2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Nov 25, 2020  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    IPSY 6214 - Consulting for Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Organizational and professional development (OPD) professionals promote and implement organizational change by using fundamental techniques of change management. Students in this course examine and apply these tools, including consulting competencies, approaches, and organizational change models to learn the skills of an OPD consultant. Students explore methods for accelerating individual, group, and organizational performance through consulting, coaching, and change management. They also explore related topics, such as organizational assessment; team development; strategic planning; group dynamics; power, politics, and influence; leadership; and conflict management. Students apply course concepts to the assessment of an organization and the development of strategies to address identified needs for change.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6216 - Dynamics of Contemporary, International, and Virtual Organizations


    (5 cr.) Globalization, technological innovation, and market factors continually change the context of business, requiring professionals who understand how organizations function to work through challenges and harness opportunities for change. In this course, students explore the implications of the changing nature of organizations as well as the emergence of international and virtual organizations in a global economy. Through contextual and application-based assignments, students address the unique opportunities and challenges for government, for-profit, nonprofit, international, and virtual organizations. Applying acquired knowledge and skills, students provide a diagnosis and recommendations for a specific organization’s development efforts.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6333 - Holding Up the Mirror: Understanding Different Cultures and Increasing Global Consciousness


    (5 cr.) Students in this course have an opportunity to explore and understand the cultural values and styles of communication, reasoning, and leadership unique to their home culture. Students apply their increased understanding to other cultures. They also identify and become familiar with the challenges American nonprofits face as they work internationally or cross-culturally within the United States.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6393 - Capstone


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with the opportunity to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program into a practical project designed to promote positive social change in a capstone project. During this course, students work on a capstone project in which they complete a major integrative paper on a topic related to their specialization, incorporating theoretical and practical knowledge as well as social scientific research skills acquired throughout the program. The instructor may approve other capstone projects presented by students.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6480 - Psychology of Organizational Behavior


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the application of behavioral theories in organizational settings. The focus is on individual, group, and organizational behavior. Topics include individual differences in employee motivation and job satisfaction, group development, team building, organizational leadership, and organizational design, culture, and development. Students acquire a broad knowledge base in organizational psychology, its research, and its applications. 
  
  •  

    IPSY 6520 - Police Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about the various roles and responsibilities of forensic psychology professionals working with and in police departments, the structures and organizations in which they work, and the skills needed to perform daily functions, such as counseling and supporting police. Students analyze and discuss common issues and challenges, including crisis situations, psychological risks of police work, and stress management. They also explore less common roles of psychology professionals working with police, such as training in hostage negotiations and the selection of special officers (SWAT, snipers, and tactical commanders). Engaging in assignments designed to provide application of content, students gain practical insight on a variety of topics, such as diversity issues and training, community impact, and forensic psychology operations.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6521 - Psychology in the Courts


    (5 cr.) Forensic psychology professionals play a vital role in the court system, providing consultation, expert testimony, and recommendations for treatment. In this course, students have the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills used by forensic psychology professionals working in the courts. Students examine major roles of psychology professionals, their responsibilities, and required proficiencies, such as oral and written communication skills. Through application-based exercises, students engage in practical exercises, such as in writing reports, planning evaluations, and preparing witnesses for testimony. Students also consider contemporary challenges, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of technology on courts in the United States.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6540 - Management and Leadership in a Global Environment


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in various types of organizations. Students in this course engage in a collaborative study of strategic planning, management, and leadership in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. Students in this course identify, analyze, and evaluate the intricate relationships between strategic planning, management, and leadership from an international perspective. Students connect three key institutional elements: thinking, acting, and leading strategically. They apply a management systems approach as they develop, adopt, manage, and lead a strategic plan for an international public or nonprofit organization or with an international focus. Students will understand the strategic context for practical decision making for international public and nonprofit organizations, emphasizing the central role of the environment in the strategic planning process. Through this course, students are offered a hands-on approach that tests students’ ability to make effective and timely management and leadership decisions in complex and uncertain conditions.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6551 - I/O Testing and Measurement


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn in depth about measurement theory and the tests used in organizational settings. They study a comprehensive examination of psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments, including classical test theory, item response theory (IRT), and item forensics approaches to testing. Topics include normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, test score interpretation, and test development. Students also address ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues, including cultural bias and fairness. A foundation for the course is professional standards for testing.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6552 - Psychology of Motivation at Work♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive an in-depth study of major topics in micro-level organizational behavior. Accountability, organization citizenship behaviors, forms of organizational attachment, motivation, goal theory, and issues of equity and justice will be covered.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6700 - Psychology of Social Change


    (5 cr.) In this course, students analyze and evaluate theories of social and personal change. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application assignments focused on power and social inequalities, ethnic inequalities, global environment, and issues related to gender and sexism, such as homophobia. In addition, students examine the impact of social change theories on children, families, and societies. They explore the concepts of change agent and change advocate as well as the role of the psychologist as change agent. Students also engage in an integrative written assignment to synthesize theories and analyze a current social problem in their community, for which they propose an action to address the issue and drive positive social change.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6701 - Culture and Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology. In addition to the previously listed goals, students focus on the impact that culture has on the field of psychology around the world. The scope of this course is broad, with the core theme being cross-cultural psychology (focusing on cultures representing different parts of the world) and comparing cultural influence on human psychology. Many of the topics addressed are related to human development. Additionally, interactions among culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses are emphasized throughout the duration of this course.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6705 - Organizational Behavior Performance and Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) The focus of this organizational behavior and human capital development course is on organizational behavior, motivation, collaboration, and performance and evaluation of individuals and teams. Some of the questions that may be explored relate to how human resource managers motivate and build resiliency in their organizational culture. Students will also consider the influence of organizational structure behavior on individuals and teams, how behavior and motivation are impacted in a global virtual environment, and the impact of expert systems and artificial intelligence on the behavior of employees.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6706 - Ethics and Standards of Industrial Organizational Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the origins of professional codes of ethics and standards of scientific psychology. Topics include ethical issues in academics (research, teaching, supervision), various work settings (assessment, consulting), and ethics involved in working with diverse populations. Additionally, students are introduced to forensic psychology and ethical issues related to the legal system. Students also explore how cultural factors are addressed in various ethical codes and the implications for scholar-practitioners.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6715 - Human Resource Strategy, Legal, and Ethical Considerations♦


