2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Nov 27, 2021  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    RSCH 8350C - Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students in this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300C - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and gain experience applying them. Students acquire more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write-up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8300C.)
  
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    RSCH 8350D - Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students in this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300Z - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and gain experience applying them. Students acquire more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write-up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8200D or SBSF 7100.)
  
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    RSCH 8350I - Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students in this research course build upon their established qualitative research proficiencies and gain practical experience in application. Students are also provided with the opportunity to develop specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write-up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. They apply their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8300P.)
  
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    RSCH 8350P - Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students in this research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300P - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and gain experience applying them. Students gain more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write-up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8300P.)
  
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    RSCH 8350X - Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students in this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300X - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and gain experience applying them. Students gain more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write-up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8200X or SBSF 7100.)
  
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    RSCH 8350Y - Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students in this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300Y - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and gain experience applying them. Students gain more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write-up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8300Y.)
  
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    RSCH 8350Z - Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students in this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300Z - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and gain experience applying them. Students gain more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write-up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8200Z or AMDS 8437 AND RSCH 8300Z or AMDS 8427 and Residency 3.)
  
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    RSCH 8351 - Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students in this research course build upon their established qualitative research proficiencies and provides them with practical experience in application. Students are also provided with the opportunity to develop specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses, multiple approaches to coding and organizing data, core components of a qualitative write-up, the importance of quality assurance, and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. They apply their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8301 and RESI 8802.)
  
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    RSCH 8351M - Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students in this research course builds upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300Z - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and gain experience applying them. Students acquire more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8201M and RSCH 8301M.)
  
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    RSCH 8351Z - Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students in this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8300Z - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and gain experience applying them. Students acquire more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8200Z or AMDS 8437 AND RSCH 8300Z or AMDS 8427 and Residency 3.)
  
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    RSCH 8360 - Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis


    (5 cr.) Students build upon the knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8310 - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis. and have experience applying them. Students develop a more sophisticated understanding of the theoretical antecedents and practical applications of eight contemporary qualitative approaches. Students gain experience developing qualitative interview guides, collecting data, and managing the process from transcription through analysis. The unique challenges of confidentiality and ethical issues are explored as well as implications for social change. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan using a topic relevant to their capstone. Note: This course was previously RSCH 8350.
  
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    RSCH 8361 - Advanced Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis


    (5 cr.) Students in this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8350 - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis and are provided experience applying them. Through this course students are provided with more specialized knowledge and skills within each of the common qualitative traditions for designing qualitative research at the doctoral level. Students explore more complex qualitative research designs and analyses; multiple approaches to coding and organizing data; core components of a qualitative write-up; the importance of quality assurance; and the ethical considerations and social change implications of conducting qualitative research and producing knowledge. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a qualitative research plan. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8360 and RESI 8802.)
  
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    RSCH 8450 - Advanced Mixed-Methods Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students in this research course build upon their established qualitative and quantitative research proficiencies. They are also provided with the opportunity to develop specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students gain an understanding of the types of mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question. They engage in assignments that emphasize the integration of quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, focusing on reliability and validity in mixed-methods approaches. They also practice data analysis and integration of qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up leading to proposal development. Students apply their knowledge and skills by developing a mixed-methods research plan that appropriately incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8200P and RSCH 8300P.)
  
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    RSCH 8450I - Advanced Mixed-Methods Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students in this research course build upon their established qualitative and quantitative research proficiencies. Students are also provided with the opportunity to develop specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students gain an understanding of the types of mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question. Students engage in assignments that emphasize the integration of quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, focusing on reliability and validity in mixed-methods approaches.  They also practice data analysis and integration of qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up leading to proposal development. Students apply their knowledge and skills by developing a mixed-methods research plan that appropriately incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8200P and RSCH 8300P.)
  
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    RSCH 8450P - Advanced Mixed-Methods Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students taking this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8200P - Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis and RSCH 8300 - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis. Students acquire more specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students gain an understanding of the types of mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question. Students emphasize integrating quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, practicing data analysis, and integrating qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up. Reliability and validity in mixed-methods approaches will be highlighted. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a truly mixed-methods research plan that appropriately incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8200P and RSCH 8300P.)
  
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    RSCH 8450Z - Advanced Mixed-Methods Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students taking this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8200 - Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis and RSCH 8300 - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis. Students acquire more specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students gain an understanding of the types of mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question. Students emphasize integrating quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, practicing data analysis, and integrating qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up. Reliability and validity in mixed-methods approaches will be highlighted. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a truly mixed-methods research plan that appropriately incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8200Z or AMDS 8437 AND RSCH 8300Z or AMDS 8427 and Residency 3.)
  
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    RSCH 8451 - Advanced Mixed-Methods Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students in this research course build upon their established qualitative and quantitative research proficiencies. They are also provided with the opportunity to develop specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students gain an understanding of the types of mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question. They engage in assignments that emphasize the integration of quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, focusing on reliability and validity in mixed-methods approaches. They also practice data analysis and integration of qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up leading to proposal development. Students apply their knowledge and skills by developing a mixed-methods research plan that appropriately incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8201, RSCH 8301, and RESI 8802.)
  
