2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Nov 30, 2021  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    PSYC 8754 - Personnel Psychology in the Workplace


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore the application of psychological theory and practice to human resources activities in organizations. They examine related topics, including job analysis and design, employee selection and placement, training and development, performance management and appraisal, and legal and ethical considerations in human resources management. Through a group project case study, students research, assess, and share critical issues in personnel psychology. They also demonstrate their ability to conduct effective research and review literature through a final research paper on a topic of interest related to course content and theory. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8745.)
  
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    PSYC 8755 - Leadership and the Process of Change


    (5 cr.) Effective leadership requires the ability to facilitate positive change, lead others in efforts to effect similar change, and work through challenges when met with resistance to change. Students in this course are provided with an extensive overview of leadership theories. Students explore definitions of leadership, major theoretical leadership models, and contextual and situational factors related to leadership and change. Students also examine various perspectives on leadership and the role of leadership in the achievement of organizational, group, and team goals. Students engage in practical assignments and discussions, focusing on effective leadership issues and practices during the process of organizational change. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8750 or PSYC 8752.)
  
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    PSYC 8757 - Leadership Coaching: Application♦


    (5 cr.) The intent of leadership coaching is to facilitate psychological change that leads to goal attainment and enhanced performance. In this course, students apply evidence-based psychological approaches to coaching case studies. They assess coaching roles and settings; skills and competencies; models and frameworks; and current issues and future trends. Students employ critical-thinking skills and synthesize concepts learned in the course to develop a plan for implementing effective coaching in a real-world setting.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8759 - Psychology and the Media♦


    (5 cr.) In an age of technological innovation and virtual spread of knowledge, there are many different types of media, which often affect individuals, groups, and cultures. Students in this course explore the psychological impact of the media as it relates to violence, prosocial behaviors, sex and pornography, advertising, news and politics, special populations, and culture and the global community. They also examine legal and ethical issues related to psychology and the media as well as the impact of the media on social change. Students engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of content on media psychology, the effects of media violence and pornography, the impact of advertising, news manipulation, global disasters, and other applicable topics.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8760 - Educational Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the variables related to teaching and learning. Topics include teaching methods, educational achievement, learning environments, curriculum development, and characteristics of teachers and learners. Educational assessment, environmental issues, and educational research techniques are also explored.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8762 - Teaching of Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine theories, techniques, and issues related to teaching psychology at the college/university level, both online and in person. They focus primarily on teaching skills, developing rapport with students, managing the course, and managing the classroom. Classroom communication and ethical issues relevant to both faculty and students are also covered.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    PSYC 8763 - Principles of Instructional Design♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are presented with an overview and critical analysis of various instructional methods and techniques, including their historical, psychological, and social foundations. Students analyze specific instructional applications in various settings and through multiple theories of learning, such as behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and social-situational. They apply prior knowledge of learning, development, and cognition to understand these applications. Students also consider and discuss the major challenges affecting curriculum design as well as potential future trends. Demonstrating understanding of course concepts, students critically analyze and present current issues in instructional design through collaborative projects.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8764 - Instructional Design for Online Course Development♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore instructional design and delivery of online courses, issues related to assessment, evaluation in a distance-learning environment, and appropriate and systematic use of technology in online learning venues. Addressing course objectives and discussion questions, students explore and assess issues related to learning styles and instructional strategies in the online environment as well as alternatives to the online lecture. Students gain hands-on experience developing components for online instruction using course concepts and best practices in the field. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8763.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8765 - The Psychological Impact of the Internet and Mobile Technologies♦


    (5 cr.) The Internet and mobile technologies have increased the immediacy and accessibility of information and have provided a global platform for the expression of creativity and new ideas. Students in this course explore how the Internet and mobile technologies affect how people think, view the world, gain information, and record and interpret history. They examine and discuss the use of the Internet and mobile technologies for socialization, entertainment, news and information, terrorism, politics, commerce and advertising, health, education, and work. Applying course concepts and theories, students demonstrate knowledge through a final paper or presentation in which they examine how the Internet and mobile technologies psychologically impact their personal lives and the lives of their family and friends.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8781 - Psychopathology From a Clinical Perspective♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an in-depth examination of current theory and research associated with major psychological disorders and their diagnosis. The primary classification systems are explored in terms of their applicability and limitations. The factors that impact the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders along a continuum of mental health are explored. Application of the diagnostic criteria in terms of case conceptualization is emphasized.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8782 - Psychopathology From a Counseling Perspective


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an in-depth examination of current theory and research associated with major psychological disorders and their diagnosis. The primary classification systems are explored in terms of their applicability and limitations. The factors that impact the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders along a continuum of mental health are explored. Application of the diagnostic criteria in terms of case conceptualization is emphasized.
  
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    PSYC 8785 - Prevention: Research and Practice


    (5 cr.) In this course, students prepare for their roles as counselors in areas of prevention, intervention, and consultation with specific populations in different settings. Students assess these three areas of mental health counseling, including the relationships among them, methodological applications, and related ethical and legal considerations. They also discuss a variety of topics with their peers, such as applications for social change, needs of specific populations, iatrogenic harm, professional approaches and challenges, program evaluation, and future trends. Using an action-research model, students develop a blueprint for a project to address a contemporary mental health issue through the context of prevention, intervention, or consultation.
  
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    PSYC 8805 - Holistic Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Holistic psychologists provide therapy to patients by incorporating all aspects of the individual, including mental, physical, and spiritual. Students in this course are provided with a foundation in holistic psychology. Students examine topics in holistic and transpersonal psychology, as well as influences of theory and research in the areas of spirituality and mind/body relationships. While focusing on the integration of various perspectives, students also examine states of consciousness, emotional and psychosomatic disorders, spiritual emergencies, death and dying, and integral psychology. They share perspectives and assess current issues through discussions, and they demonstrate knowledge through a final written assignment on a major topic of choice related to holistic psychology.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8810 - Community Psychology


    (5 cr.) Through collaborative research and action, community psychologists work to enhance the well-being of individuals and community by understanding how communities function on many different levels. Students in this course explore the fundamental concepts and practice of community psychology. They examine guiding values and assumptions of the field, basic ecological concepts, and models of intervention. Evaluating traditional and topical research, students explore diversity in community psychology, strategies for social change, primary and secondary prevention, community mental health, empowerment, stress, and resiliency. They also have the opportunity to assess and discuss their personal and professional experiences, values, and cultural background and consider how these factors are likely to influence their work as community psychologists.
  