    (5 cr.) In this course students focus on strategic planning that supports labor relations, succession planning, retention of both tacit and explicit knowledge, as well as the strategic role of information technology in human resources management. Students will also consider the regulatory requirements for global organizations as well as establishment of a positive social and ethical environment.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6720 - Strategic Thinking for Effective Human Resource Management


    (4 cr.) One of the main responsibilities of human resource managers and organizational leaders is to employ human resources (HR) to align with an organization’s needs and goals, moving the organization toward competitive advantage and sustainable success. Students in this course are introduced to advanced research topics in the strategic management of HR within a systems thinking and metrics-based performance measurement context. Students engage in a variety of group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on the analysis of resource-based theories of organizational performance; strategic management; and HR strategy, planning, and management (including succession planning). Students also discuss the role of metrics, knowledge management, and human resource information systems in supporting HR and organizational strategies in global markets. Through extensive reading and literature review, students explore global and ethical dimensions of course topics and identify potential HR research topics for their dissertation.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6725 - Human Resource Talent Management♦


    (5 cr.) Managing organizational talent in the 21st century requires organizations to fully engage their workforce to optimize motivation, commitment, and productivity. Leadership and management of the organizational talent strategy to optimize use of global talent is a current organizational necessity, which requires talent management leaders to consider new workforce strategies for selection, recruitment, and retention of the workforce. Topics to be considered include information technology impact on talent management, recognition and reward systems, compensation and benefits, as well as the need to engage an agile workforce.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6730 - The Development of Human Capital Within Organizations


    (4 cr.) How do organizational leaders determine who to hire and in what ways do they ensure that capable employees are sustained and managed in a way that guarantees high performance and organizational achievement? Students in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions through the examination of advanced research topics, including the development and management of human capital within organizations. Students engage in group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on human resource concepts related to training and development, rewards and compensation, individual performance management, the role of human resources with individuals for global positions, and organization-wide succession planning. Through extensive reading and literature review, students identify potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the global and ethical dimensions pertaining to course subject matter.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6740 - The Legal, Ethical, and Cultural Environment of Human Resource Management


    (4 cr.) Considering global-level expansion, issues of diversity, and traditional ethical issues, nearly all organizations must follow a host of laws and regulations; it is the responsibility of managers to know these guidelines for the welfare of employees and stability of the company. Students in this course explore advanced research topics that address the legal, ethical, and cultural environment, both internal to organizations and more broadly. They engage in group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on the analysis of the regulatory environment in which human resource (HR) professionals must operate, HR management’s role in communications, management of diversity and inclusion, and promotion of justice within organizations. Through extensive reading and literature review, students engage actively in identifying potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the global and ethical dimensions pertaining to course subject matter.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6750 - Human Resource Management and Its Role in Labor Relations, Negotiation, and Conflict Resolution


    (4 cr.) Human resource (HR) managers bridge the gap between employees and management, creating a challenging relationship requiring the ability to recognize and assess conflict, communicate strategically and effectively, and negotiate for resolutions. Students in this course explore this relationship and examine advanced research topics in labor relations, negotiation, and conflict resolution. They engage in group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on a variety of topics, including the HR role in designing and managing conflict resolution processes beginning with mediation and negotiating with labor and other major human resource constituencies. Through extensive reading and literature review, students identify potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the global and ethical dimensions pertaining to course subject matter.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6751 - Leadership Coaching: Process and Practice


    (5 cr.) The intent of leadership coaching is to facilitate psychological change that leads to goal attainment and enhanced performance. In this course, students apply evidence-based psychological approaches to coaching case studies. They assess coaching roles and settings; skills and competencies; models and frameworks; and current issues and future trends. Students employ critical-thinking skills and synthesize concepts learned in the course to develop a plan for implementing effective coaching in a real-world setting.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6752 - Leadership Coaching: Application


    (5 cr.) The intent of leadership coaching is to facilitate psychological change that leads to goal attainment and enhanced performance. In this course, students apply evidence-based psychological approaches to coaching case studies. They assess coaching roles and settings; skills and competencies; models and frameworks; and current issues and future trends. Students employ critical-thinking skills and synthesize concepts learned in the course to develop a plan for implementing effective coaching in a real-world setting.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6753 - Leadership Coaching: Theories, Concepts, and Processes


    (6 cr.) The intent of leadership coaching is to facilitate psychological change that leads to goal attainment and enhanced performance. In this course, students apply evidence-based psychological approaches to coaching case studies focusing on coaching competencies and ethical practices. They assess coaching roles and settings; skills and competencies; models and frameworks; and current issues and future trends. Students employ critical-thinking skills and synthesize concepts learned in the course to develop a plan for implementing effective coaching in a real-world setting. Students will also engage in hands-on coaching competency and skill development through Voice to Voice training sessions. (This course includes a practice lab).
  
  •  

    IPSY 6754 - Personnel Psychology in the Workplace


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore the application of psychological theory and practice to human resources activities in organizations. They examine related topics, including job analysis and design, employee selection and placement, training and development, performance management and appraisal, and legal and ethical considerations in human resources management. Through a group project case study, students research, assess, and share critical issues in personnel psychology. They also demonstrate their ability to conduct effective research and review literature through a final research paper on a topic of interest related to course content and theory.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6755 - Leadership and Leader Development


    (5 cr.) Effective leadership requires the ability to facilitate positive change, lead others in efforts to effect similar change, and work through challenges when met with resistance to change. Students in this course are provided with an extensive overview of leadership theories. Students explore definitions of leadership, major theoretical leadership models, and contextual and situational factors related to leadership and change. Students also examine various perspectives on leadership and the role of leadership in the achievement of organizational, group, and team goals. Students engage in practical assignments and discussions, focusing on effective leadership issues and practices during the process of organizational change.
  
  •  

    IPSY 6756 - Leadership Coaching: Practices and Applications


    (6 cr.) Effective leadership coaches must be fully capable of working with clients immersed in different organizational cultures that present unique challenges. In this course, students apply models, approaches, and frameworks; individual and team coaching strategies; and ethical guidelines to case studies focusing on coaching competencies and ethical practices. Students also examine characteristics, factors, and conditions that influence the effectiveness of coaching; assessment and evaluation; diversity considerations; and professional issues and challenges. Students will also engage in hands-on coaching competency and skill development through Voice to Voice training sessions. (This course includes a practice lab).
  
