2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Dec 08, 2021  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    NSEI 6511 - Information Systems Project Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students develop the skills needed to plan, lead, and manage an information systems project. Topics include estimating, budgeting, and scheduling; risk management; team leadership; engineering process management; and open-source processes.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6561 - Service and Sourcing Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students learn to manage projects and programs that span multiple organizations. Topics include process and best practices for qualification, acceptance, and assurance; service-level agreements; relationship management; and supply chain strategy.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6630 - Information Systems Management


    (3 sem. cr.) An effective healthcare information system is one that provides value by addressing the requirements of an organization and the needs of the individuals who will use the system. Such a system requires knowledgeable, ongoing management at each step within the complex process. Students in this course explore the technical aspects of information systems management, including key issues of systems design and development as well as system support and maintenance. Focusing on the systems development life cycle (SDLC) approach, students analyze and describe necessary steps in the cycle, such as identifying and selecting appropriate systems technology and data standards, creating requirements, evaluating security, and accommodating human factors in design and use. Additionally, students learn terminology, functions, and standards as well as the basics of information architecture and systems infrastructure.
  
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    NSEI 6631 - Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students learn key approaches to the integration of enterprise-wide information to support business strategy and decision-making. They cover issues in data acquisition, storage, retrieval, and analysis. Topics include data warehouses; data marts; dashboards, key performance indicators, and scorecards; online analytical processing; and data visualization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6645 - Representation of Health Information♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students examine the need for consistency in health data standards and the importance of appropriate identification and selection of these standards. The structure of medical and health information through effective knowledge representation is presented, with an emphasis on the practice of knowledge management and the incorporation of evidence-based best practices. The diverse terminology, ontology, acronyms, coding, and classification systems used in health information technology, both by information systems users and by those who design and maintain those systems, are examined. Topics include data communication, the development and advancement of e-health technologies, and future federal initiatives to digitalize health data.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6661 - Business Analytics and Data Mining♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students learn and apply techniques for inference and discovery in large data sets. Topics include statistical inference, exploratory data analysis, data mining, text mining, and machine learning for predictive modeling.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6712 - Business Architecture and Process♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course examine the structure and operations of organizations from an information-processing point of view and develop skills in analyzing, designing, and improving operations. Topics include fundamental business structures; business process design, management, and optimization; decision support and automation; and enterprise resource planning and integration.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6713 - Business Strategy for Competitive Advantage♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The focus of this course is on the development and implementation of business strategies that enable competitive advantage, with an emphasis on understanding the current environment in which the organization competes and forecasting how that environment may change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6720 - Integrated Project Process Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course focus on the iterative nature of the project management processes, demonstrating how an integrated approach to project management increases the likelihood of project success. Students learn how the project management processes and process groups intersect. Students develop a comprehensive project plan that comprises the project management knowledge areas with specific emphasis on scope, time, cost, and quality management. Students also learn the paramount importance of project communications management as a tool for managing stakeholder expectations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6721 - Organizational and Social Dimensions of Information Systems♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students place their technical and process work in a human context, focusing on issues and effects in a broader domain. Topics include organizational behavior and change; intellectual property issues; ethics, professionalism, and social impact; and privacy and security.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6730 - Budgeting and Management of Operations♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students explore the role of budgeting and management of operations in an organizational environment. Emphasis is placed on developing budget and operational plans based on an organization’s financial data, project plans, and goals. The interdisciplinary knowledge and skills associated with achieving project goal attainment, positive operating cash flow, risk mitigation strategy, and operational alignment are developed in this course. Students are also introduced to planning considerations associated with global operations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6740 - Enterprise and Project Risk Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students learn how to plan, analyze, respond to, and control qualitative and quantitative risk in projects. Students examine the internal risks associated with managing projects and the external risks associated with customer behavior, the supply chain, transportation and distribution channels, and acts of nature within the framework of the organization’s overall risk strategy. Students learn about strategies for working with project stakeholders to identify and respond to risk within defined ethical and legal standards.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6781 - Information Security Governance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course cover information security issues in an organizational context, recognizing the increasing stakes in keeping systems safe from tampering and disclosure. Topics include management structures and processes for enterprise information security; information security in the supply chain; legal, regulatory, audit, and policy issues; risk management; and the business case for information security.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6841 - Information Security Challenges and Solutions♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students survey some of the fundamental issues and techniques in information systems security, preparing students to analyze and solve problems. Topics include issues of authentication and authorization, common vulnerabilities and attacks, prevention and detection, information security best practices, and information security and privacy technologies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NUNP 6531 - Advanced Practice Care of Adults Across the Lifespan


    (5 cr.) In this course, students learn how nurse practitioners master the art and science of clinical decision making among adult populations. Students focus on the diagnosis and management of primary healthcare needs and problems of the adult and elderly adult. They engage in a variety of course assignments that focus on physical and behavioral disease processes central to diagnosing illnesses as well as planning, implementing, and evaluating therapeutic treatment programs for acute illnesses commonly encountered in a primary healthcare setting. Students gain confidence in clinical experiences in a primary healthcare setting where they learn to plan, implement, and evaluate therapeutic regimens for adult patients with common acute and chronic illnesses.   (Prerequisite(s): NURS 6501, NURS 6512, and NURS 6521.) Note: This course requires a minimum of 160 practicum hours.
  
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    NUNP 6540 - Advanced Practice Care of Frail Elders


    (5 cr.) The complex assessment and care of patients in the hospital setting will require advanced practice nurses to obtain the specialized skills necessary to provide quality care for patients in these acute care settings. This course is designed to prepare students to provide care for acutely ill and critically ill patients. Students in this course will be introduced to the role of the advanced practice nurse, while gaining confidence in caring for acutely ill patients. Through course assignments and clinical practice in the acute care setting, they will plan, implement, and evaluate care for critically ill patients. Students will also increase their knowledge of pharmacologic management of hospitalized patients, while applying knowledge gained through previous coursework.

      Note: This course requires a minimum of 160 practicum hours.

  
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    NUNP 6541 - Primary Care of Adolescents and Children


    (5 cr.) How can a nurse practitioner master the art and science of clinical decision making among pediatric populations? In this course, students have the opportunity to answer this question as they examine content related to the primary healthcare of children and adolescents while focusing on common health problems. Students learn how to identify, diagnose, and manage these problems. They also gain confidence in clinical experience in a primary healthcare setting that provides opportunities to assess, diagnose, plan, implement, and evaluate therapeutic regimens for acute and chronic illnesses commonly found in children and adolescents. (Prerequisite(s): NURS 6501, NURS 6512, NURS 6521, and NURS 6531 or NUNP 6531.) Note: This course requires a minimum of 160 practicum hours.
  
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    NUNP 6550 - Advanced Practice Care of Adults in Acute Care Settings I


    (5 cr.) The complex assessment and care of patients in the hospital setting will require advanced practice nurses to obtain the specialized skills necessary to provide quality care for patients in these acute care settings. This course is designed to prepare students to provide care for acutely ill and critically ill patients. Students in this course will be introduced to the role of the advanced practice nurse, while gaining confidence in caring for acutely ill patients. Through course assignments and clinical practice in the acute care setting they will plan, implement and evaluate care for critically ill patients. Students will also increase their knowledge of pharmacologic management of hospitalized patients, while applying knowledge gained through previous coursework.