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    PSYC 8815 - Contemporary Gerontology/Geriatric Psychology


    (5 cr.) Statistical data indicate that people are living longer and the number of older persons is continually increasing. As the population ages, society must prepare to address their needs. Students in this course are provided with a multidisciplinary approach to the study of aging in contemporary societies. Students examine the biological, psychological, social, and societal contexts of aging. They also explore the historical and cross-cultural perspectives on aging, social theories of aging, managing chronic diseases, cognitive changes associated with aging, mental health issues, sexuality, and social interactions. Through a series of taskforce reports on various topics, such as sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, and elder abuse, students apply course concepts and critically examine current issues in gerontology.
  
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    PSYC 8825 - Psychology of Gender♦


    (5 cr.) Gender has been the focus of many stereotypes developed over time; but how much does the biological sex of an individual actually influence one’s behavior, development, or emotions? Students in this course are introduced to theories and research on gender role expectations and their influence on the psychosocial developmental experience of women, men, and children. Students apply current gender research to understanding achievement, work, relationships, sexuality, violence, and physical health and illness. They also engage in readings and assignments that emphasize the responses of women and men to life stresses, women as clients in psychotherapy, and the increasing role of gender research in the mental health professions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8830 - Psychology of Sexuality♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore sexuality through a variety of frameworks, including historical, psychological, sociological, anthropological, biological, public health, and media and cultural studies. Using a variety of theoretical perspectives, including essentialist and constructivist notions of sex, sexuality, and sexual identity, students examine traditional understandings of sexuality, including male and female sexual anatomy, physiology, and response; variations across the lifespan; sexual communication; love and interpersonal attraction; and sexual disorders. They also explore and discuss different expressions of sexual identity, including heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality as well as different expressions of gender identity from cross-cultural and interdisciplinary viewpoints. Students complete an integrative final paper incorporating research, ideas, and peer feedback from discussions on a topic related to the psychology of sexuality.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8871 - Practicum


    (6 cr. minimum—3 cr. per term for minimum 2 terms) The practicum is the opportunity for students to engage in a supervised experience that integrates theory and research with practice. Through the practicum, students work toward developing intermediate conceptual, assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills; awareness of professional and ethical issues; professional and interpersonal growth; development of cultural competence; and the ability to effectively use supervision and feedback. Students must secure a practicum appropriate to their specialization, and the practicum must meet the current requirements of the state psychology board to which students intend to apply. Students design the PhD in Psychology practicum for a period of no fewer than 750 hours, which they must complete over a minimum of 2 terms. Students also participate in an online classroom experience. (Prerequisite(s): Completion of the practicum application and approval of the field placement coordinator and completion of the Academic Year in Residence.) Note: Post-doctoral certificate students may complete the practicum in one term, but may register for an additional term if they need more time.
  
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    PSYC 8882 - Internship


    (12—3 cr. per term for 4 terms cr.) The internship is a supervised training experience that prepares students to successfully function in the role of a professional psychologist and/or counselor. Internship experiences emphasize the integration of theory and research through applied practice in a variety of settings and situations. Supervising psychologists mentor interns through a professional relationship. Students learn how to effectively use and understand a supervisory relationship, engage in critical thinking, conduct assessments, implement evidence-based interventions, evaluate intervention efficacy, engage in professional consultation, and function within professional ethical standards. Interns also participate in didactic training. Internship is the final component of advanced applied professional training for students in licensure specializations prior to graduation. Students must secure internships appropriate to their specialization, and the internship must meet the current requirements of the state psychology board to which the student intends to apply. A total of 2,000 hours is required. Internships may be designed as a part-time or a full-time experience (minimum of 15 hours per week) but must be completed within a 2-year time frame. Students also participate in an online classroom experience. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8871, completion of the internship application, and approval of the field training coordinator.)
  
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    PSYC 8912 - Mental Health Law♦


    (5 cr.) Mental health counseling professionals in all areas, especially criminal forensic psychological practice, may encounter various conflicts regarding psychological and legal approaches to treatment. Therefore, it is important for counselors to have a firm understanding of mental health law to avoid conflicts, such as issues of liability and malpractice. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to examine several different aspects of the law related to mental health issues, including those constituting forensic psychological practice, such as civil matters (personal injury and civil competency issues) and criminal matters (competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, diminished capacity, and death-penalty issues). Students employ recent court decisions and laws, such as the Tarasoff ruling, mandated reporting, and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), to examine how mental health law influences the practice of psychology and mental health counseling.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8920R - Research Practicum


    Students engaging in the research practicum participate as researchers in a project designed and supervised by faculty members. The students receive ethics training and consider ethical implications of research projects. They read literature concerning the project, collect data, analyze and interpret the quantitative and qualitative data that have been collected, and write a final paper on the project.
  
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    PSYC 8920T - Teaching Practicum


    (5 cr.) Students in this course can develop advanced skills necessary to become effective and ethical higher education instructors. They will engage in simulations to practice instructional skills and tasks and will evaluate their instructional and communication skills through practice in video and virtual classroom environments. Substantial reflection and instructor and peer feedback will enhance learning and development of skills. Students will refine the portfolios they developed in the Teaching of Psychology course.
  
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    PSYC 9000 - Dissertation


    (5 credits per quarter for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion) Doctoral students are provided with the opportunity to integrate their program of study into a research study through which they explore a specific area of interest in this course. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members through a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with their dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for PSYC 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation for a minimum of four terms.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 4 quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Dissertation with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook. (Prerequisite(s): Foundation and core courses and designation of an approved dissertation committee chairperson. Students engaging in a qualitative or mixed-methods dissertation study must also complete PSYC 8310. Students completing a mixed-methods dissertation study are strongly encouraged to also complete PSYC 8320.)

  
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    PSYR 8117 - Writing a Quality Prospectus in Psychology


    (5 cr.) This five-credit course is focused specifically on the process of writing the dissertation prospectus. Students can use their preliminary research plan, developed previously, and develop a problem statement to be used in the dissertation. They can further refine the problem statement and carry out the planning and the library research that will bring them to the formulation of a dissertation prospectus. The prospectus is a brief paper, typically 15–20 pages in length, that lays out the background for the problem statement, the problem statement itself, a survey of the relevant literature, typically 25–75 references, and a research, implementation, and evaluation plan for the solution of the problem. This course is provided in-residence, which means that students divide their time between online activities and activities completed in-residence, with the majority of the instruction occurring face-to-face during the in-residence class meetings.
  