  •  

    IPSY 6776 - Transformative Change in a Shared-Power World


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8000 - Foundations for Graduate Study in Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals, and they develop a program of study, a professional development plan, and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. They engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8002 - Foundations of Graduate Studies in Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students build a foundation for academic and professional success as social change agents. They assess the relationship of Walden’s mission and vision to professional goals. They establish connections with their peers and the broader Walden community. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of scholarly writing, critical-thinking skills, academic integrity, ethics, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence within the field of psychology.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8004 - Foundations of Graduate Study in Psychology


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals, and they develop a program of study, a professional development plan, and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. They engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8005 - Business Concepts for the Organizational Development Professional


    (5 cr.) This course explores the language of work, business, and management structures and processes, and the human and market factors that determine organizational success. It examines topics such as finance, marketing, accounting, strategic planning, organizational design, and quality and process improvement. Applications include the examination and analysis of sources of information that assess overall organizational health.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8101 - Introduction to Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an expansive overview of forensic psychology, including basic tenets, practices, and procedures. Students explore subspecialties of forensic psychology; roles and responsibilities; and related legal, ethical, and diversity issues. They learn how forensic psychology links to the criminal justice system as they explore related topics, including criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, and correctional psychology. Through this course, students acquire a broad understanding of forensic psychology theories and concepts, which they apply to the analysis of controversial issues and contemporary challenges within the field.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8115 - Writing a Quality Prospectus in Psychology


    (5 cr.) This five-credit course is focused specifically on the process of writing the doctoral study prospectus. Students will use their preliminary research plan, developed previously, and develop a problem statement, to be used in the doctoral study. They further refine the problem statement and carry out the planning and the library research that will bring them to the formulation of a doctoral study prospectus. The prospectus is a brief paper, typically 15-20 pages in length, that lays out the background for the problem statement, the problem statement itself, a survey of the relevant literature (typically 25-75 references), and a research, implementation, and evaluation plan for the solution of the problem.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8202 - Survey Research Methods


    (5 cr.) An in-depth study of a range of survey methods administered via in-person interview, self-report, phone interview, and Internet administration is introduced in this course. Topics include survey design, administration, analysis, and addressing sources of bias. Students also review theoretical and empirical research on question and questionnaire effects. Students prepare through the practice of writing questions and designing questionnaires, both in general and in light of existing research. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8100 and RSCH 8200.)
  
  •  

    IPSY 8214 - Consulting for Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Organizational and professional development (OPD) professionals promote and implement organizational change by using fundamental techniques of change management. Students in this course examine and apply these tools, including consulting competencies, approaches, and organizational change models to learn the skills of an OPD consultant. Students explore methods for accelerating individual, group, and organizational performance through consulting, coaching, and change management. They also explore related topics, such as organizational assessment; team development; strategic planning; group dynamics; power, politics, and influence; leadership; and conflict management. Students apply course concepts to the assessment of an organization and the development of strategies to address identified needs for change.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8216 - Dynamics of Contemporary, International, and Virtual Organizations


    (5 cr.) Globalization, technological innovation, and market factors continually change the context of business, requiring professionals who understand how organizations function to work through challenges and harness opportunities for change. In this course, students explore the implications of the changing nature of organizations as well as the emergence of international and virtual organizations in a global economy. Through contextual and application-based assignments, students address the unique opportunities and challenges for government, for-profit, nonprofit, international, and virtual organizations. Applying acquired knowledge and skills, students provide a diagnosis and recommendations for a specific organization’s development efforts.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8252 - Themes and Theories of I/O Psychology


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are introduced to theories, research, and themes that form the tenets of psychology. Basic theoretical models will be reviewed, including psychodynamic, cognitive, developmental, social learning/socio-cognitive, behaviorist, learning and motivation, systems, biopsychosocial, and gender theories. Theories encompassing diverse populations, including cross-cultural and feminist theories, will also be examined. Students will critically examine the strengths and limitations of these theories and their utility in the field of psychology. Contemporary themes in psychology will be explored, with an emphasis on application of theories designed to effect positive social change. 
  
  •  

    IPSY 8333 - Holding Up the Mirror: Understanding Different Cultures and Increasing Global Consciousness


    (5 cr.) Students in this course have an opportunity to explore and understand the cultural values and styles of communication, reasoning, and leadership unique to their home culture. Students apply their increased understanding to other cultures. They also identify and become familiar with the challenges American nonprofits face as they work internationally or cross-culturally within the United States.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8412 - Research Foundations


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine and receive support for student readiness regarding the use of quantitative and qualitative research approaches. They study research fundamentals, including the distinction between social problems and research problems, the functions of research problems versus research purpose statements, and the role of theory and conceptual framework in informing research. Students examine quantitative and qualitative concepts central to research methods, design, and analysis. They also study how research design, methods, and analyses properly align for both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Students demonstrate their knowledge by creating two research outlines, using quantitative and qualitative approaches, which they develop throughout the course. They determine appropriate conditions for the use of mixed-methods approaches and differentiate between types of mixed-methods research designs. Students engage in pre- and post-assessments of skills and knowledge. 
  
  •  

    IPSY 8480 - Psychology of Organizational Behavior


    (5 cr.) Students taking this course examine the application of behavioral theories in organizational settings. The focus is on individual, group, and organizational behavior. Topics include individual differences in employee motivation and job satisfaction, group development, team building, organizational leadership, and organizational design, culture, and development. Students acquire a broad knowledge base in organizational psychology, its research, and its applications.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8520 - Police Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about the various roles and responsibilities of forensic psychology professionals working with and in police departments, the structures and organizations in which they work, and the skills needed to perform daily functions, such as counseling and supporting police. Students analyze and discuss common issues and challenges, including crisis situations, psychological risks of police work, and stress management. They also explore less common roles of psychology professionals working with police, such as training in hostage negotiations and the selection of special officers (SWAT, snipers, and tactical commanders). Engaging in assignments designed to provide application of content, students gain practical insight on a variety of topics, such as diversity issues and training, community impact, and forensic psychology operations.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8521 - Psychology in the Courts


    (5 cr.) Forensic psychology professionals play a vital role in the court system, providing consultation, expert testimony, and recommendations for treatment. In this course, students have the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills used by forensic psychology professionals working in the courts. Students examine major roles of psychology professionals, their responsibilities, and required proficiencies, such as oral and written communication skills. Through application-based exercises, students engage in practical exercises, such as in writing reports, planning evaluations, and preparing witnesses for testimony. Students also consider contemporary challenges, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of technology on courts in the United States.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8540 - Management and Leadership in a Global Environment


