2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Nov 28, 2021  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    SOCW 6443 - Psychopharmacology and Biopsychosocial Considerations for Social Workers


    (5 cr.) The potential for addictive disorders to present like a variety of medical and psychological disorders is common. In this course, students examine how to treat addictions that may coexist with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive behavior, and other psychological disorders as described in the DSM-IV-TR. They survey a spectrum of psychotropic medications and their use in the treatment of mental, behavioral, and addictive disorders. Students also explore factors that increase the likelihood for a person, community, or group to be at risk for psychoactive substance use disorders. Through this course, students gain an understanding of the basic classifications, indications, and contraindications of commonly prescribed medications so that they make appropriate referrals within treatment teams. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6090 and SOCW 6111.)
  
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    SOCW 6446 - Social Work Practice With Children and Adolescents


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine empirically supported theories and techniques for working with children and adolescents in the counseling process. Students work toward enhancing their theoretical and practical understanding of the systemic interplay among children, adolescents, families, and the stakeholders in their lives. They engage in coursework and readings focused on a family-systems view of intervention, and they devote special attention to developmental, cognitive, behavioral, educational, multicultural, and environmental issues. Students assess a distinct group of empirically supported interventions aimed at improving individual and family functioning. They also explore legal and ethical issues related to counseling children and adolescents. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6090 and SOCW 6111.)
  
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    SOCW 6456 - Social Work Practice With Couples and Family Systems


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on gaining an advanced understanding of theories and techniques for working with couples, married individuals, and families, as well as to acquire skills for theory integration and theory-based treatment. Through video demonstrations and other topical materials, students witness and examine empirically supported treatments and techniques in prevention, intervention, development, and promoting the well-being of marriages, couples, and families. They explore systemic implications for conceptualization, assessment, treatment planning, and interventions. Students also learn how to assess procedures for critically evaluating relevant research and how to apply these findings to their counseling practices. Additionally, they explore methods of adapting models to meet the needs of a diverse society and the legal and ethical issues related to working in this specialty area. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6090 and SOCW 6111.)
  
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    SOCW 6500 - Social Work Field Education I


    (3 cr.) This is the first foundation course in the four-part field practicum sequence. Students are required to complete 250 hours in an approved social services agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Through the practicum experience, students are introduced to the role of a professional social worker. Students demonstrate skills in maintaining boundaries and ethics while interacting in a professional manner with clients. Through their participation in a weekly hour-long seminar with their instructor and peers, students demonstrate their integration of classroom knowledge with professional practice skills.
  
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    SOCW 6510 - Social Work Field Education II


    (3 cr.) This is the second foundation course in the four-part field practicum sequence. As in SOCW 6500, students are again required to complete 250 hours in an approved social services agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Students have the opportunity to develop and demonstrate skills in engaging clients, developing mutually agreed-upon goals, identifying clients’ strengths and needs, completing assessments, and providing professional documentation during the field practicum experience. Students also identify policies at the organizational, local, state, or national level, which impact the client system. Through their participation in a weekly hour-long seminar with their instructor and peers, students demonstrate their integration of classroom knowledge with professional practice skills. (Prerequisite(s): Skills Lab I, SOCW 6301, and SOCW 6500.)
  
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    SOCW 6511 - Treatment of Forensic Populations


    (5 cr.) In this course, students gain the foundational knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations, such as sex offenders, substance abusers, and white-collar criminals. Students analyze the use of traditional forms of intervention, including individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice. Applying the concepts and theories learned in the course, students develop a project scenario in which they feature an offender and describe treatment approaches as well as related ethical, legal, and multicultural factors that may impact treatment. Students also consider and discuss professional identity and goals.
  
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    SOCW 6520 - Social Work Field Education III


    (3 cr.) This is the third course in the field practicum sequence. It is an advanced course. Students are required to complete 250 (20–24 hours per week) hours in an approved social services agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. There is a focus on agencies that serve clients from diverse populations and/or marginalized or oppressed groups. In this course, students focus on recognizing the importance of clinical social work practice and demonstrating the ability to negotiate and advocate with and on behalf of client systems to enhance client well-being and ensure social and economic justice. Students demonstrate the ability to critically examine research available on interventions, make an appropriate selection, and follow through with the implementation. A seminar is included in which students demonstrate the integration of classroom knowledge with the professional practice skills. (Prerequisite(s): RESI 6651, RESI 6652, Skills Lab 2, SOCW 6060, SOCW 6090, and SOCW 6510.)
  