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    RSCH 8451M - Advanced Mixed-Methods Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students taking this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8200 - Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis and RSCH 8300 - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis. Students acquire more specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students gain an understanding of the types of mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question. Students emphasize integrating quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, practicing data analysis, and integrating qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up. Reliability and validity in mixed-methods approaches will be highlighted. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a true mixed-methods research plan that appropriately incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8201M and RSCH 8301M.)
  
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    RSCH 8451Z - Advanced Mixed-Methods Reasoning and Analysis


    (4 cr.) Students taking this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8200 - Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis and RSCH 8300 - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis. Students acquire more specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students gain an understanding of the types of mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question. Students emphasize integrating quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, practicing data analysis, and integrating qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up. Reliability and validity in mixed-methods approaches will be highlighted. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a true mixed-methods research plan that appropriately incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements.  (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8200Z or AMDS 8437 AND RSCH 8300Z or AMDS 8427 and Residency 3.)
  
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    RSCH 8460 - Advanced Mixed-Methods Reasoning and Analysis


    (5 cr.) Students build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8210 - Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis and RSCH 8310 - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis for more specialized knowledge and skills to design mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students are provided with more specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. They gain an understanding of the types of mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question(s). The emphases of this course are on integrating quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies, practice in data analysis, and integration of qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a mixed-methods research plan that incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements appropriately. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8110 or RSCH 7110 or RSCH 6110 and RSCH 8210 or RSCH 7210 or RSCH 6210 and RSCH 8310 or RSCH 7310 or RSCH 6310.) Note: This course was previously RSCH 8450.
  
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    RSCH 8461 - Advanced Mixed-Methods Reasoning and Analysis


    (5 cr.) Students in this research course build upon knowledge and skills acquired in RSCH 8260 - Quantitative Reasoning and Analysis and RSCH 8360 - Qualitative Reasoning and Analysis. Through this course, students are provided with more specialized knowledge and skills for designing mixed-methods research at the doctoral level. Students gain an understanding of the types of mixed-methods designs and how to select the most appropriate approach for the research question. In this course, students emphasize integrating quantitative and qualitative elements into true mixed-methods studies; practice in data analysis; and integration of qualitative and quantitative data within a research write-up. Reliability and validity in mixed-methods approaches will be highlighted. Students will apply and synthesize their knowledge and skills by developing a truly mixed-methods research plan that appropriately incorporates qualitative and quantitative elements. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8260 and RSCH 8360 and RESI 8802.)
  
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    SBSF 7100 - Research Forum


    (6 cr.) The purpose of this dissertation companion course is to assist education professionals in making steady progress toward completing their degree. The companion provides a forum for ongoing exchange of ideas, input, and feedback between education professionals and the dissertation chair as education professionals complete coursework for their PhD in Education and prepare to begin their dissertation. The instructor of record for a section of the companion is the chair of the dissertation committee. Section participants are education professionals working with the faculty mentor at the early stages of their dissertation.
  
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    SBSF 8110 - Theories of Social Change


    (4 cr.) There is no specific course description in this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8111 - Theories of Social Change (Operations Research)


    (4 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8120 - Current Research in Social Change


    (4 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8125 - Current Research in Social Change and Educational Technology


    (5 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8130 - Professional Practice and Social Change


    (4 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8135 - Professional Practice, Social Change, and Education Technology


    (4 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8210 - Theories of Human Development


    (4 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8220 - Current Research in Human Development


    (4 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8225 - Current Research in Human Development and Educational Technology


    (4 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8230 - Professional Practice and Human Development


    (4 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8235 - Professional Practice, Human Development, and Educational Technology


    (4 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8310 - Theories of Organizational and Social Systems


    (4 cr.) There are no specific course descriptions for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8320 - Current Research in Organizational and Social Systems


    (4 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8325 - Current Research in Social Systems and Educational Technology


    (5 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8330 - Professional Practice and Organizational and Social Systems


    (4 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SBSF 8335 - Professional Practice, Social Systems, and Educational Technology


