulfilling learning outcomes provided them the skills, knowledge, and qualifications required for the position.
    Prerequisites
    • Completion of all other program coursework

  
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    EDUC 4019TL - Play, Creativity, and the Arts [Tempo Learning®-Specific Course]


    (5 cr.)
    Play, creative expression, and the arts offer children opportunities to learn about who they are—to express and explore their individuality and to flourish together. The competencies in this course allow educators to explore the value and practice of fostering play, creativity, and the creative arts with children preschool through third grade. Educators also analyze the role child-centered learning and teaching play in fostering children’s creative thinking and creative involvement in the arts.
    Note: This version of EDUC 4019 is only available as part of specific competency-based Tempo Learning® programs.
  
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    EDUC 4020 - Science K–6: Instruction and Assessment


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals explore teaching and learning in science, based on the latest research on the most effective methods for teaching appropriate science curriculum from Kindergarten through grade 6. Candidates focus on ways to use developmentally appropriate strategies to promote modes of inquiry and analytical skills in science education. They also explore instructional and assessment strategies to develop children’s conceptual understanding of science, particularly relating to the standards for physical, life, and earth and space sciences. Candidates examine and apply integration of science with reading, math, social studies, and technology. Candidates consider their own science content knowledge and explore local professional development opportunities. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 3054
    • Lab Science requirement

  
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    EDUC 4030 - Demonstration Teaching/Seminar: Professional Ethics, Communication, and Collaboration in Elementary Education


    (10 cr.)
    Demonstration teaching is the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program and is an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills. Education professionals participate in orientation activities and then gradually assume complete teaching responsibility of an elementary classroom. Education professionals take full control for 4 consecutive weeks over a 12-week placement, gaining real-world experience and the opportunity to translate theory into practice.

    Candidates demonstrate the various roles of an elementary educator. Education professionals work closely with, and are evaluated by, their Walden University supervisor, classroom cooperating teacher, and Walden faculty member. During demonstration teaching, all professionals complete the Education Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA), participate in weekly discussions, and complete a collaboration based major assessment. This course requires a 12-week full-time classroom experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites

    • Completion of all other required coursework

  
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    EDUC 4102 - Play and Learning for the Preschool Child♦


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals address an essential question in early childhood education: Why is play integral to children’s development and learning? They learn the theory, methods, and materials needed to support and enhance children’s play and learning in preschool settings, and they gain an understanding of the vital role of play in fostering growth in each of the developmental domains. They also explore how to arrange developmentally appropriate environments; provide opportunities for high-quality, productive play, and learning experiences; and assess development and learning through observation of play-based activities and learning experiences.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4104 - Inclusive Practices in Classroom Communities♦


    (5 cr.)
    All children have the right to develop and learn in classroom communities that support diverse, individual needs. In this course, education professionals explore the ways in which preschool teachers can build inclusive environments that exemplify developmentally appropriate practice. Education professionals learn strategies that support inclusion, meet identified needs, and foster a sense of classroom community. They also engage in coursework focused on observation and assessment, partnership development with families, collaboration with support resources, legal regulations and issues, and the roles of reflection and evidence-based decision making.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4105 - Early Literacy♦


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals explore current research on the most effective methods of promoting literacy development in preschool children. Using the “five pillars” of reading—phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension—as an organizational framework, education professionals explore the characteristics of emergent readers and writers. They also learn about developmentally appropriate assessments, materials, and strategies for instruction, including developing literacy through play and effectively using current technologies. They also engage in coursework that highlights the integral role of literacy across the curriculum.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4106 - Teaching Across Content Areas in Preschool♦


    (5 cr.)
    Teaching within and across specific content areas in the preschool curriculum requires practices that are engaging, meaningful, and developmentally appropriate. Education professionals in this course learn how to develop significant and enduring early childhood learning experiences in mathematics, social studies, science, language and literacy, health and physical education, and the visual and performing arts. They engage in practical applications and discussions on planning and implementing child-centered, age-appropriate curriculum and assessment as well as strategies for integrating content areas, including the project approach.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4112 - Making Connections: Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning


    (2 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals examine the themes, issues, and challenges related to developmentally appropriate teaching and learning at the preschool level. Education professionals make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, controversies, and possibilities associated with interdisciplinary preschool teaching and learning. Using a case study scenario, education professionals demonstrate their understandings of the project approach by developing a short overview explaining its function as well as how it represents developmentally appropriate practice. They also assess examples of project-based learning and evaluate what children can learn from such experiences.
  
