2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Oct 17, 2021  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    CRJS 5217 - Technological Solutions and 21st-Century Crime


    (5 cr.) In this course, students learn about the relationship of technology and criminal activity, which includes current trends in cyber crime. Not only will students gain a comprehensive view of cyber crime, they will learn how technology is used by law enforcement agencies to track and apprehend such criminals. Students are provided with technique scenarios for solving the crimes. Methods to deal with the problem are introduced, and students study legal responses for these issues. By identifying, data mining, protecting, and gathering evidence, students will have a comprehensive understanding of solving and prosecuting these crimes. Additionally, techniques and tools used to build and solve cyber crime cases are presented and analyzed.
  
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    CRJS 5511 - Special Populations


    (5 cr.) Students in this course perform an in-depth analysis of treatment of women and people of color as professionals, litigants, victims, and offenders in the criminal justice system. They further examine systemic outcomes of the intersections of race, class, sexual orientation, and gender for these groups in relation to social justice and social inequality. Through critical examination of readings and data analysis, students will come to understand the complexity of the historical relationship between these groups and the American criminal justice system and broader social context.
  
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    CRJS 6000 - Foundations of Graduate Study


    (1 cr.) Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.
  
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    CRJS 6002 - Foundations of Graduate Study


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.
  
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    CRJS 6100 - Critical Issues in Emergency Management♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the theories and concepts underpinning contemporary emergency management and how to understand the phenomena of natural and human-caused disasters. Students examine the historical context of emergency management, the general process of risk assessment, the emergency management cycle, communications within emergency management and crisis planning, and the general policy and legal framework surrounding the process of emergency management in the United States with a focus on the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Case studies of major catastrophes are used to explore contemporary and practical hazard management. Students can complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute courses IS-100.b - Introduction to Incident Command System and either IS-800.b - National Response Framework: An Introduction or IS700.a - National Incident Management System as part of this course. Nationally recognized certificates are awarded for successful completion of FEMA courses.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6111 - Informational Technology in Criminal Justice


    (5 cr.) In the 21st century, criminal justice organizations have evolved in the way they use records and data management systems to protect and gather evidence. While new technologies and the use of social media have increased and have assisted criminal justice professionals in tracking and apprehending criminals, there still are challenges for law enforcement, the courts, and prison systems. In this course, students will explore case studies related to challenges with protecting and collecting evidence as well as ethical dilemmas with the use of technology. Students examine how technology is used in criminal law, law enforcement, criminal procedures, or court procedures. In addition, students can look into the future of information technology as it relates to criminal justice.
  
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    CRJS 6136 - Criminal Behavior


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with contemporary views, theories, and case-study analysis of maladaptive and criminal behavior, victimology, and victim-offender relationships. A broad conceptualization of criminal behavior, such as that woven from biological, sociological, and psychological perspectives is explored and evaluated. Theories of crime and the application of risk factors associated with criminal behavior are examined. Additionally, students will be exposed to specific offender groups, both violent and nonviolent, including psychopaths, serial and mass murderers, criminal paraphiliacs, arsonists, white-collar thieves, scam artists, domestic terrorists, and others.
  
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    CRJS 6137 - The Nature of Crime and Criminology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to contemporary views and theories of maladaptive and criminal behavior. They examine a broad conceptualization of criminal behavior from an interdisciplinary perspective as well as theories and application of criminal profiling. Students also explore specific views of criminal behavior germane to groups, such as psychopaths, serial offenders, and sexually violent predators. At the end of this course, students will have an understanding of the theories and practices that are the foundations of the field of criminology.
  
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    CRJS 6200 - Risk Assessment, Preparedness, and Disaster Mitigation♦


    (5 cr.) Risk assessment and mitigation are key components to effective emergency management and all-hazard planning and response. Students in this course focus on the methods and techniques required to assess an organization or government’s risk associated with the protection of human life and capital assets. They study ways to evaluate the social vulnerabilities to disaster and the special needs of at-risk populations, and they explore methods to reduce vulnerabilities and build capacity through structural and nonstructural mitigation. Additionally, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS-393.a: Introduction to Hazard Mitigation as part of this course.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6201 - Psychological Aspects of Violent Crime


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students explore the nature and extent of the psychological nexus of criminal homicide across various environments to include serial, mass, spree, workplace violence homicide, school shooter homicide, and child abduction homicide. Students will examine the theories and trends of these types of violent crime regarding offender and victim psychological and behavioral characteristics.
  
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    CRJS 6202 - Human Trafficking


    (5 cr.) Human trafficking is one of the most serious and widespread types of crime occurring at both the national and international levels. Human trafficking is a complex and global issue that is driven by economic, social, and political forces and has many direct impacts at the regional, national, and international levels. In this course, students explore the types (labor and sex trafficking), prevalence, risk factors, responses, and best practices related to treatment in order to address this human rights issue. Students also complete authentic assessments designed to simulate real-world professional tasks required in the field. Students will develop critical-thinking skills and engage in reflective practice regarding the law enforcement response to human trafficking and many impacts to direct victims and communities.
  
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    CRJS 6203 - Victimology♦


    (5 cr.) What is the relationship between victims and those who commit crimes against them, and how does the criminal justice system protect and respond to victims of crime? In this course, students have the opportunity to answer such questions through a comprehensive assessment of victimology, a relatively new discipline in the field of criminal justice. Students examine victim patterns and tendencies and learn how victims interact with the police and the legal system. They also examine how factors of class, race, and sexual orientation affect the perception of the victim by different constituents, including the public, the court system, and the media. Students assess and discuss the concept of primary and secondary victims and gain practical insight on a range of services and resources available to all types of victims.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6204 - Sex Offender Behavior and Treatment


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore the traits and behaviors of both deviant and criminal sex offenders. Legal issues raised in both criminal and civil cases that involve sex offenses will be discussed. Students analyze the empirical evidence behind various assessment tools and treatment plans for sex offenders. They evaluate the risk for future sexual offense behavior and whether the protection of society outweighs the loss of civil liberty experienced by civil commitment for sex offenders. 
  
