2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Oct 27, 2021  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    WMBA 6677 - Competing in the Global Economy♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Over the last few decades, a fundamental shift in the world economy has been underway. No longer are national economic interests and business operations largely confined within well-­defined geographic borders. Phenomena such as the explosion of the Internet, outsourcing, and the reduction in barriers to cross-­border trade have all contributed to the creation of a truly global economy. Students in this course focus on the global environment of business and explore how the international sociocultural, political, legal, economic, physical, and historical environments affect business practices and policies. Students will learn the skills and methodologies required for market analysis and business strategizing on a global scale. In particular, students identify the internal and external forces affecting an organization’s ability to compete both domestically and globally.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6681 - Decision-Making Tools for Today’s Financial Professional♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Today’s effective finance professionals use a variety of financial management tools as they seek to evaluate alternatives and make sound financial recommendations. Students will gain practical experience of a financial professional’s role by using financial modeling tools such as breakeven and cost-volume-profit analysis for model pricing and cost sensitivity, forecasting and cost prediction, variance cost analysis, relevant cost analysis, project valuation and prioritization using payback, rates of return, and discounted cash flow methods. Students’ increased diagnostic critical-thinking skills will help them to construct effective, ethical, fact-based arguments, which are among the fundamental capabilities required for financial decision making. Using relevant management articles, case studies, and topic analyses, students also examine how to align business needs with fact-based solutions, how to identify new opportunities, and how to manage and enhance an organization’s competitive position.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6683 - Managerial Accounting for Organizational Performance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) One of the primary functions of the accountant’s role is preparing internal accounting information that can be used by management for effective decision making and organizational performance. Students can gain a practical perspective into this role through case study review and analysis of pricing and contribution margin analysis, cost management and allocation, activity-based costing and throughput accounting, and inventory management. Students assess performance measurements, including key performance indicators, balanced scorecard, and forecasting. They explore operating and capital budgeting and financial planning techniques and become familiar with quantitative models and approaches used in management accounting. Through this course, students learn about the different departments and operating divisions within an organization and how they work individually and collaboratively to handle accounting responsibilities.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6687 - Managing Operational and Financial Business Risks♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Accountants and business managers must be astute and proactive in managing a business to combat the inevitable threat of operational and financial risks, including those involving credit, market, liquidity, reputation, technology, and legality. In this course, students assess the tools used by accountants and managers in managing these risks. They explore the various processes used to identify, analyze, and assess risks, and they learn the appropriate use of financial and operational controls to mitigate such risks. Additionally, students examine ways to implement techniques, such as developing a risk control matrix and using the concepts of the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) framework to improve an organization’s enterprise risk management.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6690 - Message Design, Audience, and Evaluation♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Using reputable sources lends credibility to a message. But how does a communication professional determine which supporting information is appropriate to help craft a message, gain audience insight, choose a communication channel, or evaluate the impact of a message? In this course, students examine research approaches that are common to the field of communication and appropriate for answering questions about audiences and evaluating messages. Topics include simple quantitative analysis and qualitative research approaches such as focus groups, interviewing, and surveys, as well as basic metrics such as cost of media, cost per sale, return on investment, and web analytics.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6693 - Interpersonal Communication♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The ability to communicate with others influences success in both professional and personal settings. As communities and places of work become increasingly diverse, the intersections of interpersonal and intercultural communication also increase, and communicators need to be aware that the cultural diversity of their audiences should affect the way they convey information. Students in this course examine interpersonal and intercultural intersections and study the influence of cultural diversity on interpersonal communication. By examining theory, students develop an approach to practice and hone individual strategies for communicating successfully in diverse interpersonal situations. Topics include interpersonal communication theory, intercultural communication theory, individual communication competence, nonverbal channels, person perception, conflict resolution, and listening and communication barriers.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6695 - Communication for Leaders and Managers


    (3 sem. cr.) The ability to communicate with others influences success in both professional and personal settings. As communities and places of work become increasingly diverse, the intersections of interpersonal and intercultural communication also increase, and communicators need to be aware that the cultural diversity of their audiences should affect the way they convey information. Students in this course examine interpersonal and intercultural intersections and study the influence of cultural diversity on interpersonal communication. By examining theory, students develop an approach to practice and hone individual strategies for communicating successfully in diverse interpersonal situations. Topics include interpersonal communication theory, intercultural communication theory, individual communication competence, nonverbal channels, person perception, conflict resolution, and listening and communication barriers.
  
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    WMBA 6697 - Creative Strategy and Execution: From Brief to Presentation♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course leverage a wide range of knowledge and skills to conceive and execute a global communications campaign that uses traditional and digital media. Students have the opportunity to develop and review a creative or innovative brief grounded in concepts of integrated marketing communication. Students generate solutions for that brief across the phases of the creative process, present and defend solutions, and evaluate solutions using metrics. Topics include the creative process, integrated marketing communication, selecting appropriate channels, pitching and selling ideas, and evaluation metrics.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6698 - Public Relations Concepts and Strategy


    (3 sem. cr.) To successfully build and manage the relationship between an organization and the public in today’s increasingly global community, a strategic communications plan requires the use of both traditional and new technology. Students in this course explore, from a global perspective, the needs of various public relations stakeholders, including the customer, the press, and the investor. Topics include how to change behaviors, advocate for causes, design messages for specific audiences, select appropriate communication channels, and evaluate results of public relations campaigns. Students also consider the potential legal and ethical aspects of the practice of public relations.
  