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    EDUC 4120TL - Effective Practices for Infants and Toddlers [Tempo Learning®-Specific Course]


    (5 cr.)
    A caregiver gazes deeply and warmly into the eyes of an infant as she continues to intentionally foster their attachment. How do responsive, respectful relationships like these begin? How do they grow? And how do they support young children’s growth and development? In this course, educators explore how early childhood professionals can foster healthy development and learning in infant and toddlers through relationships, play, routines, transitions, and supportive environments. Educators also take part in field experience, developing a meaningful experience for infants or toddlers and working with young children and their teacher to make this experience come alive with learning for all.
    Note: This version of EDUC 4120 is only available as part of specific competency-based Tempo Learning® programs.
  
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    EDUC 4121TL - Meaningful Learning Experiences [Tempo Learning®-Specific Course]


    (10 cr.)
    How do early childhood teachers nurture children’s curiosity, interests, and wonder, while providing them with opportunities to actively engage with ideas, content areas, and each other? In this course, educators get to know the context—children, families, community—of the classroom where they are completing their field experience. As well, educators ground themselves in the standards, strands, and themes that underpin key content areas that children are learning about all the time. And then, educators collaborate with their host teacher to design, implement, and evaluate a unit of study that effectively integrates content areas to provide opportunities for children to engage in meaningful learning experiences.
    Note: This version of EDUC 4121 is only available as part of specific competency-based Tempo Learning® programs.
  
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    EDUC 4122TL - Learning and Teaching in Inclusive Early Childhood Settings [Tempo Learning®-Specific Course]


    (5 cr.)
    How can an early childhood professional help to ensure that every child thrives in the early childhood setting? In this course, educators delve into the foundation of high-quality early childhood inclusion programs. As well as studying practical strategies for working with children and partnering with families and other professionals, educators also apply evidence-based advocacy approaches to support high-quality inclusive programming in early care and education settings.
    Note: This version of EDUC 4122 is only available as part of specific competency-based Tempo Learning® programs.
  
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    EDUC 4205 - Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Infant Settings♦


    (5 cr.)
    Through this course, education professionals engage in an in-depth exploration of infant growth and development. They examine the role of the caregiver; components of high-quality caregiver-child relationships; and strategies for ensuring developmentally appropriate, individually appropriate, and culturally appropriate practice. They also explore methods to understand and work with families, observation skills, attachment, separation, continuity of care, brain development, and the creation of nurturing environments for very young children and their families. Demonstrating their understanding of course content, education professionals apply concepts through practical assignments, such as the development of a newsletter that provides information on the influence of infant settings on supporting young children and their families.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4206 - Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Toddler Settings♦


    (5 cr.)
    Education professionals in this course engage in an in-depth exploration of toddler growth and development. They explore the role of the toddler caregiver/teacher; the components of high-quality adult-child relationships; and strategies for ensuring developmentally appropriate, individually appropriate, and culturally appropriate practice. Education professionals engage in readings and course assignments focused on observation skills, attachment, separation, working with families, and creating inspiring and supportive environments for young children and their families. They also share perspectives and make connections through discussions on related topics, such as cultural values and beliefs, separations and reunions, play and the environment, and identity formation and cultural responsiveness, among others.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4211 - Making Connections: Effective Programs for Infants and Toddlers


    (2 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals focus on themes and issues related to the challenge of developing and maintaining high-quality infant/toddler settings. They make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, controversies, and possibilities related to effective programs for infants and toddlers. Through practical exercises, they describe how infants and toddlers exhibit prosocial behavior as well as why it is important for infant/toddler programs to foster such behavior. Education professionals also compose an article conveying the importance of applying brain research to policies, programs, and/or families to foster lifelong healthy development and learning.
  
