2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Oct 21, 2020  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    MMPP 6300 - Disaster Response and Recovery♦


    (5 cr.) A major concern of disaster response professionals is meeting basic and humanitarian needs of disaster-affected populations. In this course, students explore a range of issues, including evacuation, relocation, and tactical and strategic decisions in the immediate aftermath of an emergency episode. Students study important federal policies related to disaster response and recovery, including the National Response Framework (NRF), and they can gain an understanding of how local, state, and federal policies mesh in response and recovery efforts. Through their exploration, they study how recovery begins once the immediate threat of the emergency wanes and the focus shifts to restoring disaster-affected areas. As part of this course, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS208.a: State Disaster Management.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6320 - Public Policy Implications of Terrorism Legislation and Policies♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive a broad perspective on the history of the U.S. Patriot Act, similar terroristic legislation and immigration laws, and these policy implications on law enforcement, governmental entities, organizations, and individuals. Public administrators and public policy analysts who are charged with drafting and implementing public policy and enforcing and/or responding to potential terroristic threats build a basic foundation, while simultaneously upholding and protecting constitutional freedoms. Material for this course is drawn from contemporary texts, websites, case studies, and material representing international, national, and local governments and organizations. Students critically review and analyze the U.S. Patriot Act and similar terroristic legislation and policies, and they participate in online discussions about these laws and their implications on U.S. constitutional freedoms.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6321 - Terrorism: A Systemic Approach for Emergency Preparedness♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive an overview of terrorism—local, national, and international—and the need to develop a systemic approach for emergency preparedness. Topics include, but are not limited to, terrorism overview, terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyber terrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Course participants begin the development and/or analysis of a terrorism preparedness infrastructure and participate in online discussions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6322 - Critical Incident Planning and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the principles of emergency planning, selection of leaders, specialized planning (e.g., schools, tourism), mutual aid, and leadership theories. Students build a basic foundation for public administrators to develop a critical incident plan and also understand leadership theories. Course participants critically analyze case studies, identifying weaknesses and potential solutions.
  
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    MMPP 6333 - Holding Up the Mirror: Understanding Different Cultures and Increasing Global Consciousness♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course have an opportunity to explore and understand the cultural values and styles of communication, reasoning, and leadership unique to their home culture. Students apply their increased understanding to other cultures. They also identify and become familiar with the challenges U.S. nonprofits face as they work internationally or cross-culturally within the United States. (Prerequisite(s): A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly advised.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6334 - Crossing Borders: U.S. and International NGO Cultures and Environments♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students study in depth the cultures, structures, and activities of NGOs in select countries and compare their activities, organizational cultures, structures, and working environments with nonprofits in the United States. (Prerequisite(s): A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly advised.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6335 - Placing NGOs in the Global Context♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course gain knowledge and understanding about the geopolitical and economic contexts in which international, nongovernmental, and voluntary agencies function in other countries. Students analyze the historical, political, social, and cultural contexts in which NGOs work and the implications these contexts have on the work of local and international NGOs. Students identify strategies that make the international and cross-cultural efforts of NGOs successful. (Prerequisite(s): A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly advised.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6345 - Public Policy Implications of Terrorism Legislation and Policies


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive a broad perspective on the history of the U.S. Patriot Act, similar terroristic legislation and immigration laws, and the policy implications on law enforcement, governmental entities, organizations, and individuals. Public administrators and public policy analysts who are charged with drafting and implementing public policy and enforcing and/or responding to potential terroristic threats build a basic foundation, while simultaneously upholding and protecting constitutional freedoms. Material for this course is drawn from contemporary texts, websites, case studies, and material representing international, national, and local governments and organizations. Learners critically review and analyze the U.S. Patriot Act and similar terroristic legislation and policies, and they participate in online discussions about these laws and their implications on U.S. constitutional freedoms.
  
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    MMPP 6346 - Terrorism: A Systemic Approach for Emergency Preparedness


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive an overview of terrorism—local, national, and international—and the need to develop a systemic approach for emergency preparedness. Topics include, but are not limited to, terrorism overview, terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyber terrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Course participants begin the development and/or analysis of a terrorism preparedness infrastructure and participate in online discussions.
  
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    MMPP 6347 - Critical Incident Planning and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the principles of emergency planning, selection of leaders, specialized planning (e.g., schools, tourism), mutual aid, and leadership theories. Students build a basic foundation for public administrators to develop a critical incident plan and also understand leadership theories. Course participants critically analyze case studies, identifying weaknesses and potential solutions.
  
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    MMPP 6363 - Public Safety Issues♦


    (5 cr.) This is a comprehensive survey of the issues faced by public safety agencies and personnel at the local, state, and national level, including police and sheriff, emergency medical, and fire services and related organizations. Students in this course emphasize communication and coordination between public safety organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6364 - Managing Public Safety Organizations♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine how public safety leaders find solutions to major issues confronting their operating systems, both organizations and communities, through research, analysis, planning, and decision making. They adapt classic business management techniques and leadership principles to public safety operations. The concepts of “first planner” and “first responder” are introduced. Solutions and alternatives to varied situations confronting public safety managers are developed. Emphasis is on systems approaches, environmental analyses, contingency planning, implications for change, coordination, and controls.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6365 - Ethics in Preserving Public Safety♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course apply the lessons of the first two courses in the specialization—management issues and planning solutions—to specific cases of leadership and personal responsibility in the public safety field. Using primarily the case study method, students analyze leadership and ethical issues that public safety officials encounter in their work and develop effective approaches for how standards and ethics can best be instilled throughout a public safety organization. Students analyze classic cases, including the federal 9/11 Commission report, for lessons applicable to any public safety agency and situation, including intelligence, planning, operations, command, interagency coordination, communication, and technology.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6379 - Advanced Methods in Public Policy Analysis and Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) An in-depth examination of the methods and processes policy analysts use to assist policymakers in identifying problems, formulating and evaluating alternative solutions, and implementing preferred policies is provided to students in this course. Students in this course learn about cost-benefit analysis, econometric analysis, policy modeling, the role of economic and political factors in public decision-making and policy formulation, marshaling resources and advocacy, and various applications to specific public policy topics. The focus of the course is on various quantitative and qualitative techniques used by policy analysts.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6380 - Policy and Politics in American Political Institutions


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the crafts of policymaking and policy analysis in the U.S. democratic system. They cover the policy process—setting agendas, using policy analysis tools, managing the political process, implementing policy, and providing evaluations and feedback. Students develop skills in policy and economic analyses as well as in determining the political feasibility of proposed policies. Regulation as a policy choice will be discussed. Students completing this course will enhance their abilities to develop alternatives and to assess strategies proposed to achieve certain policy objectives. Policy areas of interest to students form the foundation of this course and may include communications, immigration, social, transportation, housing, labor, arts, and environmental policies.
  