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    SOCW 6530 - Social Work Field Education IV


    (3 cr.) This is the final course in the four-part field practicum sequence. As in SOCW 6500, SOCW 6510, and SOCW 6520, students in this course are also required to complete 250 hours in an approved social services agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Through the practicum experience, students are provided with the opportunity to monitor and evaluate therapeutic outcomes and engage in research-based practice. Students demonstrate the ability to provide services to a client or client system, from intake to termination or transfer. Students demonstrate skills in termination; evaluating interventions and outcomes; and disseminating these results and analysis to colleagues, peers, and other practitioners. A seminar is included in which students demonstrate the integration of classroom knowledge with the professional practice skills. (Prerequisite(s): RESI 6651, RESI 6652, SOCW 6520, SOCW 6521, and SOCW 6311.)
  
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    SOCW 6652 - Residency II


    (5 cr.) This residency is designed to complement the advanced curriculum. In this residency, students continue to develop their clinical skills and are required to demonstrate competency in ethical practice, case conceptualization, and evidence-based practice. In addition, students have the opportunity to practice their own supervision and consultation skills. Successful completion of this residency will result in an evaluation that indicates students have demonstrated proficiency in the prescribed areas and are ready to interface with the public as a clinical social worker in training.
  
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    SOCW 8000 - Foundations for Graduate Study


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study, a Professional Development Plan, and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as academic writing support from Walden University’s Online Writing Center. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence and integrity.
  
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    SOCW 8002 - Foundations of Graduate Study


    (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Through this course, students gain a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical- thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence. Major assignments include the preparation of the Professional Development Plan and Program of Study.
  
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    SOCW 8103 - Introduction to Addiction


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to aspects of functioning as a professional as an addiction counselor, including but not limited to role setting of addiction counselors; history, philosophy, and trends in addiction counseling; professional standards for addiction counselors; effects of crises and trauma-causing events on persons with addictions; self‐care; and ethical and culturally sensitive practice of addiction counseling. Students also explore competencies, credentialing, and other professional issues. Students explore the future as addiction counselors with an overview of the addiction counseling profession.
  
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    SOCW 8110 - Advanced Social Work Theory and Practice


    (5 cr.) In this foundational doctoral course, students are provided with an overview of the ways of knowing diverse contemporary theories in social work and the social sciences. Students will be able to understand how the assumptions of various epistemological paradigms (i.e., ways of knowing) inform research.  Students will also explore how theories inform social work practice, policy, and research, and they will discuss the role of the social worker in social issues at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. In addition, there is an emphasis on the delivery of culturally sensitive and ethical services.
  
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    SOCW 8116 - History and Development of Social Work


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide a doctoral foundation in the history and philosophy of clinical social work and social welfare. Students can explore the strengths and weaknesses of the social work delivery systems. They can review the origins of the profession as well as its various responses to the changing needs of society. Students can begin to develop their identities as leaders, researchers, and best-practices informants in the area of social work through critical literature reviews related to research, policy, and practice; discussions about social work and contemporary society; and course assignments. Students in this course also focus on the competencies and ethics of social work and social welfare professionals.
  
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    SOCW 8117 - Diversity and Multiculturalism


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to prepare students to provide leadership to communities, institutions, employees, and agencies to address social justice, fairness, and equity for diverse, vulnerable, and marginalized populations. Students examine the intersections of age, gender, race, ethnicity, sexual identity, ability, and socioeconomic status to understand individuals’, communities’, and families’ experiences of oppression, power, access, and opportunity in society. In addition, students can engage in extensive self-awareness activities to address how their own values, attitudes, and beliefs will impact their ability to practice, advocate, and collaborate around social work, welfare, and policy.
  
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    SOCW 8137 - Contemporary Issues, Social Change, and Social Policy


    (5 cr.) How can students prepare for ethical leadership in social work practice, administration, and advocacy? In this course, students can enhance their understanding of the responsibility of social workers in advanced practice to foster social change for their community, clients, and profession through practice, policy, and advocacy. Students can use current research to analyze and evaluate policy and identify how community, national, and international issues affect the social work profession. In addition, students examine opportunities to learn how to influence policy as a response to the changing needs of a diverse population. Students also can gain an understanding of how to ethically initiate advocacy and social change processes.
  
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    SOCW 8138 - Program and Practice Evaluation


    (5 cr.) Using models of evaluation derived from social science and social work theory and research, students can learn to apply research in social work to inform practice, future research, policy, and advocacy. Topics include the history and theory underlying program and practice evaluation, approaches to evaluation, selection of appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative models and techniques used to perform the evaluation, strategies for getting gatekeepers to be invested in the development of the research and in the outcomes, demonstration of program effectiveness, and dissemination of results to stakeholders. Students can gain an understanding of how to address dimensions of diversity (race, ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, sexual identity, gender, etc.) in their program and practice evaluations in an effort to ensure equity and fairness in program delivery and advocacy.
  
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    SOCW 8140 - Action Research Methods in Social Work


    (5 cr.) Action research is a form of social research that combines research with intervention. It is characterized by a collaborative relationship between the researcher and a client organization that is in an immediate problematic situation. The research process is directed toward addressing the problem situation and producing knowledge that contributes to the goals of social science. Action research is compatible with many of the values and principles of social work. Students in this course also address issues of social work ethics and values encountered by the action researcher.
     