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    EDUC 4220TL - Early Childhood Professionalism [Tempo Learning®-Specific Course]


    (5 cr.)
    Throughout this program, educators have been preparing to embrace their role as an early childhood professional grounded in evidence-based practice, the collaborative nature of the work, and a commitment to fostering positive outcomes for young children and their families. During the competencies that make up this course—the capstone experience—educators update their professional profile, core beliefs, and professional resume; hone their interview proficiency; and create an advocacy plan based on an issue that resonates with their professional goals. During the final competency, educators assess and plan for their ongoing professional development and commitment to working for positive social change for young children, families, and the early childhood field.
    Note: This version of EDUC 4220 is only available as part of specific competency-based Tempo Learning® programs.
  
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    EDUC 4301 - School-Age Children and Adolescence in a Multicultural Society♦


    (5 cr.)
    In today’s multicultural society, educators must be cognizant of the ways in which they teach culturally diverse values and social attitudes to school-age children and adolescents. Education professionals in this course examine these values and attitudes as well as ways to transmit such concepts in the classroom. They explore topics of ethnicity, language, gender, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status. They also examine how each of these areas of diversity affects school-age children and adolescents as well as how they relate to stereotyping and bias.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4302 - Home, School, and Community♦


    (5 cr.)
    Education professionals in this course explore the spheres of influence on school-age children and adolescents and the techniques needed to facilitate positive relationships among homes, schools, and communities to foster healthy development and learning. They explore and discuss the definition of home, school, and community; research on the benefits of partnerships; home visits and shared decision making; expectations and accountability; volunteer screening; and examples of successful educational partnerships. Applying course concepts, education professionals engage in an integrative project through which they develop a handbook of best practices for forming home, school, and community partnerships, including challenges, strategies, and potential legal and ethical issues.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4303 - Trends and Issues in School-Age Children♦


    (5 cr.)
    By understanding the relationship between children’s health, culture, and socioeconomic status, in addition to related trends and issues, professionals who work with school-age children are in a better position to address and respond to these issues and related challenges effectively. Education professionals in this course critically examine selected issues and trends related to school-age children, such as technology/media, bullying, gender, abuse prevention, drugs/alcohol, obesity/eating disorders, stress, peer relationships, and school success. They demonstrate their understanding of course concepts through various applications, including the creation of an informative brochure for the purpose of explaining topical issues on health and wellness to parents and other stakeholders.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4304 - Trends and Issues in Adolescence♦


    (5 cr.)
    Physical changes and social pressures make adolescence a challenging time for many teens; therefore, it is important for professionals to be aware of current trends and critical issues that affect the mental and physical well-being of this age group. Education professionals in this course examine and discuss selected issues and trends related to adolescents, such as technology/media, cyber bullying, gender, sexual orientation, drugs/alcohol, obesity/eating disorders, depression, self-injury, suicide, teenage pregnancy, and school success. Applying course concepts, education professionals engage in practical exercises, such as research analyses through which they explore the connections between topical issues and the larger world as they affect adolescents and their transition into adulthood.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4305 - Making Connections: The Role of the Professional


    (2 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals explore the role of the professional as advocate, interventionist, family liaison, and public policymaker. They make connections between key topics and their personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world settings; and future trends, challenges, and possibilities related to the development of the whole child. They engage in various discussions and activities related to the responsibilities of educators, such as the development of action plans detailing how they would organize and participate in interventions in response to specific situations. Education professionals also consider how they might engage in advocacy as part of their current or future profession.
  
