2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Oct 17, 2021  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    COUN 8662 - Psychology and Social Change♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students analyze and evaluate theories of social and personal change. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application assignments focused on power and social inequalities, ethnic inequalities, global environment, and issues related to gender and sexism, such as homophobia. In addition, students examine the impact of social change theories on children, families, and societies. They explore the concepts of change agent and change advocate as well as the role of the psychologist as change agent. Students also engage in an integrative written assignment to synthesize theories and analyze a current social problem in their community, for which they propose an action to address the issue and drive positive social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8671 - Consulting for Organizational Change♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore methods for accelerating individual, group, and organizational performance through consulting, coaching, and change management. Students address topics such as organizational assessment; team development; strategic planning; group dynamics; power, politics, and influence; leadership; and conflict management. Applications include the assessment of an organization and the development of strategies to address identified needs for change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8672 - Psychological Consultation


    (5 cr.) What is the role of consultation in the delivery of psychological services and how does it differ from therapy or counseling? Students in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions as they examine the history, theory, process, and methods in the field of psychological consultation. They explore the qualifications and techniques required of psychologists who consult in various settings, including the courtroom; business and industry; and educational, mental health, and medical situations. Students apply concepts and theories learned in the course to a consultation action plan based on personal experience or one anticipated in a future professional situation. Through this project, students consider multiple factors, such as setting, clients, data collection, professional challenges, multicultural considerations, and ethical issues.
  
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    COUN 8682A - Counseling Internship I♦


    (3 cr.) Through this internship, mental health counseling students have an upper-level, supervised “capstone” clinical experience designed to refine and enhance their basic counseling skills, integrate their professional knowledge and skills, and continue their development in specialization areas. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 6671 and approval of the coordinator of field training.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course with PD or Field Director approval, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8682B - Counseling Internship II♦


    (3 cr.) Through this internship, mental health counseling students have an upper-level, supervised “capstone” clinical experience designed to refine and enhance their basic counseling skills, integrate their professional knowledge and skills, and continue their development in specialization areas. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 6671, COUN 8682A, and approval of the coordinator of field training.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course with PD or Field Director approval, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8720 - Diagnosis and Assessment♦


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with an overview of what is commonly referred to as abnormal psychology; however, students also consider factors constituting normalcy from multiple perspectives. Students explore the application of diagnostic criteria in various mental health work settings, such as schools, rehabilitation facilities, community agencies, and private practices. Using the scholar-practitioner model, students consider environmental and biological factors contributing to behavioral disorders. Students also examine techniques commonly used for the diagnosis and treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial problems. Through coursework and discussions, students consider multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis as well as current trends and contemporary issues in clinical assessment and diagnosis.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8722 - Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories♦


    (5 cr.) There are hundreds of therapeutic theories and techniques available to frame the practice of counseling and psychotherapy. An important skill for mental health counselors is to understand the strengths and limitations of these theories to determine which are most appropriate and work best in their own personal practice. In this course, students explore the history of counseling and psychotherapy theories. They examine the major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy in current use, including empirical foundations, advantages, and limitations. Students assess examples of theory-based applications and develop a personal theory of counseling based on theories and techniques assessed in the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8723 - Multicultural Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with the opportunity to increase their knowledge of multicultural counseling and the delivery of psychological services as well as related skills needed in professional practice. Students explore diversity and identity issues and discuss their impact on the therapeutic relationship. They examine the application of traditional theoretical orientations and current multicultural theories to culturally diverse groups. Through a variety of assignments designed to provide practical application of content, students also investigate counseling concepts related to race and ethnicity, sex and gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, and ability.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8726 - Couples and Family Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) An important skill for clinicians is to have a fundamental understanding of the dynamics and functioning of couples and families. Students in this course are introduced to concepts and applications in theoretical perspectives and techniques, classical schools of thought, and recent developments in couples and family therapy. Students explore culture, gender, and ethnicity factors in family development. They also review and compare theoretical frameworks in couples and family therapy, including psychosocial, psychodynamic, transgenerational, strategic, cognitive-behavioral, and social constructionist models. Additionally, students assess the roles of culture, spirituality, and values in understanding families.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8728 - Substance Abuse Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) The impact of substance abuse on the lives of people with addictions, and the lives of their families, makes for a highly complex and challenging area of mental health counseling. Counselors working with these individuals must possess a comprehensive understanding of the background, controversies, and current approaches in regard to the treatment of substance abuse. In this course, students examine psychological aspects of addictions involving alcohol, prescription medications, and illegal substances. They also examine current research in the field of dependency and addiction. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application-based assignments on diagnosing patients, choosing among models of treatment, planning treatment, using group and family treatment plans, and ensuring treatment efficacy. They also consider strategies to promote change, including the trans-theoretical model of behavior change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8730 - Counseling Addictive Disorders


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with a foundation for counseling clients with both substance-related and behavioral addictions. In this course, students examine historical perspectives and current trends in addiction treatment, as well as the biological and environmental influences on the etiology of addiction. Techniques and processes for assessment and diagnosis are examined in the context of individual, group, and systemic perspectives, with attention given to developmental and multicultural influences on addiction. Influences of public policy and advocacy on addiction and treatment are also examined.
  
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    COUN 8753 - Vocational Psychology and Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to develop practical skills in career and vocational assessment as well as functional knowledge of how career assessment can assist in the exploration and understanding of the interrelationship among work, family, and life roles. They examine major sources of career and work information available on the Internet as well as through printed material and computer-based guidance systems. Gaining practical career counseling experience, students administer, score, and interpret printed and computer-based assessments of career interests, beliefs, and values. Students learn how to integrate career development theory and assessment results with career clinical interventions. They also examine clinical and assessment issues, devoting attention to computer-based applications and multicultural implications.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8890 - Counseling Doctoral Practicum


    (3 cr.) Counseling Doctoral Practicum is an advanced clinical experience as the first of a three-part practitioner capstone experience before dissertation. During the practicum course, students work toward gaining and applying new and advanced clinical knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions. Students must secure a field experience site, apply with the Office of Field Experience within the published application window, and earn approval before being eligible for practicum enrollment. Once enrolled, students will spend a minimum average of 8–10 hours per week at the site that they have secured. They will complete direct counseling hours using the new and advanced skills, weekly individual or triadic supervision with their site supervisor, administrative duties, and other activities as assigned by the site. Concurrently, students will participate in weekly case conceptualization activities, 2 hours of group supervision per week with their faculty supervisor, and other clinically relevant assignments directly related to the work at the site. There are multiple synchronous components of this course. Students must be prepared to be flexible in meeting the demands of this course. (Prerequisite(s): All core courses in the program of study, all residencies, and approval by the Office of Field Experience.)
  