  
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    SOCW 8145 - Crisis Management


    (5 cr.) In this course, counselor educators can learn the fundamentals of crisis management and crisis leadership. In addition, they can develop an understanding of the theories and models related to crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events. Students also explore ethical, legal, and diversity considerations in crisis and trauma response. By the end of the course, students understand models for training and supporting other counselors in the areas of crisis response applicable to community, national, and international crises. Furthermore, students develop a crisis management plan for their own community.
  
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    SOCW 8152 - Human Services Administration


    (5 cr.) Diminishing resources are compounding the societal challenges facing human services agencies today. In this course, students will examine the core competencies that human service administrators need in order to address these challenges and make a greater difference in the communities they serve. A broad range of skills and innovative approaches will be discussed, including cross-agency collaboration, stakeholder communication, supervision of people and processes, creation and implementation of policies, and strategic planning and management. Through course discussions, applications, and critical literature reviews, students can demonstrate knowledge and skills that are directly translatable to their current work environment.
  
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    SOCW 8203 - Theories, Treatment, and Case Management of Addictions


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to theories, treatment intervention, and case management strategies for addiction counseling. Students are introduced to various models of treatment, recovery, relapse prevention, and continuing care for addictive disorders. In addition, students explore the treatment principles and philosophies of addiction-related programs. Students increase their self-awareness by understanding their own limitations as addiction counselors; recognizing when they need additional resources and support; and knowing when and where to refer clients when appropriate. In addition, students examine substance abuse policies and regulatory processes that influence service delivery in addiction counseling.
  
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    SOCW 8204 - Medical Social Work I


    (5 cr.) Designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of roles and competencies of social workers in medical settings, this course is developed to enhance students’ knowledge of medical terminology, crisis intervention, medical after-care and discharge planning, mental health evaluations, chemical dependency evaluations, community resources, and medical treatment teams. At the end of this course, students can also understand ethical practice with regard to medical social work.
  
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    SOCW 8205 - Medical Social Work II


    (5 cr.) The course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills for supporting vulnerable populations. Those populations include individual clients or patients and families with acute, chronic, and terminal illness; disabilities; and challenges of age. Students can extend their knowledge of support and resources for families around organ transplants; psychosocial aspects of illness and health for individuals and families; support skills for individuals and families around grief and loss; and end-of-life decision making. Students enhance their knowledge of ethical group and individual interventions for these vulnerable populations. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 8204 - Medical Social Work I.)
  
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    SOCW 8210 - Survey Research Methods


    (5 cr.) Participants in this course study in-depth a range of survey methods administered via in-person interview, self-report, phone interview, and Internet administration. Topics include survey design, administration, analysis, and addressing sources of bias. Students also review theoretical and empirical research on question and questionnaire effects. Students prepare in the practice of writing questions and designing questionnaires, both in general and in light of existing research.
  
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    SOCW 8333 - Vicarious Trauma and Compassion Fatigue


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding and awareness of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue for first responders. Students examine intervention strategies and models of treatment and prevention of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue through the lens of a counselor educator, supervisor, and clinician. Assignments include conducting a needs assessment and examining the use of standardized instruments. Students propose social change recommendations related to vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue to promote informed and competent trauma-response helping professionals. In this course, an emphasis is placed on the ethical, legal, multicultural, and spiritual implications for wellness and self-care, including personal, professional, and organizational elements. As a final project, students interview a first responder and develop an organizational wellness plan for his or her setting.
  
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    SOCW 8346 - Child and Adolescent Counseling


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with an overview of empirically supported theories and techniques for working with children and adolescents in the counseling process. The course is designed to enhance students’ theoretical and practical understanding of the systemic interplay among children, adolescents, families, and the stakeholders in their lives. Emphasis is given to a family systems view of intervention, with specific attention to developmental, cognitive, behavioral, educational, multicultural, and environmental issues. Students will be exposed to a distinct group of empirically supported interventions aimed at improving individual and family functioning. Legal and ethical issues related to counseling children and adolescents will be explored.
  
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    SOCW 8350 - Historical and Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice


    (5 cr.) Students in this course look at the evolution of crime—from lone criminals to worldwide syndicates—using the scientific rigor built into the selected readings and discussions. Among the topics examined are the philosophy of community- and problem-oriented policing, transnational crime, terrorism, and the new nexus between them. Current and future leaders are equipped with the knowledge and depth of understanding to assess and manage the opportunities, innovations, and challenges in their profession.
  
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    SOCW 8351 - Policy Analysis in the Criminal Justice System


    (5 cr.) Students in this course review key court decisions and explore the tension between constitutionally guaranteed individual rights and crime-prevention and public-safety efforts. Students also cover policy analysis and planning in the criminal justice field and offer an understanding of the policy context in which the criminal justice system functions.
  