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in various types of organizations. Students in this course engage in a collaborative study of strategic planning, management, and leadership in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. Students in this course identify, analyze, and evaluate the intricate relationships between strategic planning, management, and leadership from an international perspective. Students connect three key institutional elements: thinking, acting, and leading strategically. Students apply a management systems approach as they develop, adopt, manage, and lead a strategic plan for an international public or nonprofit organization or with an international focus. Students will understand the strategic context for practical decision making for international public and nonprofit organizations, emphasizing the central role of the environment in the strategic planning process. The hands-on approach of this course tests students’ ability to make effective and timely management and leadership decisions in complex and uncertain conditions.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8551 - I/O Tests and Measurement


    (5 cr.) Students in this course study in-depth measurement theory and the tests used in organizational settings. Included are a comprehensive examination of psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments, including classical test theory, item response theory (IRT), and item forensics approaches to testing. Topics include normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, test score interpretation, and test development. Students also address ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues, including cultural bias and fairness. Professional standards for testing provide a foundation for the course.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8552 - Psychological Motivation at Work


    (5 cr.) Participants in this course study in depth major topics in micro-level organizational behavior. Accountability, organization citizenship behaviors, forms of organizational attachment, motivation, goal theory, and issues of equity and justice will be covered.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8576 - Advanced Personnel Psychology


    (5 cr.) Participants in this course study in depth advanced topics in personnel psychology, including competency modeling, succession planning, talent management, alternative approaches to validation of selection tests, adverse impact, return on investment, and application of multiple linear regression analysis.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8579 - Job Attitudes, Measurement, and Change


    (5 cr.) Participants in this course study in depth major theories of job attitudes, as well as their antecedents, correlates, and consequences. Topics include job satisfaction, organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behavior, withdrawal behavior, and counterproductive organizational behavior. Application of learning is demonstrated through an applied-attitude survey research project.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8700 - Psychology of Social Change


    (5 cr.) In this course, students analyze and evaluate theories of social and personal change. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application assignments focused on power and social inequalities, ethnic inequalities, global environment, and issues related to gender and sexism, such as homophobia. In addition, students examine the impact of social change theories on children, families, and societies. They explore the concepts of change agent and change advocate as well as the role of the psychologist as change agent. Students also engage in an integrative written assignment to synthesize theories and analyze a current social problem in their community, for which they propose an action to address the issue and drive positive social change.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8701 - Culture and Psychology


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology. In addition to the previously listed goals, students focus on the impact that culture has on the field of psychology around the world. The scope of this course is broad, with the core theme being cross-cultural psychology (focusing on cultures representing different parts of the world) and comparing cultural influence on human psychology. Many of the topics addressed in the course are related to human development. Additionally, interactions between culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses are emphasized throughout the duration of this course.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8702 - Dissertation Literature Review Lab


    (2 cr.) The purpose of this course is to help students prepare to write a well-structured, soundly presented critical literature review. In this course, students cover topic selection, research analysis, writing, and editing. Upon completing the course, students produce an annotated bibliography and outline of a literature review using a minimum of 10 self-selected research articles. This course is appropriate for doctoral students who are preparing for their dissertation research.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8705 - Organizational Behavior Performance and Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) The focus of this organizational behavior and human capital development course is on organizational behavior, motivation, collaboration, and performance and evaluation of individuals and teams. Some of the questions that may be explored relate to how human resource managers motivate and build resiliency in their organizational culture. Students will also consider the influence of organizational structure behavior on individuals and teams, how behavior and motivation are impacted in a global virtual environment, and the impact of expert systems and artificial intelligence on the behavior of employees.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8706 - Ethics and Standards of I/O Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the origins of professional codes of ethics and standards of scientific psychology. Topics include ethical issues in academics (research, teaching, supervision), various work settings (assessment, consulting), and ethics involved in working with diverse populations. Additionally, students are introduced to forensic psychology and ethical issues related to the legal system. Students also explore how cultural factors are addressed in various ethical codes and the implications for scholar-practitioners.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8715 - Human Resource Strategy, Legal, and Ethical Considerations♦


    (5 cr.) In this course students focus on strategic planning that supports labor relations, succession planning, retention of both tacit and explicit knowledge, as well as the strategic role of information technology in human resources management. Students will also consider the regulatory requirements for global organizations as well as establishment of a positive social and ethical environment.
     
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8720 - Strategic Thinking for Effective Human Resource Management


    (4 cr.) One of the main responsibilities of human resource managers and organizational leaders is to employ human resources (HR) to align with an organization’s needs and goals, moving the organization toward competitive advantage and sustainable success. Students in this course are introduced to advanced research topics in the strategic management of HR within a systems thinking and metrics-based performance measurement context. Students engage in a variety of group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on the analysis of resource-based theories of organizational performance; strategic management; and HR strategy, planning, and management (including succession planning). Students also discuss the role of metrics, knowledge management, and human resource information systems in supporting HR and organizational strategies in global markets. Through extensive reading and literature review, students explore global and ethical dimensions of course topics and identify potential HR research topics for their dissertation.
  
  •  

    IPSY 8725 - Human Resource Talent Management♦


    (5 cr.) Managing organizational talent in the 21st century requires organizations to fully engage their workforce to optimize motivation, commitment, and productivity. Leadership and management of the organizational talent strategy to optimize use of global talent is a current organizational necessity, which requires talent management leaders to consider new workforce strategies for selection, recruitment, and retention of the workforce. Topics to be considered include information technology’s impact on talent management, recognition and reward systems, compensation and benefits, as well as the need to engage an agile workforce.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    IPSY 8730 - The Development of Human Capital Within Organizations


    (4 cr.) How do organizational leaders determine who to hire and in what ways do they ensure that capable employees are sustained and managed in a way that guarantees high performance and organizational achievement? Students in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions through the examination of advanced research topics, including the development and management of human capital within organizations. Students engage in group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on human resource concepts related to training and development, rewards and compensation, individual performance management, the role of human resources with individuals for global positions, and organization-wide succession planning. Through extensive reading and literature review, students identify potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the global and ethical dimensions pertaining to course subject matter.
  