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    COUN 8895 - Doctoral Internship I


    (3 cr.) Counseling Doctoral Internship I is the second of a three-part capstone experience before dissertation. During the Doctoral Internship I course, site contacts, and individual and group supervisors guide and evaluate students on their ability to synthesize and apply the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions in a minimum of three of five Counseling Educator domains (Teaching, Supervision, Leadership/Advocacy, Counseling, and Research). Students must secure field experience site(s) for each domain of focus, apply with the Office of Field Experience within the published application window, and earn approval before being eligible for Doctoral Internship I enrollment. Once enrolled, students will spend a minimum average of 25–35 hours per week at the site(s) that they have secured. They will complete activities directly related to the approved domains, weekly individual or triadic supervision with their individual supervisor, administrative duties, and other activities the site assigns. Concurrently, students will participate in weekly course discussion and assignments that promote developing a professional identity as a Counselor Educator, 2 hours of group supervision per week with their faculty supervisor, and other domain-relevant assignments directly related to the work at the site. There are multiple synchronous components of this course. Students must be prepared to be flexible in meeting the demands of this course. (Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Counseling Doctoral Practicum and approval by the Office of Field Experience.)
  
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    COUN 8896 - Doctoral Internship II


    (3 cr.) Counseling Doctoral Internship II is the third of a three-part capstone experiences before dissertation. During the Doctoral Internship II course, site contacts and individual and group supervisors guide and evaluate students on their ability to synthesize and apply the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions in a minimum of three of five Counseling Educator domains (Teaching, Supervision, Leadership/Advocacy, Counseling, and Research). Students must secure field experience sites for each domain of focus, apply with the Office of Field Experience within the published application window, and earn approval before being eligible for Doctoral Internship II enrollment. Once enrolled, students will spend a minimum average of 25–35 hours per week at the site(s) that they have secured. They will complete activities directly related the approved domains, weekly individual or triadic supervision with their assigned individual supervisor, administrative duties, and other activities the site assigns. Concurrently, students will participate in weekly course discussions and assignments that promote on developing a well-rounded professional identity as a Counselor Educator, 2 hours of group supervision per week with their faculty supervisor, and other domain-relevant assignments directly related to the work at the site. There are multiple synchronous components of this course. Students must be prepared to be flexible in meeting the demands of this course. (Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Counseling Doctoral Internship I and approval by the Office of Field Experience.)
  
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    COUN 8995 - Counseling Doctoral Internship I


    (3 cr.) Counseling Doctoral Internship I is the second of a three-part capstone experience before dissertation. During the Doctoral Internship I course, site contacts as well as individual and group supervisors guide and evaluate students on their ability to synthesize and apply the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions in a minimum of 3 of 5 Counseling Educator domains (Teaching, Supervision, Leadership/Advocacy, Counseling, and Research). Students must secure field experience site(s) for each domain of focus, apply with the Office of Field Experience within the published application window, and earn approval before being eligible for Doctoral Internship I enrollment. Once enrolled, students will spend a minimum average of 25–35 hours per week at the site(s) that they have secured. They will complete activities directly related to the approved domains, weekly individual or triadic supervision with their individual supervisor, administrative duties, and other activities the site assigns. Concurrently, students will participate in weekly course discussions and assignments that promote development of a professional identity as a Counselor Educator, 2 hours of group supervision per week with their faculty supervisor, and other domain-relevant assignments directly related to the work at the site. There are multiple synchronous components of this course. Students must be prepared to be flexible in meeting the demands of this course. (Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Counseling Doctoral Practicum and Approval by the Office of Field Experience.)
  
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    COUN 8996 - Counseling Doctoral Internship II


    (3 cr.) Counseling Doctoral Internship II is the third of a three-part capstone experiences before dissertation. During the Doctoral Internship II course, site contacts, as well as individual and group supervisors guide and evaluate students on their ability to synthesize and apply the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions in a minimum of 3 of 5 Counseling Educator domains (Teaching, Supervision, Leadership/Advocacy, Counseling, and Research). Students must secure field experience sites for each domain of focus, apply with the Office of Field Experience within the published application window, and earn approval before being eligible for Doctoral Internship II enrollment. Once enrolled, students will spend a minimum average of 25–35 hours per week at the site(s) that they have secured. They will complete activities directly related the approved domains, weekly individual or triadic supervision with their assigned individual supervisor, administrative duties, and other activities the site assigns.  Concurrently, students will participate in weekly course discussions and assignments that promote the development of a well-rounded professional identity as a Counselor Educator, 2 hours of group supervision per week with their faculty supervisor, and other domain-relevant assignments directly related to the work at the site. There are multiple synchronous components of this course. Students must be prepared to be flexible in meeting the demands of this course. (Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Counseling Doctoral Internship I and approval by the Office of Field Experience.)
  
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    CPLB 601L - Pre-Practicum 1


    (0 cr.) By participating in a Walden Pre-Practicum, students gain skills in their development as scholar-practitioners. Through Pre-Practicum experiences, students expand their network of peers and faculty members while they develop their professional skills and identity. In Pre-Practicum 1, students begin to apply the core skills and techniques introduced in the Techniques course. Students also continue to develop the multicultural competencies needed for counseling. Per program requirements, there is a synchronous experience. Students will receive specific information about their upcoming field experience and credentialing.
  
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    CPLB 602L - Pre-Practicum 2


    (0 cr.) In Pre-Practicum 2, students continue to develop core skills from Pre-Practicum 1 and integrate advanced skills in their development as scholar-practitioners. Through their Pre-Practicum experiences, students expand their network of peers and faculty members while they continue to develop professional skills and identity. In Pre-Practicum 2, students begin to develop group leadership skills, integrate counseling theory, and continue to demonstrate cultural competency skills. Students will engage in developing their upcoming field experience plan and continue credentialing skills activities. (Prerequisite(s): GRPL 6100 and COUN 6250 for those in Addiction Counseling; Marriage, Family, and Couple Counseling; and Clinical Mental Health Counseling programs. GRPL 6100 and COUN 6350 for those in School Counseling programs.)
  