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    WMBA 6880 - Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation: A Global Perspective


    (3 sem. cr.) Social entrepreneurs are gaining international attention motivated by the desire for change and to see the world as it can be, not as it is. Students in the course will learn how social entrepreneurs have developed creative solutions to address social problems. The intention of the course is to develop knowledge, appreciate of the role of social entrepreneurs who create social change, deepen students’ understanding of the world around them, and to inspire them to use their skills and knowledge to be, as Gandhi said, “the change you wish to see in the world.”

    Students in this course will gain knowledge about social entrepreneurs and how they are creating solutions to address societal problems, learn how to develop creative solutions to address social problems, and empower students to see social entrepreneurship as a force for social change. The course is designed for those who want to gain valuable tools to prepare them to make an impact on the lives of others. This course will be housed in the School of Public Policy and Administration for future upgrades and course maintenance.

  
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    WMBA 6881 - Grant Writing


    (3 sem. cr.) Grant writing is the method by which external funding can be secured by educational institutions, community organizations, and nonprofit agencies to provide services to the community. In this course, students will understand processes and gain basic skills needed for successful grant writing. These processes and skills consist of developing a project idea, identifying a funding agency, writing a compelling needs statement with goals and measurable objectives, developing a budget, collaborating with other people, submitting the grant application, understanding the grant review process, responding to the review, and managing the grant award. Course assignments allow students to apply and practice grant writing skills by developing a grant proposal based on an actual Request for Proposal (RFP).
  
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    WMBA 6882 - Initiating and Managing Change


    (3 sem. cr.) Today’s business environment is constantly evolving to accommodate changes in economy, leadership, new regulations, and internal reduction and growth. Organizations require leaders who know how to work through barriers to effect positive and efficient organizational change. Students in this course learn about situations that constitute and require such change. They engage in a variety of assignments through which they explore effective strategies for initiating change and anchoring change into corporate culture to achieve organizational goals as well as for managing unplanned or unwelcome change. Students explore a variety of approaches and methods to transition individuals and organizations within evolving environments. They distinguish between reactive responses and proactive responses to change and examine the implications of culture, inertia, and uncertainty. Additionally, students explore the importance of understanding motivation and effective communication in mitigating negative reactions to change and facilitating the change process itself.
  
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    WMBA 6883 - New and Emerging Technologies


    (3 sem. cr.) Through this course, education professionals consider the future of teaching and learning, discover promising trends in technology, and investigate opportunities to become leaders in the field of technology and learning. They consider how to address school-wide challenges, such as limited resources and resistance to change, and they explore skills and strategies, such as grant writing and leading change. Additionally, they complete a capstone project that demonstrates their ability and willingness to become advocates and change agents who use technology to address challenges and create opportunities within the field of education.
  
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    WMBA 6884 - Issues and Trends in the Early Childhood Field


    (3 sem. cr.) Leaders in the early childhood field must have in-depth understanding of the critical issues and trends affecting young children, their families, and the field. Education professionals in this course explore changing demographics; political and economic influence on programmatic funding streams; current debates related to school success, effective assessment and the achievement gap; and brain research influence on early development, care, and education from a historical and current perspective. Sharing perspectives and making connections with the professional world, educational professionals post blogs to establish contacts with early childhood professionals; reach out to international contacts in the field to gain an understanding of poverty issues in different regions, issues related to excellence at the forefront of professional discussions, and insight on further development opportunities; and share Web resources, such as websites and e-newsletters. 
  
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    WMBA 6990 - Capstone: Sustainable Business Practices and Strategies


    (3 sem. cr.) The purpose of the capstone course is to integrate the knowledge and concepts students have gained through the MBA program. Students will practice their skills and employ their knowledge by evaluating business strategies capable of achieving sustainable competitive advantage. Students in this course will be required to identify and address challenges and opportunities found in today’s complex and often uncertain business environment. Students complete their transformational journey through the program by reflecting on their learning and will consider the next phase of their career development. The aim of the course is to improve the students’ ability to manage in an environment requiring both strategic and operational knowledge. Topics include corporate social responsibility and stakeholder management, resource-based capabilities analysis, external competitive analysis, business-level strategy evaluation and development, and change management.
  
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    WSRO 1002D - Doctoral Student Readiness Orientation


    (0 cr.) The Doctoral Student Readiness Orientation (SRO) is a self-paced course that includes resources on time management and conducting research. In the orientation’s practice environment, doctoral students will follow a student avatar through exploring doctoral coursework, learning about participating in residencies, and becoming an independent scholar-practitioner. Students will take a quiz that measures their understanding of the material in the SRO. Students will have access to this orientation course in their Walden portal for 1 year after enrollment so that they can refer to its resources as needed.
  
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    WSRO 1002M - Master’s Student Readiness Orientation


    (0 cr.) The Master’s Student Readiness Orientation (SRO) is a self-paced course that includes a tour of the online classroom. In the orientation’s practice environment, master’s students will follow a student avatar through creating a discussion post and working on an assignment. Students will take a quiz that measures their understanding of the material in the SRO. Students will have access to this orientation course in their Walden portal for 1 year after enrollment so that they can refer to its resources as needed.
  
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    WSRO 1002U - Undergraduate Student Readiness Orientation


    (0 cr.) The Undergraduate Student Readiness Orientation (SRO) is a self-paced course that includes a tour of the online classroom. In the orientation’s practice environment, undergraduate students will follow a student avatar through creating a discussion post and working on an assignment. Students will take a quiz that measures their understanding of the material in the SRO. Students will have access to this orientation course in their Walden portal for 1 year after enrollment so that they can refer to its resources as needed.
 

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