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    PSYR 8208 - Career Assessment and Intervention


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with practical skills in career and vocational assessment. Students can administer, score, and interpret printed and computer-based assessments of career interests, beliefs, and values. Major sources of career and work information available on the Internet and through printed materials and computer-based guidance systems will be examined. Emphasis is placed on helping students gain functional knowledge of how career assessment can assist in the exploration and understanding of the interrelationship among work, family, and life roles. Students will learn how to integrate career development theory and assessment results with career counseling interventions. Current issues in career counseling and assessment will be discussed, with particular attention paid to computer-based applications and multicultural implications. This course is provided in-residence, which means that students divide their time between online activities and activities completed in-residence, with the majority of the instruction occurring face-to-face during the in-residence class meetings.
  
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    PSYR 8214 - Consulting for Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Organizational and professional development (OPD) professionals promote and implement organizational change by using fundamental techniques of change management. Students in this course examine and apply these tools, including consulting competencies, approaches, and organizational change models to learn the skills of an OPD consultant. Students explore methods for accelerating individual, group, and organizational performance through consulting, coaching, and change management. They also explore related topics, such as organizational assessment; team development; strategic planning; group dynamics; power, politics, and influence; leadership; and conflict management. Students apply course concepts to the assessment of an organization and the development of strategies to address identified needs for change.
  
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    PSYR 8214 - Consulting for Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Organizational and professional development (OPD) professionals promote and implement organizational change by using fundamental techniques of change management. Students in this course examine and apply these tools, including consulting competencies, approaches, and organizational change models to learn the skills of an OPD consultant. Students explore methods for accelerating individual, group, and organizational performance through consulting, coaching, and change management. They also explore related topics, such as organizational assessment; team development; strategic planning; group dynamics; power, politics, and influence; leadership; and conflict management. Students apply course concepts to the assessment of an organization and the development of strategies to address identified needs for change.
  
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    PSYR 8232 - Consultation and Supervision in Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the history, theory, process, and methods in the fields of psychological consultation and clinical supervision. Students can gain theoretical and empirical knowledge as well as the relevant practical skills needed to function as consultants and supervisors. Ethical and legal issues in providing consultation and supervision will be addressed. This course is provided in-residence, which means that students will be dividing their time between online assignments and assignments completed in-residence, with the majority of the instruction occurring face-to-face during the in-residence class meetings. This format will allow students the opportunity to integrate the online didactic learning experience with hands-on skills demonstration.
  
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    PSYR 8240 - Cognitive Behavioral Therapy


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will examine the historical and theoretical underpinnings of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)/Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT). Students will demonstrate the use of case conceptualization from a CBT perspective and will integrate and apply the therapeutic skills and techniques of CBT in the solution of life problems to mental health disorders. In examining ethical responsibility, students will analyze the appropriateness of using CBT with diverse populations, discussed within the context of empirically supported interventions. During the in-residence portion of the class, students will demonstrate and practice the skills of CBT/REBT. This course is provided in-residence, which means that students divide their time between online activities and activities completed in-residence, with the majority of the instruction occurring face-to-face during the in residence class meetings. This format allows the student to integrate the online didactic learning experience with hands-on skills demonstration.
  
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    PSYR 8340 - Cognitive Assessment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to historical and current theories of intellectual functioning. Students can critically analyze issues related to cognitive ability and achievement and develop competency in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of various standardized instruments designed to assess cognitive and intellectual functioning. Students review and prepare written reports that summarize, interpret, and integrate assessment results with recommendations for prevention and intervention. There is an emphasis on ethical test use in a diverse society and linking assessment results to appropriate interventions and practice. This course is provided in-residence, which means that students divide their time between online activities and activities completed in-residence, with the majority of the instruction occurring face-to-face during the in-residence class meetings.
  
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    PSYR 8345 - Interventions II


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore the application of empirically supported treatment and interventions to client problems ranging from problems in living to severe mental disorders in selected populations. Students demonstrate the implementation of intervention models, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, person-centered therapy, short-term dynamic psychotherapy, and integrative psychotherapy, in the online and face-to-face classrooms. Culturally competent interventions are emphasized within an ethical framework for clinical or counseling practice. This course is provided in-residence, which means that students divide their time between online activities and activities completed in-residence, with the majority of the instruction occurring face-to-face during the in-residence class meetings.
  
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    PSYR 8346 - Clinical Psychopharmacology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course survey basic neuropharmacology, the effects of various psychotropic drugs, and the actions of drugs used to treat mental disorders. Basic principles of neuropharmacology, distribution and elimination of drugs, drug-receptor interactions and dose-response relationships, structure of neurons, neurophysiological mechanisms involved in synaptic activity, and the distribution of specific neurotransmitter systems are covered. Students also learn the actions of specific drugs, their effects on behavior, and their uses in biological psychiatry. This course is provided in-residence, which means that students divide their time between online activities and activities completed in-residence, with the majority of the instruction occurring face-to-face during the in-residence class meetings.
  
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    PSYR 8350 - Personality Assessment


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and concepts relevant to objective personality assessment as well as to build the skills needed to administer, score, and interpret specific measures of personality and social-emotional functioning in a professionally and ethically responsible manner. The course is also designed to develop students’ skills in selection of assessment methods, integration of all assessment data, case formulation, psychodiagnosis, report writing, and treatment planning based on assessment findings. This course has a skill-based, face-to-face required in-residence component, which is designed to be hands-on, intensive, and cumulative to promote learning and skill building that will generalize to “real-world” practice. Students can gain experience in integrative report writing and begin to develop evidence-based consultation and test-interpretation feedback skills. Satisfactory completion of this demanding course is seen as an essential component of the core Professional Psychology curriculum. It will be important for students to demonstrate mastery of course requirements considered essential in the professional practice of psychology (professional knowledge, skills, and attitudes) at the required in-residence. This course is provided in-residence, which means that students divide their time between online activities and activities completed in-residence, with the majority of the instruction occurring face-to-face during the in-residence class meetings.
  