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    CPLB 802L - Pre-Practicum 1: Enhancing Teaching and Research Skills


    (0 cr.) In Pre-Practicum 1, students examine their professional identity as counselor-educators and develop key components of a research plan. Students develop these skills through the practice of teaching and the acquisition of enhanced research knowledge. Topics include roles, responsibilities, philosophy of, and best practices within teaching. Students also develop research questions, align research questions and methodologies, explore social change in research, and explore literature critique and synthesis.
  
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    CPLB 803L - Pre-Practicum 2: Advanced Supervision, Teaching, and Research Skills


    (0 cr.) In Pre-Practicum 2, students continue to examine and strengthen their professional identity while gaining the teaching and supervision experiences that are required by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs (CACREP). A complement to both the Clinical Supervision and Teaching in Counselor Education courses, students in this Pre-Practicum have the opportunity to enhance and demonstrate advanced teaching skills and clinical supervision both online and in face-to-face environments. During the Pre-Practicum, students will also enhance their knowledge of research methodologies and alignment of research, and they design and present a research proposal to inform and develop their research skills.
  
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    CPSY 6001 - Foundations for Graduate Study in Psychology


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students receive a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Topics include the relation of mission and vision to professional goals; development of the program of study and professional development plan; strategies for online success; introduction to the online library; and introduction to critical thinking, professional writing, and academic integrity. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing.
  
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    CPSY 6100 - Introduction to Mental Health Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the mental health counseling profession. The history, philosophy, and theoretical foundations of the profession, and the scope of practice, credentialing, and other professional issues are explored. The focus of this course is on the student as a future mental health counselor. Students receive an overview of the mental health counseling program, the profession, and professional competencies.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6215 - Lifespan Development♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an advanced overview of human development through the lifespan, including prenatal, childhood, adolescent, adult, and late-adult phases. Students examine and apply basic processes and theories to developmental milestones that occur within these phases of development. They explore factors of heredity and environmental elements on human development, and they consider ethical issues, research considerations, and global perspectives as they assess strategies to promote optimal development. Students also engage in coursework and discussions that highlight themes of diversity and social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6221 - Psychopathology From a Clinical Perspective♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine in-depth current theory and research associated with major psychological disorders and their diagnosis. The primary classification systems are explored in terms of their applicability and limitations. The factors that impact the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders along a continuum of mental health are explored. Application of the diagnostic criteria in terms of case conceptualization is emphasized.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6245 - Social Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine both human cognition and behavior through the lens of research and theory in social psychology. Topics include perception, attitudes, relationships and attraction, altruism, prejudice and aggression, conformity and obedience, group behavior, and the influence of culture. The implications of social psychology theory and research are explored in relation to social justice and social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6250 - Group Process and Dynamics♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive a comprehensive review of counseling approaches to group therapy. The theoretical bases of different approaches to group therapy, including psychoanalytic, existential, person-centered, gestalt, transactional, behavioral, rational-emotive, and reality-therapy are examined. The focus of this course is on counseling of various types of groups, the efficacy of using group therapy as treatment method with multicultural and diverse populations, and the stages of group development.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6341 - Psychological Assessment♦


    (5 cr.) There is a variety of assessment types that professionals use in modern clinical psychology settings. In this course, students learn about these assessments, focusing on cognitive and personality assessments as well as other tests commonly used in clinical practice. They engage in a comprehensive examination of measurement theory and the psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. Students also explore related topics, including normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, test score interpretation, and test development. Through assignments and discussions, students address ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues, including cultural bias and fairness. A foundation for this course is professional standards for psychological testing.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6342 - Interventions I♦


    (4 cr.) The focus of this course is on the acquisition and demonstration of clinical and counseling skills in the context of empirically supported modes of intervention. Students apply skills in treatment planning exercises, clinical vignettes, and face-to-face simulations of psychotherapy sessions.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6343 - Interventions II♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore the application of empirically supported treatment and interventions to client problems ranging from problems in living to severe mental disorders in selected populations. Students demonstrate the implementation of intervention models, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, person-centered therapy, short-term dynamic psychotherapy, and integrative psychotherapy. Culturally competent interventions are emphasized within an ethical framework for clinical or counseling practice.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6356 - Marriage, Couple, and Family Therapy♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive a foundation in the theoretical perspectives and empirical framework necessary for couple and family counseling. The theoretical perspective includes general systems theory and its applications, as well as psychosocial, psychodynamic, transgenerational, strategic, cognitive-behavioral, and social constructionist models. Students learn to conceptualize presenting issues within a systemic perspective and context. Empirically based techniques for assessment and intervention of marriages, couples, and families are reviewed and analyzed.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6700 - Master’s Practicum I


    (3 cr.) The focus of this course is on experiential learning, which is an essential component of applied professional training. Students in the practicum are provided with the opportunity to engage in a supervised experience that integrates theory and research with practice. The practicum experience includes guided development of professional skills, awareness of professional and ethical issues, professional and interpersonal growth, development of cultural competence, and effective use of supervision. In addition to on-site supervision, students are required to participate in an online classroom experience.
  
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    CPSY 6701 - Culture and Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology. In addition to the previously listed goals, students focus on the impact that culture has on the field of psychology around the world. The scope of this course is broad, with the core theme being cross-cultural psychology (focusing on cultures representing different parts of the world) and comparing cultural influence on human psychology. Many of the topics addressed are related to human development. Additionally, interactions among culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses are emphasized throughout the duration of this course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6705 - Ethics and Standards of Professional Practice♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the psychologist’s principles of conduct, code of ethics, and standards of practice. The guidelines for practice in specific psychological services and with identified populations are explored. The ethical decision-making process is studied in depth. Topics include informed consent, confidentiality, duty to warn, mandated reporting, recordkeeping, the limits of competency, and dual relationships. Through this course, students also address issues of professional development, such as supervision, peer consultation, and continuing education.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6722 - Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course summarize the history and explore the primary concepts of the major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy in current use. The empirical foundations of each theory are examined, and examples are supplied showing how each method is applied to clients. Limitations of each approach are also explored.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6728 - Substance Abuse Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine psychological aspects of addictions involving alcohol, prescription medications, and illegal substances. Current research in the field of dependency and addiction is explored. Topics include diagnosis, models of treatment, treatment planning, use of group and family treatment plans, and efficacy of treatment. Strategies to promote change, including the transtheoretical model of behavior change, are discussed.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6753 - Career Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn practical skills in career and vocational assessment. Students will administer, score, and interpret printed and computer-based assessments of career interests, beliefs, and values. Major sources of career and work information available on the Internet, through printed material, and computer-based guidance systems will be examined. Emphasis is placed on helping students gain functional knowledge of how career assessment can assist in the exploration and understanding of the interrelationship among work, family, and life roles. Students will learn how to integrate career development theory and assessment results with career clinical interventions. Current issues in career clinical and assessment, with particular attention to computer-based applications and multicultural implications, will be discussed.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CPSY 6810 - Master’s Internship I