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    CRJS 6205 - Psychological Aspect of Cybercrimes


    (5 cr.) In this course, students review the psychobehavioral factors of criminals who engage in criminal activities using digital social media and other online resources. Students analyze the types and trends of both domestic and global cybercrime. In addition, students will examine characteristics of cyber perpetrators and cyber victims. Students are also provided a foundational understanding of the origins and consequences of human trafficking; sexual exploitation of children from psychological, social, and legal perspectives; and how technology facilitates these types of crimes. Students in this course examine the best practices in preventing and responding to cybercrimes.
  
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    CRJS 6215 - Controversies in Criminal Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Justice is at the heart of the U.S. democratic system, yet opposing viewpoints surrounding and within the system often muddle interpretations of the law and the development of policies to promote and enforce justice. In this course, students examine events that have significantly changed how the legal system interprets the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Code, and the U.S. Patriot Act, for example, the terrorist acts of September 11, 2001. They learn how social and historical changes have shifted perspectives and sparked debates on expanding the rights of government versus safeguarding personal civil rights and civil liberties. Through discussion with peers, assessment of contemporary articles, and examination of Supreme Course cases, students have the opportunity to reflect on and potentially broaden their own opinions and perspectives on current criminal justice affairs in regard to issues of law enforcement, public perception, policy development, and ethics.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6216 - Criminal Justice Research♦


    (5 cr.) Criminal justice encompasses many roles and responsibilities, including responding to victims, punishing or rehabilitating criminals, and developing laws and policies. To carry out these tasks effectively and responsibly, taking into account current trends and ethical considerations, criminal justice professionals need to understand underlying factors, such as the root causes of crime and the impact of crime on communities. In this course, students examine a range of research methodologies, including quantitative and qualitative methods, that professionals use to collect data and analyze trends in criminal justice. They examine models, metrics, and tools used to evaluate criminal justice programs and policies, and they assess the strengths and limitations of research methods. Students also learn about threats to the validity of data and consider the legal and ethical issues associated with research and evaluation methods.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6217 - Technological Solutions and 21st-Century Crime♦


    (5 cr.) In consideration of modern technological innovation and the spread of knowledge through digital means, the relationship between technology and criminal activity is increasing. In this course, students explore this relationship and gain a comprehensive view of cyber crime, including current trends. They learn how law enforcement agencies use technology to track and apprehend criminals. Through real-world scenarios, students examine legal responses to cyber crime and learn different approaches and techniques for solving cyber crimes and handling related challenges. Students also have the opportunity to gain a comprehensive understanding of building cases and prosecuting crimes through practical exercises in identification, data mining, and the protection and gathering of evidence.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6218 - Applied Communications♦


    (5 cr.) Practitioners in the field of criminal justice must be adept in preparing communications for colleagues, supervisors, and the public. In this course, students have the opportunity to develop the skills needed to produce effective documents that criminal justice professionals use on a daily basis, such as court records, data analysis reports, and program-implementation plans. Student learn how to conduct interviews, gather background information, and use decision-making and critical-thinking skills to create clear, concise communications. They broaden their ability to write for a specific purpose and a highly defined audience as they incorporate criminal justice principles and practices into a variety of communication tools.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6245 - Social Psychology


    (5 cr.) In this course, students use the lens of social psychology to examine both social cognitions and social behavior—nearly all phenomena that pertain to the individual in society. Students explore the topics of perceptions, attitudes, relationships and attraction, the motivation to help others, prejudice and aggression, conformity and obedience, group behavior, and the influence of culture, and they consider how knowledge of these topics can be used to effect positive social change. The application of what students learn in this course culminates in a final project in which they develop a plan for using social psychology research to address a significant social problem. Moreover, their learning in this course will extend to their personal and professional lives and truly enable students to effect positive social change as scholar-practitioners committed to doing so.
  
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    CRJS 6280 - Policy and Politics in American Political Institutions♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the crafts of policymaking and policy analysis in the U.S. democratic system. They cover the policy process—setting agendas, using policy analysis tools, managing the political process, implementing policy, and providing evaluations and feedback. Students develop skills in policy and economic analyses as well as in determining the political feasibility of proposed policies. Regulation as a policy choice will be discussed. Students completing this course will enhance their abilities to develop alternatives and to assess strategies proposed to achieve certain policy objectives. Policy areas of interest to students form the foundation of this course and may include communications, immigration, social, transportation, housing, labor, arts, and environmental policies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6281 - Program Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive an introduction to the tools used by policymakers and policy analysts to evaluate the impact of social programs. Topics include selecting programs to evaluate, crafting program descriptions, identifying stakeholders and their interests, developing logic models, framing evaluation questions, applying utilization-focused evaluation techniques, using quantitative and qualitative tools to complete formative and summative evaluations, and providing evaluation reports and feedback to decision makers. By the end of the course, each student will develop a program-evaluation design for a social program.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6282 - Public Policy and Finance♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover microeconomic and macroeconomic models used in policy formulation, as well as how public finance influences policy choices and implementation alternatives. Students examine tax policies and tax incentive models, budgeting, public/private models, market influences on policy, the impact of government expenditures on income redistribution, and economic considerations of welfare, food stamps, workers’ compensation, and Social Security. Students also examine outsourcing of public programs.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6300 - Disaster Response and Recovery♦


    (5 cr.) A major concern of disaster response professionals is meeting basic and humanitarian needs of disaster-affected populations. In this course, students explore a range of issues, including evacuation, relocation, and tactical and strategic decisions in the immediate aftermath of an emergency episode. Students study important federal policies related to disaster response and recovery, including the National Response Framework (NRF), and they can gain an understanding of how local, state, and federal policies mesh in response and recovery efforts. Through their exploration, they study how recovery begins once the immediate threat of the emergency wanes and the focus shifts to restoring disaster-affected areas. As part of this course, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS208.a: State Disaster Management.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6320 - Public Policy Implications of Terrorism Legislation and Policies


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive a broad perspective on the history of the U.S. Patriot Act, similar terroristic legislation and immigration laws, and their policy implications on law enforcement, governmental entities, organizations, and individuals. Public administrators and public policy analysts who are charged with drafting and implementing public policy and enforcing and/or responding to potential terroristic threats build a basic foundation, while simultaneously upholding and protecting constitutional freedoms. Material for this course is drawn from contemporary texts, websites, case studies, and material representing international, national, and local governments and organizations. Learners critically review and analyze the U.S. Patriot Act and similar terroristic legislation and policies, and they participate in online discussions about these laws and their implications on U.S. constitutional freedoms.
  