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    MMPP 6381 - Program Evaluation


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive an introduction to the tools used by policymakers and policy analysts to evaluate the impact of social programs. Topics include selecting programs to evaluate, crafting program descriptions, identifying stakeholders and their interests, developing logic models, framing evaluation questions, applying utilization-focused evaluation techniques, using quantitative and qualitative tools to complete formative and summative evaluations, and providing evaluation reports and feedback to decision makers. By the end of the course, each student will develop a program-evaluation design for a social program.
  
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    MMPP 6382 - Public Policy and Finance


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover microeconomic and macroeconomic models used in policy formulation, as well as how public finance influences policy choices and implementation alternatives. Students examine tax policies and tax incentive models, budgeting, public and/or private models, market influences on policy, the impact of government expenditures on income redistribution, and economic considerations of welfare, food stamps, workers’ compensation, and Social Security. Students also examine outsourcing of public programs.
  
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    MMPP 6390 - Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course engage in collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration. Students apply a systems perspective to construct a public enterprise model of the public organization of their choice, as a way of understanding the strategic context for practical action and the stakeholder relations involved. This is an organization “mental model,” which is similar to a traditional “business model,” but which includes the three interrelated flows of money, knowledge, and influence. Emphasis in this course is on management and leading of the unknown—imagining and creating a future that works in a time of unprecedented and unpredictable change. Students apply strategic scenarios to organizational change for the public organization of special interest to them. Students also develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6391 - Transformative Change in a Shared-Power World♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course engage in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students are taught a pragmatic-action learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. The dynamics of complex adaptive systems are studied to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change are studied and applied to a positive organizational change situation of special interest to the students. Students also develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6392 - The Language of Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) In today’s complex environment, leaders engaged in shaping public policy must know how to use the emotional as well as the intellectual power of language to motivate, inspire, and competently manage their organizations. Dynamic leadership requires understanding and use of techniques that affect both conscious and unconscious influences on human behavior. Effective communication connects at many different levels. Students in this course receive both theoretical and practical information; demonstrate the necessary components for making such connections; and show why stories, symbols, and metaphors are essential elements in the language of leadership.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6400 - Public Health Leadership and Systems Thinking♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore leadership models and theories, the core principles of public health leadership, and the application of systems thinking to public health. They examine how to create strategies and solutions that efficiently utilize public health and healthcare resources. Students also discuss descriptive and prescriptive systems, focusing on the application of these processes to current public health issues and challenges at the organizational and community levels.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6405 - Ethics and Social Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. Students in this course explore ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends, and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6420 - Health Economics♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the application of economic principles to healthcare managerial decision making regarding the amount, structure, and distribution of healthcare resources and services. Because of the complexity and uncertainty of the healthcare system, as well as the scope of resources consumed by health and health-related organizations, managers must appreciate the economic implications of decisions regarding allocation of resources. Students advance their knowledge of economic principles as reflected in the population demand for health; the demand for healthcare and medical care; the supply of health organizations and practitioners; the role of insurance, moral hazard, and adverse selection; the practice of cost-shifting; the structure, competitive nature, and dynamics of markets; differing objectives of for-profit and non-profit organizations; variation in consumer access to and utilization of services; roles of uncertainty and information asymmetry; strategies for consumer cost-sharing; and the challenges healthcare organizations face in the pricing, production, allocation, and distribution of health and medical services. Special attention is devoted to understanding how health services differ in a variety of competitive markets.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6431 - Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector♦


    (5 cr.) Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in the public sector. Students in this course examine finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. Students gain an understanding of theories underlying fiscal policy, and they read and analyze budgets, financial statements, and financial reports. Other topics include the use of auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, and financial technology systems specific to government organizations. Students apply what they learn to developing budget and financial projects relevant to public organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6450 - Historical and Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course look at the evolution of crime—from lone criminals to worldwide syndicates—using the scientific rigor built into the selected readings and discussions. Among the topics examined are the philosophy of community- and problem-oriented policing, transnational crime, terrorism, and the new nexus between them. Current and future leaders will be equipped with the knowledge and depth of understanding to assess and manage the opportunities, innovations, and challenges in their profession.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6452 - Policy Analysis in the Criminal Justice System♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course review key court decisions and explore the tension between constitutionally guaranteed individual rights and crime prevention and public-safety efforts. Students also cover policy analysis and planning in the criminal justice field and gain an understanding of the policy context in which the criminal justice system functions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6453 - Leadership: Putting Theory Into Practice in Criminal Justice Administration♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the problems that currently confront the administration of the criminal justice system as well as problems predicted for the future. To prepare to lead efforts to address these challenges, students learn powerful models for strategic, critical, and reflective thinking. Students immerse themselves in discussion about the major components of effective justice administration: organizational thought and theory, leadership, human capital, policy development and implementation, and collaboration with other public safety and community organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6465 - Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination♦


    (5 cr.) In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public, private, and nonprofit organizations need to be strategic in planning and creating effective, collaborative programs and services. Students in this course explore the role and process of strategic planning with an emphasis on collaboration, cooperation, and coordination within and among organizations. Students apply these concepts to real-life situations and organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6480 - Applied Research and Evaluation Methods♦