    (3 cr.) The focus of this course is on experiential learning, which is an essential component of applied professional training. In the practicum, students have the opportunity to engage in a supervised experience that integrates theory and research with practice. The practicum experience includes guided development of professional skills; awareness of professional and ethical issues; professional and interpersonal growth; development of cultural competence; and effective use of supervision. In addition to on-site supervision, students are required to participate in an online classroom experience.
  
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    CPSY 6900 - Master’s Practicum III


    (5 cr.) This course is an optional third quarter following the required two-quarter practicum sequence for those students seeking additional field experience. During this course, students will complete a minimum of 300 additional hours. In this course, students are able to engage in a supervised experience that integrates theory and research with practice. The practicum experience includes guided development of professional skills; awareness of professional and ethical issues; professional and interpersonal growth; development of cultural competence; and effective use of supervision. In addition to on-site supervision, students are required to participate in an online classroom experience. (Prerequisite(s): Completion of the practicum application and approval of the field placement coordinator.)
  
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    CPSY 6910 - Master’s Internship II


    (3 cr.) The focus of this course is on experiential learning, which is an essential component of applied professional training. In the practicum, students have the opportunity to engage in a supervised experience that integrates theory and research with practice. The practicum experience includes guided development of professional skills; awareness of professional and ethical issues; professional and interpersonal growth; development of cultural competence; and effective use of supervision. In addition to on-site supervision, students are required to participate in an online classroom experience.
  
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    CPSY 8002 - Foundations of Graduate Studies in Clinical Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students build a foundation for academic and professional success as social change agents. They assess the relationship of Walden’s mission and vision to professional goals. They establish connections with their peers and the broader Walden community. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of scholarly writing, critical-thinking skills, academic integrity, ethics, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence within the field of psychology.
  
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    CPSY 8101 - Introduction to Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of the areas covered by a broad definition of forensic psychology. In doing so, the students are introduced to the basic tenements of forensic psychology and the criminal justice system. Topics of study include criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, correctional psychology and others. Assignments focus on providing the student with a broad basic knowledge of the forensic psychology field.
  
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    CPSY 8102 - Intersection of Crime, Psychology, and the Law


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an expansive overview of forensic psychology, including basic tenets, practices, and procedures. Students explore subspecialties of forensic psychology; roles and responsibilities; and related legal, ethical, and diversity issues. They learn how forensic psychology links to the criminal justice system as they explore related topics, including criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, and correctional psychology. Through this course, students acquire a broad understanding of forensic psychology theories and concepts, which they apply to the analysis of controversial issues and contemporary challenges within the field.
  
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    CPSY 8126 - Understanding Violence, Risk, and Threat Assessment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover the varied assessment techniques and instruments used in the forensic psychology arena. Some of the assessment areas covered include risk assessment, juvenile evaluations, lie detection, custody evaluations, and many of the psychological tests and instruments that are used in these assessments. Students receive a solid foundation of the knowledge of forensic psychology techniques and assessment in this course rather than specific skills in administering and interpreting psychological tests.
  
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    CPSY 8207 - History and Systems of Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course focus on the historical and philosophical roots of psychology and counseling. Topics include structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, psychoanalysis, gestalt, and existentialism, as well as contemporary perspectives including evolutionary psychology, positive psychology, postmodernism, and feminist psychology. Themes of diversity and multiculturalism in psychology and counseling are highlighted within each of the perspectives.
  
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    CPSY 8214 - Consulting for Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Organizational and professional development (OPD) professionals promote and implement organizational change by using fundamental techniques of change management. Students in this course examine and apply these tools, including consulting competencies, approaches, and organizational change models to learn the skills of an OPD consultant. Students explore methods for accelerating individual, group, and organizational performance through consulting, coaching, and change management. They also explore related topics, such as organizational assessment; team development; strategic planning; group dynamics; power, politics, and influence; leadership; and conflict management. Students apply course concepts to the assessment of an organization and the development of strategies to address identified needs for change.
  
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    CPSY 8215 - Lifespan Development


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an advanced overview of human development through the lifespan, including prenatal, childhood, adolescent, adult, and late-adult phases. Students examine and apply basic processes and theories to developmental milestones that occur within these phases of development. They explore factors of heredity and environmental elements on human development, and they consider ethical issues, research considerations, and global perspectives as they assess strategies to promote optimal development. Students also engage in coursework and discussions that highlight themes of diversity and social change.
  
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    CPSY 8226 - Biopsychology


    (5 cr.) An important branch of psychology, known as biopsychology, combines neuroscience with basic psychological models for the purpose of understanding how the brain and neurotransmitters influence human behavior. In this course, students examine the structure and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems and explore the impact of neurobiology, endocrinology, and physiology on human behavior. They learn about brain functioning, including exploration of neural conduction; effects of neurotransmitters; sensory systems; and mechanisms of attention, memory, perception, and language. Students also explore literature addressing issues related to neuroplasticity, lateralization, and regeneration. Applying knowledge and skills gained throughout the course, students develop a final research paper through which they synthesize biopsychology concepts, critically analyze related research, and demonstrate APA-writing ability.
  
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    CPSY 8238 - Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior


    (5 cr.) Core theories of cognition and affect are reviewed as well as their roles in human functioning. Students in the course will review basic components of cognition, including knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, language and various aspects of thinking, and emotions. There is also a focus on the multidimensional and interactive characteristics of human cognitive and affective functioning. A specific emphasis is placed on theories and research bearing on how cognition and affect interact in important areas of human functioning such as emotional regulation, construction of reality, motivation, psychopathology, and health.
  