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    IPSY 8740 - The Legal, Ethical, and Cultural Environment of Human Resource Management


    (4 cr.) Considering global-level expansion, issues of diversity, and traditional ethical issues, nearly all organizations must follow a host of laws and regulations; it is the responsibility of managers to know these guidelines for the welfare of employees and stability of the company. Students in this course explore advanced research topics that address the legal, ethical, and cultural environment, both internal to organizations and more broadly. They engage in group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on the analysis of the regulatory environment in which human resource (HR) professionals must operate, HR management’s role in communications, management of diversity and inclusion, and promotion of justice within organizations. Through extensive reading and literature review, students engage actively in identifying potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the global and ethical dimensions pertaining to course subject matter.
  
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    IPSY 8750 - Human Resource Management and Its Role in Labor Relations, Negotiation, and Conflict Resolution


    (4 cr.) Human resource (HR) managers bridge the gap between employees and management, creating a challenging relationship requiring the ability to recognize and assess conflict, communicate strategically and effectively, and negotiate for resolutions. Students in this course explore this relationship and examine advanced research topics in labor relations, negotiation, and conflict resolution. They engage in group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on a variety of topics, including the HR role in designing and managing conflict resolution processes beginning with mediation and negotiating with labor and other major human resource constituencies. Through extensive reading and literature review, students identify potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the global and ethical dimensions pertaining to course subject matter.
  
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    IPSY 8751 - Leadership Coaching: Process and Practice


    (5 cr.) The intent of leadership coaching is to facilitate psychological change that leads to goal attainment and enhanced performance. In this course, students apply evidence-based psychological approaches to coaching case studies. They assess coaching roles and settings; skills and competencies; models and frameworks; and current issues and future trends. Students employ critical-thinking skills and synthesize concepts learned in the course to develop a plan for implementing effective coaching in a real-world setting.
  
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    IPSY 8752 - Leadership Coaching: Application


    (5 cr.) The intent of leadership coaching is to facilitate psychological change that leads to goal attainment and enhanced performance. In this course, students apply evidence-based psychological approaches to coaching case studies. They assess coaching roles and settings; skills and competencies; models and frameworks; and current issues and future trends. Students employ critical-thinking skills and synthesize concepts learned in the course to develop a plan for implementing effective coaching in a real-world setting.
  
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    IPSY 8753 - Leadership Coaching: Theories, Concepts, and Processes


    (6 cr.) The intent of leadership coaching is to facilitate psychological change that leads to goal attainment and enhanced performance. In this course, students apply evidence-based psychological approaches to coaching case studies focusing on coaching competencies and ethical practices. They assess coaching roles and settings; skills and competencies; models and frameworks; and current issues and future trends. Students employ critical-thinking skills and synthesize concepts learned in the course to develop a plan for implementing effective coaching in a real-world setting. Students will also engage in hands-on coaching competency and skill development through Voice to Voice training sessions.
  
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    IPSY 8754 - Personnel Psychology in the Workplace


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore the application of psychological theory and practice to human resources activities in organizations. They examine related topics, including job analysis and design, employee selection and placement, training and development, performance management and appraisal, and legal and ethical considerations in human resources management. Through a group project case study, students research, assess, and share critical issues in personnel psychology. They also demonstrate their ability to conduct effective research and review literature through a final research paper on a topic of interest related to course content and theory. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8750 or PSYC 8752.)
  
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    IPSY 8755 - Leadership and Leader Development


    (5 cr.) Effective leadership requires the ability to facilitate positive change, lead others in efforts to effect similar change, and work through challenges when met with resistance to change. Students in this course are provided with an extensive overview of leadership theories. Students explore definitions of leadership, major theoretical leadership models, and contextual and situational factors related to leadership and change. Students also examine various perspectives on leadership and the role of leadership in the achievement of organizational, group, and team goals. Students engage in practical assignments and discussions, focusing on effective leadership issues and practices during the process of organizational change.
  
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    IPSY 8756 - Leadership Coaching: Practices and Applications


    (6 cr.) Effective leadership coaches must be fully capable of working with clients immersed in different organizational cultures that present unique challenges. In this course, students apply models, approaches, and frameworks; individual and team coaching strategies; and ethical guidelines to case studies focusing on coaching competencies and ethical practices. Students also examine characteristics, factors, and conditions that influence the effectiveness of coaching; assessment and evaluation; diversity considerations; and professional issues and challenges. Students will also engage in hands-on coaching competency and skill development through Voice to Voice training sessions.
  
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    IPSY 8776 - Transformative Change in a Shared-Power World


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
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    IPSY 9000 - Dissertation


    (5 cr. per term for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion) Doctoral students in this course are provided with the opportunity to integrate their Program of Study into a research study through which they explore a specific area of interest. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members through a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with their dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for IPSY 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation for a minimum of four terms.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 4 quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Dissertation with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook.

      (Prerequisite(s): Foundation and core courses and designation of an approved dissertation committee chairperson.

  
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    ISYS 3001 - Information Systems in Enterprise♦


    (5 cr.) All businesses rely on systems to process, collect, share, and store important information. The most effective way to help an organization achieve its goals is to understand how to leverage information systems and emerging technology. In this course, students have the opportunity to gain skills needed to employ such leverage in the professional arena. Students examine the characteristics of information systems and their role in organizations. They also assess and discuss the impact that information systems have on the enterprise as a whole, in addition to their current architectures, enabling tools, and project cycles. (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ISYS 4301 - Business Process Design♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course have the opportunity to gain working knowledge of the requisite skills, concepts, and methodologies that managers and team members use to conduct a business process redesign (BPR). Through weekly readings of literature and contemporary articles, students learn about the manager’s role in the business process as well as the function of BPR. They examine the function of information systems as enablers for business process design. They also learn how to analyze business processes and redesign them for dramatic results. Reinforcing the practical application of concepts, students demonstrate their critical-thinking and problem-solving skills through a case study assignment in which they solve a real-world problem using BPR.
      (Prerequisite(s): ISYS 3001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ISYS 4302 - Management of Technology♦