      Note: This course requires a minimum of 160 practicum hours.

  
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    NUNP 6551 - Primary Care of Women


    (5 cr.) How can a nurse practitioner decide what is important to focus on in a 15- to 30-minute appointment with a woman seeking primary care? Students in this course gain opportunities to teach and promote wellness in women through the process of screening for commonly seen gynecological disorders. Students learn to analyze data to interpret results for the benefit of women seeking assistance with planning healthy lifestyle behaviors. They also gain clinical experience in a primary healthcare setting that provides opportunities to increase competence in diagnosis, treatment, referrals, or follow-up care with a concentration on improving patient outcomes. (Prerequisite(s): NURS 6501, NURS 6512, NURS 6521, NURS 6531 or NUNP 6531, and either NURS 6540 or NURS 6541.) Note: This course requires a minimum of 160 practicum hours.
  
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    NUNP 6560 - Advanced Practice Care of Adults in Acute Care Settings II


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will advance their clinical competence in the care of patients in acute care settings by building on knowledge and skills gained in the NURS 6550. Through clinical practice, students will build confidence as they begin the transition from student to advanced practice nurse. Classroom activities and case studies will enable students to explore the complex healthcare system, including multiple governmental, social, and personal resources available to acutely ill adults across the age continuum. With clinical experiences in hospital settings students will be provided with the continued opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate management plans for adults and older adults with complex acute, critical, and chronic illness. The application of knowledge in the management of patients and the collaboration between the advanced practice nurse and the patient, family, and interprofessional healthcare team are emphasized.

      Note: This course requires a minimum of 160 practicum hours.

  
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    NUNP 6565 - Synthesis in Advanced Nursing Practice Care of Patients in Primary Care Settings


    (5 cr.) Students in this synthesis course will focus on clinical competence in primary care settings by building on knowledge and skills gained in previous courses. Through clinical practice, students will build confidence as they begin the transition from the role of registered nurse to that of advanced practice nurse. Classroom activities and case studies will enable students to explore the salient nurse practitioner practice issues involved in the delivery of safe, competent, high-quality, cost-effective care of patients in a dynamic healthcare system. Clinical experiences in primary care settings will provide students with the continued opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate management plans for patients with complex health conditions. The application of knowledge in the management of clients and collaboration among the advanced practice nurse and the client, family, and interprofessional healthcare team are emphasized. (Prerequisite(s): NURS 6501, NURS 6512, NURS 6521, NURS 6531 or NUNP 6531, NURS 6541 or NUNP 6541, and NURS 6551 or NUNP 6551.) Note: This course requires a minimum of 160 practicum hours.
  
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    NUNP 6630 - Psychopharmacologic Approaches to Treatment of Psychopathology


    (5 cr.) At times, psychotherapy is not enough to alleviate the emotional difficulties that some patients face. To that end, psychopharmacologic approaches are needed. Psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners (PMHNPs) must have a strong basis in psychopharmacology, extending from a prior education in pharmacology, to make appropriate medication choices for their patients. Learners in this course consider psychopharmacologic approaches to major mental health disorders including, but not limited to, major depressive disorders, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders as well as psychotic disorders. Learners explore key considerations associated with medication selection, monitoring of efficacy, and long-term management.
  
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    NUNP 6640 - Psychotherapy With Individuals


    (5 cr.) Psychotherapy involves giving more than “good advice.” For the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner (PMHNP) to be effective, deliberate approaches to therapy must be used that are consistent with evidence-based practices. Learners in this course are introduced to a variety of therapeutic techniques that can be used during psychotherapy sessions with individuals across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based applications of various therapeutic approaches for a wide range of psychiatric issues. The focus of the practicum experience is on psychotherapeutic approaches with individuals. Note: This course requires a minimum of 160 practicum hours.
  
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    NUNP 6650 - Psychotherapy With Groups and Families


    (5 cr.) Managed care has ushered in a new era of effective mental health services. To that end, the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner (PMHNP) must know how to optimize not only his or her time but also the treatment benefits associated with family and group therapy. In this course, the emphasis is on the concept of treatment of the family unit. Group dynamics and benefits associated with group therapy are also emphasized along with introducing the learner to techniques that can be used in group therapy settings. The focus of the practicum experience is on the treatment of the family unit as well as the provision of group psychotherapy. Note: This course requires a minimum of 160 practicum hours.
  
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    NUNP 6660 - Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Role I: Child and Adolescent


    (5 cr.) Working from a lifespan approach, this first practicum course for the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner (PMHNP) is an introduction for the learner to child and adolescent psychiatry. Emphasis is placed on the psychiatric and/or mental health disorders that begin in childhood and adolescence and topics include psychiatric assessment, differential diagnosis, application of diagnostic criteria, appropriate diagnostic testing, and diagnostic formulation. The learner will select a combination of psychotherapeutic modalities coupled with psychopharmacologic approaches to treat common psychiatric mental health conditions of children and adolescents. The focus of the practicum experience is on application of didactic concepts to actual patient care situations. Note: This course requires a minimum of 160 practicum hours.
  
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    NUNP 6670 - Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Role II: Adult and Older Adult


    (5 cr.) Continuing from the lifespan approach, the focus for the learner in this final course for the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner (PMHNP) program is on psychiatric mental health issues that occur in adults and older adults. Selection of assessment approaches for the adult and older adult as well as differential diagnosis, application of diagnostic criteria, appropriate diagnostic testing, and diagnostic case formulation will be undertaken. The learner will use both psychotherapeutic approaches coupled with psychopharmacologic approaches to treat common psychiatric mental health conditions of adults and older adults. Through these practicum experiences, learners will focus on the application of didactic concepts to patient care situations. Note: This course requires a minimum of 160 practicum hours.
  
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    NURS 3000 - Issues and Trends in Nursing♦


    (5 cr.) Improvement of healthcare delivery in the United States relies on many factors, such as effective nurse advocacy through politics, policy, and professional associations. But advocacy depends on the ability to fully understand current issues, systems, policies, and related contexts. In this course, students engage in a systems-level analysis of the implications of healthcare policy on issues of access, equity, affordability, and social justice in healthcare delivery.

    Through policy analysis assignments students apply legislative, regulatory, and financial processes relevant to their organization and provision of healthcare services in their community. Students consider the impact of these processes on quality and safety in nursing practice environment and disparities in the healthcare system. Through this course, students gain the knowledge and skills needed to advocate for vulnerable populations and promote positive social change.  Note: BSN students must take this course first in their sequence.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    NURS 3001 - Issues and Trends in Nursing


    (5 cr.) Improvement of healthcare delivery in the United States relies on many factors, such as effective nurse advocacy through politics, policy, and professional associations. But advocacy depends on the ability to fully understand current issues, systems, policies, and related contexts. In this course, students engage in a systems-level analysis of the implications of healthcare policy on issues of access, equity, affordability, and social justice in healthcare delivery.