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    CPSY 8242 - Changing Health Behavior: Theory and Practice


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will review past and current models of health behavior change, disease prevention, disease management, and relapse prevention. Coverage of health-related issues includes dietary needs, tobacco and drug use, safer sexual practices, and stress management. In addition, students will examine the analysis of behavior change within specific populations (young, elderly, cognitively impaired, etc.) and factors that predict or serve as obstacles to lifestyle change and adherence. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8745.)
  
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    CPSY 8245 - Interpersonal Psychotherapy


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will acquire and demonstrate skills essential to the practice of the interpersonal psychotherapy approach to treatment. Students will integrate historical and current views of relational theory and its relationship to the interpersonal psychotherapy approach and how this information impacts clinical practice and focus when attempting to decrease or eliminate symptoms and solve problems in a client’s experience. In addition, students will synthesize research regarding interpersonal psychotherapy and its effectiveness in treatment regarding various disorders and maladaptive behavioral patterns as well as its effectiveness and/or limitations when working with diverse populations. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate clinical interviewing skills, interpersonal psychotherapy treatment approach skills, case conceptualization skills from the interpersonal psychotherapy approach, and receive feedback from faculty and peers. Ethical considerations specific to the practice of the interpersonal psychotherapy approach are discussed.
  
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    CPSY 8247 - Social Psychology


    (5 cr.) Factors of cognition and social behavior are at the root of nearly all experiences pertaining to individuals in society. In this course, students use the lens of social psychology to examine perceptions, attitudes, relationships and attraction, motivation to help others, prejudice and aggression, conformity and obedience, group behavior, and the influence of culture. Students apply knowledge and skills gained in the course to a final project in which they develop a plan for using social psychology research to address a significant social problem. Moreover, students consider ways to extend lessons learned to their personal and professional lives to effect positive social change as scholar-practitioners.
  
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    CPSY 8290 - Clinical Psychology Practicum I


    (3 cr.) This course is the first of the two-course practicum sequence. Students are able to engage in a supervised experience that integrates theory and research with practice. Working in collaboration with their site supervisor and course instructor, the students’ practicum experience includes guided development of intermediate conceptual, assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills; awareness of professional and ethical issues; professional and interpersonal growth; development of cultural competence; and effective use of supervision.
  
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    CPSY 8291 - Clinical Psychology Practicum II


    (3 cr.) This course is the second of the two-course practicum sequence. Students are able to engage in a supervised experience that integrates theory and research with practice. Working in collaboration with their site supervisor and course instructor, the students’ practicum experience includes guided development of intermediate conceptual, assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills; awareness of professional and ethical issues; professional and interpersonal growth; development of cultural competence; and effective use of supervision.
  
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    CPSY 8292 - Psychology Internship I


    (3 cr.) The internship course is taken in conjunction with a supervised clinical experience and is intended to prepare clinical psychology students for readiness to enter practice. This course follows completion of the practicum sequence and is designed to develop intermediate intervention and assessment skills, integrate professional knowledge and skills with evidence-based practices, and continue focused development in specialization areas. A minimum of 2,000 clock hours with at least 900 clock hours of direct client contact must be documented.
  
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    CPSY 8293 - Psychology Internship II


    (3 cr.) The internship course is taken in conjunction with a supervised clinical experience and is intended to prepare clinical psychology students for readiness to enter practice. This course follows completion of the practicum sequence and is designed to develop intermediate intervention and assessment skills, integrate professional knowledge and skills with evidence-based practices, and continue focused development in specialization areas. A minimum of 2,000 clock hours with at least 900 clock hours of direct client contact must be documented.
  
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    CPSY 8294 - Psychology Internship III


    (3 cr.) The internship course is taken in conjunction with a supervised clinical experience and is intended to prepare clinical psychology students for readiness to enter practice. This course follows completion of the practicum sequence and is designed to develop intermediate intervention and assessment skills, integrate professional knowledge and skills with evidence-based practices, and continue focused development in specialization areas. A minimum of 2,000 clock hours with at least 900 clock hours of direct client contact must be documented.
  
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    CPSY 8295 - Psychology Internship IV


    (3 cr.) The internship course is taken in conjunction with a supervised clinical experience and is intended to prepare clinical psychology students for readiness to enter practice. This course follows completion of the practicum sequence and is designed to develop intermediate intervention and assessment skills, integrate professional knowledge and skills with evidence-based practices, and continue focused development in specialization areas. A minimum of 2,000 clock hours with at least 900 clock hours of direct client contact must be documented.
  
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    CPSY 8316 - Tests and Measurement


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of the different types of tests used in clinical, educational, and organizational settings. Students engage in a comprehensive examination of psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. They examine normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, test score interpretation, and test development. Students also consider related ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues, including cultural bias and fairness. Professional standards for testing provide a foundation for the course. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8304.)
  
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    CPSY 8520 - Psychology and the Courts


    (5 cr.) Students taking this course cover the major roles that a forensic psychologist could have within the court system. Issues such as expert testimony, jury selection, eyewitness testimony, and consultation with attorneys are covered. Additionally, practical skills such as documentation and report writing are addressed.
  
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    CPSY 8522 - Psychology and the Courts


    (5 cr.) In this course, students cover the major roles that a forensic psychologist could have within the court system. Issues such as expert testimony, jury selection, eyewitness testimony, and consultation with attorneys will be covered. Additionally, practical skills such as documentation and report writing will be addressed.
  
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    CPSY 8700 - Psychology and Social Change


    (5 cr.) In this course, students analyze and evaluate theories of social and personal change. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application assignments focused on power and social inequalities, ethnic inequalities, global environment, and issues related to gender and sexism, such as homophobia. In addition, students examine the impact of social change theories on children, families, and societies. They explore the concepts of change agent and change advocate as well as the role of the psychologist as change agent. Students also engage in an integrative written assignment to synthesize theories and analyze a current social problem in their community, for which they propose an action to address the issue and drive positive social change.
  