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    PSYR 8421 - Multicultural Psychology


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide a foundation in the theory and skills necessary for multicultural counseling and the delivery of psychological services to diverse populations. Students explore cross-cultural issues and their impact on the therapeutic relationship. Specific populations include those related to race, ethnicity, sex, gender, sexual orientation, social class, economic status, age, religion, and disability. The effects of oppression and its prevention are also discussed in terms of social justice. This course is designed to be provided in-residence, which means that students will be dividing their time between online activities and activities completed in-residence, with the majority of the instruction occurring face-to-face during the in-residence class meetings. With this format, the student has the opportunity to integrate the online didactic learning experience with hands-on skills demonstration. This course is provided in-residence, which means that students divide their time between online activities and activities completed in-residence, with the majority of the instruction occurring face-to-face during the in-residence class meetings.
  
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    PSYR 8704 - Ethics and Standards of Psychological Practice


    (5 cr.) The guidelines for practice in specific psychological services and with identified populations are explored. The ethical decision-making process is studied in depth. Topics include informed consent, confidentiality, duty to warn, mandated reporting, record keeping, the limits of competency, and dual relationships. Students in the course also address issues of professional development such as supervision, peer consultation, and continuing education. This course is provided in-residence, which means that students divide their time between online activities and activities completed in-residence, with the majority of the instruction occurring face-to-face during the in-residence class meetings.
  
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    PSYR 8752 - Psychology of Organizational Behavior


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the application of behavioral theories in organizational settings. The focus is on individual, group, and organizational behavior. Topics include individual differences in employee motivation and job satisfaction, group development, team building, organizational leadership, and organizational design, culture, and development. Students acquire a broad knowledge base in organizational psychology, its research, and its applications.
  
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    PUBH 1000 - Foundations of Public Health♦


    (5 cr.) This course is an introduction to the principles and practice of safeguarding and improving the health of populations. Students examine the philosophies, goals, history, and organization of the field of public health. They discuss the role of the government in improving the health and well-being of its citizens. Students explore key concepts of public health, including morbidity and mortality, infectious and chronic disease, social determinants of health, and health disparities within populations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 3000 - Environmental Health♦


    (5 cr.) Human interaction has a major influence on the natural world, resulting in outcomes that can impact human and environmental health. In this course, students learn the principles of environmental health and examine the short- and long-term effects of environmental hazards on human health. Students consider their own interactions with natural and human-made environments to assess the impact of chemical, physical, biological, and social elements on their health. They also explore the potential impact of climate change on population health, emerging global health threats related to the environment, and environmental factors involved in the etiology and transmission of both communicable and non-infectious disease. Using concepts and methods presented in the course, students conduct an environmental risk assessment to determine the health of home environments. They also conduct a written analysis to report their findings, identifying actions to improve inspection results.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 3100 - Human Disease and Prevention♦


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students explore the historical milestones concerning human disease and prevention, morbidity and mortality rates associated with various diseases, and the biological effects of infectious and chronic disease on the human body. Students discuss the general characteristics of disease transmission, symptoms, treatment, prevention, and control among various populations. They also examine psychosocial and behavioral factors that influence human disease.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 4000 - Public Health Education and Communication♦


    (5 cr.) Effective delivery of health education and communication often leads to improved health literacy and positive changes in behavior among populations. In this course, students receive an overview of health education and its role in improving the health of individuals as well as populations. Students review the philosophical, historical, ethical, and theoretical foundations of health education as well as effective principles for the delivery of healthcare. They also examine the primary responsibilities and competencies of health educators, trends in the field, professional organizations, national certification, and the code of ethics.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 4030 - Planning Public Health Programs♦


    (5 cr.) Planning culturally relevant and effective public health programs is essential to improving the health of populations. In this course, students are introduced to public health program planning and design, including the process of needs assessment. Students examine and apply various models and theoretical frameworks of program planning. They also explore fundamental competencies relating to planning, such as writing goals and objectives, selecting strategies, developing budgets, and planning for specific populations. Students learn about concepts related to program implementation, management, and evaluation as these relate to the planning process. (Prerequisite(s): HLTH 3115).
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 4100 - Evaluating Public Health Programs♦


    (5 cr.) How do public health professionals know when a program is working? This course provides an introduction to evaluating public health programs. It examines various types of program evaluations, including formative, process, outcome, and impact evaluations. Students apply concepts for designing and conducting practical, ethical, and effective program evaluations that determine whether program goals are achieved. Students also explore ways to appropriately disseminate program evaluation results.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 4200 - Public Health Policy for Social Change♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine one of the most influential factors shaping the health of populations: public policy. Public health policy impacts the public’s health at the local, state, and federal levels. Students explore the institutional, economic, social, ethical, and political factors that impact public policy. Students examine how public policy is developed and discuss issues relating to health advocacy within the framework of social justice. (Prerequisite(s): HLTH 3115.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 4900 - Capstone in Public Health


    (5 cr.) In this capstone course, students have the opportunity to examine contemporary global public health issues, as well as to evaluate and synthesize the key concepts and skills they have gained from this program of study. Students complete a final capstone project based on service learning, field observations, or a review of literature. (Prerequisite(s): All required core and concentration courses, if applicable, within the BS in Public Health.)
  
  •  

    PUBH 5005 - Perspectives on Health and the Developing Scholar-Practitioner


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover the origins and evolution of the concept of health, including some of the important health problems that face the world today and emerging concerns for the future. Students taking this foundational course are introduced to key events in history, as well as some of the health systems and issues that a modern health practitioner may encounter. Strategies for success as a graduate-level scholar and a health practitioner are integrated in a way that provides meaningful context to learners. Students discuss key concepts with peers, and the course culminates with a reflection paper designed to help learners evaluate their professional goals and how to progress as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Students explore careers in various public health and health education settings and experience a virtual health department in order to learn about various functions and personnel.
    Note about required first courses: Students in the MPH program must receive a B or better in this course.
  