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    EDUC 4500 - Capstone


    (7 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals have the opportunity to integrate knowledge of child development; principles and methods of working with school-age children and adolescents; and current research, issues, and trends that affect this age group. They create an integrative project that demonstrates synthesis and application of this knowledge. They consider professional goals while reflecting on research, issues, and trends explored throughout the program. Education professionals research a variety of positions in the field based on interests gained from learning experiences, and they develop a resume and cover letter to distinguish themselves competitively. Additionally, they complete a professional development plan through which they set goals and consider areas for further professional development.
    Prerequisites
    • Completion of all other required coursework

  
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    EDUC 5005 - Foundations: Early Childhood Studies


    (5 cr.)
    Students in this course focus on the study of leadership and professionalism in the early childhood field, examining current research, ethical considerations, and multiple theories of child development, teaching, and learning. Students will be introduced to the foundation of evidence-based research and decision making, which will be interwoven throughout the program. Students will also build their understanding of the philosophy, requirements, and community of Walden University, The Richard W. Riley College of Education and Human Services, and the master’s degree program in Early Childhood Studies.
  
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    EDUC 5105 - Organizations, Innovation, and Change


    (5 cr.)
    Understanding the fundamentals of organizational behavior and change management are essential for facilitating innovation in any organization. In this course, students examine the role the instructional designer can play in managing change within an organization. Students evaluate leadership qualities and practices that foster and sustain innovation in settings such as corporations, higher education, K–12 education, government, healthcare, and nonprofit organizations. Topics include the resistance to change and barriers to innovation, as well as problem-solving techniques that promote competitive advantage.
  
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    EDUC 5115 - Learning Theories and Instruction


    (5 cr.)
    Effective instructional design begins with an understanding of the learning process. Students in this course examine behaviorist, cognitive, constructivist, and social learning theories, and their relationship to instructional practices and course design. Factors that influence learning, such as learning styles, motivation, and engagement, are also explored.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 5105

  
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    EDUC 5160 - Early Childhood Development


    (5 cr.)
    Students in this course look closely at typical and atypical physical, cognitive/language, and social and emotional development. Attention will be paid to the powerful and important role cultural and linguistic diversity play in the development of children prenatal through age 8. Students will observe children in a variety of settings, learn how adults can support healthy development, and study new findings related to the factors that foster and impede healthy development and learning.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 5005

  
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    EDUC 5161 - Effective Programs and Practices


    (5 cr.)
    Research states that long-term benefits from early childhood programs result only when the programs are of high quality. Students in this course focus on the components essential to program effectiveness, including planning for, improving, and evaluating program quality. Students will learn research-based, effective practices for promoting learning and development across developmental domains and subject matter areas from birth through age 8.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 5160

  
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    EDUC 5162 - Issues and Trends in the Early Childhood Field


    (5 cr.)
    Leaders in the early childhood field must have in-depth understanding of the critical issues and trends affecting young children, their families, and the field. Students will study such topics as the impact of changing demographics; the influence of politics and economics on programmatic funding streams; current debates related to school success, the achievement gap, and effective assessment; and the impact of brain research on early development, care, and education from both a historical and current perspective.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 5161

  
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    EDUC 6001 - MSED Resource Toolkit♦


    (0 sem. cr.)
    The purpose of this zero-credit course is to assist students with making steady progress toward earning an MS in Education degree. Information and resources related to action research, scholarly writing, major assessments, program expectations, and other topics are provided for candidates to help them become successful graduate students, scholarly practitioners, and educators who effect positive social change. This course is meant to provide items that are essential to success while not repeating what candidates receive from other areas of Walden support. 
    Note: This course is offered for no credit and the candidate will receive no grade. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6002 - Foundations: Educational Leadership and Administration


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Candidates start this course by building on their understanding of the philosophy, requirements, and community of Walden University, The Richard W. Riley College of Education and Human Services, and the program. Candidates complete a pre-assessment and develop an individual learning plan.

    Following this essential introductory work, candidates begin their study of school leadership by focusing on the structures of school organizations and leadership styles.