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    CPSY 8745 - Health Psychology


    (5 cr.) Health psychologists work toward positive change in healthcare and health behavior through the study of relationships between patients and providers, how individuals and groups adapt to illness, damaging health behaviors, health cognitions, and many other related issues. In this course students explore the field of health psychology with a focus on the biopsychosocial model. They discuss behavioral and biomedical theories as well as the effect of psychological (personality), behavioral (health behaviors and coping), and social factors (stress and physician-patient relationships) on physical health and wellness. Through the examination of current literature and peer discussions, students explore and address issues related to cardiovascular and immune health, including heart disease, stroke, cancer, and HIV/AIDS. They demonstrate their understanding of course material and consider how topics apply to their personal and professional life through the development of taskforce papers, a health brochure, and a final essay. 
  
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    CPSY 8748 - Stress and Coping


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine contemporary theories on the perception of stress, appraisal of stressors, ways of coping, and the psychophysiological mechanisms involved in the stress response. They explore topical issues, including psychoneuroimmunology, behavioral nutrition, psychophysiology, traumatic stress, chronic pain, and stress-related psychophysiological and medical disorders as they relate to stress and coping. Students engage in discussions designed to provide practical application of course content. Demonstrating breadth and depth of knowledge and critical-thinking skills, students explore a topic of interest through a final research proposal and paper on a current issue related to course concepts. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8226.)
  
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    CPSY 8752 - Psychology of Organizational Behavior


    (5 cr.) Effective leadership coaches must be fully capable of working with clients immersed in different organizational cultures that present unique challenges. In this course, students apply models, approaches, and frameworks; individual and team coaching strategies; and ethical guidelines to multiple case studies related to coaching for leadership development. Students gain practical insight on the characteristics, factors, and conditions that influence coaching efficacy, assessment, and evaluation. In addition, students consider diversity, ethics, and professional issues and challenges in the context of leadership coaching. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8750.)
  
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    CPSY 8755 - Leadership and Leader Development


    (5 cr.) Effective leadership requires the ability to facilitate positive change, lead others in efforts to effect similar change, and work through challenges when met with resistance to change. Students in this course are provided with an extensive overview of leadership theories. Students explore definitions of leadership, major theoretical leadership models, and contextual and situational factors related to leadership and change. Students also examine various perspectives on leadership and the role of leadership in the achievement of organizational, group, and team goals. Students engage in practical assignments and discussions, focusing on effective leadership issues and practices during the process of organizational change. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8750 or PSYC 8752.)
  
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    CPSY 8762 - Teaching of Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine theories, techniques, and issues related to teaching psychology at the college/university level, both online and in person. They focus primarily on teaching skills, developing rapport with students, managing the course, and managing the classroom. Classroom communication and ethical issues relevant to both faculty and students are also covered.
  
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    CPSY 8763 - Principles of Instructional Design


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are presented with an overview and critical analysis of various instructional methods and techniques, including their historical, psychological, and social foundations. Students analyze specific instructional applications in various settings and through multiple theories of learning, such as behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and social-situational. They apply prior knowledge of learning, development, and cognition to understand these applications. Students also consider and discuss the major challenges affecting curriculum design as well as potential future trends. Demonstrating understanding of course concepts, students critically analyze and present current issues in instructional design through collaborative projects. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6235 and PSYC 6765.)
  
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    CPSY 8764 - Instructional Design for Online Course Development


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore instructional design and delivery of online courses, issues related to assessment, evaluation in a distance-learning environment, and appropriate and systematic use of technology in online learning venues. Addressing course objectives and discussion questions, students explore and assess issues related to learning styles and instructional strategies in the online environment as well as alternatives to the online lecture. Students gain hands-on experience developing components for online instruction using course concepts and best practices in the field. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8763.)
  
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    CPSY 8781 - Psychopathology From a Clinical Perspective


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an in-depth examination of current theory and research associated with major psychological disorders and their diagnosis. The primary classification systems are explored in terms of their applicability and limitations. The factors that impact the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders along a continuum of mental health are explored. Application of the diagnostic criteria in terms of case conceptualization is emphasized.
  
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    CPSY 9000 - Dissertation


    (5 cr. per term for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion) Doctoral students are provided with the opportunity to integrate their program of study into a research study through which they explore a specific area of interest in this course. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members through a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with their dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for CPSY 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation for a minimum of four terms.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 4 quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Dissertation with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook.

     

  
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    CPSY 9000L - Dissertation


    (5 cr. per term for a minimum of four terms) Doctoral students are provided with the opportunity to integrate their Program of Study into a research study through which they explore a specific area of interest in this course. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members through a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with their dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for CPSY 9000L, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation for a minimum of four terms. (Prerequisite(s): Foundation and core courses and designation of an approved dissertation committee chairperson.
  
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    CRJS 1001 - Contemporary Criminal Justice Systems♦


    (5 cr.) What is criminal justice and how is it delivered and administered? Student in this course are provided with a survey of the contemporary criminal justice system in the United States, with emphasis on the roles and responsibilities of police (law enforcement), courts (adjudication), and corrections. Students analyze methods of diversion by criminal justice personnel at all levels of practice. Students analyze the components of and major players in the criminal justice process and system and apply this content to current events and dilemmas. They overview crime and criminal law and explore how these concepts connect to criminal justice. Students also consider diversity, mental health considerations, and ethical challenges and issues as they relate to all aspects of criminal justice. Finally, students explore and discuss how the criminal justice system addresses criminality; consider its strengths and limitations; and examine issues, challenges, and trends related to the system.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 2001 - Criminology and Social Control♦


    (5 cr.) People commit crimes for a variety of reasons, and these crimes vary in their impact on individual victims and society. Students in this course examine a range of views, definitions, and perspectives on crime and criminology; the nature, causes, and typologies of crime and offenders; theories that attempt to explain why individuals commit crimes; and approaches to the prevention and control of crime. Students apply theories and perspectives to crime in real life as well as to crime presented in vignettes and case studies. Students devote special attention to the debate between social-responsibilities and social-problems approaches to criminology.
      (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001 or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 2002 - Juvenile Delinquency and Justice♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the factors that lead some juveniles to engage in criminal or antisocial behavior as well as ways to intervene in the process and outcome. They consider the biological, psychological, and sociological factors in juvenile delinquency as well as modern trends in prevention and treatment. Through traditional literature and interactive learning modules, students explore the concept of juvenile justice and consider the proper age that society should hold a juvenile criminally responsible as well as the age that juveniles should be tried as adults. (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 2003 - Criminal Law♦