  •  

    PUBH 5030 - Socioecological Perspectives on Health♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students identify and discuss social and ecological perspectives of public health including individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, societal, and public policy factors. Students explore and apply the socioecological model (SEM) and other theoretical frameworks that aim to address current public health problems and reduce health disparities, morbidity, and mortality. Students demonstrate understanding of course concepts through peer discussion and through researching and describing a specific health issue in a community, discussing the contributing factors, and proposing an appropriate intervention.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 5127 - Public Health Policy, Politics and Progress♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the role of federal, state, and local government in the assurance of public health through health policy and law. Consideration is given to contemporary policy, law, and regulatory issues arising in public health practice, as well as to the economics and financing of public health programs. The advocacy, political, and creative process in the formulation, implementation, and modification of health policy are examined and discussed. Students also learn how to write and structure a health policy analysis.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6005 - Perspectives on Health and the Developing Scholar-Practitioner


    (5 cr.) Students cover the origins and evolution of the concept of health, including some of the important health problems that face the world today and emerging concerns for the future. In this foundational course, students are introduced to key events in history as well as some of the health systems and issues that a modern health practitioner may encounter. Strategies for success as a graduate-level scholar and a health practitioner are integrated in a way that provides meaningful context to learners. Students discuss key concepts with peers, and the course culminates with a reflection paper designed to help learners evaluate their professional goals and how to progress as scholar–practitioners and social change agents. Students explore careers in various public health and health education settings and experience a virtual health department to learn about various functions and personnel.
    Note about required first courses: Students in the MPH program must receive a B or better in this course.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6030 - Socioecological Perspectives on Health♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students identify and discuss social and ecological perspectives of public health including individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, societal, and public policy factors. Students explore and apply the socioecological model (SEM) and other theoretical frameworks that aim to address current public health problems and reduce health disparities, morbidity, and mortality. Students demonstrate understanding of course concepts through peer discussion and through researching and describing a specific health issue in a community, discussing the contributing factors, and proposing an appropriate intervention.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6031 - Public Health Administration and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with a foundational understanding of the administrative, managerial, and organizational practices of public health and healthcare delivery systems. Students examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. They engage in a variety of contextual and practical assignments focused on management theories, policy processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, public health financing, human resource management, public health informatics, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. Students also consider the impact of global trends on public health.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6032 - SPSS Revealed♦


    (1 cr.) This is a laboratory-type course where students learn the skills needed to use the statistical computer package SPSS in public health practice and research. Topics include importation of data, management of various types of data, creation and exportation of tables and graphs, and computation of basic statistical tests using SPSS.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6033 - Interpretation and Application of Public Health Data♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about biostatistical methods and concepts used in public health practice and research. Emphasis is placed on interpretation and application of concepts rather than statistical calculations. Major topics include identification of types of data, creation and interpretation of narrative and graphical descriptive statistics, conceptualization of statistical inference and probability, and interpretation of common nonparametric tests, analysis of variance, and simple linear regression models. Students are required to use the statistical computer package SPSS.  

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
  •  

    PUBH 6034 - Environmental Health: Local to Global♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are offered a comprehensive overview of environmental factors that affect the health and safety of a community. Students examine causal links between chemical, physical, and biological hazards in the environment and their impact on health. They also explore the genetic, physiologic, and psychosocial factors that influence environmentally compromised health outcomes. Students investigate environmental risk assessment methods; strategies for effective management and control of environmental exposures; and legal, regulatory, and ethical considerations at the federal, state, and local levels. Using theories and methods presented in the course, students assess current solutions and consider new ways to address environmental threats, such as waste, water, air, vectors, and global warming as well as issues related to bioterrorism and disaster preparedness and management.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6035 - Epidemiology: Decoding the Science of Public Health♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an epidemiological approach to the study of the incidence, prevalence, and patterns of disease and injury in populations, and the application of this study to the control of public health problems. Key sources of data for epidemiological purposes are identified, and principles and limitations of public health screening programs are addressed. Students learn to calculate basic epidemiological measures and to draw appropriate inferences from epidemiological data and reports.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6038 - Health Behavior Theory♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to concepts necessary for promoting positive health-behavior change by examining the most commonly used theories and models in public health and health education and promotion. Coursework focuses on the identification and application of theories and models for promoting and designing effective health behavior programs and interventions. Students explore individual, interpersonal, and community theories and modules to determine the most appropriate application. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6127 - Public Health Policy, Politics and Progress♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the role of federal, state, and local government in the assurance of public health through health policy and law. Consideration is given to contemporary policy, law and regulatory issues arising in public health practice, as well as to the economics and financing of public health programs. The advocacy, political, and creative process in the formulation, implementation, and modification of health policy are examined and discussed. Students also learn how to structure and write a health policy analysis.  
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 6128 - Biological Foundations of Public Health♦


    (5 cr.) A foundation in basic science and critical thinking informs the core areas of public health. Students explore the biological and physical underpinnings of the human body in health and disease states, and they investigate the microbiological, physical, behavioral, and environmental causes of common diseases from a public health perspective. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 6129 - Global Perspectives on Health♦


    (5 cr.) Students are introduced to current public health issues and challenges affecting vulnerable populations around the globe. Particular emphasis is given to the social and economic determinants of health and possible intervention strategies for addressing the global burden of diseases. Students learn about organizations that work to support and advance health locally and internationally and compare health systems around the globe. Students also analyze global health ethics, examine international health-related goals, and explore health communication and other strategies for social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 6135 - Leadership, Professionalism, and Ethics in Public Health Practice♦


    (4 cr.) Critical issues, such as infectious diseases, inadequate healthcare access, and an aging population, require leaders who have a diverse skill set as well as the professional and ethical sensibilities needed to lead efforts that improve quality of life for individuals and communities. In this course, students examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. They explore ethical choices, values, professionalism, opportunities for advocacy, and the application of principles of social justice implicit in public health decisions and practice. Students learn how to employ collaborative methods for working with and motivating diverse communities and constituencies, and they consider methods and develop new strategies for evaluating and solving current problems in healthcare.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 6145 - Epidemiology♦


    (4 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an epidemiological approach to the study of the incidence, prevalence, and patterns of disease and injury in populations, and the application of this study to the control of public health problems. Key sources of data for epidemiological purposes are identified, and principles and limitations of public health screening programs are addressed. Students learn to calculate basic epidemiological measures and to draw appropriate inferences from epidemiological data and reports. (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 6125.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6155 - Research in Public Health♦