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    CRJS 6321 - Terrorism: A Systemic Approach for Emergency Preparedness♦


    (5 cr.) Participants in this course receive an overview of terrorism—local, national, and international—and the need to develop a systemic approach for emergency preparedness. Topics include, but are not limited to, terrorism overview, terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyber terrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Course participants begin the development and/or analysis of a terrorism preparedness infrastructure and participate in online discussions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6322 - Critical Incident Planning and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the principles of emergency planning, selection of leaders, specialized planning (e.g., schools, tourism), mutual aid, and leadership theories. Students build a basic foundation for public administrators to develop a critical incident plan and also understand leadership theories. Course participants critically analyze case studies, identifying weaknesses and potential solutions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6360 - Public Safety Issues♦


    (5 cr.) This is a comprehensive survey of the issues faced by public safety agencies and personnel at the local, state, and national level, including police and sheriff, emergency medical, and fire services and related organizations. Students emphasize communication and coordination between public safety organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6361 - Managing Public Safety Organizations♦


    (5 cr.) Students taking this course examine how public safety leaders find solutions to major issues confronting their operating systems, both organizations and communities, through research, analysis, planning, and decision making. Students adapt classic business management techniques and leadership principles to public safety operations. The concepts of “first planner” and “first responder” are introduced. Solutions and alternatives to varied situations confronting public safety managers are developed. Emphasis is on systems approaches, environmental analyses, contingency planning, implications for change, coordination, and controls.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6390 - Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course engage in collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration. Students apply a systems perspective to construct a public enterprise model of the public organization of their choice as a way of understanding the strategic context for practical action and the stakeholder relations involved. This is an organization “mental model,” which is similar to a traditional “business model,” but that includes the three interrelated flows of money, knowledge, and influence. Emphasis in this course is on management and leading of the unknown—imagining and creating a future that works in a time of unprecedented and unpredictable change. Students apply strategic scenarios to organizational change for the public organization of special interest to them. Students also develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6391 - Transformative Change in a Shared-Power World♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course engage in collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students are taught a pragmatic action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. The dynamics of complex adaptive systems are studied to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change are studied and applied to a positive organizational change situation of special interest to the students. Students also develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6392 - The Language of Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) In today’s complex environment, leaders engaged in shaping public policy must know how to use the emotional as well as the intellectual power of language to motivate, inspire, and competently manage their organizations. Dynamic leadership requires understanding and use of techniques that affect both conscious and unconscious influences on human behavior. Effective communication connects at many different levels. Students in this course receive both theoretical and practical information; demonstrate the necessary components for making such connections; and show why stories, symbols, and metaphors are essential elements in the language of leadership.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6400 - Strategic Context of Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Students in this course engage in a collaborative study of the changing strategic context of criminal justice management and leadership. Students will understand the strategic context for stakeholder relations needed while resolving issues in criminal justice. They engage in readings and practical assignments that emphasize management and leadership in a time of unprecedented and unpredictable change. Students also work toward being able to apply data and statistics to engage communities and to design program evaluations.
  
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    CRJS 6405 - Ethics and Social Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. Students in this course explore ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students use demographic data and current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6420 - Organizational Management and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Public and nonprofit leaders require a deep understanding of their roles as directors and managers of diverse and complex organizations. Students in this course examine the distinction among leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development from a theoretical and applied perspective. Students apply principles to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6431 - Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector♦


    (5 cr.) Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. Students in this course examine finance and budgeting concepts, policies and practices related to organizations, as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. Students gain an understanding of theories motivating major fiscal-policy debates; read, analyze, and construct budgets; and read and analyze financial statements and reports. Other topics include auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems specific to government organizations, and the use of dashboards for financial reporting. Students apply what they learn to develop a budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6435 - Human Resource Management: Building a Capable Workforce♦


    (5 cr.) The acquisition, development, and retention of talent are critical to the success of any organization. Students in this course examine theories, approaches, and systems related to the acquisition, management, development, and retention of employees in government and nonprofit organizations. Students explore topics including legal and ethical considerations; diversity, performance management, technology, and conflict management; and the establishment and implementation of policies through the use of case studies. Students apply principles learned in this course to situations encountered in public, private, and nonprofit organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6465 - Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination♦


    (5 cr.) In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public and nonprofit organizations need to be strategic in their planning in order to fulfill the organizational mission and enhance stakeholder satisfaction. Students in this course explore the role and process of strategic planning with an appreciation for collaboration, cooperation, and coordination as these elements relate to the strategic planning process. Students apply these concepts to real-life situations and organizations and develop a strategic plan.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6511 - Special Populations♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an in-depth analysis of the treatment of women and people of color as professionals, litigants, victims, and offenders in the criminal justice system. Students examine the systemic outcomes of the intersections of race, class, sexual orientation, and gender for these groups as they relate to social justice and social inequality. Through critical examination of readings and data analysis, students learn about the complexity of the historical relationship between these groups and the U.S. criminal justice system and broader social context.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6540 - Management and Leadership in a Global Context♦


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in various types of organizations. In this course, learners engage in a collaborative study of strategic planning, management, and leadership in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. Students in this course identify, analyze, and evaluate the intricate relationships among strategic planning, management, and leadership from an international perspective. Students connect three key institutional elements: “Thinking-Acting-and-Leading” strategically. Students apply a management systems approach as they develop, adopt, manage, and lead a strategic plan for an international public or nonprofit organization or with an international focus. Students will understand the strategic context for practical decision making for international public and nonprofit organizations, emphasizing the central role of the environment in the strategic planning process. Students are offered a hands-on approach in this course that tests their ability to make effective and timely management and leadership decisions in complex and uncertain conditions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6541 - Sustainable Development for Global Communities♦


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change; assess community needs and resources; create community visions; promote stakeholder interest and participation; analyze community problems; and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models, and they apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6542 - Transformative Change in a Global Environment♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6740 - Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma♦