    (4 cr.) There is no specific course description for this course for doctoral students due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    SCIE 6660 - The Nature of Science♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals can investigate the nature and history of science and the role science plays in 21st-century life. They can discover unifying themes across all areas of science such as scientific inquiry, systems and energy, models and scale, constancy and change, ecology and the environment, and form and function. Education professionals can explore environmental science and apply the scientific tools of inquiry, discovery, hypothesis, and theory to facilitate their own learning in science and to foster engaging and motivating scientific learning in their students.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    SCIE 6661 - Exploring the Physical World♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals can examine various physical phenomena (e.g., light, sound, heat, magnetism, and motion) in this course. They engage in authentic, active learning experiences that advance their knowledge about these phenomena and model creative teaching approaches that can be used to engage their students in powerful learning about the physical sciences. The practical application of theories and concepts will be emphasized.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    SCIE 6662 - Investigating the Living World♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals take a journey of discovery and explore the components of the living world, including plants, animals, fungi, and other organisms as well as their ecology in this course. They can learn about the controversy that persists in the scientific community about what makes an organism alive and discover how organisms interact with each other and their environments. Education professionals use inquiry methods to develop learning experiences to engage their own students in exploring these ideas in the classroom.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    SCIE 6663 - Exploring the Earth and Beyond♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals can investigate timeless questions about how the Earth fits into time and space. Explorations will span from ocean depths to the breadth of the universe in this course. They examine earthly and other-world phenomena, such as weather, climate, volcanoes, earthquakes, planetary systems, and supernovae, and explore the similarities and differences between this world and other worlds. Transferring this scientific knowledge to classroom instruction will be emphasized.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    SCIE 6664 - Looking Into the Future of Science and Education♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals take a future-focused view of science while developing their skills in science education during this course. Trends, issues, challenges, and opportunities related to science and its role in schools, society, and the workplace will be explored. Topics include genetic engineering, biotechnologies, environmental issues such as climate change and global warming, and the call for education in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). Education professionals engage in professional discourse to grapple with uncertainties and learn how scientific principles can be used to advocate for authentic social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    SCNC 4001 - Analyzing Contemporary Scientific Controversies♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students critically examine controversies in science. They explore topics including pseudoscience, human cloning, stem cell research, genetically modified foods, and climate change. Students learn to articulate sound arguments for the validity of scientific claims as well as demonstrate an understanding of the reasons why popular beliefs in unsubstantiated claims persist.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    SCNC 4001C - Analyzing Contemporary Scientific Controversies♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students critically examine controversies in science. They explore topics including pseudoscience, human cloning, stem cell research, genetically modified foods, and climate change. Students learn to articulate sound arguments for the validity of scientific claims as well as demonstrate an understanding of the reasons why popular beliefs in unsubstantiated claims persist.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    SOCI 1001 - Introduction to Sociology♦


    (5 cr.) Students have the opportunity, in this course, to think critically about society and their own lives from a wide range of classical and contemporary perspectives. Students engage in assignments that balance theory with current research findings and emphasize social policy. They explore and apply major theoretical perspectives to evaluate chosen topics, analyze culture and society through the exploration of holidays and celebrations, consider the idea of self in relation to global perspectives, and compare and contrast social institutions. Through their study of sociology, students sharpen their critical-thinking skills and develop a sociological imagination, which they can use throughout their personal and professional lives to understand social structure and behavior.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    SOCI 1001C - Introduction to Sociology♦


    (5 cr.) Students have the opportunity, in this course, to think critically about society and their own lives from a wide range of classical and contemporary perspectives. Students engage in assignments that balance theory with current research findings and emphasize social policy. They explore and apply major theoretical perspectives to evaluate chosen topics, analyze culture and society through the exploration of holidays and celebrations, consider the idea of self in relation to global perspectives, and compare and contrast social institutions. Through their study of sociology, students sharpen their critical-thinking skills and develop a sociological imagination, which they can use throughout their personal and professional lives to understand social structure and behavior.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    SOCI 1001S - Introduction to Sociology♦


    (5 cr.) Students have the opportunity, in this course, to think critically about society and their own lives from a wide range of classical and contemporary perspectives. Students engage in assignments that balance theory with current research findings and emphasize social policy. They explore and apply major theoretical perspectives to evaluate chosen topics, analyze culture and society through the exploration of holidays and celebrations, consider the idea of self in relation to global perspectives, and compare and contrast social institutions. Through their study of sociology, students sharpen their critical-thinking skills and develop a sociological imagination, which they can use throughout their personal and professional lives to understand social structure and behavior.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    SOCI 2001 - Multicultural Dimensions of Society♦


    (5 cr.) As globalism increasingly affects all facets of society, including school, work, and situations in everyday life, our country is growing ever more diverse. in this course, students gain a framework to understand, respect, and value diversity through real-life experiences and reflections. Students explore concepts of teamwork, leadership, communication, and conflict management among people with diverse life experiences. They complete a range of short writing assignments on such topics as prejudice, cultural bias, and discrimination; religious freedom; and diversity. Through this course, students gain the knowledge and sensibilities to develop appropriate, flexible approaches for identifying and managing diversity issues in the workplace.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    SOCI 2001C - Multicultural Dimensions of Society


    (5 cr.) As globalism increasingly affects all facets of society, including school, work, and situations in everyday life, our country is growing increasingly diverse. In this course, students acquire a framework to understand, respect, and value diversity through real-life experiences and reflections. Students explore concepts of teamwork, leadership, communication, and conflict management among people with diverse life experiences. They complete a range of short writing assignments on topics such as prejudice, cultural bias, and discrimination; religious freedom; and diversity. Through this course, students gain the knowledge and sensibilities to develop appropriate, flexible approaches for identifying and managing diversity issues in the workplace. 
  