    (5 cr.) Books, movies, and television programs about crime, particularly those that feature criminals and trials, have been popular for decades. But there’s more to criminal law than the theatrics that media often features. In this course, students examine the concepts and principles related to criminal law. They engage in discussions and assignments designed to provide practical application on a variety of topics, including domestic and international crimes, criminal defense, punishment, and sentencing.
      (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001 or POLI 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 3001 - Corrections♦


    (5 cr.) What is the goal of the corrections system? Is it punishment, rehabilitation, or both? In this course, students have the opportunity to answer such questions through the examination of the history of corrections as well as the practice and legal environment in corrections, including institutional and community-based programs and their relationship to other areas of the criminal justice system. Students also learn about correctional philosophy and practices related to incarceration, diversions, community-based corrections, and treatment of offenders. They employ analytical skills to assess the role of corrections professionals and challenges facing corrections in a society that continues to change in demographics, norms, and expectations of criminal justice.
      (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 3002 - Courts and Judicial Process♦


    (5 cr.) What happens in a courtroom is both complex and fascinating, as is evidenced by the popularity of courtroom drama—real and fictional. In this course, students analyze and apply information about the components of the judicial system, including their structure, function, and processes. Students examine the professional roles within the system and learn how the system selects these figures. They learn about judicial conduct and professional standards and apply these concepts to examples of judicial behavior. Students also analyze issues related to the courts and judicial process in an increasingly diverse society and consider these in regard to future trends, such as in cases and legal claims. (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001 or PSPA 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 3003 - Law Enforcement♦


    (5 cr.) There is a diverse assortment of issues and challenges involved in enforcing laws and protecting the public, for which a wide array of agencies share responsibility in addressing. Such agencies encompass federal, state, and local police as well as private figures, such as security officers and city inspectors. In this course, students examine the roles and responsibilities of law enforcement professionals and explore the development and evolution of law enforcement in the United States. They examine community policing models and the use of power, discretion, and deception by police. Students also engage in practical discussions and exercises to explore long-standing, contemporary, and future law enforcement issues and challenges. (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 3004 - Data Analysis for Criminal Justice Professionals♦


    (5 cr.) All criminal justice professionals must understand the methods of extracting and using data and research—a critical function lending to the responsibilities of all roles in the system, including law enforcement, crime prevention, sentencing, and corrections. Students in this course explore how professionals apply basic statistical principles and research methods to contemporary criminal justice problems and issues in court, law enforcement, and correctional settings. Students learn how to evaluate data and research, represent data using graphs, and present data using statistical measures. They also consider ethical issues related to criminal justice research and technological advancements that influence current and future criminal justice data analysis and research. (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 3010 - Profiling Serial and Mass Murderers♦


    (5 cr.) Law enforcement officials characterize serial murder among one of the most abhorrent of all criminal behavior. In this course, students examine the interest in serial and mass murder in popular culture and explore typologies and theories of criminal behavior. They assess and discuss the history and evolution of profiling; roles, goals, and responsibilities of profilers; the use of profiling in criminal investigations; and populations victimized by serial and mass murderers. Students also apply typologies and criminal theories to real-world case scenarios. (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001 or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 4101 - Criminal Evidence and Investigation♦


    (5 cr.) Criminal investigation is a critical duty at all levels of public and private law enforcement. Students in this course examine the integral tasks involved in such investigation through the examination of proper collection, tagging, and processing of evidence as well as the chain of custody. Students also learn how to assess a crime scene; interview and interrogate witnesses and suspects; and use informants and surveillance techniques in an investigation. Students also consider and discuss the codes of ethics to which investigators adhere as well as the impact of technological advancements on the future of criminal investigation.
      (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 4102 - The Criminal Mind♦


    (5 cr.) What makes a criminal unique? Criminal justice professionals confront criminal behavior in many forms. In this course, students explore theories and research that provide cognitive, behavioral, and psychological explanations of criminal behavior. Through the examination of such theories, students have the opportunity to gain the professional knowledge and sensibilities to be able to interact effectively with offenders. Students also investigate potential trends and current biological research that may change or advance the study and treatment of criminal behavior.
      (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 4103 - Drugs, Gangs, and Organized Crime♦


    (5 cr.) The implications surrounding drug trade, gangs, and organized crime are felt throughout communities domestically and around the globe. In this course, students explore these implications as well as domestic and international law enforcement efforts in managing issues contiguous to drugs and crime. Students have the opportunity to gain real world insight into urban problems involving drugs, gang processes and activity, and organized crime through examination of current information and trends. They further dissect these concerns to learn what impact such issues have on crime in general and the cost of policing in the United States.
      (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 4150 - Capstone: International Justice and Human Rights


    (5 cr.) In this capstone course, students have the opportunity to discover new concepts and synthesize existing knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program, keeping in mind the end goal of future positive social change. They first focus their attention on the basic rights of all human beings and the rule of law in the international arena—topics of increasing global importance. Students also investigate real-world examples of human rights violations, both domestic and international, and they assess responses and resolutions to such violations. Finally, students develop a project or paper that integrates and applies the concepts of international justice, rule of law, and/or human rights in their area of concentration. (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
  
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    CRJS 4160 - Capstone: Ethics and Diversity in Criminal Justice


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will explore the implications of ethics and diversity in the criminal justice field. Students examine the importance of ethical behavior on controversial issues and decision-making in law enforcement, corrections, and the courts system. Students will also explore the importance of diversity among employees in the field of criminal justice, as well as an understanding of cultural diversity as a building block of an unbiased justice system.
  