    (5 cr.) Students taking this course define natural and human-made disasters such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities, and review how they impact the psychology of individuals and groups. Topics include theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with the trauma. Students focus on the importance and development of culturally appropriate service delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disaster(s).
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6741 - Psychology of Terrorism♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the history, philosophy, techniques, and countermeasures to terroristic threats to public safety. Topics include aspects of international and domestic terrorism with an emphasis on its roots viewed from the broadest possible political, sociological, and cultural perspectives; factors and catalysts attributed to the terrorism phenomena, including poverty, psychology (e.g., motivational factors, antisocial behaviors), social injustice, oppression, and religion; and impact of media and technology in aiding and countering terroristic activities.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6742 - Conflict, Conflict Resolution, and Peace


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students engage in a study of conflict, conflict resolution, and peace from psychological and social psychological perspectives. Students examine the concept of conflict and methods of addressing it, including management, resolution, and transformation; theories related to conflict resolution; approaches to conflict resolution, including negotiation and third-party interventions; and social psychological factors that influence conflict and conflict resolution. They also consider the influence of culture in conflict and conflict resolution; the role of ethics; intractable and international conflicts; the concept of peace; and how third-party approaches can contribute to the peace process. Students apply conflict resolution approaches to conflicts at all levels, from interpersonal to those involving whole nations.
  
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    CRJS 6743 - Criminal Justice Strategies for Terrorism


    (5 cr.) As the field of criminal justice has evolved, it has become essential for its professions to develop strategies in response to terrorism. In this course, students will explore the history of terrorism to understand the historical trends and motivations. They will examine controversial policies and practices by debating issues with colleagues in the Discussion boards. Students will look at domestic and international perspectives on terrorism, the refugee crisis, ungoverned areas, and safe havens. They will explore cyber crime and its relationship to terrorism. Finally, students will examine the prevention of terrorism.
  
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    CRJS 6810 - Fundamentals of Law and Public Policy♦


    (5 cr.) Legal decisions and the law have an impact on the creation of public policy. Students in this course explore the relationship between laws and public policy and the impact court decisions have on policy and policy leaders. Topics include legal concepts and terminology, legal jurisdictions, case law, seminal cases, and the Supreme Court’s roles and procedures. Students apply fundamental legal concepts and principles to case studies and contemporary problems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6811 - Legal Research for Policy Practitioners♦


    (5 cr.) There is a wealth of vital legal knowledge available to public policy practitioners. In this course, students will be introduced to a number of print and electronic resources available for legal research, and they will gain an understanding of how the law is used to inform the creation of public policy. Topics include navigating legal libraries, citing cases, and using research to support public policy. Students apply legal research to case studies and contemporary issues.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6812 - Contemporary Cases and Issues in the Courts♦


    (5 cr.)

    Major issues in the Supreme Court have an impact on public policy at the state and local levels. In this course, students examine major past and current U.S. Supreme Court decisions and explore how these decisions affect public policy. Topics include individual rights, property rights, administrative law, immigration law, and foreign policy. Students apply legal research and verdicts to case studies and current issues.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    CRJS 6830 - Current Issues in Homeland Security♦


    (5 cr.) Since its inception, the Department of Homeland Security has profoundly impacted public policy and administration. Students in this course examine homeland security history, concepts, policies, and strategies of prevention and response. Topics include ethical issues, telecommunications, technology, threat assessment, contingency planning, and risk management. Students apply fundamental concepts and principles of homeland security to case studies and current issues.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6831 - Critical Incident Leadership and Planning♦


    (5 cr.) Strategic leadership is required to address the challenges and complexities of homeland security. To respond to critical incidents while and after they occur, leaders must plan tactically and understand how to obtain and mobilize resources. Students explore the roles of leaders in relation to activating or coordinating funding, personnel, jurisdictional issues, training, communication, information management, technology, and healthcare in order to create an effective response to homeland security needs. Course participants critically analyze case studies, identifying weaknesses and potential solutions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6832 - Terrorism: Legislation and Policy♦


    (5 cr.) The events of September 11, 2001, resulted in a new and intense focus on the issue of terrorism in the United States and abroad. Through traditional literature and a wealth of contemporary journal articles and media sources, students explore the history of terrorism, the evolution and international context of terrorist groups, and the causes of and motivations for terrorist acts. They learn about the laws, regulations, and legislation related to terrorism. They also analyze possible future trends in terrorism as well as the current role of the media, governmental agencies, and entities in the prevention of and response to terrorism. Students use concepts presented in the course and additional research to develop a proposal to change and improve an existing counterterrorism policy.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 6910 - Capstone: Criminal Justice Ethics and Social Justice


    (5 cr.) Ethical behavior is an essential element of leadership. In this course, students examine the philosophy of ethics as well as responsibility and social justice—the basic tenets of public service. Through a combination of seminal texts and contemporary case studies, students explore the complex social, political, and ethical challenges leaders face as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. Course topics focus upon ethics and social justice involving economic disparity, political power, and social privilege. Students analyze current social trends related to the ethical and social justice issues of a global community. Throughout the course, students assess emerging or persistent ethical and social justice issues and make recommendations for resolving specific dilemmas.
  
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    CRJS 8002 - Foundations of Doctoral Study


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in public policy and administration.
  
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    CRJS 8100 - Critical Issues in Emergency Management


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the theories and concepts underpinning contemporary emergency management and how to understand the phenomena of natural and human-caused disasters. Students examine the historical context of emergency management, the general process of risk assessment, the emergency management cycle, communications within emergency management and crisis planning, and the general policy and legal framework surrounding the process of emergency management in the United States with a focus on the National Incident Management System (NIMS.). Case studies of major catastrophes are used to explore contemporary and practical hazard management. Students can complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute courses IS-100.b - Introduction to Incident Command System and either IS-800.b - National Response Framework: An Introduction or IS700.a - National Incident Management System as part of this course. Nationally recognized certificates are awarded for successful completion of FEMA courses.
  
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    CRJS 8115 - Writing a Quality Prospectus


    (5 cr.) The prospectus is a brief paper, typically 15–20 pages in length, that helps students organize, delineate, and make decisions regarding their doctoral study and appropriate research methodology. Students create a prospectus to establish the background for the problem statement; the problem statement itself; a survey of the relevant literature (typically 25–75 references); and a research, implementation, and evaluation plan for the solution of the problem. Students in this 5-credit course focus specifically on the process of writing the dissertation prospectus. They employ their preliminary research plan to develop a problem statement for their dissertation. Students further refine the problem statement and carry out the planning and the library research that lends to the formulation of a dissertation prospectus.
  