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    SOCI 4080 - Social Responsibility♦


    (5 cr.) Technological advancements, globalization, and other 21st-century dynamics that bring individuals together provide a means and a responsibility to work collectively for the common good. In this course, students gain an interdisciplinary synthesis of learning through the lens of civic engagement and social responsibility. Students engage in assignments that emphasize problem solving in contemporary society. They explore the history of social responsibility and issues related to social change, civic engagement, and the media. In this course, students develop awareness and skills to sustain and advance the communities in which they live.
      (Prerequisite(s): All other required general education courses completed.) Note: This course is delivered over a 6-week term but is equated to SOCI 4080E, which is delivered over a 12-week term.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    SOCI 4080C - Social Responsibility


    (5 cr.) Technological advancements, globalization, and other 21st-century dynamics that bring individuals together provide a means and a responsibility to work collectively for the common good. Students in this course receive an interdisciplinary synthesis of learning through the lens of civic engagement and social responsibility. Students engage in assignments that emphasize problem solving in contemporary society. They explore the history of social responsibility and issues related to social change, civic engagement, and the media. Students develop awareness and skills to sustain and advance the communities in which they live. 
  
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    SOCW 2001 - Introduction to Social Work


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to introduce students to the social work profession. Students in the course explore the history of the profession, the characteristics of generalist practice, social work practice settings, and professional values and ethics. Students also develop knowledge of current issues and directions for the profession, and the requirements and challenges of being a professional social worker.
  
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    SOCW 2002 - Basic Skills for Social Work Practice


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to develop the basic practice skills necessary for BSW students to begin professional social work practice. Students in the course receive an overview of the knowledge, skills, values, and ethics that a generalist social worker must possess to work effectively with a client. Concepts underlying social work practice, such as the helping process—intake and assessment; basic interviewing skills for the beginning social work professional; engagement; and best practices—are addressed. The practice content to be explored includes understanding self-awareness and confidentiality. While the major emphasis of the course is on basic interviewing skills, a strengths perspective within a systems framework is incorporated in the course.
  
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    SOCW 2003 - Introduction to the Welfare State


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge to analyze, formulate, and advocate for social policies that advance individual and social well-being. Students explore various methods of policy analysis and develop advocacy plans that involve collaboration with colleagues and communities to address policy issues. There is a special emphasis on policies that impact human rights and advance social and economic justice.
  
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    SOCW 3001 - Diversity and Multiculturalism


    (5 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to multicultural social work practice and the importance of cultural competence. During the course, students are encouraged to assess their own level of self-awareness and their ability to engage in critical thinking on the issues of diversity and social justice. Grounded within the professional Code of Ethics, students learn about concepts and theory related to social, economic, and environmental justice. In this course, students analyze and reflect on the impact of oppression and discrimination on diverse groups. They learn how to engage evidence-informed practice, as well as advocate on behalf of others, particularly vulnerable populations. Throughout the course, students learn about various cultural groups and apply their learning to a different population each week. By the end of the course, students will be prepared with the foundational knowledge and skills for social work practice with culturally diverse and vulnerable populations.
  
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    SOCW 3002 - Human Behavior in the Social Environment I


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the intersection between the social environment and the healthy lifespan development of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Throughout this course, students enhance their understanding of how the environment and social context serve to mediate or intersect with the healthy development of each individual, family, group, or community. Students are introduced to the ways gender, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, race and ethnicity, and disability impact human development. Students also explore human behavior through the lens of human development, environment, and social context.
  
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    SOCW 3003 - Human Behavior in the Social Environment II


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to prepare students for clinical social work practice that reflects an advanced understanding of lifespan development and sociopsychological identity development in individuals, families, groups, and communities. Throughout this course, students will use their learning around lifespan development and sociopsychological identity development to understand human behavior and, particularly, individual and family functioning within the environmental context. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 3002).
  
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    SOCW 3004 - Social Work Research I


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to develop students’ understanding of the importance of research to social work practice. Students are introduced to basic principles of scientific method and to various research methods within the quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research. This course is designed to introduce students to ethical standards as they relate to research, particularly as it relates to social work. Students explore research that addresses diverse populations. This basic course is the first of two courses designed to prepare students to use research to inform their ethical social work practice.
  
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    SOCW 4001 - Policy and Advocacy


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge to analyze, formulate, and advocate for social policies that advance individual and social well-being. Students explore various methods of policy analysis and develop advocacy plans that involve collaboration with colleagues and communities to address policy issues. There is a special emphasis on policies that impact human rights and advance social and economic justice. Students will develop skills in the policy analysis process, including the values that influence policy, the legislative process, and the roles of advocacy and lobbying organizations.
  
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    SOCW 4002 - Social Work Research II


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to support students’ development as generalist social workers. Students will identify and apply research that can be used to advance social work practice, including social welfare, advocacy, and policy. Throughout the course, students are provided with resources and activities designed to help them develop as critical consumers of research for the sake of ethical, evidenced-based social work practice. Students in this course have the opportunity to select research utilizing the various research methods and evaluate research design, research methods, and applicability of results to diverse populations. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 3004.)
  
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    SOCW 4003 - Generalist Practice I—Individuals/Families


    (5 cr.) This first practice course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to utilize in their social work practice with individuals and families. The focus of this course is on preparing students to practice with clients from diverse cultural backgrounds and marginalized or oppressed populations. Students demonstrate therapeutic skills to engage individuals and families, to define and prioritize issues, to set mutually developed goals, and to commit to the change process.
  