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    CRJS 4201 - Restorative Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Criminal justice involves more than retribution; it is twofold in that it must punish offenders and also address their needs and the needs of victims and the community. Students in this course explore the theory of justice and practices that emphasize repairing the harm caused by criminal behavior. They learn the ways in which this effort contrasts with an adversarial approach to justice. Students learn about strategies involving stakeholders in actions that transform the relationships among victims, offenders, communities, and criminal justice agencies in their response to crime. They also explore and reflect on case studies and topical models for an in-depth understanding how professionals conduct restorative justice in the real world.
      (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 4202 - Mobilizing and Coordinating Community Response♦


    (5 cr.) While victim response is vital, it is also important to focus on the potential effects of crime on a community, such as economic instability, drug use, prejudices, and further criminal activity. Students in this course identify existing community resources that professionals use in conjunction with planned and ad hoc community responses to learn positive and effective intervention strategies that address the needs of individuals and communities affected by criminal incidents. They also assess the challenges inherent in such efforts and discuss ways to mitigate obstacles. Gaining new perspectives on possible ways to address the coordination of community response, students examine how victims perceive crime and/or change their role as a result of the crime. (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 4203 - Introduction to Victimology♦


    (5 cr.) There are many considerations related to the perception, needs, and treatment of crime victims, which continue to lend to a growing area of study and legislation. Students in this course learn about the different types of victimization as well as the differences between direct and indirect victims of crime. They examine the role of criminal justice practitioners who work with and respond to victims. Students also assess and discuss the many ethical issues related to victims’ human and civil rights and the impact of these rights on criminal justice professionals and changing legislation. Through case studies and contemporary literature, students also analyze both current problems and future trends in victimology.
      (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 4205 - Crisis and Intervention


    (5 cr.) Communities around the nation have identified the need for resources to help people in various states of crisis. For these individuals, the ultimate goal for the criminal justice system is to refer them to the proper community resources rather than incarceration. Students will explore how crisis intervention teams (CIT) provide a practical application of interaction with persons in mental health crises, as well as those affected by trauma. Students also will explore the legal aspects of intervention strategies, including de-escalation, defusing, and negotiating.
  
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    CRJS 4206 - Probation and Parole


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will review historical trends in and the evolution of probation and parole as applied in the U.S. criminal justice system. Course discussion topics will include community-based programs, such as work release, halfway houses, treatment centers, and therapeutic community centers. The course includes an examination of both adult and juvenile systems and the stakeholders in community corrections.
  
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    CRJS 4301 - Terrorism♦


    (5 cr.) Acts of physical and psychological violence to create fear have occurred throughout the ages, but they have only recently begun to affect the United States directly. The American public, now more than ever, must be aware of the possible threat of further terrorist attacks. In this course, students learn about current legislation to counter terrorism as well as to provide U.S. citizens with knowledge of these efforts and any further threats. Students engage in assignments on topics related to domestic and international terrorism, including theory, history of and trends related to terrorism, causes and goals of terrorist groups, and responses to terrorist acts by the criminal justice system. Students examine and analyze contemporary terrorist threats and movements and contemplate future trends. (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 4302 - Critical Incidents and Cross-Agency Coordination♦


    (5 cr.) What happens when disasters occur, natural or otherwise, and the agencies that respond operate independent of one another? Students in this course have the opportunity to examine the fallout of such events to learn effective ways to manage critical incidents, avoiding errors of the past, thus helping to prevent widespread harm to communities. They learn about the development of broad-based contingency planning and the development of strategies, policies, and procedures for cross-agency coordination. Through practical exercises and simulations, students sharpen their critical-thinking and problem-solving skills as they learn ways to develop models of cross-agency coordination that anticipate prototypical critical incident responses.

      (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 4303 - WMD and Disaster Response♦


    (5 cr.) In an age of technological innovation, nuclear advancement, and virtual spread of knowledge, terrorism is at the vanguard of governmental action. In this course, students explore and discuss methods used by the criminal justice system to counter and manage disaster incidents, and they examine law enforcement responses to such incidents. Students learn about the function of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS)—agencies created specifically to provide specialized guidance and support to all levels of government and nongovernmental organizations who respond to disasters. They examine different types of weapons of mass destruction (including biological and chemical threats) as well as cyber terrorism. Through this course, students work toward gaining practical skills to engage in organizational preparation efforts in many different professional positions, including disaster response.
      (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 4401 - Management and Supervision in Criminal Systems♦


    (5 cr.) Today’s criminal justice organizations are complex and varied, and they require effective management, administration, and leadership. Students in this course analyze and discuss the function and nature of criminal justice organizations. Through the examination of traditional literature, in addition to contemporary videos and articles, students learn about criminal justice management and leadership roles and processes, politics and socialization, motivation, organizational change, technology, and current ethical considerations. Students apply concepts presented in the course to practical management problems and issues in law enforcement, prosecution, courts, and corrections.
      (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 4402 - Planning and Budgeting♦


    (5 cr.) Planning and applying effective budgeting strategies are critical elements in managing corporate and government criminal justice organizations. In this course, students have the opportunity to gain fundamental skills for effective management while focusing on short- and long-term financial analysis as well as on policy and budget creation. They complete practical application assignments, focusing on issues of plan development, grant sources, and different tasks and challenges related to budgeting. Students also engage in discussions with peers on a variety of topics, such as the public and private budgets, strategies, financing, forecasting, and ethical issues related to public budgeting. (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001 or MATH 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CRJS 5137 - The Nature of Crime and Criminology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to contemporary views and theories of maladaptive and criminal behavior. They examine a broad conceptualization of criminal behavior from an interdisciplinary perspective as well as theories and application of criminal profiling. Students also explore specific views of criminal behavior germane to groups, such as psychopaths, serial offenders, and sexually violent predators. At the end of this course, students will have an understanding of the theories and practices that are the foundations of the field of criminology.
  
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    CRJS 5203 - Victimology


    (5 cr.) What is the relationship between victims and those who commit crimes against them? How does the criminal justice system protect victims of crime? Who are the secondary victims of crime? In this course, students explore how victims interact with the police and the legal system and their patterns and tendencies. Students review how factors such as class, race, and sexual orientation affect the perception of the victim by different constituents, including the public, the court system, and the media. Students assess the concept of primary and secondary victims and gain knowledge about the range of services and resources available to victims.
  
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    CRJS 5215 - Controversies in Criminal Justice


    (5 cr.) In this course, students review recent events that have significantly changed how the legal system interprets the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Code, and the U.S. Patriot Act. Students analyze case studies to further explore relevant events, such as how the terrorist acts of September 11, 2001, have broadened the interpretation of certain areas of the law. Students heighten their understanding of how social and historical changes have shifted perspectives and sparked debates on expanding the rights of government versus safeguarding personal civil rights and civil liberties.
  
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    CRJS 5216 - Criminal Justice Research


    (5 cr.) Discover the range of research methodologies used to collect data and analyze trends in criminal justice. Students in this course are introduced to the quantitative and qualitative methods used to study the root causes of crime and the impact of crime on communities. Students examine models, metrics, and tools used to evaluate criminal justice programs and policies; legal and ethical issues associated with research and evaluation methods; the strengths and limitations of research methods; and threats to the validity of data. 
 

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