    (5 cr.) The efficiency and success of most organizations today depends on the ability of leaders to integrate technology and business functions through activities such as supply chain management, outsourcing, and e-business practice. Students in this course examine the key concepts in management of information technology and the role of technology managers. They analyze the management of technology from both a process and system perspective and investigate major technical issues involved in innovation and implementation. Students engage in weekly discussions on a variety of topics, such as advanced databases, business intelligence, artificial intelligence systems, wireless technology, and outsourcing.
      (Prerequisite(s): ISYS 4301.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ISYS 4303 - Case Study: Project Management♦


    (5 cr.) The process of creation, from conception through completion, requires a diverse set of management skills, including the ability to make strategic plans. In this course, students learn the theory, tools, and techniques needed to manage technology projects successfully throughout a project lifecycle. Students in this course focus on the project management process and development of the project team as key to the successful achievement of information systems projects. They analyze the role of the project manager as an integral administrator overseeing the execution, progress, and interaction of all parties involved. Students also assess and discuss effective project management styles, critical factors for project success, organizational support systems that enhance projects, project authority, and ethics in project execution.
      (Prerequisite(s): ISYS 4302.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 1010 - IT Infrastructure♦


    (5 cr.) Information technology (IT) is essential to the function and success of nearly all businesses. Businesses whose systems are lacking or experience failure are at risk of significant loss; therefore, there will always be a need for IT support and innovation. In this course, students are introduced to fundamental concepts of the IT infrastructure to prepare for a role in the field of IT. Students learn about the structure and purpose of hardware components (computers, networks, and interface devices) and software components (operating systems, middleware, applications, and system software). They examine key issues of capacity, performance, reliability, scale, and obsolescence through the evaluation of IT’s role in supporting business and individuals. Students take a practical approach to understanding how IT infrastructure can relate to personal goals as they examine the various career options within the field.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 1020 - Networking Fundamentals♦


    (5 cr.) More than ever, individuals and businesses rely on Web surfing for variety of functions, including buying products, searching for jobs, sharing data, and entertainment. However, there are many threats involved if a network is not secure, which is why we value network administrators. In this course, students have the opportunity to gain the insight and skill of a network administrator. They examine concepts, components, and design of information and communication infrastructures. Students learn about the design of the Internet protocol stack, the structure and function of important Internet services and applications, and Internet governance. They engage in hands-on lab exercises involving configuration of settings, management of local user accounts, and design of different types of networks. (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 1010.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 1030 - Introduction to Programming♦


    (5 cr.) The cornerstone of modern software design is object-oriented programming (OOP), which is a methodology that uses objects to represent complex relationships and simplifies the development and management of information systems. In this course, students will learn current information on OOP and other prevailing techniques in programming. Students begin by studying foundational concepts and terminology of OOP. They examine programming paradigms, algorithmic thinking, and problem-solving techniques in Java. Students engage in coursework and share blogs on computer program design, constraints, variables, functions, procedures, logic and code control, error trapping, error handling, and interactive coding techniques. They gain hands-on, practical experience through lab work focusing on compiling and running applications, reading data interactively, and debugging.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 1010 and MATH 1040.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 2010 - Data Structures


    (5 cr.) A data structure is a specialized layout for organizing and storing data. An integral part of the information technology arena, programmers work with many different types of data structures. Using fundamental programming knowledge, such as object-oriented programming (OOP), students continue their practice with OOP and have the opportunity to gain integral knowledge of advanced data structures, including lists, stacks, queues, and the functions of each. They also learn how to choose data structures that are appropriate for various types of information. They engage in blogs and discussions to work through ideas and gain various perspectives on topical issues, such as arrays, data collections, and recursion. Students gain hands-on experience as they solve complex word problems by writing a program and using tools to create, compile, debug, and run interactive programs.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 1030.)
  
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    ITEC 2020 - IT Theory Fundamentals♦


    (5 cr.) Did you ever wonder how many different valid passwords a computer system allows? Or perhaps you need to know how to encrypt a message so that only the intended recipient can decipher it. To answer such questions, programmers use discrete mathematics, which allows them to study sets and numbers, linear algebra, combinatorics, graphs, and probability. Students in this course are introduced to discrete mathematics concepts and techniques used in information technology (IT). Students examine each concept in action and geared toward a specific application in IT. They engage in various application assignments focusing on elements of graph theory, coding, and probability.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 1010 and MATH 1040.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 2030 - Operating Systems Fundamentals and Administration♦


    (5 cr.) There are many important benefits from studying the different types of operating systems, such as administering computers efficiently and structuring code more effectively, which lend to best practices in writing code. In this course, students become familiar with the concepts of computer operating systems, including the main functions, similarities, and differences. They explore a variety of topics, including configuration, file systems, security, administration, interfacing, multitasking, and performance analysis. Students contextualize their learning experience through hands-on activities, such as performing basic administrative tasks on Windows and Linux servers, including configuring networking parameters, administering user accounts and groups, setting access and application permissions, and locating and analyzing log files.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 1010 or CMIS 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 2040 - Systems Analysis♦


    (5 cr.) There are many roles involved in creating and managing an organization’s information system, including the systems analyst. The analyst helps ensure that the software development process is successful by understanding its purpose, scope, and resource requirements. Students in this course face the prospect of understanding the field from the perspective of a systems analyst. Students focus on the definition and examination of system requirements, both functional and nonfunctional, for an information system (IS) project. Through the review of videos, case, studies, and supplemental websites, they learn about the identification of stakeholders and techniques for requirement elicitation, representation, and life cycles. Students sharpen their communication and practical skills through group projects during which they apply concepts learned in the course to an actual information system.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 1010 or CMIS 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 2050 - Systems Design♦


    (5 cr.) This course is an introduction to the approaches used to specify details during the design phase of a systems development life cycle (SDLC). Students explore the discipline of reducing requirements to the structural and functional design of organizational information technology solutions. They examine conceptual modeling, design patterns, and application frameworks. Students learn the basics of modeling, design representations, and the use of design tools. Through discussion with their peers, students confer about and debate the different approaches to systems design, security aspects of interfaces, and documentation. Students work toward gaining collaborative and critical-thinking skills through group projects focusing on the specifics of system design, including planning and implementation.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2040 or CMIS 3003.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 2060 - Database Management Systems♦