    Through policy analysis assignments, students apply legislative, regulatory, and financial processes relevant to their organization and provision of healthcare services in their community. Students consider the impact of these processes on quality and safety in nursing practice environment and disparities in the healthcare system. Through this course, students gain the knowledge and skills needed to advocate for vulnerable populations and promote positive social change. Note: RN-MSN students must take this course first in their sequence Note: RN-MSN students must take this course first in their sequence.

  
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    NURS 3005 - The Context of Healthcare Delivery♦


    (5 cr.) Improvement of healthcare delivery in the United States relies on many factors, such as effective nurse advocacy through politics, policy, and professional associations. But advocacy depends on the ability to fully understand current issues, systems, policies, and related contexts. In this course, students engage in a systems-level analysis of the implications of healthcare policy on issues of access, equity, affordability, and social justice in healthcare delivery. Through policy analysis assignments students apply legislative, regulatory, and financial processes relevant to their organization and provision of healthcare services in their community. Students consider the impact of these processes on quality and safety in nursing practice environment and disparities in the healthcare system. Through this course, students gain the knowledge and skills needed to advocate for vulnerable populations and promote positive social change.  (Prerequisite(s): NURS 3000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 3010 - Information Management in Nursing and Healthcare♦


    (5 cr.) Professionals often use information technology to support clinical and managerial decision making in the field of healthcare. Students in this course explore these information technology applications through a variety of written and practical assignments. They focus on information technology that supports the delivery of services, including the collection, storage, retrieval, and communication of data; information systems safeguards; ethical and legal issues; and information management to promote patient safety and quality of care. Students also share examples of information literacy and discuss why it is important to the practice of nursing. Additionally, students identify basic hardware and software components and explore fundamental software applications, including spreadsheets and healthcare databases.
      (Prerequisite(s): NURS 3005.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 3015 - Pathopharmacology♦


    (5 cr.) A major responsibility of nurses is to help ensure safe administration of medication by having an in-depth understanding of drug categories and how each type interacts with other drugs in the body. In this course, students explore foundational pharmacologic principles and topics, including key drug actions and interactions, effects of various categories of drugs, and pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Through case studies and other functional applications, students learn about the pathophysiology related to major health problems across the lifespan and the pharmacologic management of those problems. They examine the cellular aspects of disease, pathophysiological signs and symptoms, and dynamics of body defenses. Students also consider pathopharmacological implications in the practice of nursing.
      (Prerequisite(s): NURS 3010.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 3020 - Health Assessment♦


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students have the opportunity to gain the knowledge and skills required to collect data related to assessment of individual health status. They learn the physical examination skills of inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation used to assess major body systems across the lifespan. They gain practical experience using interviewing techniques and communication skills for taking patient histories, and they discuss the psychological, social, and cultural aspects of clinical assessment. Additionally, students consider the integration of data to guide the nursing process and ethical guidelines. Engaging in interactive simulations, students apply knowledge and demonstrate understanding of conducting health assessments.
      (Prerequisite(s): NURS 3100 or 3000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 3100 - Issues and Trends in Nursing♦


    (6 cr.) In this course, students are provided with an overview of the evolution of nursing as a profession and introduced to their new role as scholar-practitioners. They examine changes in the U.S. healthcare delivery system, the importance of information technology, and measures that promote quality, safety, and better health outcomes in patient care. Students consider major issues and trends in contemporary nursing and healthcare practice, including the influence of socioeconomic, ethical, legal, and political variables and professional values. Through weekly discussions and assignments, students explore and share personal experiences in the context of contemporary nursing issues, such as the nursing shortage, workforce challenges, healthcare financing, professional organizations, and diversity. They are challenged to examine and propose solutions to these nursing issues in addition to those in their workplace. Students reflect on Walden’s mission of social change and its impact on their future nursing practice as a scholar-practitioner. Because this is the first nursing course within the RN/BSN program, students learn to use Walden University’s resources to enhance writing skills. Students are also introduced to the tools essential to success at Walden.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 3101 - Issues and Trends in Nursing♦


    (6 cr.) In this course, students are provided with an overview of the evolution of nursing as a profession and introduced to their new role as scholar-practitioners. They examine changes in the U.S. healthcare delivery system, the importance of information technology, and measures that promote quality, safety, and better health outcomes in patient care. Students consider major issues and trends in contemporary nursing and healthcare practice, including the influence of socioeconomic, ethical, legal, and political variables and professional values. Through weekly discussions and assignments, students explore and share personal experiences in the context of contemporary nursing issues, such as the nursing shortage, workforce challenges, healthcare financing, professional organizations, and diversity. They are challenged to examine and propose solutions to these nursing issues in addition to those in their workplace. Students reflect on Walden’s mission of social change and its impact on their future nursing practice as a scholar-practitioner. Because this is the first nursing course within the RN/BSN program, students learn to use Walden University’s resources to enhance writing skills. Students are also introduced to the tools essential to success at Walden.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 3110 - Information Management and Patient Care Technology♦


    (5 cr.) Nursing informatics supports nursing practice in education, administration, research, patient safety, quality outcomes, core standards, and nurse-sensitive outcomes. In this course, students emphasize the meaningful use of information technology in the delivery of nursing services, including the collection, storage, retrieval, and communication of data; information system safeguards; ethical and legal issues; and information management to promote patient safety and quality of care.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 3150 - Foundations of Nursing Research♦


    (5 cr.) Nurses must understand research in order to effectively participate in the provision of evidence-based nursing care. Students in this course learn the foundational elements of the research process, refine information literacy skills, and develop an understanding of ethical research. Students investigate each step of the research process and complete a critical examination of quantitative and qualitative research relevant to their nursing practice. Students are given the tools to analyze nurse-sensitive indicators and clinical practice guidelines.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 3151 - Foundations of Nursing Research


    (5 cr.) Nurses must understand research in order to effectively participate in the provision of evidence-based nursing care. Students in this course learn the foundational elements of the research process, refine information-literacy skills, and develop an understanding of ethical research. Students investigate each step of the research process and complete a critical examination of quantitative and qualitative research relevant to their nursing practice. Students are given the tools to analyze nurse-sensitive indicators and clinical practice guidelines.
  