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    CRJS 8137 - The Nature of Crime and Criminology 


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to contemporary views and theories of maladaptive and criminal behavior. They examine a broad conceptualization of criminal behavior from an interdisciplinary perspective as well as theories and application of criminal profiling. Students also explore specific views of criminal behavior germane to groups, such as psychopaths, serial offenders, and sexually violent predators. At the end of this course, students will have an understanding of the theories and practices that are the foundations of the field of criminology.
  
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    CRJS 8171 - Theories and Frameworks for Adult Learning


    (5 cr.) To understand adult learning, one must ask and answer complex questions: Who is the adult learner? What is the social context of learning? What motivates adult learners? In this course, education professionals explore the theories and frameworks that inform the field of adult learning today. They identify, compare, and contrast foundational and emerging perspectives on adult learning with the aim of transforming theory into practice. They engage in an integrative course project through which they synthesize and apply various theories to real-world situations, including their own development; summarize how the idea of wisdom impacts their experiences as adult learners; interview an adult learner; and assess various perspectives in regard to educating diverse learners.
  
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    CRJS 8177 - Using Technology to Enhance Adult Learning


    (5 cr.) Emerging technologies are rapidly altering the field of adult education today. Innovative technologies are removing traditional boundaries to learning and encouraging a global perspective on school, work, and communications. New developments in software, multimedia applications, Internet technologies, and mobile computing are transforming the educational landscape and empowering learners around the world. Educators and students leverage these advances to enhance the learning process and improve outcomes in today’s digital information society.
  
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    CRJS 8200 - Risk Assessment, Preparedness, and Hazard Mitigation


    (5 cr.) Risk assessment and mitigation are key components to effective emergency management and all-hazard planning and response. Students in this course focus on the methods and techniques required to assess an organization or government’s risk associated with the protection of human life and capital assets. They study ways to evaluate the social vulnerabilities to disaster and the special needs of at-risk populations, and they explore methods to reduce vulnerabilities and build capacity through structural and nonstructural mitigation. Additionally, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS-393.a: Introduction to Hazard Mitigation as part of this course.
  
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    CRJS 8203 - Victimology


    (5 cr.) What is the relationship between victims and those who commit crimes against them, and how does the criminal justice system protect and respond to victims of crime? In this course, students have the opportunity to answer such questions through a comprehensive assessment of victimology, a relatively new discipline in the field of criminal justice. Students examine victim patterns and tendencies and learn how victims interact with the police and the legal system. They also examine how factors of class, race, and sexual orientation affect the perception of the victim by different constituents, including the public, the court system, and the media. Students assess and discuss the concept of primary and secondary victims and gain practical insight on a range of services and resources available to all types of victims.
  
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    CRJS 8215 - Controversies in Criminal Justice


    (5 cr.) In this course, students review recent events that have significantly changed how the legal system interprets the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Code, and the U.S. Patriot Act. Students analyze case studies to further explore relevant events, such as how the terrorist acts of September 11, 2001, have broadened the interpretation of certain areas of the law. Students heighten their understanding of how social and historical changes have shifted perspectives and sparked debates on expanding the rights of government versus safeguarding personal civil rights and civil liberties.
  
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    CRJS 8217 - Technological Solutions and 21st-Century Crime 


    (5 cr.) In consideration of modern technological innovation and the spread of knowledge through digital means, the relationship between technology and criminal activity is increasing. In this course, students explore this relationship and gain a comprehensive view of cyber crime, including current trends. They learn how law enforcement agencies use technology to track and apprehend criminals. Through real-world scenarios, students examine legal responses to cyber crime and learn different approaches and techniques for solving cyber crimes and handling related challenges. Students also have the opportunity to gain a comprehensive understanding of building cases and prosecuting crimes through practical exercises in identification, data mining, and the protection and gathering of evidence.
  
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    CRJS 8300 - Disaster Response and Recovery


    (5 cr.) A major concern of disaster response professionals is meeting basic and humanitarian needs of disaster-affected populations. In this course, students explore a range of issue, including evacuation, relocation, and tactical and strategic decisions in the immediate aftermath of an emergency episode. Students study important federal policies related to disaster response and recovery, including the National Response Framework (NRF), and they can gain an understanding of how local, state, and federal policies mesh in response and recovery efforts. Through their exploration, they study how recovery begins once the immediate threat of the emergency wanes and the focus shifts to restoring disaster-affected areas. As part of this course, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS208.a: State Disaster Management.
  
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    CRJS 8320 - Public Policy Implications of Terrorism Legislation and Policies


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a broad perspective on the history of the U.S. Patriot Act, similar terroristic legislation and immigration laws, and their policy implications on law enforcement, governmental entities, organizations, and individuals. They receive a basic foundation upon which to build for those public administrators and public policy analysts who are charged with drafting and implementing public policy and enforcing and/or responding to potential terroristic threats, while simultaneously upholding and protecting constitutional freedoms. Material for this course is drawn from contemporary texts, websites, case studies, and material representing international, national, and local governments and organizations. Students critically review and analyze the U.S. Patriot Act and similar terroristic legislation and policies, and they participate in online discussions about these laws and their implications on U.S. constitutional freedoms.
  
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    CRJS 8321 - Terrorism: A Systemic Approach for Emergency Management


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of terrorism—local, national, and international—and the need to develop a systemic approach for emergency preparedness. Topics include, but are not limited to, terrorism overview, terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyber terrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Course participants begin the development and/or analysis of a terrorism preparedness infrastructure and participate in online discussions.
  
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    CRJS 8322 - Critical Incident Planning and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the principles of emergency planning, selection of leaders, specialized planning (e.g., schools, tourism), mutual aid, and leadership theories. Public administrators receive a basic foundation to develop a critical incident plan and also understand leadership theories. Course participants critically analyze case studies, identifying weaknesses and potential solutions.
  