    (5 cr.) All types of businesses rely on systems to manage their data and to keep that data secure, accurate, and reliable. A database is a system designed to do just this as well as to simplify the processes of data entry, search, and retrieval. In this course, students learn about database management through the examination of the life cycle of a database. Students focus on the representation and manipulation of information in relational database management systems. They learn how to map real-world concepts onto relational representations and how to manipulate them through relational queries to implement data-intensive applications. They also discuss related issues, such as database storage, data validation, sorting, grouping, and nesting data. Students learn to use a core subset of the Structured Query Language (SQL) as well as the fundamentals of database administration.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2050 or CMIS 3004.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 2070 - Human-Computer Interaction♦


    (5 cr.) This course is an overview of human perception and cognitive performance, computer processes, and system design approaches for successful human-computer interaction. Topics include human factors, usability evaluation, and principles of interface design.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2050 or CMIS 3004.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 2080 - Web Programming♦


    (5 cr.) Every day, we are learning to adapt to 21st-century technology. More importantly, we are beginning to rely on it for daily needs, such as obtaining the news, shopping, communicating, banking, and full-scale education. The need for developers of static and dynamic Web pages of all kinds is in demand. In this course, students consider the many factors of developing Web applications for a specific purpose or audience, such as optimization, accessibility, and appeal. They also examine the tools and techniques needed to develop and manage these applications. Through discussions and application assignments, students explore dynamic Web page implementations, elements of client-server and server-side processing, data validation, and concurrency issues.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 1030 or CMIS 1003 and ITEC 1010 or CMIS 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 3010 - Mobile and Pervasive Technologies♦


    (5 cr.) Mobile computing was developed in the early 1990s with the introduction of laptop computers. Since then, devices have become smaller, more intuitive, and more accessible, and they have worked their way into businesses, homes, hospitals, and children’s backpacks. The basic principles of system design for such technologies are not entirely different from larger-scale development, but designers must make different considerations and use special techniques for mobile and pervasive technologies. In this course, students examine the technical, business, legal, and sociocultural benefits and challenges of mobile devices and wireless communication technologies. Through discussion and written assignments, students explore wireless protocols and business and consumer applications, such as portable computing, communication, and multimedia devices; telemetry and monitoring systems; and context-aware services.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2080.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 3020 - Computer Security Fundamentals♦


    (5 cr.) Insecure security systems can cause major risks and vulnerabilities for companies. Breaches in personal employee information, financial information, or company secrets can elicit the downfall of an organization. In this course, students learn the importance of such concerns as well as key concepts of computer and information security, including technical, privacy, organizational, social, and policy issues. They examine fundamental notions of authentication, authorization, and encryption. Students learn about economic and human impact issues through the analysis of case studies of security and privacy breaches. Through discussions, applications, and group projects, students also examine risk management, informal system security methods, and corporate governance.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 1002 or ITEC 1010; ITEC 2030 is recommended as a prerequisite).
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 3030 - Business Architecture and Process♦


    (5 cr.) All companies have goals, but depending on the organization’s size or purpose, these goals may differ. Some may be to improve efficiency and immediate profit and others might be long-term sustainability or customer satisfaction. Regardless of specific goals, leaders must understand the organization as a whole, including its structure, processes, applications, and systems, so that the company can make informed decisions, avoiding risks and instability. Students in this course examine the structure and operations of organizations from an information processing point-of-view. Students work toward gaining skills in analyzing, designing, and improving operations as they engage in coursework focusing on fundamental business structures; business process design, management, and optimization; decision support and automation; enterprise resource planning; and integration. Using current ligature and simulations, students evaluate specific techniques designed to manage change in a company as well as to measure and maintain process advancement and value.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2050.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 3040 - IT Project Management♦


    (5 cr.) The process of creation, from conception through completion, is complicated and requires a diverse set of management skills. Students in this course are introduced to the knowledge, tools, and techniques needed to successfully manage information technology (IT) projects throughout a project life cycle. Students in this course focus on the IT project management process and development of the project team as key to the successful achievement of IT projects. Students analyze the role of the project manager as an integral administrator overseeing the execution, progress, and interaction of all parties involved. Students learn the intricacies of managing projects and programs that may span multiple organizations. They engage in coursework through which they examine the project management cycle, sourcing strategy, third-party provider selection, and management of third-party providers.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2050 or CMIS 3004.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 3101 - Systems Software Security♦


    (5 cr.) The job of an information security specialist is to oversee enterprise operations that follow industry best practices for security and data integrity to ensure that systems are free from external threats and risks that may jeopardize or harm the organization. Students in this course investigate the responsibilities of the security specialist, including the security of operating systems and other system software, such as database management systems. Through a variety of assignments, including hands-on lab work, students explore components of a networked operating system, architectural designs for secure usage, system administration tasks, and tools for security. Students examine the real effects that security threats have on systems. They address such threats through exercises in administrative tasks using tools vital for implementing security policies on Linux and Windows systems.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 3020 OR CMIS 4101.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 3201 - Database-Driven Web Applications♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students work toward gaining the skills necessary to develop and administer database-backed dynamic Web applications, which are in increasing demand as organizations compete for cutting-edge, fully-interactive, dynamic Web pages. Students explore contemporary development tools for database-driven Web applications, the use of templates to separate business logic and presentation, and data storage and management. They also examine server and application configuration to ensure site security, session management, and user authentication. In this course, students have the opportunity to enhance their communication and critical-thinking skills as they engage in peer discussions on topical issues, such as Web hosting, operations, security, and database table structure.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2060 and ITEC 2080.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 3202 - Data Centers♦


    (5 cr.) Effective data center operation involves efficient operating practices in an environmentally responsible manner. Students in this course encounter an overview of data center principles and operational issues, including environmental controls, power supplies, backup, data communications, and security standards to assure business continuity. Students discuss emerging trends and technologies in areas including cloud computing, virtualization, middleware, databases, data centers, green grids, and corporate and environmental social responsibility.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2050 and ITEC 3030.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 3301 - IT Service Management♦


    (5 cr.) The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the management of information technology (IT), including the relationships of parties involved, the tools for IT process improvement, and best practices involved in the field. Students focus on the relationship among an IT organization, business customers, and users. They explore the customer’s perspective of IT’s contribution to the organization and they learn ways to communicate effectively with stakeholders. Students use current articles and classic literature to examine a variety of topics, including operations architecture, IT governance, and relevant frameworks. Students also examine relationships of IT service management to process improvement movements, for example, Six Sigma improvement methodology, total quality management (TQM), business process management (BPM), and Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) standards. Through group projects and peer evaluation, students learn to work efficiently in groups as they assess the design of a service management program and the role of ethics in service management.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 3030 and ITEC 3040.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 3402 - Server-Side and Multi-Tier Programming♦