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    SOCW 4004 - Generalist Practice II—Groups


    (5 cr.) This practice course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to apply social work services when working with groups. Students in this course will concentrate on the application of evidence-based practice theories and group work models consistent with empowerment and ecological perspectives. This course is particularly focused on groups from diverse cultural backgrounds and marginalized or oppressed populations. The focus is on the influence of social work professional values in working with families and on group work practice.  (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 4003.)
  
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    SOCW 4005 - Generalist Practice III—Organizations and Communities


    (5 cr.) This advanced course is designed to prepare students for their roles as supervisors, leaders, and administrators in social work organizations and communities. Students receive academic preparation focused on leadership theory and strategies for leadership development, ethical practice as supervisors, and roles of administrators in social work organizations and as community leaders. Students participate in activities that develop their skills in critical decision making to address some of the complex problems that are common to organizations and communities in social work. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 4003, SOCW 4004.)
  
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    SOCW 4100 - Field Seminar I


    (10 cr.) This is the first course in the field practicum sequence. Students are required to complete 200 hours in an approved social services agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Students gain an introduction to the roles of a professional social worker in the practicum experience. Students have the opportunity to demonstrate skills in maintaining social work boundaries and ethics while interacting in a professional manner with clients. Students participate in weekly synchronous hour-long seminars with their instructor and peers. In the weekly seminar, students demonstrate their integration of classroom knowledge with the professional practice skills. (Prerequisite(s): All required core and upper division courses.)
  
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    SOCW 4110 - Field Seminar II


    (10 cr.) This is the second field course in the field practicum sequence. Students are required to complete 200 hours in an approved social services agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Students have the opportunity to develop and demonstrate skills in engaging clients, developing mutually agreed-upon goals, identifying client’s strengths and needs, completing assessments, and completing professional documentation in this practicum experience. Students also identify policies at the organizational, local, state, or national level that impact the client system. Students participate in weekly synchronous hour-long seminars with their instructor and peers. In the weekly seminar, students demonstrate their integration of classroom knowledge with the professional practice skills. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 4100.)
  
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    SOCW 6000 - Changing Lives, Changing Society: Introduction to Social Work


    (5 cr.) This foundation course is designed to introduce students to the social work profession. Students explore the history of the profession, the characteristics of advanced generalist practice, social work practice settings, and professional values and ethics. Students develop knowledge of current issues and directions for the profession, and the requirements and challenges of being a professional social worker.
  
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    SOCW 6002 - Changing Lives, Changing Society: Introduction to Social Work


    (3 cr.) This is a foundation course designed to introduce students to the social work profession. Students explore the history of the profession, the characteristics of generalist practice, social work practice settings, and professional values and ethics. Students also develop knowledge of current issues and directions for the profession, and the requirements and challenges of being a professional social worker.
  
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    SOCW 6051 - Diversity, Human Rights, and Social Justice


    (5 cr.) This is a foundation course in which students broadly address race and ethnicity, socioeconomic status and class, culture, religion, gender, sexual orientation, ability and disability, and environment in an effort to better understand social identity. Throughout this course, students benefit from course assignments, discussions, and course materials to understand the role of power and privilege and oppression and marginalization on the social development of clients. Students specifically focus on activities that help them recognize systems that support or foster power inequities, oppression, and underutilization of human talent and skills. In addition, students engage in activities to foster self-awareness of their own role in the hierarchy of power and privilege. At the completion of this course, students will understand the importance of social workers developing competence in providing evidence-based contextually and culturally relevant assessments and interventions for individuals, families, groups, and communities.
  
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    SOCW 6060 - Social Work Theory and Practice


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an overview of theories, models, and intervention methods for clinically informed advanced generalist social work practice. Students explore the theories and models for application to working with clients. The emphasis of the course is to understand the assumptions of theories and models and how they guide social work assessment, intervention, and practice evaluation. In addition, students evaluate the strengths and limitations of the various theories, with specific consideration to compatibility of a theory with a client’s diverse background and to social work values. Students integrate multiple sources of knowledge to critically evaluate a theory or model’s applicability to social work practice. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6500.)
  
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    SOCW 6070 - Supervision, Leadership, and Administration in Social Work Organizations


    (5 cr.) Students in this advanced course prepare for roles as supervisors, leaders, and administrators in clinical social work. Students examine leadership theory and strategies for leadership development, ethical practice as clinical supervisors, and the roles of administrators in social work organizations. Students participate in activities that develop their skills in critical decision making to address some of the complex problems that face leaders and administrators in social work. As a result of this course, students will understand the competencies of social work supervisors, leaders, and administrators and will identify a plan for their own continued development in these areas. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6111 and SOCW 6361.)
  
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    SOCW 6090 - Psychopathology and Diagnosis for Social Work Practice


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are prepared to identify mental disorders and to understand the necessary professional evaluations needed to formulate a DSM-5 diagnosis in a culturally sensitive and ethical manner. Students are sensitized to the risks and benefits of using diagnosis, with an emphasis on minimizing stigma.