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    NURS 4000 - Research and Scholarship for Evidence-Based Practice♦


    (5 cr.) Nurses engage in research to stay up-to-date on the changing scope of healthcare as well as new methods and best practices in providing quality care to patients. Students in this course learn the basic elements of the research process. They also learn how scholar-practitioners use these elements to discover new knowledge and models for applying evidence to inform clinical decisions and improve nursing practice and patient outcomes. They consider the ethical conduct of research and scholarly work as well as the nurse’s role in the collection, documentation, analysis, interpretation, dissemination, and utilization of research data. Students apply course concepts as they research a current problem in nursing practice, propose solutions for change, and synthesize literature that supports their proposed changes.
      (Prerequisite(s): NURS 3020.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 4001 - Research and Scholarship for Evidence-Based Practice


    (5 cr.) Nurses engage in research to stay up-to-date on the changing scope of healthcare as well as new methods and best practices in providing quality care to patients. Students in this course learn the basic elements of the research process. They also learn how scholar-practitioners use these elements to discover new knowledge and models for applying evidence to inform clinical decisions and improve nursing practice and patient outcomes. They consider the ethical conduct of research and scholarly work as well as the nurse’s role in the collection, documentation, analysis, interpretation, dissemination, and utilization of research data. Students apply course concepts as they research a current problem in nursing practice, propose solutions for change, and synthesize literature that supports their proposed changes.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    NURS 4005 - Topics in Clinical Nursing♦


    (5 cr.) Nurses play a critical role in the care of patients with major acute and chronic health problems. They are accountable for clinical outcomes and for promoting quality and safety in patient care through the use of information technology. Students in this course will examine their role in the evaluation of nurse-sensitive indicators, standards, and core measures to develop an evidence-based practice approach to care. Students explore the relationship of genetics and genomics to health and illness as well as infection-control issues. The nurse’s role in palliative and end-of-life care and complementary and alternative therapies is also explored. Students apply course concepts and demonstrate an understanding of nursing interventions and agency policy to improve nursing practice. (Prerequisite(s): NURS 4000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 4006 - Topics in Clinical Nursing


    (5 cr.) Nurses play a critical role in the care of patients with major acute and chronic health problems. They are accountable for clinical outcomes and for promoting quality and safety in patient care through the use of information technology. Students in this course will examine their role in the evaluation of nurse-sensitive indicators, standards, and core measures to develop an evidence-based practice approach to care. Students explore the relationship of genetics and genomics to health and illness as well as infection-control issues. The nurse’s role in palliative and end-of-life care and complementary and alternative therapies is also explored. Students apply course concepts and demonstrate an understanding of nursing interventions and agency policy to improve nursing practice.
  
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    NURS 4010 - Family, Community, and Population-Based Care


    (7 cr.) The focus of this course is on application of theories and concepts from nursing and public health sciences in assessing health status and preventing and controlling disease in families, aggregates, and communities as clients. The use of epidemiological and community assessment techniques to examine populations at risk, health promotion, and levels of disease prevention with special emphasis on ethnically diverse and vulnerable populations are incorporated. Major local, state, and national health issues are considered, including mental health and substance abuse and related co-morbidities, re-emergence of infectious and communicable diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, bioterrorism, emergency preparedness, and disaster response.  Practice experiences provide relevant learning opportunities in population-based health promotion in your own community. (Prerequisite(s): NURS 4005.)
  
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    NURS 4011 - Family, Community, and Population-Based Care


    (7 cr.) The focus of this course is on application of theories and concepts from nursing and public health sciences in assessing health status and preventing and controlling disease in families, aggregates, and communities as clients. The use of epidemiological and community assessment techniques to examine populations at risk, health promotion, and levels of disease prevention with special emphasis on ethnically diverse and vulnerable populations are incorporated. Major local, state, and national health issues are considered, including mental health and substance abuse and related co-morbidities, re-emergence of infectious and communicable diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, bioterrorism, emergency preparedness, and disaster response.  Practice experiences provide relevant learning opportunities in population-based health promotion in your own community.
  
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    NURS 4015 - Public and Global Health♦


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students widen their perspectives of promoting health and preventing disease as they examine health issues that transcend national borders, class, race, ethnicity, and culture. Students discuss the role of the nurse in preserving and promoting health among diverse populations as well as their role in illness prevention and health promotion, protection, and maintenance of targeted populations. They also explore principles of epidemiology and the influencing sociopolitical factors that impact health and well-being of humankind. Students engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of content on topical issues, such as infant mortality rates in the United States and abroad, infectious or communicable disease, implications of global climate change on health, among others. Finally, students consider and reflect on the nurse’s role as a leader in transforming the future of the world’s health.
      (Prerequisite(s): NURS 4010.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 4020 - Leadership Competencies in Nursing and Healthcare


    (7 cr.) This focus of this course is on building the knowledge and key competencies essential to successful leadership and influence in an evolving healthcare delivery system. Students in this course emphasize increasing self-awareness in the context of organizational challenges and individual motivation; distinguishing leadership from management, team building, strengthening interpersonal communication, and interdisciplinary effectiveness; shaping a preferred future for nursing; translating strategic vision into action; as well as developing skills in implementing and managing organizational change. Specific learning opportunities include case studies, a battery of self-assessments and 360-degree feedback instruments, and exposure to top-level leaders in nursing and healthcare. Students’ practice experiences provide relevant learning opportunities in quality improvement and leadership development in students’ own practice environment. (Prerequisite(s): NURS 4015.)
  
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    NURS 4021 - Leadership Competencies in Nursing and Healthcare


    (7 cr.) This focus of this course is on building the knowledge and key competencies essential to successful leadership and influence in an evolving healthcare delivery system. Students in this course emphasize increasing self-awareness in the context of organizational challenges and individual motivation; distinguishing leadership from management, team building, strengthening interpersonal communication, and interdisciplinary effectiveness; shaping a preferred future for nursing; translating strategic vision into action; as well as developing skills in implementing and managing organizational change. Specific learning opportunities include case studies, a battery of self-assessments and 360-degree feedback instruments, and exposure to top-level leaders in nursing and healthcare. Students’ practice experiences provide relevant learning opportunities in quality improvement and leadership development in their own practice environment.
  
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    NURS 4100 - Quality and Safety Through Evidence-Based Practice


    (5 cr.) Nurses are expected to engage in evidence-based practice. As scholar-practitioners, students in this course learn to use evidence in clinical decision making to promote a safe healthcare environment. Students apply course concepts as they identify a current problem in nursing practice and synthesize and evaluate literature, as well as identify changes in practice. Students analyze clinical guidelines and nurse-sensitive indicators in establishing quality and safety initiatives. Students utilize quality improvement models in promoting changes in practice.
  
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    NURS 4105 - Advocacy Through Healthcare Policy♦


    (5 cr.) Effective nurse advocacy is essential to the improvement of health in the United States. In this course, students learn about the power of advocacy through politics, policy, and professional associations. Students gain an understanding of how current issues, systems, policies, and related contexts impact advocacy. They engage in a system-level analysis of healthcare policy issues of access, equity, affordability, and social justice. Students perform healthcare policy analysis by applying research as well as legislative, regulatory, and financial processes in order to positively impact the quality and safety of nursing practice in the healthcare system. Through this course, students gain the knowledge and skills needed to be empowered to advocate for vulnerable populations and promote social justice and positive social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 4115 - Role of the Nurse—Public and Global Health


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will widen their perspectives related to promoting health and preventing disease as they examine health issues that transcend national borders, class, race, ethnicity, and culture. Students evaluate the role of the nurse in preserving and promoting health among diverse populations as well as the role in illness prevention and health promotion, protection, and maintenance of targeted populations. They also explore principles of epidemiology and the influencing sociopolitical factors that impact health and well-being of humankind. Students engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of content on topical issues, such as infant mortality rates in the United States and abroad, infectious or communicable disease, and implications of global climate change on health, among others. Finally, students consider and reflect on the nurse’s role as a leader in promoting positive social change in transforming the health of populations in the world.
  