    (5 cr.) Organizational credibility, community trust, and fundraising are increasingly dependent upon demonstration of program effectiveness and success. Students in this course are introduced to research and evaluation methods in the public and nonprofit sectors to learn ways to measure and assess a program’s effectiveness and potential success as well as to address problems or issues in the field. Students examine the strengths, limitations, and threats to validity; models, quantitative metrics, and tools used to evaluate programs and policies; and legal and ethical issues associated with research and evaluation methods. Using these parameters and other concepts presented in the course, students critically evaluate sample research, consider ways to communicate results to an intended audience, and reflect on trends and challenges that could affect future program evaluation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6540 - Management and Leadership in a Global Context


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in various types of organizations. In this course, learners engage in a collaborative study of strategic planning, management, and leadership in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. Students in this course identify, analyze, and evaluate the intricate relationships among strategic planning, management, and leaderships from an international perspective. Students connect three key institutional elements: “Thinking-Acting-and-Leading” strategically. Students apply a management systems approach as they develop, adopt, manage, and lead a strategic plan for an international public or nonprofit organization or with an international focus. Students will understand the strategic context for practical decision making for international public and nonprofit organizations, emphasizing the central role of the environment in the strategic planning process. Students are offered a hands-on approach in this course that tests their ability to make effective and timely management and leadership decisions in complex and uncertain conditions.
  
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    MMPP 6541 - Sustainable Development for Global Communities


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change; assess community needs and resources; create community visions; promote stakeholder interest and participation; analyze community problems; and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models, and they apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning.
  
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    MMPP 6542 - Transformative Change in a Global Environment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
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    MMPP 6740 - Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma


    (5 cr.) Students taking this course define natural and human-made disasters such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities and review how they impact the psychology of individuals and groups. Topics include theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with the trauma. Students focus on the importance and development of culturally appropriate service delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disaster(s).
  
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    MMPP 6741 - Psychology of Terrorism♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the history, philosophy, techniques, and countermeasures to terroristic threats to public safety. Topics include aspects of international and domestic terrorism with an emphasis on its roots viewed from the broadest possible political, sociological, and cultural perspectives; factors and catalysts attributed to the terrorism phenomena, including poverty, psychology (e.g., motivational factors, antisocial behaviors), social injustice, oppression, and religion; and impact of media and technology in aiding and countering terroristic activities.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6810 - Fundamentals of Law and Public Policy♦


    (5 cr.) Legal decisions and the law have an impact on the creation of public policy. Students in this course explore the relationship between laws and public policy and the impact that court decisions have on policy and policy leaders. Topics include legal concepts and terminology, legal jurisdictions, case law, seminal cases, and the Supreme Court’s roles and procedures. Students apply fundamental legal concepts and principles to case studies and contemporary problems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6811 - Legal Research for Policy Practitioners♦


    (5 cr.) There is a wealth of vital legal knowledge available to public policy practitioners. In this course, students will be introduced to a number of print and electronic resources available for legal research, and they will gain an understanding of how the law is used to inform the creation of public policy. Topics include navigating legal libraries, citing cases, and using research to support public policy. Students apply legal research to case studies and contemporary issues.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6812 - Contemporary Cases and Issues in the Courts♦


    (5 cr.) Major issues in the Supreme Court have an impact on public policy at the state and local levels. Students in this course examine major past and current U.S. Supreme Court decisions and explore how these decisions affect public policy. Topics include individual rights, property rights, administrative law, immigration law, and foreign policy. Students apply legal research and verdicts to case studies and current issues.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6820 - Elements of Sustainable and Livable Communities♦


    (5 cr.) Creating and maintaining livable and sustainable communities require leaders who understand and can assess the interrelated elements that make a community viable over time. Students in this course explore demographics, health, education, employment opportunities, transportation, recreation, housing, natural resources, technology, and other elements necessary to sustain a thriving community. Students define and explore these concepts through case studies and local community examples.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6821 - Tools for Sustainable Community Development♦


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders require comprehensive tools and resources to create livable and sustainable communities. Students explore topics that include demographic analysis and forecasting, citizen engagement, economic forecasting and budgeting, acquisition of alternative funding sources, GIS (geographic information system) technology, comprehensive-use planning, and other tools and resources needed to meet the challenge of creating and maintaining sustainable communities. Students use case studies and examples drawn from local communities to identify and apply appropriate strategies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6822 - Current Issues in Regional and Local Public Policy♦


    (5 cr.) Local government leaders must understand and address complex and interrelated issues including public health and safety, urban sprawl, immigration, transportation, the aging of the baby-boom generation, affordable housing, living wage jobs, and the threats to natural resources. Students in this course explore current concepts with an emphasis on creating livable and sustainable communities through cooperation, coordination, and collaboration of community stakeholders. Students use local community examples to assess critical issues and identify problem-solving strategies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6830 - Current Issues in Homeland Security♦


    (5 cr.) Since its inception, the Department of Homeland Security has profoundly impacted public policy and administration. Students in this course examine homeland security history, concepts, policies, and strategies of prevention and response. Topics include ethical issues, telecommunications, technology, threat assessment, contingency planning, and risk management. Students apply fundamental concepts and principles of homeland security to case studies and current issues.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6831 - Critical Incident Planning and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Strategic leadership is required to address the challenges and complexities of homeland security. To respond to critical incidents while and after they occur, leaders must plan tactically and understand how to obtain and mobilize resources. Students explore the roles of leaders in relation to activating or coordinating funding, personnel, jurisdictional issues, training, communication, information management, technology, and healthcare in order to create an effective response to homeland security needs. Course participants critically analyze case studies, identifying weaknesses and potential solutions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6832 - Terrorism: Legislation and Policy♦


    (5 cr.) The events of September 11, 2001, resulted in a new and intense focus on the issue of terrorism in the United States and abroad. In this course, students explore the history of terrorism; laws, regulations, and legislation related to terrorism; and the roles of the media, governmental agencies, and entities in the prevention of and response to terrorism. Students apply their knowledge to case studies and current trends related to terrorism.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6840 - Health Policy and Management♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the factors that influence and improve health outcomes of individuals and populations, with attention to the goals of Healthy People 2010 and the main components and issues of organization, financing, and delivery of health services and public health systems in the United States. Topics include management theories and processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. The policy process is addressed as well as the advocacy role of the public health professional in influencing local, state, and federal policy. The impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems is also considered.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6841 - Legal and Regulatory Aspects of Public Health♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the role of federal, state, and local government in the assurance of public health through legislation and regulation. Consideration is given to contemporary legal and regulatory issues arising in public health practice and emergencies with attention to public health security and preparedness in response to bioterrorism and disasters.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6842 - Leadership, Professionalism, and Ethics in Public Health Practice♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. Ethical choices, values, professionalism, opportunities for advocacy, and the application of principles of social justice implicit in public health decisions and practice are considered, with emphasis on a collaborative approach to working with diverse communities and constituencies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6850 - Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector♦