    Throughout this course, students learn about the most common DSM-5 diagnoses and integrate that knowledge with the use of established diagnostic procedures. In developing a “working diagnosis,” students learn to consider differential diagnosis, individualize and capture missing dimensions of an illness (mental status, severity, cultural idioms, and other details) as well as adapting interventions to various ages, races, genders, and cultures. Students learn how to incorporate DSM-5 requirements into a holistic biopsychosocial approach that includes the use of evidence-based assessments to systematically resolve ambiguities in diagnosis and strengthen diagnostic accuracy. Students also practice communicating and coding DSM-5 diagnoses and their supporting evidence to peers. The course uses case materials for direct skill-building. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6111.)

  
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    SOCW 6101 - Essential Skills for Social Work Practice


    (5 cr.) This course is designed for students to gain foundation-level social work skills on the micro, mezzo, and macro levels of social work practice. Students in the course explore how to set professional boundaries and exhibit professional demeanor conducive to social work practice. They further examine appropriate ethical conduct, client engagement, active listening, empathetic responses, and interviewing skills. Students also apply the Generalist Intervention Model in a culturally competent manner through engagement, assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation, termination, and follow-up with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.
  
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    SOCW 6103 - Introduction to Addictions


    (5 cr.) Students gain an overview of the addiction counseling profession in this course. They are introduced to aspects of professional functioning as an addiction counselor, including but not limited to: role setting; history, philosophy, and trends in addictions counseling; professional standards; the effects of crises and trauma-causing events on persons with addictions; self-care; and ethical and culturally sensitive practices. Students also explore competencies, credentialing, and other professional issues.
  
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    SOCW 6111 - Advanced Clinical Social Work Practice I


    (5 cr.) This is an advanced course designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to apply clinical social work services. Students in this course focus on the application of evidence-based theories and other intervention methods with individuals and families. There is a particular focus on individuals and families from diverse cultural backgrounds and marginalized or oppressed populations in this course. Students demonstrate therapeutic skills to engage clients, to define and prioritize issues, to set mutually developed goals, and to commit to the change process. Students select, implement, monitor, and evaluate interventions. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6500.)
  
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    SOCW 6121 - Advanced Clinical Social Work Practice II


    (5 cr.) In this advanced course, students gain knowledge and skills to apply research-based models, theories, and intervention methods to groups and organizations. The focus of the course is on therapeutic factors in group process and the tasks and skills of the clinical social worker in forming, planning, facilitating, documenting, and evaluating groups. A special emphasis is placed on cultural and gender-sensitive application of social work group practice. There is an added emphasis on empowerment of groups, organizations, and communities. Students explore the structure, role, goals, and impact of organizations, including culturally sensitive management, and the impact of organizations on social welfare and the delivery of human services. Students effectively engage, assess, develop, implement, and evaluate research-based interventions with groups and organizations. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6090 and SOCW 6111.)
  
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    SOCW 6135 - Criminal Behavior


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a foundation in historical and contemporary biological, psychological, and sociological theories of criminal behavior. Students consider two important questions in forensic psychology: “Who is a criminal?” and “Is criminal behavior a mental illness?” Students explore theoretical issues that result from attempts to explain criminal behavior in forensic populations. They examine groups of offenders, including mentally disordered offenders, sex offenders, violent offenders, and juvenile offenders. Students apply ethical guidelines and standards to the study and research of criminal behavior. They also use concepts and theories to assess the behavior of criminal offenders in case-study scenarios.
  
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    SOCW 6145 - Crisis Management


    (5 cr.) By studying the fundamentals of crisis management and crisis leadership, students develop an understanding of the theories and models related to crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events. Students also explore ethical, legal, and diversity considerations in crisis and trauma response. At the end of the course, students will understand models for training and supporting other counselors in the areas of crisis response applicable to community, national, and international crises. Furthermore, students develop a crisis management plan for their own community.
  
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    SOCW 6200 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment I


    (5 cr.) Students in this foundation course are provided with an understanding of the intersection between the social environment and the healthy lifespan development of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Throughout this course, students increase their comprehension of how the environment and social context serve to mediate or intersect with the healthy development of each individual, family, group, or community. They examine the ways gender, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, race and ethnicity, and disability impact human development. Students explore human behavior through the lens of human development, environment, and social context.
  
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    SOCW 6202 - Treatment of Addictions


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an understanding of theories, treatments, and  interventions for addiction. The focus of the course is to introduce various models of treatment, recovery, relapse prevention, and continuing care for addictive disorders. In addition, students understand the treatment principles and philosophies of addiction-related programs. Students increase their self-awareness as helping professionals by understanding their own limitations, recognizing when they need additional resources and support, and knowing when and where to refer clients. In addition, students examine substance abuse policies and regulatory processes that influence service delivery in addiction counseling.
  