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    CRJS 8350 - History and Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice


    (5 cr.) Students in this course look at the evolution of crime—from lone criminals to worldwide syndicates—using the scientific rigor built into the selected readings and discussions. Among the topics examined are the philosophy of community- and problem-oriented policing, transnational crime, terrorism, and the new nexus between them. Current and future leaders are equipped with the knowledge and depth of understanding to assess and manage the opportunities, innovations, and challenges in their profession.
  
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    CRJS 8351 - Policy and Analysis in Criminal Justice Systems


    (5 cr.) Criminal justice professionals must understand the various factors that influence the development of criminal justice policy, and how to evaluate whether existing policy meets its objectives. In this course, students will examine the principles of policy analysis and the role that scientific information plays in the development of criminal justice policy. Topics explored include policing, corrections, and sentencing; juvenile justice; the relationship among drugs, race, and crime; deterrence as a crime control policy; and the use of public registries. Through further analysis of criminal justice policies, students determine how these policies have changed over time, gaining insight into possible future trends of policy development and analysis.
  
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    CRJS 8352 - Leadership: Putting Theory into Practice in Criminal Justice Administration


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the problems that currently confront the administration of the criminal justice system, as well as problems predicted for the future. To be prepared to lead efforts to address these challenges, students acquire powerful models for strategic, critical, and reflective thinking. Students immerse themselves in discussion about the major components of effective justice administration: organizational thought and theory, leadership, human capital, policy development and implementation, and collaboration with other public safety and community organizations.
  
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    CRJS 8381 - Program Evaluation


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the tools used by policymakers and policy analysts to evaluate the impact of social programs. Topics include selecting programs to evaluate, crafting program descriptions, identifying stakeholders and their interests, developing logic models, framing evaluation questions, applying utilization-focused evaluation techniques, using quantitative and qualitative tools to complete formative and summative evaluations, and providing evaluation reports and feedback to decision makers. By the end of the course, each student will develop a program-evaluation design for a social program.
  
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    CRJS 8390 - Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in either a public organization, a private one, a nonprofit one, or a combined or networked one. Learners engage in a collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration as they apply a strategic planning and management approach to the implementation of public policy. Learners are introduced to planning, management, financial management, performance management, and contracting processes in the organization whose purpose it is to implement public policy.
  
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    CRJS 8391 - Transformative Change in a Shared Power World


    (5 cr.) Students in this course engage in collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students learn a pragmatic-action learning process for learning from the experience of transformative change in complex systems. The dynamics of complex adaptive systems are studied to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change are studied and applied to a positive organizational change situation of special interest to the students. Students also develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
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    CRJS 8392 - The Language of Leadership


    (5 cr.) In today’s complex environment, leaders engaged in shaping public policy must know how to use the emotional as well as the intellectual power of language to motivate, inspire, and competently manage their organizations. Dynamic leadership requires understanding and use of techniques that affect both conscious and unconscious influences on human behavior. Effective communication connects at many different levels. Students gain both theoretical and practical information demonstrating the necessary components for making such connections and showing why stories, symbols, and metaphors are essential elements in the language of leadership.
  
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    CRJS 8400 - Strategic Context of Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Students in this course engage in a collaborative study of the changing strategic context of criminal justice management and leadership. Students will understand the strategic context for stakeholder relations needed while resolving issues in criminal justice. They engage in readings and practical assignments that emphasize management and leadership in a time of unprecedented and unpredictable change. Students also work toward being able to apply data and statistics to engage communities and to design program evaluations.

     

     

  
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    CRJS 8511 - Special Populations


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an in-depth analysis of the treatment of women and people of color as professionals, litigants, victims, and offenders in the criminal justice system. Students examine the systemic outcomes of the intersections of race, class, sexual orientation, and gender for these groups as they relate to social justice and social inequality. Through critical examination of readings and data analysis, students learn about the complexity of the historical relationship between these groups and the U.S. criminal justice system and broader social context.
  
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    CRJS 8540 - Management and Leadership in a Global Context


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in various types of organizations. In this course, learners engage in a collaborative study of strategic planning, management, and leadership in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. Students in this course identify, analyze, and evaluate the intricate relationships between strategic planning, management, and leadership from an international perspective. Students connect three key institutional elements: thinking, acting, and leading strategically. Students apply a management systems approach as they develop, adopt, manage, and lead a strategic plan for an international public or nonprofit organization or with an international focus. Students will understand the strategic context for practical decision making for international public and nonprofit organizations, emphasizing the central role of the environment in the strategic planning process. Students are offered a hands-on approach in this course that tests their ability to make effective and timely management and leadership decisions in complex and uncertain conditions.
     
  
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    CRJS 8541 - Sustainable Development for Global Communities


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change; assess community needs and resources; create community visions; promote stakeholder interest and participation; analyze community problems; and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models, and they apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning.
     
  
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    CRJS 8542 - Transformative Change in a Global Environment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
     
  
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    CRJS 8763 - Principles of Instructional Design 


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are presented with an overview of instructional design, including its historical foundations, theories, and models. Students analyze learning theories in relation to instructional design theories and their philosophy toward teaching. Students critically analyze and apply taxonomies, course outcomes, learning objectives, instructional strategies, and assessment and evaluation approaches. Students also analyze challenges and future trends in instructional design for higher education and consider their role as agents of positive social change.
  
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    CRJS 8764 - Instructional Design for Online Course Development


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore instructional design for the development of online courses. Different types of online courses and the roles of online instructors are addressed. Students analyze learning theories and approaches for promoting community in online classrooms. Students analyze criteria for developing learning objectives and online instructional strategies in relation to diverse student populations. Issues related to technology, copyright compliance, fair use, and academic integrity are explored. Students analyze assessment and evaluation approaches and explore future trends in online higher education in relation to delivery of instruction and positive social change.
  
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    CRJS 8810 - Fundamentals of Law and Public Policy


    (5 cr.) Legal decisions and the law have an impact on the creation of public policy. Students in this course explore the relationship between laws and public policy and the impact court decisions have on policy and policy leaders. Topics include legal concepts and terminology, legal jurisdictions, case law, seminal cases, and the Supreme Court’s roles and procedures. Students apply fundamental legal concepts and principles to case studies and contemporary problems.
  