    (5 cr.) Nonprofit organizations serve as the foundation for many social change efforts. Students in this course explore the history, foundations, and types of nonprofit organizations and the diverse political, social, and economic contexts within which they exist. Students examine and apply marketing, public relations, and communication concepts and strategies to case studies and contemporary situations. Ethical, legal, and global lenses are applied to the study of the nonprofit sector. Students develop a concept paper guiding the development of a nonprofit organization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6851 - Board Governance and Volunteer Management♦


    (5 cr.) Volunteers are the “lifeblood” of many nonprofit organizations. These organizations rely heavily on their volunteer board of directors to govern and guide them toward their mission. The success of nonprofit organizations is largely dependent on the effective management of program volunteers and board members. Students in this course explore the volunteer management process, including volunteer recruitment, orientation, training, supervision, and evaluation, with an emphasis on creating and maintaining an effective board of directors. Students design a board development or volunteer management plan based on the concept paper they developed in the Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6852 - Resource Development♦


    (5 cr.) All nonprofit organizations require financial resources. Obtaining philanthropic financial support is essential to program delivery and stability. Students explore the concepts of philanthropy and development, identification of funding sources, donor/prospect cultivation and education, and solicitation and appreciation strategies. An emphasis is placed on creating an organizational philanthropic culture based on ethics and donor relationships. Students create a resource development plan for the organization designed in the Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6910 - Capstone Seminar♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course have with an opportunity to integrate learning from courses in the program in a capstone project, defined as an applied project with a written paper or a research paper.  Students may use the capstone to focus on governance, policy, or leadership and management in either the public or nonprofit sectors or take a cross-sector comparative perspective.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6000 - Dynamic Leadership


    (3 sem. cr.) Being an effective leader is essential in business and demands that an individual has a strong set of competencies including the ability to understand one’s self, motivate others, understand organizational culture, and manage ambiguity. In this course, students begin their personal and professional transformation by closely examining their current strengths and weaknesses, values, decision-making processes, and approaches to dealing with difficult problems. Students also explore leadership in turbulent times by examining how effective leaders think as well as how various management styles impact situations and relationships within an organization. Topics include key leadership concepts with applications to authentic situations; personal leadership and competency assessment; personal and professional development planning; and ethical values-based leadership decision making.
  
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    MMSL 6010 - Managing People and Promoting Collaboration♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Contemporary business environments are increasingly competitive, global, fast paced, and knowledge intensive. In these environments, effective use of human capital is vital to an enterprise’s success and survival. In this course, students will explore practical issues related to developing individuals and managing collaboration and will examine the skills and strategies necessary to address them effectively. Students will examine ethical and legal implications of managing a diverse workforce including issues that arise from cross-cultural differences and virtual work settings. The importance of communication as a tool to manage internal and external relationships is emphasized as it relates to the effectiveness of managing people to achieve organizational goals. Topics include planning and executing staffing strategies, developing individuals, fostering positive work environments, creating and sustaining teams, maintaining influence in the organization, managing a global workforce, managing programs for productivity improvement, and planning and managing the human side of organizational change.
  
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    MMSL 6100 - The Character of Leadership


    (3 sem. cr.) There are many challenges in the work of an ethical, vision-oriented leader at any level of organization. In this course, students examine these challenges and learn about the skills needed to navigate in turbulent, changing environments that often pose difficult choices. Students explore concepts related to level-five leadership and servant leadership, and they begin the process of self-assessment and reflection-in-action. Students are also provided with an introduction to Walden University, graduate studies at Walden, the MS in Leadership program, and all related processes and policies, including best practices of online learning and employing graduate-level standards to coursework.
  
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    MMSL 6105 - Finding Your Inner Leader♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Being an effective authentic and trustworthy leader requires considerable self-awareness based on commitment to candid self-reflection and the wisdom to recognize how they can best serve others through creating shared vision for a better future. In this course, students examine their values, experiences, skills, capabilities, preferences, and knowledge in context of their leadership aspirations. Students will examine factors that affect their ability to influence and inspire others and create plans to strengthen these leadership skills. Students will learn strategies to navigate in turbulent, changing environments that often pose difficult choices and discover how leaders rise to meet challenges and opportunities.
  
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    MMSL 6110 - Building Organizational Culture: Leaders as Architects♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Organizational leaders act as partners in shaping, and are shaped by, the organizational cultures they seek to influence. Students in this course learn to recognize the elements that make up an organization’s culture as well as ways to harness these for positive change and organizational success. They explore perspectives on how to make conceptual sense of the cultural landscape of organizations and examine the implications for leading and building effective communities at various levels of application. Students assess and discuss a variety of topics, such as tools of self-development, the reciprocal nature of leadership, and cultural components.  
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6115 - Communication for Leaders and Managers♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The ability to communicate with others influences success in both professional and personal settings. As communities and places of work become increasingly diverse, the intersections of interpersonal and intercultural communication also increase, and communicators need to be aware that the cultural diversity of their audiences should affect the way they convey information. Students in this course examine interpersonal and intercultural intersections and study the influence of cultural diversity on interpersonal communication. By examining theory, students develop an approach to practice and hone individual strategies for communicating successfully in diverse interpersonal situations. Topics include interpersonal communication theory, intercultural communication theory, individual communication competence, nonverbal channels, person perception, conflict resolution, and listening and communication barriers.
  