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    SOCW 6203 - Theories, Treatment, and Case Management of Addictions


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to theories, treatment intervention, and case management strategies for addiction counseling. The focus of the course is to introduce various models of treatment, recovery, relapse prevention, and continuing care for addictive disorders. In addition, students explore the treatment principles and philosophies of addiction-related programs. Students increase their self-awareness as addiction counselors by understanding their own limitations as counselors; recognizing when they need additional resources and support; and knowing when and where to refer clients when appropriate. In addition, students examine substance abuse policies and regulatory processes that influence service delivery in addiction counseling.
  
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    SOCW 6204 - Medical Social Work I


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of the roles and competencies of social workers in medical settings. Students’ knowledge of medical terminology, crisis intervention, medical aftercare and discharge planning, mental health evaluations and chemical dependency evaluations, community resources, and medical treatment teams is enhanced. At the end of this course, students will also understand ethical practice with regard to medical social work. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6090 and SOCW 6111.)
  
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    SOCW 6205 - Medical Social Work II


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with knowledge and skills for supporting vulnerable populations, including individuals and families dealing with acute, chronic, and terminal illness, disability, or the challenges of aging. Students extend their knowledge of support and resources for those dealing with organ transplants; psychosocial aspects of illness and health, grief and loss, and end-of-life decision making. Students enhance their knowledge of ethical group and individual interventions for these vulnerable populations. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6090, SOCW 6111, and SOCW 6204.)
  
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    SOCW 6210 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment II


    (5 cr.) This advanced course is designed to prepare students for clinical social work practice that reflects an advanced understanding of lifespan development and sociopsychological identity development in individuals, families, groups, and communities. Throughout this course, students will use their learning on lifespan development and sociopsychological identity development to understand human behavior and, particularly, individual and family functioning within the environmental context. With an emphasis on ethical practice in social work, students have the opportunity to use this information to inform their assessments, evaluations, interventions, and advocacy for their clients. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6200.)
  
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    SOCW 6212 - Working With Military Spouses, Families, and Children


    (5 cr.) This is an advanced practice course designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to apply clinical social work services when working with military members, military families, and veterans. Students in this course will concentrate on the application of evidence-based practice theories and group work models consistent with empowerment and ecological perspectives. The particular focus of this course is on military groups from diverse cultural backgrounds. Students will demonstrate clinical practice skills in the assessment, intervention, and evaluation of military systems and groups. Students in this course will focus on the influence of social work professional values in practice in working with military members, their families, and veterans. Students will learn to use the problem-solving process to develop mutually agreed goals and objectives, mediate, and facilitate the treatment process. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6090 and SOCW 6111.)
  
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    SOCW 6214 - Social Work Practice with Medical Populations


    (5 cr.) This is an advanced practice course designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to apply clinical social work services with medical populations. Students in this course will concentrate on the application of evidence-based practice theories and group work models consistent with empowerment and ecological perspectives. A particular focus of this course is on client populations facing medical/healthcare issues. Students will demonstrate clinical practice skills in the assessment, intervention, and evaluation with clients from diverse cultural backgrounds. Students in this course will examine the influence of professional social work values in healthcare settings. They will learn to use the problem-solving process to develop mutually agreed goals and objectives, mediate, and facilitate the treatment process.
  
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    SOCW 6215 - Advanced Social Work Practice With Children and Family Services


    (5 cr.) This is an advanced practice course designed to provide students with opportunities to examine social work practice with diverse child and family systems, using an ecological-developmental framework. Through case studies, videos, and interactive media, students learn to apply social work skills of collaboration, assessment, child and family therapy, and multilevel interventions designed to build on strengths that exist within individuals and in the social contexts (e.g., family, school, work, neighborhoods, and communities) where children and families live. Students learn how to foster child and family success in their social environments, especially those challenged by stress, poverty, violence, disorganization, and/or oppression. Additionally, students critically evaluate legal and ethical issues related to working in this specialization. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6090 and SOCW 6111.)
  
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    SOCW 6301 - Social Work Practice Research I


    (5 cr.) The goal of this foundation course is to develop students’ understanding of the importance of research in relation to social work practice. Students are introduced to various research methods: quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods research. Students examine ethical standards as they relate to research, basic principles of scientific method, and research that addresses diverse populations. This basic course is the first of two courses designed to prepare students as scholar-practitioners who use research to inform their ethical social work practice. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6002.)
  
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    SOCW 6311 - Social Work Practice Research II


    (5 cr.) This advanced course is designed to support students’ development as scholar-practitioners in clinical social work. Students identify and apply research that can be used to advance their practice, including social welfare, advocacy, and policy. Throughout the course, students are provided resources and activities designed to help them become critical consumers of research for the sake of ethical, evidence-based clinical social work practice. Students in this course have the opportunity to evaluate research design, research methods, and the applicability of results to diverse populations. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6301.)
  