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    CRJS 8811 - Legal Research for Public Policy


    (5 cr.) There is a wealth of vital legal knowledge available to public policy practitioners. In this course, students will be introduced to a number of print and electronic resources available for legal research and will gain an understanding of how the law is used to inform the creation of public policy. Topics include navigating legal libraries, citing cases, and using research to support public policy. Students apply legal research to case studies and contemporary issues.
  
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    CRJS 8812 - Contemporary Cases and Issues in the Courts


    (5 cr.) Major issues in the Supreme Court have an impact on public policy at the state and local levels. In this course, students examine major past and current U.S. Supreme Court decisions and explore how these decisions affect public policy. Topics include individual rights, property rights, administrative law, immigration law, and foreign policy. Students apply legal research and verdicts to case studies and current issues. Outsourcing of public programs is also examined.
  
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    CRJS 9000 - Dissertation


    (5 cr. per term for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion) Through this course, doctoral students have the opportunity to integrate their Program of Study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation independently, with the guidance of a dissertation supervisory committee chair and committee members. Students complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and dissertation. Once students register for CRJS 9000, they will be registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 4 quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Dissertation with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook

  
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    DDBA 8006 - Contemporary Challenges in Business♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students are provided with a foundation for academic and professional success specific to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in the Doctor of Business Administration degree program. The topics covered in this course include change management, crisis management, innovation, and disruptive technology. Students engage in discussion and analyze scholarly literature related to these topics, their personal and professional experiences, and areas of academic interest from a practitioner approach and from a social-change-agent viewpoint. The focus of the course assignments is on the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the promotion of professional business practice and academic excellence. Through their assignments, students emphasize their personal and professional development, including the completion of a personal SWOT analysis and professional development plan.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    DDBA 8100 - Doctoral Study Mentoring


    (0 sem. cr.) The purpose of this course is to assist doctoral students in making steady progress toward the DBA. Students use this course as a forum for ongoing exchange of ideas, input, and feedback with peers and their doctoral study chair. They engage in a variety of activities, providing the tools needed to complete the doctoral study capstone successfully. Students gain practice with various research methods and data-gathering techniques; determine best practices; explore the various resources, including the Walden Library, Writing Center, and Research Center; and prepare a draft and final version of their doctoral study prospectus, which is required to proceed with the final doctoral study.
     

      Note: The “instructor of record” for a section of the course is the chair of the student’s doctoral study committee. Section participants are students who work with faculty members at various stages of their doctoral study.

  
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    DDBA 8101 - Doctoral Study Mentoring


    (1 sem. cr.) The purpose of this course is to assist doctoral independent scholars in making steady progress toward the DBA degree. Independent scholars use this course as a forum for ongoing exchange of ideas, input, and feedback with peers and their doctoral study chair. They engage in a variety of activities, providing the tools needed to complete the doctoral study capstone successfully. They gain practice with various research methods and data-gathering techniques; determine best practices; explore the various resources, including the Walden Library, Writing Center, and Research Center; and prepare a draft and final version of their doctoral study prospectus, which is required to proceed with the final doctoral study. Note: The instructor of record for a section of the course is the chair of the independent scholar’s doctoral study committee. Section participants are independent scholars who work with faculty members at various stages of their doctoral study.
  
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    DDBA 8110 - Business Operations: Systems Perspectives in Global Organizations♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Corporate social impact is of increasing interest because many organizations are moving from a profit-only outlook to a model of social responsibility. Students in this course are immersed in the ways business operates in a global environment, which provides the opportunity to widen professional perspectives. Students engage in variety of writing and creative assignments while exploring a variety of topics, such as supply chain management, process management, quality, innovation, and forecasting. Integrating professional practice at the doctoral level, they employ critical-thinking skills to analyze decision-making motives and techniques in a global operations environment.
     

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    DDBA 8120 - Information Systems: Global Management Strategies and Technologies♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Information technology and systems saturate every aspect of business, from small corner stores to global corporations. Students are provided with broad coverage of information systems management concepts and trends underlying current and future developments as well as principles for providing effective implementation of information systems management in this course. Students use business case studies to gain real-world insight on the impact of information systems on decision making, collaboration, and maintaining business relationships. They engage in discussions on a variety of topics, such as the advantages and disadvantages of global Internet commerce, the role of on- and off-shore workers in a company-wide information system, and the pros and cons of short-cycle time approaches to information systems development. Students develop and define their position and reasoning on a variety of information systems’ current issues as the course progresses. Students also focus on the practical application of writing and the integration of professional practice at the doctoral level.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    DDBA 8130 - Marketing: Strategic Innovation in Globally Diverse Markets♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The current global environment is diverse, technologically reliant, and constantly changing; old skills and tools that were once effective may no longer be efficient for today’s market. In this course, independent scholars examine the global marketplace and identify, adapt, and apply skills and supporting tools that guide them to develop and create a globally competitive advantage in multiple and diverse scenarios and settings. They apply requisite knowledge of marketing concepts, such as the marketing mix, differentiation, and branding for focused markets as essentials for market audit data analysis. Through detailed case studies and marketing audits, independent scholars will develop market analysis skills to determine potential marketing strategies, with an emphasis on the importance of positive social change.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    DDBA 8140 - Finance: Fiscal Leadership in a Global Environment—Creating Competitive Responses and Building Corporate Opportunities♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Daily, there are risks of corporate challenges and insults ranging from local and national regulatory shifts and breaches to international complexities of emerging opportunities. These events require global business leaders to possess a variety of financial skills and sensibilities. Through case studies and analytical projects, students have the opportunity to build skills and knowledge for leading organizations with ethical integrity and social accountability. They explore the financial and monetary markets in the United States and abroad to gain an economic context to apply the concepts and tools necessary to assess an organization’s financial position and to explore alternatives to finance-organizational ventures. Students also engage in assignments focused on financial planning, budgeting, and other trends, such as balancing risks. Students prepare to be key ethical players who are effective in leading an organization’s financial capabilities based on sound financial and economic principles.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    DDBA 8150 - Leadership: Building Sustainable Organizations♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Business leaders may take on a range of personalities, including charismatic, transformational, adaptive, or contextual. Regardless of style, one thing that they all have in common is the ability to identify and develop leadership strategies that lend to the success and sustainability of a business. In this course, students examine these strategies as well as the role, attributes, and challenges of leaders in a global environment. Students assess current articles, engage in online discussions, and complete application assignments based on globalization, individual and group behaviors, organizational culture and change, systems thinking, innovation, social responsibility, and sustainability. They explore these basic dimensions of leadership and how they affect the employee, organization, community, and environment. Students focus on the practical application of writing, resourcefulness, critical thinking, and the integration of professional practice at the doctoral level as they develop sustainable solutions from the perspective of a global leader.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    DDBA 8151 - Organizational Leadership: Doctoral Theory and Practice♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Successful business leaders create a positive organizational culture based on personal ethical behavior, ethical expectations, training, and transparency. Business leaders use a range of leadership styles, including transformational, transactional and servant leadership, based on the organizational situation. Regardless of leadership style, one thing that business leaders have in common is the ability to identify and develop leadership strategies that lend to the success and sustainability of their business. In this four-module course, students cover a wide range of different topics on business leadership. Students focus on the practical application of APA writing, critical thinking, and the integration of professional leadership practice at the doctoral level as they develop sustainable solutions from the perspective of a business leader. Students examine the relationship between leadership and management, evaluate the impact and utility of leadership styles assessments, and analyze different leadership styles. Additionally, students evaluate and investigate various leadership theories, sources of power, and motivation theories to gain a better understanding into the nature and practice of leadership. Students evaluate and assess ethical dilemmas, organizational stress, and craft an organizational strategy to shape a successful business culture. They assess current articles, engage in online discussions, and complete application assignments based on organizational culture, ethics, strategy, stress, and leadership theories.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    DDBA 8160 - Business Strategy and Innovation