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    NURS 4210 - Role of the Nurse Leader in Population Health


    (5 cr.) Students in this course focus on application of theories and concepts from nursing and public health sciences in assessing health status, preventing and controlling disease, and promoting a healthier population by working with families, aggregates, communities, and healthcare systems. Students apply system thinking by using epidemiological and community assessment techniques to examine  at-risk populations, health promotion, and levels of prevention with special emphasis on ethnically diverse and vulnerable populations. Major local, state, and national health issues are considered, including communicable disease, chronic illness, environmental and occupational health, bioterrorism, emergency and disaster preparedness and response. Practice experiences provide learning experiences in population-based health promotion by collaborating with interdisciplinary public health partners in a local community.(1 credit of practicum equates to 72 clock hours of student practice experience hours.)
  
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    NURS 4211 - Role of the Nurse Leader in Population Health


    (5 cr.) Students in this course focus on application of theories and concepts from nursing and public health sciences in assessing health status; preventing and controlling disease; and promoting a healthier population by working with families, aggregates, communities, and healthcare systems. Students apply systems thinking by using epidemiological and community assessment techniques to examine populations at risk, health promotion, and levels of prevention with special emphasis on ethnically diverse and vulnerable populations. Major local, state, and national health issues are considered, including communicable disease, chronic illness, environmental and occupational health, bioterrorism, emergency and disaster preparedness, and response. Practice experiences provide learning experiences in population-based health promotion by collaborating with interdisciplinary public health partners in a local community. (1 credit of practicum equates to 72 clock hours of student practice experience hours.)
  
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    NURS 4220 - Leadership Competencies in Nursing and Healthcare


    (5 cr.) Contemporary nurses who wish to influence the current healthcare system must equip themselves with the knowledge and competencies to lead in times of pressure, constant change, and innovation. Quality Improvement science provides a rich set of tools and techniques and has been adopted by most nursing leaders. Nurses are expected to lead with quality improvement knowledge and competencies. Students in this course work toward gaining these skills by focusing on real practice problems and developing evidence-based solutions. They also learn skills and techniques in team building; strengthening interpersonal, communication, and interdisciplinary collaboration; promoting meaningful use of data to gauge improvements and problem solving; translating day to day practice problems to long term strategy for organizational growth; and identify strategies to manage organizational change. Students apply course concepts through case studies. Through this practice experience, students gain professional knowledge from nursing leaders in practice the application of quality improvement science. (1 credit of practicum equates to 72 clock hours of student practice experience hours.)
  
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    NURS 4221 - Leadership Competencies in Nursing and Healthcare


    (5 cr.) Contemporary nurses who wish to influence the current healthcare system must equip themselves with the knowledge and competencies to lead in times of pressure, constant change, and innovation. Quality Improvement science provides a rich set of tools and techniques and has been adopted by most nursing leaders. Nurses are expected to lead with quality improvement knowledge and competencies. Students in this course work toward gaining these skills by focusing on real practice problems and developing evidence-based solutions. They also learn skills and techniques in team building; strengthening interpersonal, communication, and interdisciplinary collaboration; promoting meaningful use of data to gauge improvements and problem solving; translating day to day practice problems to long term strategy for organizational growth; and identify strategies to manage organizational change. Students apply course concepts through case studies. Through this practice experience, students gain professional knowledge from nursing leaders in practice the application of quality improvement science. (1 credit of practicum equates to 72 clock hours of student practice experience hours.)
  
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    NURS 5050 - Policy and Advocacy for Improving Population Health


    (5 cr.) In today’s rapidly changing healthcare delivery system, decisions made within the political arena impact the future of healthcare systems and the populations that healthcare professionals serve. In this course, students examine healthcare reform and its impact on healthcare delivery, population health, and nursing practice. They evaluate policies that influence the structure, financing, and quality in healthcare and examine healthcare delivery from a global perspective. Through discussions, case studies, and other activities, students examine the effects of legal and regulatory processes on nursing practice, healthcare delivery, and population health outcomes. Students also examine ways to advocate for promotion and preservation of population health and gain the necessary skills to influence policy and support changes effected by the passing of new healthcare reform legislation.
  
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    NURS 5051 - Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology


    (5 cr.) Evidence-based practice is an essential nurse competency that supports the provision of effective and efficient care. Through team projects and individual applications, students learn how to organize, evaluate, and use health information and knowledge to critically appraise and use information technology to enhance evidence-based practice. Students also apply evidence-based practice to improve advanced nursing practice and healthcare outcomes across organization, public-health, and consumer-health settings.
  
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    NURS 5052 - Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice


    (5 cr.) Nurses base practice on sound and tested evidence to ensure the safety, high quality, and cost-effectiveness of patient care. In this course, students have the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the development and relationship of nursing theory, research, and practice. Through a variety of online activities and coursework, students explore the role of nursing theory in both research and practice. They examine research literature to differentiate and critique various research designs, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method models; appraise statistical data; and analyze evidence. Acquired knowledge helps students critically evaluate research to make decisions about use of findings to enhance practice.
  
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    NURS 5501 - Introduction to Statistics and Applied Research Methods


    (4 sem. cr.) Students in this course are provided with an introductory understanding of elementary statistics for social scientists as well as an introduction to social science research. Statistical methods include computation and analysis of frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, understanding of basic probability, and understanding of the normal curve, as well as conceptual understanding of effect sizes, probability value, and the correlation coefficient. Research methods include understanding basic language associated with research, such as the difference between theory and hypothesis, the nature of variables, and different research designs. Students learn to read research critically. Note: This course is for semester-based master’s-level students.
  
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    NURS 6001 - Foundations for Graduate Study


    (1 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students receive a foundation for the student’s academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Course assignments focus on the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the integration of professional practice with professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in nursing.  
  
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    NURS 6002 - Foundations for Graduate Study


    (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students receive a foundation for the student’s academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Course assignments focus on introducing students to resources that support success, development of graduate-level writing skills and use of APA, academic integrity, and the development of a professional development plan based on the student’s chosen specialization.
  
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    NURS 6003 - Foundations for Graduate Study


    (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students receive a foundation for the student’s academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Course assignments focus on introducing students to resources that support success, development of graduate-level writing skills and use of APA, academic integrity, and the development of a professional development plan based on the student’s chosen specialization.
  