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    MMSL 6120 - Leading Vibrant and Diverse Teams♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective leaders at all levels of organization apply their knowledge of group dynamics to create productive groups. They produce desirable goal-oriented behaviors within their groups, maximize the impact of diversity of people and perspectives on group functioning, and create cultures of trust and justice.  Students investigate these aspects of the leadership role and how it creates vibrant, diverse communities, organizations, and groups. Students examine diversity in a myriad of contexts and explore the particular challenges of building effective teams that are fueled by diversity. Through assignments focused on personal assessments, real-world contextual frameworks, and application of theory integrated with personal experience, students sharpen their critical-thinking and writing skills while working toward becoming more effective leaders.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6125 - Initiating and Managing Change♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Today’s business environment is constantly evolving to accommodate changes in economy, leadership, new regulations, and internal reduction and growth. Organizations require leaders who know how to work through barriers to effect positive and efficient organizational change. Students in this course learn about situations that constitute and require such change. They engage in a variety of assignments through which they explore effective strategies for initiating change and anchoring change into corporate culture to achieve organizational goals as well as for managing unplanned or unwelcome change. Students explore a variety of approaches and methods to transition individuals and organizations within evolving environments. They distinguish between reactive responses and proactive responses to change and examine the implications of culture, inertia, and uncertainty. Additionally, students explore the importance of understanding motivation and effective communication in mitigating negative reactions to change and facilitating the change process itself.
  
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    MMSL 6130 - Leadership in a Global Landscape♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Leaders encounter many challenges as people from different cultures, social structures, religions, and languages participate in a globalized landscape and workforce. Students in this course examine these challenges and develop an understanding of the interrelatedness of nations in the global economy. They also explore the changing nature of international business and leadership.  Students evaluate and discuss the concepts of sustainable business strategies, international trade, foreign direct investment, and regional economic integration in relation to leadership in a global environment.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6140 - Framing and Analyzing Problems: Research Strategies for Leaders♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Leadership is a complex landscape of analysis and decision making. Students in this course work toward increasing their ability to think critically, with a long-term view, about identifying and analyzing problems and interpreting data. Through this practice, they learn to avoid common decision errors that occur because of faulty, deep-seated mental models. Students also review and discuss fundamentals of scientific research, including the application of qualitative and quantitative research methods to understand leadership phenomena for a conceptual and practical understanding of research strategies available to leaders.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6150 - Developing and Communicating Solutions: Tools and Strategies for Leaders♦


    (3 sem. cr.) An important leadership qualification is the leader’s ability to accurately and persuasively frame for their stakeholders solutions to complex problems. In this course, students learn ways to create and frame the decision-making context and to produce and present viable solutions for complex issues in volatile and uncertain environments. They analyze real-world problems and learn to identify and communicate with organizational stakeholders. Students create a plan to align stakeholder mental models with effective decision-making practices, using the tools of communication, engagement, consensus building, and strategic-decision models.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6160 - Taking the Long View: Systems Thinking and Tools for Sustainability♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The concept and reality of a system and its dependence upon all its parts drives how decisions are made in an organization. Students in this course focus on building their capacity to see things systemically to be able to recognize a system and all its parts for effective decision making. They use systems thinking tools to model single, double, and multiple-loop feedback systems, at micro and macro levels of analysis, and they practice using multiple-scenario analysis. Through practical exercises, students learn how the practice of systems thinking lays the foundation for creating sustainable outcomes. Through discussion and reflection, they consider the impact of decisions and actions. Students have the opportunity to gain skills to plan for multiple scenarios, creating highly agile responses and preventing vulnerability imposed by rapid change with no ready response on the part of leaders and organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6175 - Managing, Mediating, and Resolving Conflict♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Managers and leaders must be skilled in conflict management including the capability to mediate or resolve conflict at the interpersonal through organizational levels. Students in this course explore the challenges of managing people in times of perceived conflict and dispute, and they work toward developing skills to identify different types of conflict situations.  Students will gain the knowledge of methods and tools to prevent, manage, and break inherent conflict. Students also consider the implications of emotion and the multifaceted array of conflict-management styles—factors for which professionals must account. They engage in hands-on, practical exercises in general contingency thinking and action approaches and communication styles designed to help them resolve conflicts and move toward win-win outcomes.
  
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    MMSL 6510 - Building Organizational Capacity Through Succession Planning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Organizations need to identify strategic talent today for their future success. In this course, students explore the processes that define an organization’s future human resource needs, identify the gaps between today’s resource requirements and future needs of the organization, and develop strategies to meet these needs. Through interactive discussion and practical exercises, students learn how to develop internal talent profiles, define career management tracks, conduct internal recruiting, develop comprehensive succession planning strategies, and use information technology to support these activities.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6520 - Building Human Capital Through Training and Development♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Training and development provide an organization’s workforce the tools it needs to contribute to success. Students explore the processes of conducting a needs assessment and developing a training proposal that builds the business case for a training intervention for both individuals and groups, creating the basis for an annual training and development plan. Integrating adult and workplace learning theory into the development of training solutions, students learn how to design, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of a training solution.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6530 - Toward Sustainable Futures: Leadership in Complex, Crisis-Driven Environments♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students taking this course build upon previous core content related to framing, prioritizing, assessing risk, and identifying variables associated with complex issues in dynamic environments. They have the opportunity to develop skills and knowledge that will help them provide clarity in constraining, confusing, and complex situations so that others engage, support, and follow new plans. In the context of leadership, students assess and discuss a variety of topics, such as systems-environment, change, socio-technology systems consideration, leverage points, sustainability, and paradigm shifts. Students also engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of content for a real-world understanding of how to be successful leaders for sustainable futures in rapidly changing contexts.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6540 - Innovation and Technology♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Contemporary and successful leaders must leverage technology in every appropriate way to achieve goals in the complex global environment. In this course, students explore the role of information and information technology in organizations and learn how to identify and analyze emerging technologies, including and beyond the scope of information technology. Students focus on the importance of technology and innovation in today’s multifaceted environment as well as the ethical implications thereof. Through individual and group applications, students examine strategies to nurture innovation and cultivate technology development. They also take time to reflect on concepts presented in the course and consider how they can use this information to become the type of leader who effects change through innovative means.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6550 - Strategic Human Resource Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In today’s organization, human resource management plays an important strategic role and increasingly contributes to its competitiveness. Students will explore how a more proactive and systemic approach to human resources addresses strategic business challenges throughout the organization—market positioning, talent acquisition, innovation, product development, quality, customer service, and operating functions. Students will see how results-based performance management is tied to the organization’s strategic agenda. Students will compare different theoretical perspectives of strategic human resource management and see the value of preparing employees of the future today to create sustainable competitive advantage.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6560 - Managing Business Partner Relationships♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Human resource departments are increasingly becoming networked organizations. Students in this course build the skills needed to evaluate build-or-buy alternatives for meeting human resource needs, negotiate contracts with service providers, develop service-level agreements, and track progress of ongoing contracts. Students examine how the human resource professional can leverage systems to integrate vendor-supplied services such as training, consulting, recruiting, assessment, coaching, and information systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6570 - Leading Strategic Initiatives for Growth and New Value♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Maintaining a competitive advantage in business requires leaders who have the knowledge and skills to develop and implement growth strategies to ensure stability and promote expansion. Students in this course focus on the challenges and opportunities when leading organic growth and value innovation initiatives. Students build upon concepts ranging from skill-based strategy, organic growth, and value innovation, while evaluating the leadership challenges of developing new value and growth opportunities for organizations. They also explore and exercise various analytic strategic-thinking perspectives and tools that lend to the development and implementation of potentially successful and innovative organizational strategies in their chosen professional field.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6605 - Performance and Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Performance management is a set of practices and processes that creates career opportunities to attract appropriate resources, establishes an environment that nurtures individual productivity and development, and smoothly transitions individuals to their next position or organization. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to address these three key sets of processes. They practice writing job descriptions, selecting the right employees, developing skill-based performance standards, effecting relevant onboarding programs, and implementing educational and training programs intended to drive the success of employees and the organization as a whole. They explore how to maximize employee productivity through structured feedback, coaching, reflective performance development conversations, effective compensation models, employee recognition programs, and career development paths. Students also examine ways to improve performance management systems by integrating feedback from the exit interviews of valued employees.
  