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    SOCW 6333 - Vicarious Trauma and Compassion Fatigue


    (5 cr.) To gain an understanding and awareness of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue for trauma-response-helping professionals, students examine intervention strategies and models for treating and preventing vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue through the lens of counselor educators, supervisors, and clinicians. Applying course concepts, students gain hands-on practice conducting a needs assessment and examining the use of standardized instruments. They also recommend social change related to vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue to inform and better prepare trauma-response-helping professionals. Students engage in course assignments that emphasize the ethical, legal, multicultural, and spiritual implications for wellness and self-care, including personal, professional, and organizational elements. As a final project, students interview a trauma-response-helping professional and develop an organizational wellness plan for their setting.
  
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    SOCW 6336 - Crisis, Trauma, and Disaster Response


    (5 cr.) Students in this course gain an understanding of the personal and systemic impact of crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events on individuals, couples, families, and communities. Students examine theories and response models as they relate to sexual trauma, crisis in individuals and families, crisis in the community, and crisis in the nation and in the world. They explore and discuss topics related to counselor competencies, vicarious trauma and countertransference, specific diagnoses, and advocacy. Students also engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of crisis assessment. Through contemporary articles and case studies, they consider and discuss cultural, legal, and ethical issues related to crisis, trauma, and disaster events and response.
  
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    SOCW 6350 - Forensic Applications in Community Settings


    (5 cr.) Professionals must devote considerable attention to forensic psychology perspectives and approaches to address issues such as the overpopulation of prisons, the decrease in healthcare availability, and cases in which courts remand treatment in community settings. Students in this course examine forensic psychology theories and perspectives, and then they apply these concepts to various community settings. They are provided with practical assignments and topical readings that focus on working with offenders re-entering the community as well as offenders who receive community placements rather than incarceration. In addition, students explore less-common applications, such as restorative justice and community crime prevention. They also analyze the impact of personal perspectives and setting on the application of forensic psychology.
  
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    SOCW 6351 - Social Policy, Welfare, and Change


    (5 cr.) Students in this foundation course are provided with an overview of the professional social worker’s role in the development, delivery, and implementation of social welfare policies, programs, and services in the U.S. The students explore the history of social welfare and current policies and programs, including those addressing poverty, healthcare (including mental health), child welfare, and disabilities. Students develop policy knowledge and skills to assist them in influencing policy development.
  
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    SOCW 6361 - Social Policy: Analysis and Advocacy


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with the knowledge to analyze, formulate, and advocate for social policies that advance individual and social well-being in this course. Students explore various methods of policy analysis and develop advocacy plans that involve collaboration with colleagues and communities to address policy issues. There is a special emphasis on policies that impact human rights and advance social and economic justice. Students develop skills in the policy analysis process, including the values that influence policy, the legislative process, and the roles of advocacy and lobbying organizations. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6351 and SOCW 6002.)
  
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    SOCW 6362 - Human Sexuality


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with a framework for understanding human sexuality in the context of couples, marriage, and family counseling in this course. Students explore empirically supported counseling approaches related to sexual functioning, intimacy, gender, and sexual orientation. They use a systemic framework for understanding the role and impact of sexuality on couples, marriages, and families. Students also explore and discuss specific topics related to issues of sexual diversity and gender identity.
  
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    SOCW 6400 - Military Culture


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with an overview of military culture. The focus of this course is on understanding the world of work for military personnel, the sociocultural identity development of military personnel, the experience of military families, support for military personnel and their families, and socioeconomic and other lifestyle challenges for military personnel. After completing this course, students will be more informed about the mental health and social support needs of these populations.
  
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    SOCW 6401 - Trauma, Crisis, and Stress With Military Personnel


    (5 cr.) The specific focus of this course is on combat trauma, crisis, and stress experiences and responses of military personnel—both wartime and post-war. Students develop an understanding of the short-term and long-term impact of post-traumatic stress and vicarious trauma. In addition to focusing on how combat and wartime experiences impact individual military personnel, students also explore the effects on families. As a result, students will be better prepared to provide services and mental health support to military personnel dealing with trauma, crisis, and stress.
  
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    SOCW 6410 - Military Culture for Social Workers


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of military culture. The focus of this course is on understanding the world of work for military personnel; the sociocultural identity development of military personnel; the experience of military families; support for military personnel and their families; and socioeconomic and other lifestyle challenges for military personnel. As a result of this course, students will be more informed about the mental health and social support needs of these populations. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6090 and SOCW 6111.)
  
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    SOCW 6411 - Social Work in Trauma, Crisis, and Stress With Military Personnel


    (5 cr.) The specific focus of this course is on the wartime and post-war and combat trauma, crisis, and stress experiences and responses of military personnel. Students in this course will develop an understanding of the short-term and long-term impact of post-traumatic stress and vicarious trauma. In addition to understanding how combat and war-time experiences impact individual military personnel, students will also focus on these individuals’ families. As a result of learning in this course, students will be better prepared to provide services and mental health support to trauma, crisis, and stress of military personnel. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6090 and SOCW 6111.)
  
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    SOCW 6412 - Working With Military Spouses, Families, and Children


    (5 cr.) The nature of military work responsibilities impacts not only military personnel but their families as well. Frequent relocations, extended deployments, parent-child separation, and high-risk jobs all contribute to unique family dynamics. This course is designed to educate students about the experience and unique support needs of military personnel and their families.
 

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