    (4 cr.) Public health professionals use the results of research in many ways, including in the development of programs and interventions designed to enhance the health of communities as well as to demonstrate the efficacy of programs to stakeholders who provide funding. Students in this course engage in an examination of the research that informs public health programs, policy, and practice. Students examine the logic that underlies scientific research; study design; sampling; identification of variables; methods of data collection and analysis; key concepts in measurement, including reliability and validity; program evaluation; and research ethics. Students also explore the methods of participatory research as well as statistical software used to support research. Gaining practical experience, students develop a research manuscript through which they engage in an integrative literature review and analyze and apply various components of research, including data sets; study designs, variables and measurements, participants; data analysis; and strategies and skills for presentation of research. (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 6125 and PUBH 6145.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6227 - Health Informatics♦


    (4 cr.) Information technology (IT) in public health practice has many functions, one of which is the dissemination of important information about disease and disease prevention, which organizations use in the management of critical issues in public health. Students in this course examine the various applications of IT in public health practice to access, interpret, and evaluate data that supports decision making and effective communication. They examine legal and ethical principles in the dissemination of information in public health settings as well as the use of informatics methods and resources as strategic tools to promote public health. Students also explore the collaborative approach to the design, implementation, and evaluation of informatics programs. Through the analysis of various case studies, students sharpen their critical-thinking and decision-making skills while gaining an understanding of the various phases of informatics project development, information architecture, and immunization registry. They also engage in practical exercises on information systems evaluation, IT personnel management, and procurement and requests for proposals (RFPs).
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6245 - Applied Research in Public Health♦


    (5 cr.) The goal of this course is to provide participants with an understanding of theories, principles, strategies, and alternative methods of applied research (quantitative, qualitative, and/or mixed-method designs) in public health focusing on culturally sensitive, appropriate literacy level and appropriate community engagement through participatory action research and collaborative inquiry of community-based participatory research, an appreciation of advantages and limitations of this approach, and skills necessary for participating effectively in CBPR projects. 
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6260 - Legal and Regulatory Aspects of Public Health♦


    (2 cr.) A major responsibility of public health professionals is to maintain balance between individual rights and the wellbeing of communities. To do this, they must understand the ethical, social, and legal issues surrounding the public health arena. Students in this course explore these concepts while examining the role of federal, state, and local government in the assurance of public health through legislation and regulation. Students investigate contemporary legal and regulatory issues arising in public health practice and emergencies, and they assess public health security and preparedness in response to bioterrorism and disasters. They also discuss the impact of cost, benefits, legal factors, and other considerations on ethical research and practice. Through the application of theories and concepts assessed in the course, students propose potential solutions to current public health issues.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 6475 - Program Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course promote competency in strategic planning, program planning and design, implementation, and evaluation. They receive an overview of public health program planning and development, as well as needs and assets assessment. Students focus on the methods required to develop a strategic plan, linking it to implementing programs and evaluating their efficacy. Students discuss the administration and coordination of public health program interventions and activities, and they explore the variety of methods used to facilitate public health research (quantitative, qualitative, and/or mixed-methods) in practice settings.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 6635 - Practicum I: Field Experience in Public Health


    (4 cr.) Students in the practicum are provided with the opportunity to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program of study and to further develop key professional competencies. Students engage in a field experience in a select public health setting, which they align to their academic and professional goals. Supervision by an on-site preceptor is a critical component of the practicum. The on-site supervisor and the course instructor monitor and evaluate students’ performance throughout the entire practicum experience. Students are required to complete 240 hours of practicum work. They must also participate in an accompanying online seminar course and begin to develop an ePortfolio based on assigned professional development activities.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6636 - Practicum II: Capstone Experience in Public Health


    (4 cr.) This course is the continuation of PUBH 6635 - Practicum I: Field Experience in Public Health. The capstone experience is an opportunity for students to demonstrate their mastery of principles, concepts, and content presented throughout the program and through their practicum field experience. In this course, students complete their ePortfolio based on their field experience and develop a substantive written paper or project. Students also engage in group discussions during which they consider career development plans, reflect on the promotion of social change, and exchange feedback on final portfolio work and lessons learned.
  
  •  

    PUBH 6638 - Practicum I: Field Experience in Public Health


    (3 cr.) Students in the practicum are provided with the opportunity to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program of study and to further develop key professional competencies. Students engage in a field experience in an approved public health setting, which they align to their academic and professional goals. Supervision by an on-site preceptor is a critical component of the practicum. The on-site supervisor and the course instructor monitor and evaluate students’ performance throughout the entire practicum experience. In this first course of the two-part practicum, students are required to complete a minimum 100 of the total 200 required hours of practicum work. Students also participate in the accompanying online course and begin to develop an eportfolio based on assigned professional development activities. (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 6245.)
  
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    PUBH 6639 - Practicum II: Field Experience and Applied Project in Public Health


    (3 cr.) This course is the continuation and extension of PUBH 6638 - Practicum I: Field Experience in Public Health. Students complete the remainder of their required 200 hours of practicum work, participate in the accompanying online course, and complete the eportfolio of their field experience. Students also develop their applied public health project (see PUBH 6245 course description for further explanation of the project). (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 6640.) Note: Time spent on developing the project is expected to be above and beyond the 200 hours devoted to actual practicum work.
  
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    PUBH 6640 - Applied Project in Public Health


    (2 cr.) As a culminating experience, MPH students are provided the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to synthesize and integrate advanced knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program and to apply theory and principles in a public health project focused on social change. For this project, students write a grant proposal for a public health initiative or create a community health program plan. The project must address the need(s) of a specific population in the student’s field site community. Students are also required to describe how the MPH program competencies/learning outcomes were demonstrated while carrying out the project as well as how their project relates to social change. (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 6638.)
    (Co-requisites: PUBH 6639.)
  