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    MMSL 6620 - Fostering a Culture of Innovation


    (3 sem. cr.) In today’s complex and uncertain environment, innovation is important to achieving business success. In this course, students examine how to be effective creative leaders who can readily apply imagination to resolve complex problems. Additionally, students explore methods to establish a work environment conducive to creative thinking. Students will gain a set of proven methods, skills, and strategies that enable innovative breakthroughs to occur in a much more deliberate and predictable manner. Topics include an overview of the concepts of creativity, foresight, and innovation; the diversity of different creative thinking styles; the “design thinking” process for business problem solving; work environments that stimulate creativity; characteristics of leaders who exemplify creativity that often leads to innovation; and the application of creativity and innovation concepts in organization settings.
  
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    MMSL 6635 - Harnessing the Power of Data and Information


    (3 sem. cr.) Effectively using data and information can make the difference in whether the best decisions are made or problems are solved correctly. There are multiple approaches to practical managerial problem solving that are rooted in the systematic collection, analysis, and display of relevant data and information. In this course, students examine the importance of data, beginning with the process of transforming data into information, and then focusing on the best methods for presenting that information in support of sound and ethical decision making. Students evaluate common misinterpretations or errors in working with data and determine how to detect data and information presented in a deceptive manner. Students explore current paradigms in data-based decision making and problem solving. They learn how they can use these analytical-thinking practices to improve their general managerial decision-making skills.
  
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    MMSL 6645 - Improving Business Performance


    (3 sem. cr.) One of the most critical challenges in maintaining and improving organizational performance is identifying core strengths and weaknesses within the organization and across the more general value creation landscape. The focus of this course is on the challenges and opportunities for managers to create value and to increase organizational performance through the effective deployment of systems thinking and change management skills. Students in the course explore systems thinking as a process whereby problems are viewed as individual components within a larger system, and they explore how various operational and systems thinking frameworks such as the Theory of Constraints and Lean Six Sigma can be utilized to optimize organizational performance in both industrial and service settings.
  
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    MMSL 6655 - Marketing Communications, Storytelling, and Persuasion


    (3 sem. cr.) Whether one is addressing a customer, an audience, or a jury, the aim is to use the tools of persuasion to influence individuals to take action. Especially in social media, it is critically important to establish an appropriate tone, voice, and personality. Tying these strategies to the overall brand positioning is even more important. It has been found that storytelling is one of the most effective tools of persuasion. Rather than simply stating the facts, the story puts facts into a meaningful context, so that the consumer can understand and empathize with the characters in the story and, therefore, identify with the brand’s social media personality. In this course, students explore the elements of the story and the approaches used to develop content. Understanding the impact of individual channels on a strategy for integrated marketing communications and positioning allows the marketer to allocate budgets more effectively and efficiently.
  
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    MMSL 6660 - Personal Leadership: Mentoring and Coaching♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Mentoring requires an understanding and integration of many theories, including leadership, interaction, and communication, that support the development of effective leaders. Students in this course understand and apply skills of effective mentoring, such as active listening, learning, empowering, and enabling change. Students engage in practical exercises, such as using feedback to create interactive dialogue and asking questions to acquire a deeper understanding of mentoring and coaching processes. In consideration of modern and virtual environments, students explore the challenges of mentoring or coaching individuals in a virtual or team setting.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6661 - Leadership in Action: Change Management and Conflict Resolution♦


    (3 sem. cr.) One of the more difficult and large-scale challenges of leadership is effecting successful change in the face of resistance and conflict. Students in this course explore this challenge as well as the various facets of leading organizational change. They engage in writing assignments designed to help them focus their ideas and critically assess major topics, such as conflict resolution strategies aimed at the personal and organizational level. Students also consider the implications of emotion and the multifaceted array of conflict-management styles—factors for which professionals must account when making decisions regarding leadership and conflict resolution. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6665 - Creative Strategy and Execution: From Brief to Presentation


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course leverage a wide range of knowledge and skills to conceive and execute a global communications campaign that uses traditional and digital media. Grounded in concepts of integrated marketing communication, students have the opportunity to develop and review a creative or innovative brief. Students generate solutions for that brief across the phases of the creative process, present and defend solutions, and evaluate solutions using metrics. Topics include the creative process, integrated marketing communication, selecting appropriate channels, pitching and selling ideas, and evaluation metrics.
  