  
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    EDUC 6003 - Foundations of Early Childhood Professionalism♦


    (3 sem. cr.)
    What does it mean to be a professional in the diverse and dynamic early childhood field? Why is considering the dignity, worth, and uniqueness of every child, family, and colleague integral to professionalism as well as healthy growth and development? How are early childhood professionals making a difference as advocates and leaders? Early childhood professionals in this course begin a rich and complex journey examining the breadth and depth of the field; what it means to be a professional guided by a code of ethical conduct; and the critical role research plays in illuminating how early childhood professionals can work as leaders and advocates to help young children, families, and the field grow and thrive.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6005 - Foundations: Early Childhood Studies


    (3 sem. cr.)
    In this course, education professionals focus on leadership and professionalism in the early childhood field; analysis of current research; ethical considerations; and multiple theories of child development, teaching, and learning. Education professionals are introduced to the foundation of evidence-based research and decision making, which is interwoven throughout the program. Education professionals also build understanding of the philosophy, requirements, and community of Walden University, the Richard W. Riley College of Education and Human Services, and the MS in Early Childhood Studies program.
  
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    EDUC 6010 - Mathematics K–6: Instruction and Assessment


    (5 cr.)
    This coherent and rigorous approach to teaching and learning K–6 mathematics focuses on conceptual understanding, procedural skills, and application of mathematical knowledge. Coursework also focuses on helping teacher candidates promote problem-solving and communication skills as the core for teaching numbers and operations, algebra, data analysis, probability, measurement, geometry, and the use of manipulatives across math strands. Themes threaded throughout the course include technology, real-world applications, integrating math with other content areas, and building on the strengths and overcoming the challenges of diverse learners. This course includes 15 hours of field experience.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 6054

  
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    EDUC 6020 - Science K–6: Instruction and Assessment


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals explore teaching and learning in science, based on the latest research on the most effective methods for teaching appropriate science curriculum from kindergarten through Grade 6. Candidates focus on ways to use developmentally appropriate strategies to promote modes of inquiry and analytical skills in science education. They also explore instructional and assessment strategies to develop children’s conceptual understanding of science, particularly relating to the standards for physical, life, and earth and space sciences. Candidates examine and apply integration of science with reading, math, social studies, and technology. Candidates consider their own science content knowledge and explore local professional development opportunities. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 6054

  
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    EDUC 6030 - Demonstration Teaching/Seminar: Professional Ethics, Communication, and Collaboration in Elementary Education


    (10 cr.)
    Demonstration teaching is the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program and is an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills. Education professionals participate in orientation activities and then gradually assume complete teaching responsibility of an elementary classroom. Education professionals take full control for 4 consecutive weeks over a 12-week placement, gaining real-world experience and the opportunity to translate theory into practice.

    Candidates demonstrate the various roles of an elementary educator. Education professionals work closely with, and are evaluated by, their Walden University supervisor, classroom cooperating teacher, and Walden faculty member. During demonstration teaching, all professionals complete the Education Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA), participate in weekly discussions, and complete a collaboration based major assessment. This course requires a 12-week full-time classroom experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites

    • Completion of all other required coursework

  
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    EDUC 6050 - Child Development, Motivation, and Learning


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, teacher candidates prepare to understand the social, physical, emotional, and intellectual growth and development of children as related to learning and motivation in the elementary classroom. Teacher candidates explore philosophies and theories of child development and make connections between and among the key topics of development, learning and motivation, and social and cultural diversity. Learning environments and resources (including technology) that support the developmental needs of elementary children are identified and analyzed. In addition, teacher candidates explore the importance of family and community connections to support children’s learning; develop strategies for engaging families in the learning process of their children; and consider the role of children’s interests and personal experiences when planning instruction. Teacher candidates identify typical and atypical developmental patterns; analyze effectiveness of instructional strategies; and consider the role of specialists in supporting children’s growth and development.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 6401

  
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    EDUC 6051 - Collaboration to Support All Learners