  •  

    PUBH 8003 - Building a Multidisciplinary Approach to Health♦


    (3 cr.) In this course, students will explore the multidisciplinary nature and integration of professional practice in the health field. Students will have the opportunity to utilize their scholarly voice with diverse audiences and with academic integrity to ensure academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. As leaders in their profession, students will discuss critical public health and health services in the health field. They use a response to a natural disaster, review of emerging issues in the health field, and what it means to be part of a multidisciplinary team to develop community partnerships with key stakeholders. This way they can address health issues impacting their communities, agencies, and/or organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 8030 - Socioecological Perspectives on Health♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will identify social and ecological approaches to public health at the individual, interpersonal, organizational, community and environment, and policy levels. They will explore and apply the socioecological model (SEM) and other theoretical frameworks to address public health issues and reduce health disparities in morbidity and mortality. Students demonstrate an understanding of course concepts through peer discussion and research on specific health issues in special populations, identifying contributing factors and proposing appropriate interventions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 8031 - Public Health Administration and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with a foundational understanding of the administrative, managerial, and organizational practices of public health and healthcare delivery systems. Students examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. They engage in a variety of contextual and practical assignments focused on management theories, policy processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, public health financing, human resource management, public health informatics, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. Students also consider the impact of global trends on public health.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 8032 - SPSS Revealed


    (1 cr.) In this laboratory course, students can learn the skills needed to use the statistical computer package SPSS (Software Package for the Social Sciences) in public health practice and research. Topics include importation of data, management of various types of data, creation and exportation of tables and graphs, and computation of basic statistical tests using SPSS.
      Note: Lab
  
  •  

    PUBH 8033 - Interpretation and Application of Public Health Data♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about biostatistical methods and concepts used in public health practice and research. Emphasis is placed on interpretation and application of concepts rather than statistical formulas. Major topics include identification of levels of measurement, interpretation of narrative and graphical descriptive statistics, conceptualization of statistical inference and probability, and interpretation of commonly used statistical tests such as t tests, analysis of variance, correlation and regression, comparing proportions, contingency tables, and chi-square tests. Students are required to use the statistical computer package SPSS.


      (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 8032
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
  •  

    PUBH 8034 - Environmental Health: Local to Global♦


    (5 cr.) A comprehensive overview of environmental factors that affect the health and safety of 21st century communities is provided in this course. Students examine associations and interrelationships among chemical, physical, and biological hazards in the environment and their impact on human health. Concepts cover food, water, air, waste, radiation, noise, pests, population growth, and climate change. Students analyze and discuss current local and global problems and solutions and consider new ways to address environmental issues. (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 8035
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 8035 - Epidemiology: Decoding the Science of Public Health♦


    (5 cr.) Public health officials frequently use epidemiologic research to develop educational strategies and intervention programs to improve the overall health of communities. Using an epidemiological approach, students in this course examine the incidence, prevalence, and patterns of disease and injury in populations and learn how to apply these concepts to the control of public health problems. Students identify key sources of data for epidemiological purposes and address principles and limitations of public health screening programs. Students calculate basic epidemiological measures and draw appropriate inferences from epidemiological data and reports. Through this course, students gain a deeper understanding of the various research designs and methodologies professionals use in public health research. (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 8032 and PUBH 8033
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 8038 - Health Behavior Theory♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to concepts necessary for promoting positive health-behavior change by examining the most commonly used theories and models in public health and health education and promotion. Coursework focuses on the identification and application of theories and models for promoting and designing effective health behavior programs and interventions. Students explore individual, interpersonal, and community theories and modules to determine the most appropriate application.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 8050 - Global Health and Issues in Disease Prevention♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided an in-depth review of how global health-based strategies are used in the prevention of disease and disability in diverse populations. They explore global health topics and disease prevention activities from the perspective of understanding the determinants of health. Using a cross-disciplinary approach, students examine how economics, social factors, cultural competency, health literacy, health policy, urbanization, globalization, the environment, and other factors influence disease. Students consider how research in disease prevention, health determinants, cultural ecology, and global health applies to public and community health efforts.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 8130 - Communications, Marketing, and Public Relations for Public Health Leaders♦


    (5 cr.) An overview of marketing and public relations principles as they relate to public health, highlighting theoretical concepts that are commonly used in health communications research, is provided to students in this course. Topics include using social marketing techniques, promoting health literacy, developing community partnerships, and creating culturally sensitive and appropriate promotional materials. Students focus on using social media to identify and advance public health interests and ethical principles. Through case studies, students examine how they can use marketing practices to translate health research into social action and behavioral change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 8135 - Leadership, Professionalism, and Ethics in Public Health Practice♦


    (4 cr.) Critical issues, such as infectious diseases, inadequate healthcare access, and an aging population, require leaders who have a diverse skill set as well as the professional and ethical sensibilities needed to lead efforts that improve quality of life for individuals and communities. In this course, students examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. They explore ethical choices, values, professionalism, opportunities for advocacy, and the application of principles of social justice implicit in public health decisions and practice. Students learn how to employ collaborative methods for working with and motivating diverse communities and constituencies, and they consider methods and develop new strategies for evaluating and solving current problems in healthcare.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 8220 - Health Promotion and Education Interventions in Diverse Populations♦


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students explore the planning and organization of health promotion programs for underserved, economically disadvantaged, and underrepresented populations. Students learn to design health promotion programs that consider the social, economic, and medical conditions influencing the health status of diverse populations. Throughout the course, students develop a health promotion project for a specific population, based on the intervention mapping process. Through this project, students analyze and integrate principles of social change and empowerment, summarize research that supports the decision-making process, and critique institutional and social systems. Students also have the opportunity to assess and discuss the future of health promotion, considering projections of needs over the next two decades. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PUBH 8225 - Design and Analysis of Community Trials♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students investigate randomized, controlled trials of health promotion and education programs as well as disease-prevention interventions, using communities as the units of analysis. Students engage in an in-depth exploration of techniques for randomization, multicenter coordination, data management, team building, statistical analysis, models for community assessment, publication, and ethics. Through case studies, students assess the univariate, bivariate, and multivariate statistical techniques used in the studies to analyze data. Students also gain practical experience developing a grant proposal for a research project focused on contemporary public health education/promotion. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8240 - Public Health Policy and Advocacy♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the role of federal, state, and local government in the assurance of public health through health policy and law. Consideration is given to contemporary policy, law and regulatory issues arising in public health practice, as well as to the economics and financing of public health programs. The advocacy, political, and creative process in the formulation, implementation, and modification of health policy are examined and discussed. Students also learn how to structure and write a health policy analysis.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8245 - Applied Research in Public Health♦


    (5 cr.) Health professionals use research skills to develop programs and interventions that enhance the health of communities and demonstrate the efficacy of programs to community partners. In this course, students engage in practical application of research methods that inform health programs, policy, and practice. Specific topics covered include study designs, sampling, identification of variables, methods of data collection and analysis, key concepts in measurement (including reliability and validity), program evaluation, culturally appropriate community-based participatory research, funding sources, and research ethics. As a major assignment in this course, students develop a proposal for a community health intervention.
      (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 8032, PUBH 8033, and PUBH 8035.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8246 - Advanced Application of Practice-Based Research in Public Health♦