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    NURS 6050 - Policy and Advocacy for Improving Population Health♦


    (5 cr.) In today’s rapidly changing healthcare delivery system, decisions made within the political arena impact the future of healthcare systems and the populations that healthcare professionals serve. In this course, students examine healthcare reform and its impact on healthcare delivery, population health, and nursing practice. They evaluate policies that influence the structure, financing, and quality in healthcare and examine healthcare delivery from a global perspective. Through discussions, case studies, and other activities, students examine the effects of legal and regulatory processes on nursing practice, healthcare delivery, and population health outcomes. Students also examine ways to advocate for promotion and preservation of population health and gain the necessary skills to influence policy and support changes effected by the passing of new healthcare reform legislation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 6051 - Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology♦


    (5 cr.) Evidence-based practice is an essential nurse competency that supports the provision of effective and efficient care. Through team projects and individual applications, students learn how to organize, evaluate, and use health information and knowledge to critically appraise and use information technology to enhance evidence-based practice. Students also apply evidence-based practice to improve advanced nursing practice and healthcare outcomes across organization, public-health, and consumer-health settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 6052 - Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice♦


    (5 cr.) Nurses base practice on sound and tested evidence to ensure the safety, high quality, and cost-effectiveness of patient care. Students have the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the development and relationship of nursing theory, research, and practice in this course. Through a variety of online activities and coursework, students explore the role of nursing theory in both research and practice. They examine research literature to differentiate and critique various research designs, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method models; appraise statistical data; and analyze evidence. Acquired knowledge helps students evaluate research critically to make decisions about use of findings to enhance practice.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 6053 - Interprofessional Organizational and Systems Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course prepare to exercise leadership through which they can help to ensure their organization is able to adapt and flourish in the ever-changing world of healthcare. Students explore the impact of healthcare system changes on transforming the nursing profession. They examine and discuss theories related to leadership and management and learn about empowerment strategies that assist master’s-prepared nurses to assume and succeed in leadership roles. Students engage in course assignments that focus on real-world nursing practice applications of theory.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 6200 - The Nurse Administrator: Leading and Managing for Excellence


    (4 sem. cr.) The primary goal of leaders in nursing is to achieve excellence in the delivery of patient services. In this course, students work toward gaining the knowledge and skills required to lead and manage in the nursing profession. They examine organizational, managerial, and leadership theories, and they discuss standards of practice for nursing administration. They also examine roles and responsibilities, quality improvements, strategic planning and management, regulations, and the function of information systems. Students observe practical applications in nursing administration through field experiences in practice settings. They also sharpen writing and critical-thinking skills through application-based writing assignments, such as a business plan proposal, journal entries, and a reflection from the perspective of a nurse administrator.
  
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    NURS 6201 - Leadership in Nursing and Healthcare


    (5 cr.) This course is foundational for the Leadership and Management specialty track. Students focus on theoretical and practical aspects of leadership and management functions in healthcare administration, and they discuss standards of practice for nursing administration. They explore a range of topics, including roles and responsibilities, quality improvements, strategic planning and management, regulations, accreditation, and information systems. Through this course, students learn the goals of the nurse leader, including ways to facilitate efficient, high-quality healthcare delivery to achieve excellence in patient care and services.
  
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    NURS 6210 - Healthcare Finance and Budgeting


    (4 sem. cr.) In this course, students explore applications of financial principles in developing, budgeting, and managing resources. Students analyze budgeting processes used in healthcare settings, budgeting models and information systems, nurse administrator responsibilities in finance and budgeting, and the impact of private and public policies. They also examine budget and resource decisions that contribute to the achievement of organizational and nursing service outcomes. Students engage in field experiences in which they observe individuals in practice settings who are involved in key financial activities. Additionally, students gain hands-on experience developing financial elements of a business plan for an organization, including a financial statement, revenue and volume projections, reimbursement codes and rates, among others.
  
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    NURS 6211 - Finance and Economics in Healthcare Delivery


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about the fundamentals of finance and budgeting in healthcare delivery. They apply financial principles, such as budgeting processes used in multiple healthcare settings and the nurse administrator’s responsibilities within the context of leading and managing resources. Through these applications, students explore budget development and management of operational and capital resources. They examine the influence of private and public policies and budgeting models that affect quality outcomes within the aspect of financial planning using information systems. Students also explore budget and resource decisions contributing to the achievement of organizational outcomes within the context of providing efficient and cost-effective quality care.
  
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    NURS 6220 - Human Resource Management


    (4 sem. cr.) One of the most important skills in the healthcare industry is the ability to manage the individuals who provide service and deliver care. Students in this course examine the roles and responsibilities of nurse administrators in human resource management. They explore and discuss current legal, ethical, professional, and practice policies and standards as well as the role of technology to support human resource functions. They also examine strategies that support positive organizational and nursing-service goals. Additionally, students observe human resource administrators within a healthcare organization to observe how they provide support to employees and align responsibilities to the strategic goals of the organization. Students use course concepts and knowledge gained from field experiences to complete various practical-application assignments.
  
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    NURS 6221 - Managing Human Resources


    (5 cr.) Nursing leadership is grounded firmly in managing our most important resource—human capital. In this course, students address nurse administrators’ role and responsibilities in human resource management. Students explore current legal, ethical, professional, and practice policies and standards, and they learn how to apply technology to human resource functions. Additionally, students learn strategies to support positive organizational and nursing service goals. They also have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the importance of staff satisfaction as well as creating collaborative and supportive partnerships within organizations.
  
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    NURS 6223 - Healthcare Quality Assurance and Risk Management in Healthcare Organizations


    (5 cr.) In this course students examine healthcare quality assurance and risk management and the methods that are utilized to achieve improvements in healthcare organizations. Topics include the link between patient safety and legal and regulatory compliance; the role of accreditation organization requirements in patient safety; evidence-based outcomes and standards of care; the development and archiving of reports, data, and device evidence in medical error situations; and managing patient safety compliance through credentialing of healthcare professionals.
  
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    NURS 6224 - Quality Assurance and Regulatory Compliance


    (5 cr.) Students in this course review compliance regulations resulting from federal and state laws governing healthcare in various settings. Students have the opportunity to study the essential elements of an effective compliance program and how to implement them. Topics include setting up and maintaining a compliance program, the role of the healthcare compliance officer, investigating, reporting, enforcement and discipline, and ethics in compliance management
  
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    NURS 6226 - Introduction to Healthcare Policy


    (5 cr.) Students in this course consider the evolution of the U.S. healthcare system and of health policy. Topics include current challenges in the delivery of healthcare and the future of the healthcare system. Students are introduced to perspectives for analyzing health and healthcare with a focus on vulnerable populations, mental health issues, variations in medical practice and the quality of care, and healthcare rationing and access to care. (Prerequisite(s): NURS 6050.)
  
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    NURS 6227 - Current Issues in Health Policy


    (5 cr.) This course serves as an introduction to major health policy issues and an examination of government’s role in the healthcare system. Course focuses on the role of policy analysis in the formation and implementation of national and local health policy and the policy implications of how government pays for care. The role of the legal system with respect to adverse medical outcomes, economic rights, and individual rights is discussed. Students examine proposals for health policy reform at the national and local level, including potential reforms of Medicare and Medicaid. An overview of health program analysis and evaluation will also be discussed.
  
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    NURS 6230 - Case Study: Quality Nursing in a Complex Healthcare Organization


    (4 sem. cr.) Students in this course use a case study approach to synthesize and apply knowledge to a current nursing practice issue. Through a collaborative case study project, students use a variety of administrative strategies to achieve positive patient care delivery outcomes. They develop a comprehensive plan in the context of current nursing-service challenges, analyze and explicate a case study, and provide strategic recommendations that address the issues and challenges presented in the case. Building their professional portfolio, students apply leadership and management theory and strategy to the design of their own case study created for use as a leadership development exercise. Students also review the work of their peers, share perspectives, and provide feedback.
  