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    MMSL 6670 - Budgeting and Resource Allocation


    (3 sem. cr.) A key function of management is the ability to interpret financial data to make effective decisions. It often involves careful planning and forecasting that takes into account many factors, such as expenses, investments, and often, unforeseen financial obligations. Students examine the role of various accounting tools, budgeting, and resource allocation along with related processes within the organizational context and how those can be used effectively. They examine processes related to managing budgets and strategies to read and communicate effectively the often complex financial information related to organizational performance and then use these tools to make sound decisions. Students also explore and discuss the implications of resource availability as well as methods to plan for and prioritize the use of resources, while considering ethical issues related to sustainability and resource scarcity.
  
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    MMSL 6680 - Individual and Organizational Commitment to Social Responsibility♦


    (4 sem. cr.) Taking into account global concerns, such as human rights, the environment, and factors of sustainability, individuals and organizations alike have incorporated a business model with a vision of change and a mission to positively influence society. In this course, students explore multiple approaches to understanding and improving the systemic relationships and obligations that exist among individuals, organizations, and the larger set of connected communities. Through assessment of past and current corporate practices of successful organizations, students gain practical insight on effective and non-effective strategies, in addition to related ethical considerations. Through application and reflection, students consider the role they can play in implementing change and growth without doing harm through unintended byproducts and outcomes, developing the ability to practice social responsibility as part of their daily work.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6681 - Social/Environmental Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Development♦


    (4 sem. cr.) Leaders can have a major impact on the environment and the lives of others through the promotion of positive social change in private enterprise. In this course, students explore and evaluate opportunities to create value through the development of new organizations that respond in sustainable ways to the needs of the micro-level community and the world at large. Students prepare to build new organizations that solve problems within a systems context. They gain hands-on experience drafting new venture plan outlines that focus on social and environmental entrepreneurship issues. Students assess and discuss planning, operations, and decision-making approaches from a leadership perspective. They also build into their approach to planning, operations, and decision making a global awareness that begins within their local community and extends far beyond.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6700 - Introduction to Human Resource Management♦


    (4 sem. cr.) Students are provided with a comprehensive overview of human resource (HR) management in this course. Students explore the role of HR managers as strategic partners who focus on the mission and goals of an organization. Within the strategic and legal framework, they examine the remaining areas of HR management functions, including workforce planning and employment; human resource development; total rewards of compensation, benefits, and rewards; risk management of health, safety, and well-being; and employee and labor relations. Students examine the use of technology as a tool in providing HR metrics to measure outcomes. They also work toward gaining the skills that enable them to develop important employment- and HR-related policies and procedures, responsibilities inherent in HR functions, programs, and activities.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6701 - Strategic Human Resource Management


    (4 sem. cr.) In this course, students adopt a strategic view of human resource management programs in evaluating their alignment with organizational strategic goals for real-world problems. Students explore such concepts as human resource issues involved with mergers and acquisitions, global management of human resources, and high-performance systems required to achieve competitive advantage. (Prerequisite(s): MMSL 6700.)
  
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    MMSL 6730 - Strategies for Advancing Innovation and Technology♦


    (4 sem. cr.) Major fluctuations in the economy often force managers to make important, timely decisions that harness existing resources within their organization, leading to new developments and strategic advantage. In this course, students address important management challenges that are typical in today’s technology-based businesses. They learn ways to align business needs with technological solutions and identify new opportunities or applications for technology. Students have the opportunity to gain the requisite skills to manage processes that ensure technology solutions enhance an organization’s competitive position. (Prerequisite(s): MMSL 6540.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6731 - Strategies for Implementing Innovation and Technology


    (4 sem. cr.) In light of rapidly evolving technology, there are many factors involved in ensuring that businesses remain successful. Such factors involve understanding new technological capabilities and aligning them with the goals of a company and the needs of customers. Students in this course explore these factors and examine how managers make decisions to help ensure their company remains innovative and technologically adept. They examine the processes and tools involved in implementing new technologies and formulate solutions to overcome related challenges. In addition, students examine and discuss how technology solutions are affected when the context is global in scope. (Prerequisite(s): MMSL 6630.)
  
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    MMSL 6740 - Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation♦


    (4 sem. cr.) An important trend of which managers must be aware involves business organizations moving from a profit-only mentality to one in which they utilize their profits and other resources to enhance society. Students in this course explore entrepreneurial concepts and processes that apply to startup enterprises as well as those that are well-established with an innovative focus or entrepreneurial spirit. Students engage in coursework focused on market opportunity, risk management, change management, innovation, product development, financing and raising capital, intellectual property, and commercialization. They have the opportunity to apply these and related concepts to problems common in contemporary organizational contexts.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6741 - Building and Funding an Entrepreneurial Venture♦


    (4 sem. cr.) In this course, students continue to build their entrepreneurial skills and knowledge by addressing problems drawn from real-world organizations. Students analyze how the organization contributes to society (local, national, or international), how entrepreneurship and commercial activities affect the environment, and how the potential of forming “glocalities” (a combination of individuals, business organizations, and political agencies) becomes more significant in the future in terms of working in unison to better society. Students also use case studies and other practical exercises to evaluate innovative funding sources and investigate the challenges involved in maintaining growth and sustainability. (Prerequisite(s): MMSL 6640.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6750 - Foundations in Project Management♦


    (4 sem. cr.) Students are introduced to the art and science of project management as applied to different types of project situations. They learn about the tools, techniques, and methodologies used to lead a project successfully throughout the project life cycle. They analyze the role of the project manager as an integral administrator overseeing the execution, progress, and interaction of all parties involved. They explore the function of the project management office (PMO), project organizations, team building, project selection, and portfolio management. Exploring context through real-world problems, students learn how managers employ the scope of work, work definition, scheduling, risk management, control, and close out throughout the course of a project. In addition, students learn how project managers use requests for proposals (RFPs), proposals, and contracts to define a project clearly and safeguard their company. Note: There is a special technology requirement for this course, requiring the use of Microsoft Project. The software will be provided in trial form, but there is not a Mac version available in this software. Students in this course are required to use Microsoft Windows XP or Server 2003 or later. Since Mac users may experience difficulty using the software, we recommend the following: (a) Mac users should be prepared to use a PC during this course, or (b) Mac users should purchase the appropriate software or hardware to be able to replicate the Windows environment on their Mac.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMSL 6751 - Project Management Skills for Managers