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, candidates explore strategies for effective communication and collaboration with colleagues, specialists, families, and community agencies to provide support for all children. Candidates examine collaboration strategies that promote the growth and learning of all children in the elementary classroom, including those with exceptionalities, gifted and talented students, and English language learners. Candidates learn about the roles of all participants in collaborative teams, including coteaching and participating in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) process. Candidates examine the role of the school in supporting all learners within the larger community context. They identify factors in the students’ environments that may affect their growth and learning and explore strategies for effective collaboration with diverse families.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 6402
    • EDUC 6052

  
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    EDUC 6052 - Effective Practices: Planning, Instruction, and Assessment


    (5 cr.)
    To help ensure high levels of learning and achievement for all students, today’s educators must be knowledgeable about learners and learning and well-versed in effective teaching and assessment practices. In this course, education professionals examine the interrelationships between assessment, teaching, and learning as well as effective practices for applying and integrating these critical components in the K–6 classroom. They gain a historical perspective on the standards and accountability movement and examine standards in their state or local setting. They also explore learning theory in the context of today’s challenging educational goals and standards. In this course, education professionals learn and apply research-based practices in effective assessment, curriculum design, and instruction. Through on-site experiences and Virtual Field Experiences, they critically analyze and implement teaching and learning principles and practices that help ensure awareness of the individual and collective needs of students. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 6401

  
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    EDUC 6053 - Community Building for Effective Classroom Management


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, education professionals learn to create safe, supportive, and respectful learning environments that promote social-emotional development, self-responsibility, and character to optimize learning for all students. Teachers will learn how to foster a sense of community in the classroom and develop positive relationships with and among students. Age-appropriate skills and strategies for managing dynamic and flexible grouping structures and for teaching conflict resolution will be presented. The course also provides strategies for building positive relationships, fostering motivation, and engaging in effective communication and problem solving with parents and families. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 6401

  
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    EDUC 6054 - Literacy K–6: Instruction and Assessment


    (5 cr.)
    Reading, listening, speaking, and writing are skills essential to success in school and in life. In this course, teacher candidates can examine a wide range of effective instructional and assessment practices that support the development of reading, oral language, and written communication for K–6 students. Teacher candidates use research-based approaches to literacy instruction while implementing a variety of assessment tools to identify students’ difficulties. Teacher candidates use assessment data to create engaging literacy learning experiences at diverse developmental levels. Topics include the incorporation of technology to support and enrich literacy learning, family involvement, and integrating literacy and learning into the content areas This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 6402
    • EDUC 6052

  
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    EDUC 6055 - Social Studies and the Arts K–6: Instruction and Assessment


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, candidates prepare to become effective educators of social studies and the arts. As they plan and implement instruction, candidates integrate the major concepts, themes, and modes of inquiry from social studies and the arts. Emphasis is on developing strategies to help students become effective citizens of a democratic and culturally diverse society. Candidates focus on building connections across disciplines and using the arts to foster student engagement and communication and promote their abilities to construct and apply knowledge. Candidates use multiple assessments to measure student progress and modify instruction to address the needs of all learners in diverse classrooms. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 6053
    • EDUC 6054
    • EDUC 6056
    • EDUC 6010
    • EDUC 6020

  
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    EDUC 6056 - Integrating Content and Technology to Enhance Learning


    (5 cr.)
    In this course, teacher candidates explore strategies for integrating technology across content areas in order to plan units and lessons that support developmental and curricular goals for elementary students. Candidates create learning experiences that promote student motivation and engagement; support exploration, problem-solving, and critical thinking; provide opportunities for collaborative and self-directed learning; and foster content area literacy. Candidates explore a wide variety of technology resources, infusing them in instructional planning to help students learn content and become proficient in the use of technology. Candidates examine effective teaching practices, including formative/authentic assessments and scaffolding techniques to support diverse learners. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University.
    Prerequisites
    • EDUC 6054

  
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    EDUC 6101 - The Developing Brain and the Young Child♦


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Research on how the brain develops in utero and throughout early childhood provides insights and guidance critical to young children’s healthy development. As brains develop, early experiences affect brain architecture in ways that promote or impede healthy relationships, self-concepts, growth, and learning. Early childhood professionals, as leaders and advocates in the field, study current, fascinating research on brain architecture, child mental health, and the ways toxic stress, trauma, and resilience influence child development across domains.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6102 - Family and Community Partnerships♦