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    NURS 6231 - Healthcare Systems and Quality Outcomes


    (5 cr.) The development of leadership strategies and competencies that support the healthcare organizational delivery of quality care is imperative to quality outcomes within healthcare systems. In this course, students use a systems approach to explore the organizational structures that impact healthcare quality and, ultimately, positive patient outcomes. Students learn how interdisciplinary collaboration is important to the development of quality management structures, gaining an understanding of how quality improvement is a strategic mandate. Engaging in conceptual and application-based assignments, students focus on clinical and service quality planning, control and improvement initiatives, models and tools for process improvement, and the importance and use of metrics in daily operations.
  
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    NURS 6241 - Strategic Planning in Healthcare Organizations


    (5 cr.) Nurse administrators in healthcare organizations must be aware of and integrate strategic organizational goals. Students in this course use an interdisciplinary case study approach to examine nursing administrative practice issues as they relate to the strategic planning process. Students apply leadership and management principles, concepts, and theory to strategic issues within the case study format. Through these applications, students learn to use a variety of administrative strategies within the context of supportive and collaborative interdisciplinary relationships to achieve positive patient care delivery outcomes that effect positive social change in patient communities.
  
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    NURS 6301 - Advanced Pathopharmacology


    (5 cr.) Nurse educators must have advanced knowledge of the concepts and principles of pathophysiology and drug therapy that relate to the nursing care of a variety of patient groups. In this course, students integrate concepts of pathophysiological processes and pharmacologic treatment as a foundation for advanced nursing practice. Students have the opportunity to apply the knowledge gained to specific real-world clinical cases.
  
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    NURS 6321 - Curriculum Development, Assessment, and Evaluation


    (5 cr.) The educational environment is influenced by social, economic, regulatory, and technological transformations. Students in this course learn the theoretical processes that drive curriculum development, assessment, and evaluation. They also focus on curriculum components, which include societal, professional, and educational trends that affect nursing education curricula in the current environment.
  
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    NURS 6330 - Curriculum Development, Assessment, and Evaluation


    (3 sem. cr.) A wide array of factors, including social, economic, regulatory, and technological transformations, impact the current educational environment. Therefore, nursing education curricula must be relevant and meet the health and nursing needs of society. Students in this course learn about curriculum development and the many processes that contribute to it. They explore the philosophical foundations of curriculum development; curriculum components; societal, professional, and educational trends; frameworks, competencies, and outcomes; organizational constraints; and selection of learning activities. Students also define the processes of curriculum assessment and evaluation in the context of program, course, and student outcomes. They apply course concepts and theory to the development of a syllabus or course outline. Through this course, students work toward attaining the skills required to develop curricula that address the nursing needs of society, support standards of practice, and prepare graduates for practice in diverse settings.
  
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    NURS 6331 - Teaching Learning Strategies: Integrating Technology Into Nursing Education


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore ways to use technology successfully and design effective teaching strategies to meet diverse learning needs. Students engage in producing innovative teaching approaches that use a variety of teaching methods, including adapting technology for multiples learning styles. Students write learning objectives using Bloom’s Taxonomy that meet unique needs of nontraditional, international, educationally disadvantaged, and physically challenged learners.
  
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    NURS 6340 - The Nurse Educator: Roles, Responsibilities, and Relationships


    (4 sem. cr.) The goal of nurses, in all settings, is to be effective educators who guide and facilitate learning and contribute to the educational goals of the organizations in which they work. Students in this course explore the significance of the educator role as it applies to diverse settings, and they assess associated responsibilities and relationships. They examine concepts related to being change agents and leaders, role socialization, legal and ethical expectations, and professional development. They also explore and discuss nurse educator responsibilities, such as balancing role demands, using evidence to improve teaching, promoting scholarship related to teaching, developing partnerships, and engaging in collaboration and advocacy. Using knowledge gained in previous courses as well as concepts presented in this course, students demonstrate their understanding through various application-based exercises. They also observe the role of a nurse educator in a practice setting and record their learning experiences through journal assignments.
  
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    NURS 6341 - Specialty in Clinical Nursing


    (5 cr.) In today’s complex healthcare arena there is increased patient acuity and a growing need for better-educated nurses at the bedside. Nurse educators must possess advanced clinical knowledge to teach complex clinical content effectively, including selecting a focus to advance their knowledge in a clinical specialty. Students advance their clinical knowledge in a selected specialty to prepare them to fulfill the role of the nurse educator. Note: This course requires a minimum of 72 practicum hours.
  
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    NURS 6351 - Role of the Nurse Educator


    (5 cr.) Nursing education students in this course explore the roles of the nurse educator, including providers of care, staff developers, clinical educators, and academic educators. Through the practicum experience, students translate and apply theoretical principles from their advanced clinical specialty of providing direct care to patients as well as in their practice of teaching. Students work toward solving real-world problems, with the assistance of their preceptors, in a clinical setting as well as with teaching projects in a classroom setting, patient setting, and staff-development setting. They also present the results of their project in the workplace and in the online classroom. Note: This course requires a minimum of 72 practicum hours.
  
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    NURS 6370 - Foundational Skills for Nurse Educators in Academic and Healthcare Environments


    (5 cr.) Nurse educators’ practice in academic and healthcare environments. In this course students have the opportunity to develop basic skills that are used by nurse educators in both educational settings. Students study the essentials of adult learning theories, alignment of objectives to lessons, and measurements that achieve course outcomes. They also explore skills for professional developers, clinical activities for nursing students, and patient teaching.
  
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    NURS 6380 - Advanced Pathopharmacology and Advanced Health Assessment for Nurse Educators


    (5 cr.) Nurse educators must have advanced mastery of health assessment and advanced knowledge of pathophysiology and drug therapy that relates to the nursing care of patient groups across the lifespan. Students in this course build on previous knowledge by integrating the advanced concepts of pathophysiological processes, pharmacology, and advanced health assessment skills as a foundation for advanced nursing practice that leads to positive patient care outcomes. Students apply the knowledge gained to specific real-world clinical cases.
  
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    NURS 6401 - Informatics in Nursing and Healthcare


    (5 cr.) Nursing informatics is a rapidly evolving discipline that impacts all areas of nursing practice. Students in this course establish foundational knowledge for understanding and practicing nursing informatics in healthcare settings. Students explore models and theories that support nursing informatics and examine the use of information technology in support of decisions that promote safety and quality in patient-centered care. They also differentiate concerns about information protection and system integrity. Using concepts learned in the course, students engage in assignments through which they focus on nursing practice in healthcare applications, thus acquiring necessary skills to improve the management of healthcare through informatics nursing practice.
  
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    NURS 6410 - Information and Knowledge Management


    (4 sem. cr.) Healthcare professionals must have the knowledge and skills to make data-based decisions that lead to effective practice and improved patient care. Students in this course examine database systems as a foundation for studying concepts of data modeling, techniques of data definition, and data manipulation. They explore concepts of information and knowledge management with emphasis on application to the practice setting. Students discuss a variety of topics, such as information management in practice, data modeling, maximizing database performance, and human error in decision making, among others. They also engage in an integrative, collaborative project through which they investigate a current nursing or healthcare issue, plan and build a relational database to address the issue, and assess and provide feedback on plans presented by peers.
  