    (5 cr.) The goal of this course is to provide participants with an understanding of theories, principles, strategies, and alternative methods of applied research (quantitative, qualitative, and/or mixed-method designs) in public health focusing on culturally sensitive, appropriate literacy level and appropriate community engagement through participatory action research and collaborative inquiry of community-based participatory research, an appreciation of advantages and limitations of this approach, and skills necessary for participating effectively in CBPR projects. 
      (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101, RSCH 8201.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8270 - Health Informatics and Surveillance♦


    (5 cr.) By addressing current trends and future applications in public health research, students develop advanced competency in health informatics and surveillance in this course. The key issues of data standards and integration, vocabularies and data transmission protocols, health information technology, surveillance systems, and the application of geographical information systems to situation awareness are addressed. Other topics include information architecture, public health records, electronic medical records, electronic health records, health information exchange, and database design, as well as information storage, security, and privacy.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8315 - Economics and Financing of Public Health Systems♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students investigate the provision of resources for the delivery of public health services and the application of economic theories to health policy issues. Students explore how organizational characteristics interact with economic forces to produce systems performance outcomes, as well as how fiscal policy can influence the performance of public health systems. Students analyze grant-writing strategies and the advantages and disadvantages of various financing options. Other topics include methods of economic evaluation and their usefulness in determining appropriate financing mechanisms for public health systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8400 - Public Health Leadership and Systems Thinking♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore leadership models and theories, the core principles of public health leadership, and the application of systems thinking to public health. They examine how to create strategies and solutions that efficiently utilize public health and healthcare resources. Students also discuss descriptive and prescriptive systems, focusing on the application of these processes to current public health issues and challenges at the organizational and community levels.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8440 - Application of Public Health and Behavior Change Theories♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course take a comprehensive look at public health and behavior change theories that apply to community health education. Students review and assess predominant social and behavioral principles at the individual, interpersonal, and community levels. Students discuss examples of how others have harnessed social marketing and communication technology to effect positive health behavior change in individuals and communities. Students learn to apply theories to public health research and practice. (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 8450
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8450 - Community Health Assessment♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover community health assessment and its application to program planning. They learn to identify and prioritize problems, then assess and utilize community resources to address these problems. Topics include measuring selected determinants of community health status and health services use, classifying community assets, identifying data sources, and applying certain methods to maximize community participation. Students synthesize the results of a community health assessment to create a community diagnosis that serves as the basis for program planning and research design. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101, RSCH 8201, RSCH 8301.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8475 - Advanced Program Implementation and Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) Competency in program design, implementation, and evaluation is promoted in this course. Students have an overview of public health program planning and development, as well as needs and assets assessment. They focus on the methods required to implement programs and evaluate their efficacy. Students discuss the administration and coordination of public health program interventions and activities, and they explore the variety of methods used to facilitate public health research. (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 8440.)
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8500 - Advanced Biostatistics♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover the advanced biostatistics methods needed to prepare for conducting future research, as well as for critically reviewing the statistical methods incorporated in public health literature. Students learn to use statistical methodologies such as covariance and repeated measures, longitudinal data analysis, life tables and survival analysis, multiple regression, logistic regression, Poisson regression, and the Cox proportional hazards regression model. In this course, students use SPSS statistical software for advanced data management, manipulation, analysis, and the use of graphical techniques.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8520 - Advanced Epidemiology Methods♦


    (5 cr.) The principles of epidemiologic design, analysis, and interpretation at an advanced level are integrated in this course. Students discuss data sources, assessment of dependent and independent variables, measurement error, confounding, and bias. They explore methodological issues in epidemiology, including factors critical to public health research, such as missing data, intermediate variables, confounding, complex study designs, meta-analysis, and questionnaire design. The concepts and applications in survival analysis, analysis of incidence rates, life tables, and parametric and nonparametric approaches are covered in this course. (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 8500.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8540 - Epidemiology Topics Seminar♦


    (5 cr.) In this seminar, students are exposed to current research and special topics of interest in epidemiology. They choose from a wide range of discussion topics, including infectious disease, non-endemic communicable disease, chronic disease, global health, maternal and child health, social and behavioral concerns, environmental issues, genetic factors, and other emerging topics of interest. Students perform a critical review of the research literature, providing them further insight into topics of epidemiology.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8545 - Advanced Analysis of Community Health Data and Surveillance in Public Health♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students cover the application of secondary data analysis, and the use of health informatics and biosurveillance for program planning. Topics include measuring identifying data sources, analysis of data on selected determinants of community health status and health services use, sampling, and power calculations. Students can develop an understanding of statistical methodology to utilize secondary data and review the use of Geographic Information Systems data in public health. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101, RSCH 8201.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8551 - Preparing for Dissertation


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on the preparation for the dissertation phase of training. In this course, students identify a dissertation topic and potential dissertation committee members; begin to conduct a literature review; develop a problem statement and research questions; and evaluate research designs, methods, and types of analyses to use for their dissertation. Students also complete their initial premise in this course and an annotated outline of their prospectus.
  
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    PUBH 8560 - Advanced Analysis of Secondary Data♦


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students develop an advanced understanding of statistical and epidemiological methodology and the use of biomedical and secondary data sources. Students explore how to design research to make appropriate use of available secondary data sources. The strengths and limitations of using secondary data are also addressed in this course. (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 8500, PUBH 8520.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PUBH 8900 - Research Forum


    (0 cr.) The purpose of this forum is to assist students in making steady progress toward earning a doctoral degree. Doctoral students are offered the opportunity to synthesize knowledge of their program of study and complete an in-depth exploration of a practice, issue, or problem within their discipline. Students will engage in regular scholarly discussions with a faculty chair and fellow doctoral students and submit Quarterly Plans and products toward completion of the doctoral degree. Information and resources related to the doctoral study, residencies, research, writing, and doctoral program expectations are provided for guidance.
     
  
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    PUBH 9000 - Public Health Dissertation


    (6 cr. per term for minimum of five terms until completion) Doctoral students are offered the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration within an interest area through the completion of a research study in this course. Students complete the dissertation independently, with the guidance of a dissertation supervisory committee chair and committee members. They must also participate in an accompanying online course and complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and final dissertation paper and presentation. Once students register for PUBH 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation.

    Students take this course for a minimum of five terms and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Dissertation with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula; appointment of an approved dissertation committee chair.)

 

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