    (4 sem. cr.) As organizations continue to grow in scope and size, so do their projects, requiring individuals with a unique and diverse set of management skills who are able to see a product through from conception to distribution. In this course, students delve deeper into the realm of project management to assess its impact on the business environment in a domestic and global context. Students examine the “soft” skills of project management as the keys to improving its practice. In the context of real-world problems, they assess research and engage in practical simulations to determine best practices of project management in today’s organizations. (Prerequisite(s): MMSL 6650.) Note: There is a special technology requirement for this course, requiring the use of Microsoft Project. The software will be provided in trial form, but there is not a Mac version available in this software. Students in this course are required to use Microsoft Windows XP, Server 2003, or later. Considering Mac users may experience difficulty using the software, we recommend the following: (a) Mac users should be prepared to use a PC during this course, or (b) Mac users should purchase the appropriate software or hardware to be able to replicate the Windows environment on their Mac.
  
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    MMSL 6900 - Capstone in Leadership: The Social Impact Vision and Project


    (3 sem. cr.) This course is built on the fundamental idea that individuals achieve great change in organizations and communities of all sizes by working toward growth and positive change in their own lives. In this capstone course, students examine the challenges of rebuilding a sense of community in the world, starting with the final crafting of their personal vision profile and personal plan of action and resulting in changes that could reverse the declines of economies, communities, and families. Integrating themes from the program, students develop a personal plan of action and an evidence-based, formally researched, service project proposal within their communities.
  
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    MMSL 6905 - Capstone: A Case for Leaders as Change Agents


    (3 sem. cr.) Leaders face all sorts of complex issues and opportunities to effect positive change that require well-thought-through solutions. To be effective, leaders must be able to analyze facts, assumptions, and theories and prioritize potential solutions. Students in this course apply their leadership skills and knowledge and build upon those to critically analyze a challenging leadership situation and create a vision for bringing about a better condition. Students integrate themes from the program as well as their own authentic leadership preferences and experiences to develop a leadership case study that will enable them to showcase their ability to put their transformational leadership capabilities into action.
  
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    MRKT 3001 - Marketing♦


    (5 cr.) Students examine basic marketing functions and the execution of successful marketing processes. They gain a fundamental understanding of marketing concepts, practices, terminology, associated technologies, and practical applications including customer relationship management. (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 4501 - Marketing Management♦


    (5 cr.) Successful business strategies and policies depend on effective marketing management processes and knowledgeable leaders. Through this course, students have the opportunity gain the creative decision-making skills required to develop and implement strategic marketing programs. Students learn about fundamental concepts and elements of marketing, including marketing mix, channels of distribution, and industrial and international marketing. They evaluate current events and contemporary business case studies to develop a real-world understanding of the development, organization, implementation, and control of the marketing plan.
      (Prerequisite(s): MRKT 3001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 4502 - International Marketing♦


    (5 cr.) Keeping with the 21st-century shift to globalization, businesses often need to extend their services beyond their home country to keep a competitive advantage. In this course, students explore the cultural, legal, technological, and financial aspects of various countries to understand the driving forces of marketing within a multinational framework. In addition, students learn to apply the tools of the marketing management process to the international environment. Through this course, students work toward gaining the strategic decision-making skills that professionals use to compete in the global marketplace.
      (Prerequisite(s): MRKT 3001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 4503 - Strategic Services Marketing♦


    (5 cr.) Marketing a service requires a different approach than marketing a traditional product. Services and products each serve different emotional, physical, and intellectual needs, so marketers must learn to present them strategically to consumers. In this course, students evaluate how service marketing differs from product marketing. They explore concepts such as the service marketing mix, total quality management, customer perceptions of services, and the pricing of services. They assess and discuss the role of pricing, the importance of adopting strategies, and the role of service environments. For a practical understanding of the service industry and marketing, students develop a comprehensive plan in the context of real-world service challenges. (Prerequisite(s): MRKT 4502 or MRKT 4504.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 4504 - Global Marketing


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine foundational concepts in global marketing. Examples and cases cover both developed and developing markets. Topics include culture and marketing, global and local competitors, cross-cultural consumer behavior and research, and intercultural marketing communications. (Prerequisite(s): MRKT 3001.)
  
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    MRKT 4505 - Hispanic Marketing in a Multicultural Context♦


    (5 cr.) Students address key issues in developing and implementing marketing strategies with an emphasis on business environments that incorporate a Hispanic cultural perspective. Topics include relating marketing strategy to organizational strategy, research and forecasting approaches, competitive analysis, and implementation of marketing strategies. (Prerequisite(s): MRKT 3001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 4506 - Marketing Communication♦


    (5 cr.) Developing targeted communication media (written, spoken, digital, broadcast, and printed) is necessary to specifically support the marketing initiatives and strategies of any planned effort. Students will use the tools and skills of integrated messaging, image clarity and enhancement, media relations, positioning, and persuasion. Basic principles are applied to evaluate successful and failed marketing communications efforts. (Prerequisite(s): MRKT 3001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 4511 - Marketing Communications♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course prepare to engage effectively in the practice of developing targeted communications—written, spoken, broadcast, and printed—that specifically support the marketing initiatives and strategies of any planned effort. Students hone their problem-solving and creative skills while practicing with marketing tools, such as integrated messaging, image clarity and enhancement, media relations, positioning, and persuasion. They use basic marketing principles to assess successful and failed marketing communications efforts and create a portfolio of useable approaches.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 4512 - International Marketing Communications♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn concepts to expand the scope of their marketing communications knowledge to include international breadth and depth. They address unique challenges, including culture, globally diverse markets, international regulation, and media differences, while embracing the remarkable opportunity of international exchange. Using integrated marketing communications principles, students engage in practical applications of content, such as the planning, development, and implementation of a marketing communications campaign for the global market. Through these globally focused projects, students acquire the necessary awareness and essential skills to function within the international marketing arena.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
 

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