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Traditions, cultures, structures, interactions, and values all influence the developing child. Understanding family context, at the heart of which is respecting each family’s dignity, worth, and uniqueness, is key to developing partnerships that help young children thrive. However, building partnerships with families is not a simple, one-size-fits-all process. In this course, early childhood professionals study the components and nuances of family context and ways to build and sustain culturally responsive, reciprocal relationships with families. Such relationships foster effective family collaboration within early childhood settings and in efforts to partner with community organizations to foster children’s healthy development and learning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6103 - Play and Creativity♦


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Play is a time when children explore, discover, and imagine; they express themselves, lose themselves, and find themselves all over again. Creativity may involve seeing the world in new ways, finding new ways to solve problems, and giving birth to ideas based on who each child is, what they feel, and how they learn, think, and interact. Early childhood professionals recognize that both play, and creativity are integral to healthy human development. And, both flourish in environments where children feel respected, are encouraged to take risks, and have time to live in what they are experiencing. In this course, early childhood professionals, as leaders of and advocates for effective practice, study international research and perspectives on the value of play and creativity and how to advocate for the infusion of play and creativity into early childhood teaching and learning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6104 - Engaging Environments


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Early childhood environments have the power to invite learning, foster curiosity, and empower meaning-making. Such environments offer spaces for children to be quiet and introspective as well as interact in robust play. The aesthetics of early childhood environments can nurture children’s appreciation of the many aspects of beauty, while the soul and feel of environments can help children and families be comfortable with who they are. In this course, early childhood professionals analyze the role of the environment as the third teacher, the ways early childhood environments support community and belonging, and the value of leading early childhood teams to create effective early childhood environments that nurture discovery, wonder, and awe. 

    (This course requires 10 hours of field experience focused on developing and taking part in meaningful learning experiences in an infant/toddler, preschool or K-3 setting.)
    Prerequisites

    • EDUC 6003
    • EDUC 6101
    • EDUC 6102
    • EDUC 6103

  
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    EDUC 6105 - Organizations, Innovation, and Change♦


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Understanding the fundamentals of organizational behavior and change management are essential for facilitating innovation in any organization. In this course, education professionals examine the role of instructional designers in managing change within an organization. They evaluate leadership qualities and practices that foster and sustain innovation in various settings, such as corporations, higher education, K–12 education, government, healthcare, and nonprofit organizations. They also explore the resistance to change and barriers to innovation as well as problem-solving techniques that promote competitive advantage.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6106 - Meaningful Curriculum P–3♦


    (3 sem. cr.)
    In order to design and implement meaningful learning experiences for and with young children, early childhood professionals must understand the principle content strands that comprise each academic discipline as well as the key concepts and methods of inquiry across academic disciplines. This course supports professionals, as advocates of meaningful curriculum, in leading efforts to apply knowledge of content and pedagogy to designing learning experiences that are engaging and challenging, and that reflect children’s individual, cultural, and linguistic diversity.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6107 - Observation and Assessment 0–8


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Early childhood professionals understand that observation is a critical method of assessment in early childhood settings. Thoughtful, ongoing observation and documentation are authentic approaches that provide a holistic picture of children and help to guide developmentally appropriate planning, interactions, and instruction. In this course, early childhood professionals consider their roles as leaders and advocates of effective observation and assessment practices who model and mentor the process of analyzing assessment strategies, methods, and data to support children’s healthy development and learning. They are challenged to critically examine and lead effective collaboration with families and other professionals to promote ethical and meaningful assessment practices, including early intervention. 