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    NURS 6411 - Information and Knowledge Management


    (5 cr.) Effectively managing healthcare data is essential to the practice of nursing informatics. In this course, students examine database systems, including database design and manipulation. Students also explore concepts of information and knowledge management in the healthcare practice setting. Course assignments provide students with the opportunity to work efficiently in teams and build essential skills to execute database design. Through this course, students examine nursing’s contributions to knowledge management in healthcare organizations. Note: Microsoft Access 2010 is required for this course. Access is commonly furnished with Microsoft Office.
  
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    NURS 6412 - Information and Knowledge Management


    (5 cr.) In this course students are introduced to relational databases and techniques for extracting data and creating knowledge from healthcare data sets. Students examine tools for sampling and analyzing data, and methods for describing, summarizing, and presenting data. There is specific focus on understanding how data analysis may be used for positive social change.
  
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    NURS 6420 - Supporting Workflow in Healthcare Systems


    (4 sem. cr.) Nurse informaticians must understand the flow of nursing work to develop information systems that provide effective support and usability. In this course, students examine the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of electronic information systems in healthcare. They compare, contrast, and critique methods of systems design and devote special attention to workflow modeling. They also engage in a variety of assignments to gain an understanding of the various workflow issues that impact the role of a nurse informatician, such as observing or interviewing healthcare professionals, developing a needs assessment plan, creating a model of a problematic workflow, and redesigning the workflow using a case approach.
  
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    NURS 6421 - Supporting Workflow in Healthcare Systems


    (5 cr.) Effective knowledge and information flow is critical in the coordination of patient care. Nurses are at the center of care coordination for patients, and informatics nurses are central to the design and development of information systems that support workflow in nursing practice. Students in this course examine the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of electronic information systems in healthcare systems. They compare, contrast, and critique methods of system design. Students also focus on workflow modeling, including assessment of current state workflow and the design of future state workflow, and they examine workflow design best practices to support the implementation and optimization of electronic health records.  Note: Microsoft Visio 2010 is required for this course.
  
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    NURS 6430 - Project Management: Healthcare Information Technology


    (4 sem. cr.) The field of health informatics requires leaders who have the knowledge and skill to oversee all types of projects, from product or service conception through delivery to stakeholders; such knowledge requires an understanding of multiple core areas of management, such as scope, time, and quality management, among others. Students in this course explore the theory and practice of how to manage health information technology projects. Students learn how to plan, schedule, and control healthcare informatics projects. They consider hypothetical scenarios and professional experiences as they discuss project management specifics, such as managing risk, controlling changes in scope, and handling budget issues. Students use project management software to build a project schedule, and they engage in an integrative team project scenario, including all the major elements and challenges of a healthcare informatics project in the real world.
  
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    NURS 6431 - Evaluation Methods for Health Information Technology


    (5 cr.) Healthcare policy, including the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (2009) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (1996), mandates that electronic documentation systems are secure and effective. In this course, students explore systems security and evaluation methods. Through discussion of real-world practice that includes public health and community-based settings, students evaluate the impact of redesigned workflows to the larger system design and throughout the organization. Students create a plan for system design and system evaluation. Through team projects and individual applications, they build skills and confidence that support collaborative, interdisciplinary system design to improve the effectiveness of care. Note: Students participate in a 72-hour practicum experience.
  
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    NURS 6441 - Project Management: Healthcare Information Technology


    (5 cr.) Healthcare information technology and the implementation of electronic health records are foundational practices critical for success in project management. In this course, students learn the theory of health information technology project management and apply it to real-world experiences. Using project management software, students create a project management plan and schedule, and they control and close tasks related to a health informatics project. Through team projects and individual applications, students build skills and confidence that support the implementation of healthcare information technology to improve the quality of care and patient outcomes. Note: Microsoft Project 2010 is required for this course.
  
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    NURS 6500 - Capstone Synthesis: Practicum I


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in the practicum are provided with the opportunity to engage in a supervised experience that integrates theory and research with practice. With guidance and support from their preceptor and instructor, students apply theory to better understand a specialization role in the context of an organization, formulate and achieve individualized learning objectives, and initiate a project conceptualized in collaboration with their preceptor in agreement with the instructor. The practicum (NURS 6500 and NURS 6510) requires a minimum of 125 total hours, which students record in their time log. Students also complete a cumulative journal in which they provide evidence-based or theory-based analyses of activities, issues, or problems that occur during their experience.
  
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    NURS 6501 - Advanced Pathophysiology♦


    (5 cr.) Advanced practice nurses must be equipped with an in-depth understanding of pathophysiological disease processes across the lifespan. In this course, students focus on understanding the biophysiological processes, the deviations from these processes, and an in-depth examination of the scientific concepts related to the biology of disease processes. Advanced practice nursing students learn how normal organ systems function and how organ systems are interrelated to help the body maintain homeostasis. Through knowledge of pathophysiological disease processes, students gain the information needed to develop appropriate treatment plans for patients across the lifespan. Students explore a variety of topics, such as immunity, inflammation, cancer genetics, and cardiovascular disease. They also examine a range of disease processes, including hematologic, renal, neurologic, gastrointestinal, and reproductive disorders.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 6510 - Capstone Synthesis: Practicum II


    (3 sem. cr.) This course is a continuation of students’ practicum experience and coursework started in NURS 6500. Students bring closure to their work on real-world problems, which they developed with their preceptors earlier in their experience. They also evaluate and complete their practicum project and present it to their work site and in the online classroom. The practicum (NURS 6500 and NURS 6510) requires a minimum of 125 total hours, which students record in their time log. Students continue work on their cumulative journal, which provides evidence-based or theory-based analyses of activities, issues, or problems that occur during their experience.
  
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    NURS 6512 - Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning♦


    (5 cr.) The physical and emotional well-being of patients and families can be complex and multifaceted. Advanced practice nurses need to have the knowledge and ability to provide safe, competent, and comprehensive physical health assessments. Students in this course focus on concepts and skills to assess patients across the lifespan. They learn to use diagnostic reasoning, advanced communication, and physical assessment skills to identify changes in health patterns. Students also use a systematic approach through which they focus on the assessment of patients with acute and chronic health problems. The advanced skills of suturing, reading 12 Lead EKGs, and interpreting X-rays will be covered. Students engage in course assignments that emphasize risk assessment, diagnostic reasoning, and evidence-based assessment across the lifespan.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NURS 6521 - Advanced Pharmacology♦


    (5 cr.) A solid foundation in the concepts and principles of drug therapy across the lifespan is essential to the work of advanced practice nurses. Students in this course apply the advanced principles of pharmacology, including pharmacogenomics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics, by analysis of common drug classes prescribed by advanced practice nurses across the lifespan. Factors influencing successful therapy such as effectiveness, safety, acceptability, cost, genetic/environmental influences, complementary regimens, and patient behaviors are considered. Through this course, students prepare to examine complex decisions in the management and treatment of selected acute and chronic diseases across the lifespan through pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic agents. Advanced practice nursing students will have a more in-depth understanding of drug legislation and regulation for prescribing drugs.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
 

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