    (5 cr.) Life in the 21st century is fast paced, and the public demands information that is expeditious, accurate, and appealingly presented. Students in this course have the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to create the types of practical, well designed, dynamic web pages that can provide people with the information they need at the pace they want. Students examine the configuration of web server software, the function of server-side programming, and the use of scripting languages. They learn about techniques for enhancing performance through examination of multi-tier locality and parallelism. They also practice methods of access control and secured transmissions in server-side programming. Students have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience through a course-long project in which they build on skills acquired in each unit to transform a static website into a fully functional, dynamic website. (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2080.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 3501 - Web and Mobile Application Development♦


    (5 cr.) Developers have to keep usability, accessibility, and cross-device compatibility in mind when creating applications for multiple platforms. In this course, students examine the critical elements of the development life cycle of these applications, including visual design, information architecture design, and interaction design as well as the work-products that developers produce.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2080.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 4010 - Network Administration♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students learn about the role of a network administrator, the many considerations of operating a modern system, and the tools and technologies that are available to meet the requirements and demands of an organization’s network. They explore the structure of the Internet and examine protocols, routers, and client/server architecture related to configuring network services. Students also learn about software platforms, control, shared resources, and security from a practical perspective. Through a series of virtual lab assignments, students practice administrative tasks using applications as network tools, routing, securing ports, configuring network address translations, and confirming reconfigurations.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 1020.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 4020 - Quality Management Standards for IT♦


    (5 cr.) Organizations in all sectors, including small businesses, government departments, and educational institutions, employ the use of quality management in information systems for a variety of reasons, such as meeting consumer’s requirements, complying with regulations, and reaching environmental goals. Students in this course explore the history of the quality revolution and the practices and standards used by today’s information technology organizations to ensure quality. Students engage in exercises, analyses, and discussions on total quality management (TQM) guidelines, Six Sigma improvement methodology, International Organization for Standardization (ISO) quality standards, Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) standards, personal software process (PSP), team software process (TSP), and the metrics used to measure success of quality initiatives. Students also learn to use tools and techniques to analyze a quality problem to make recommendations for improvement.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2050.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 4030 - Systems Integration♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the systems integration approaches used by today’s information technology organizations to learn what makes them more effective, efficient, and competitive. They explore the functions of enterprise application integration (EAI) practices, middleware models, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) integration challenges, service-oriented architecture (SOA), and integration using cloud computing. Through a hands-on approach, students learn to solve an integration problem by designing an appropriate architecture.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2050 and ITEC 2080.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 4101 - Network Security♦


    (5 cr.) Technological innovation has led us to store all types of information on the Web, such as medical records, financial data, and personal communications. We rely on this information to be safe from external attacks. Preventing such threats is a vital role in the field of information technology. Students in this course have an overview of network security defense techniques and countermeasures. Students sharpen their communication and analytical skills through the discussion and debate of a variety of topics, such as cryptanalysis and attacks, safety of wireless connections, intrusion detection methods, and access control. They engage in assignments designed to provide them with practical applications of content, such as the design and configuration of firewalls, traffic analysis and filtering, intrusion detection, statistical anomaly detection, and wireless security.
    \n  (Prerequisite(s): STAT 3001 OR STAT 2001 OR STAT 3401 OR ITEC 3101 OR CMIS 4102.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 4102 - Application Software Security♦


    (5 cr.) In the past, security measures were merely supplemental to software design, but with the increasing threat of hackers who manipulate applications and steal or modify important data, countermeasures are vital to protect applications from vulnerability. In this course, students have an overview of best practices in developing secure software applications and the tools for investigating anomalies and vulnerabilities in application software. Students engage in a variety of course assignments focusing on related topics, including buffer overflow, structured query language (SQL) injections, selected programming and scripting languages, and the security of web applications on both the client and server side.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2080 and ITEC 3020.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 4103 - Computer Forensics♦


    (5 cr.) As we adapt to the digital revolution, an increasing number of cases, both civil and high-profile, rely on data identification, recovery, and preservation of digital evidence. We also rely on computer forensics for the prevention and prosecution of criminal activity, such as child pornography, financial fraud, and personal identify theft. In this course, students learn procedures and tools for collecting and investigating evidence from illegal or inappropriate computer use. They also engage in a range of assignments and activities focusing on the legal, ethical, and policy implications of various forensic techniques and monitoring practices.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 3101, ITEC 4101, and ITEC 4102.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 4201 - Database Administration♦


    (5 cr.) The database administrator plays an integral role in ensuring that the information on which organizations rely is organized, efficient, and secure. In this course, students identify the range of tasks a database administrator performs, including disaster recovery, performance analysis and tuning, data dictionary maintenance, data modeling and optimization, and database and user management and monitoring. They also assess the techniques, tools, and best practices used in managing a relational database. Students apply concepts presented in the course to practical exercises involving installation, management, performance monitoring, creation of users and user privileges, backup, and recovery.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2060.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 4203 - Fault-Tolerant Systems♦


    (5 cr.) Businesses rely on stable, secure systems to run their organizational operations. If a system is disrupted or encounters problems, it may result in loss of money, time, or customer faith. Effective data center operation helps to provide assurance that the integrity and functionality of a system is at low risk of disruption or threat. Students in this course explore the study and application of the principles of fault-tolerant systems (failsafe) and networks, which are used to ensure systems continue to operate appropriately, even if one or more components fail. They learn about a variety of topics, including design; modeling; analysis; and integration of hardware, software, and redundancy techniques to achieve dependable systems. Students also examine performance and reliability evaluation techniques, system diagnosis, disaster recovery planning, backup strategies for data and hardware, virus monitoring, and associated security and administration issues.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2020 and ITEC 4020.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 4302 - Network Planning and Maintenance♦


    (5 cr.) Before a business can establish a new network or service, they must ensure that the system or service meets their specific needs and requirements. Once a system is in place, they must continue to ensure that the network is optimized, connected appropriately, and free of critical threats, such as viruses and spyware. In this course, students learn about the specifics of planning, maintaining, and auditing data communications and networks in an organization. Students engage in assignments focusing on business planning, long- and short-term planning, operations, maintenance, and forecasting. They also explore topological design, network synthesis, and network realization.
      (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2020 and 4020.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
 

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