    (This course requires 10 hours of field experience focused on developing and taking part in meaningful learning experiences in an infant/toddler or preschool setting.)
    Prerequisites

    • EDUC 6104
    • EDUC 6106

  
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    EDUC 6108 - Intentional and Responsive Practice in the Content Areas P–3♦


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Early childhood professionals understand that positive and supportive interactions with young children rightly place the young child at the heart of the learning and teaching process. In this course, early childhood professionals analyze developmentally appropriate approaches that reflect knowledge of how children develop and learn. In the role of leaders, they advocate and mentor by applying this knowledge to the planning of differentiated learning experiences that are responsive to young children’s individual strengths and needs as well as their family and cultural contexts. They examine concepts and evaluate models of quality inclusive care and education for young children. They build awareness throughout the field of the vital importance of reflective, responsive, and intentional practice to support and nurture the healthy growth and learning of each individual child.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6109 - Meaningful Learning Experiences: P–3


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Early childhood professionals employ a broad repertoire of skills and strategies that are appropriate for the young children in their settings. In this course, they apply their knowledge of young children’s characteristics, needs, strengths, and family and cultural contexts to planning and instruction in an authentic P–3 classroom setting. They intentionally plan differentiated learning experiences to ensure challenge and meaning for each child as well as for the group. As they engage in the planning, learning and teaching, and assessment cycle, early childhood professionals collaborate with host teachers and other colleagues to sharpen their instructional skills, deepen reflection on their own practice, and lead professional development to promote effective practice in P–3 settings. 

    (This course requires 20 hours of field experience focused on developing and taking part in meaningful learning experiences in a preschool or K - 3 setting.)
    Prerequisites

    • EDUC 6107
    • EDUC 6108

  
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    EDUC 6110 - Effective Leadership for Early Childhood Settings♦


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Effective leaders in early childhood settings develop and maintain programs that are grounded in ethical principles and exemplify healthy organizational culture. This effort takes an abundance of skill particularly related to modeling and applying ethical standards and legal requirements; building respectful relationships with—and between—staff, families, and children; and stewarding the program’s mission and vision. Leadership is deeply challenging, rewarding, and dynamic. This course helps early childhood professionals in search of leadership skills, tools, and insights, become the program leaders they hope to be.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6111 - Effective Management for Early Childhood Settings♦


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Consider the needs and challenges of early childhood programs. How might knowledge of and skills related to budgeting, allocating resources, and obtaining additional funding help an early childhood professional develop and maintain a high-quality program? Creating successful grant proposals, having the tools to effectively market the program, and continuously working with staff to productively manage a facility with financial skill is key to program success as well as the ability to serve the best interests of children and families. This course provides early childhood professionals with a strong foundation in the key areas of grant writing, budgeting, and making strategic decisions about funding.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6115 - Learning Theories and Instruction♦


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Effective instructional design begins with an understanding of the learning process. The behaviorist, cognitive, constructivist, and social learning theories and their relationship to instructional practices and course design are also examined. Factors that influence learning, such as learning styles, motivation, and engagement, are also explored.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6125 - Foundations of Research♦


    (3 sem. cr.)
    An introduction to the principles and processes of research is provided in this course. Education professionals explore the various steps and considerations of the research process. They develop an understanding of basic research methodologies and statistical analyses, learn how to formulate research problems and questions, conduct a literature review, and critique and evaluate research. Additionally, they consider the ethical responsibilities of the researcher.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6135 - Distance Learning♦


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Online education could be the driving force that transforms education and training practices in the 21st century. Through this lens, education professionals explore the current trends impacting the field of distance education and their implications for the design and development of distance-learning programs. They examine the different models, theories, and technologies used in the development and delivery of online education and training programs. They also explore the implications and considerations of designing instruction for blended, fully online, instructor-led, and self-paced learning environments.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6145 - Project Management in Education and Training♦


    (3 sem. cr.)
    Purposeful and careful planning is a key element to the success of any program. In this course, education professionals explore the systematic approaches to project management. Education professionals learn to use various project management tools, procedures, and methodologies, which they apply to projects in a real-world education or training environment. They also analyze the interrelated nature of the triple constraints of time, cost, and scope as well as their influence on the overall quality of the project.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an enrollment specialist [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
 

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