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course focus on development and implementation of business strategies that enable competitive advantage and winning in the marketplace. They develop an understanding of why and how individuals and organizations must work together to create a sustainable business and global environment. Students apply methods for assessing the strengths and weaknesses of organizations and identify industry opportunities and threats resulting from forces shaping the marketplace. They also examine and apply concepts to assess the capability of industries to implement these strategies successfully. Students focus on practical business applications of writing and critical thinking and engage in a combination of essay discussions, research assignments, and papers to analyze, develop, and defend ideas for strategic and innovative business solutions for sustainability. Students also develop a problem statement to use in their doctoral study final capstone project through the synthesis of principles of sustainable strategic management and thinking.

     
  
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    DDBA 8161 - Business Strategy and Innovation for Competitive Advantage♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this DBA strategy course concentrate on the creation and implementation of business strategies that maximize competitive advantage in the marketplace. Students develop an understanding of why and how individuals and business organizations work together creating sustainable businesses in the global marketplace. They apply models for assessing the strengths and weaknesses of business organizations and identify opportunities and threats resulting from forces shaping the marketplace. Students focus on practical business applications of writing, critical thinking, and classroom engagement in a combination of essay discussions, research assignments, and writing papers to analyze, develop, and defend ideas for strategic and innovative business solutions for sustainability.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    DDBA 8300 - Qualitative and Quantitative Methodology for Applied Business Research


    (4 sem. cr.) In this course, independent scholars are introduced to quantitative and qualitative frameworks for inquiry. Quantitative designs covered include correlation, experimental and quasi-experimental, survey, and causal-comparative designs; qualitative designs include case study, phenomenology, grounded theory, and ethnography. Independent scholars work toward acquiring substantive, foundational knowledge of the philosophy of science as they construct, use, and critique concepts and theories. They learn to produce knowledge for practice as they examine ethical, social, and political aspects of conducting research. Demonstrating knowledge and the ability to solve problems, independent scholars engage in course assignments that emphasize the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the integration of professional practice at the doctoral level.
  
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    DDBA 8303 - Qualitative and Case Study Methodology for Business Analysis Research


    (4 sem. cr.) In this course, independent scholars have the opportunity to extend their research and general analysis skills as they further explore qualitative research methodology and design types—with emphasis on case-study research designs—that they may incorporate into their own doctoral study. Independent scholars learn to focus their analysis on efforts to improve the quality of business practice. They also focus on how to think in an action-oriented manner, as if they were business consultants, so that their own doctoral study work could be applied in action. Finally, they engage in an iterative process of writing their own prospectus application, incorporating feedback from peers and the course instructor.
  
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    DDBA 8307 - Quantitative Business Data Analysis Using SPSS


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, independent scholars develop skills in descriptive statistics, statistical inference, and quantitative techniques, including t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation, multiple linear regression, and nonparametric methods (i.e., two-way contingency table analysis). They use quantitative data analysis and data-management techniques, and they learn to utilize SPSS software for data analysis. This course is not intended for independent scholars to become fully grounded in statistical methods; rather, they learn appropriate questions to ask about data analysis as well as how to defend their use of specific techniques in professional practice.
  
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    DDBA 8307B - Quantitative Business Data Analysis Using SPSS


    (4 sem. cr.) In this course, independent scholars develop skills in descriptive statistics, statistical inference, and quantitative techniques, including t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation, multiple linear regression, discriminant analysis, and nonparametric methods (i.e., two-way contingency table analysis). They use quantitative data analysis and data-management techniques, and they learn to utilize SPSS software for data analysis. This course is not intended for independent scholars to become fully grounded in statistical methods; rather, they learn appropriate questions to ask about data analysis as well as how to defend their use of specific techniques in professional practice.
  
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    DDBA 8427 - Applied Research Methods—Qualitative and Quantitative♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students are provided with the opportunity to acquire substantive, foundational knowledge of the philosophy of science, including the construction, use, and critique of concepts and theories. Students examine qualitative and quantitative frameworks for inquiry as well as the ethical, social, and political aspects of conducting research. They learn about quantitative designs, such as experimental and quasi-experimental, survey, causal-comparative, evaluation, and existing action research. In regard to qualitative designs, students examine case study, phenomenology, grounded theory, and ethnography designs. Students complete application exercises to demonstrate their conceptual knowledge of applied research methods in preparation for their doctoral study as well as for problem-solving in professional practice. They also engage in the practical application of writing and critical thinking as they synthesize the relationship between research in management and the promulgation of social change.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

 

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