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    SOCW 8356 - Theories and Techniques in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an advanced understanding of theories and techniques for working with couples, marriages, and families. The focus of this course is on empirically supported treatments and techniques for addressing prevention, intervention, development, and wellness of marriages, couples, and families. Systemic implications for conceptualization, assessment, treatment planning, and interventions will be addressed. Students will be exposed to procedures for critically evaluating relevant research and to methods for applying findings to their counseling with these groups. Methods of adapting models to meet the needs of a diverse society as well as legal and ethical issues related to working in this specialty area will be explored.
  
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    SOCW 8451 - Public Policy Analysis


    (5 cr.) Public administrators today work in a hypercharged, partisan environment with unprecedented access to public policy data. This challenging environment affords public administrators both extraordinary opportunities and severe constraints. Students in this course examine, in detail, the key stakeholders and actors in the public policy process with particular attention devoted to understanding the functions, impacts, and constraints of these stakeholders upon policy development and the policy-making process. In addition, students explore professional ethics related to the role of the policy analyst and consider the significant social outcomes of public policy. This course is an introduction to the theories and strategies used by policy-makers and policy analysts to develop, implement, execute, evaluate, and promulgate public policy. Students explore the impact and consequences of public policy and consider and evaluate policy in a social justice framework. Students craft a policy memorandum to a decision maker of their choosing that examines and evaluates competing alternatives regarding a current public policy problem.
  
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    SOCW 8465 - Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination


    (5 cr.) In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public and nonprofit organizations need to be strategic in their planning to fulfill the organizational mission and enhance stakeholder satisfaction. Students in this course explore the role and process of strategic planning with an appreciation for collaboration, cooperation, and coordination as they relate to the strategic planning process. Students will apply these concepts to real-life situations and organizations and develop a strategic plan.
  
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    SOCW 8550 - Preparing for Dissertation


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is specifically on the process of writing the dissertation prospectus. Students will use their preliminary research plan, developed previously, and develop a problem statement, to be used in the dissertation. They will further refine the problem statement and carry out the planning and the library research that will bring them to the formulation of a dissertation prospectus. The prospectus is a brief paper, typically 15–20 pages in length, that lays out the background for the problem statement; the problem statement itself; a survey of the relevant literature, typically 25–75 references; and a research, implementation, and evaluation plan for the solution of the problem.
  
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    SOCW 8570 - Social Work Supervision


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to explore the major conceptual approaches, methods, and techniques; evaluation; and ethical and legal issues related to clinical supervision for social workers and social workers in training. Throughout this course, students focus on strategies for working with supervisees representing diverse backgrounds as well as various developmental and learning styles. Students can analyze the purpose of supervision and the theoretical frameworks and models of supervision in social work.
  
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    SOCW 8571 - Treatment of Forensic Populations


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the basic knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations. Various forensic populations, such as sex offenders, substance abusers, and victims of crime, and employee assistance to law enforcement personnel will be covered. The use of traditional forms of intervention, such as individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice, will be addressed.
  
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    SOCW 8610 - Action Research Project


    (5 cr. per term for a minimum of four terms until completion) Through the doctoral study action research project, students demonstrate their scholarly ability to engage in an iterative process to examine, critique, and synthesize knowledge, theory, and experience so that new ideas can be tested; best practices identified, established, and verified; and theoretical, practice, or policy constructs evaluated and advanced. In all cases, the doctoral study is a rigorous inquiry that results in new knowledge, insight, or practice, demonstrating its efficacy in the world of business and management. The goal of the doctoral study action research project is for the social work professional to conduct a participatory investigation that focuses on a research-based intervention within a designated context. Ultimately, every doctoral study makes a fresh contribution to clinical practice in the field of social work and social work education.

    Successful completion of this proposal development course does not guarantee approval of the resulting proposal by the student’s doctoral committee, the relevant program director, or the IRB committee.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 4 quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Doctoral Study with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a doctoral study, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their doctoral study on ProQuest before their degree is conferred.

     

  
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    SOCW 8750 - Leadership Development


    (5 cr.) Great leadership is enhanced by an understanding of the psychological principles of leader development. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the psychology of leadership and leader development. Topics include psychological theories of leadership, leadership styles, qualities of great leaders, and instruments used to assess leadership and leadership potential. Students apply psychological theories to understanding their own capacity for leadership.

     

  
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    SOCW 8785 - Social Change in Action: Prevention, Consultation, and Advocacy


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to prepare students for their roles as counselors in prevention, intervention, and consultation endeavors with specific populations in specific settings. Using an action-research model, students will prepare a blueprint for a prevention, intervention, or consultation project for a community, agency, or organization.
  
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    SOCW 8786 - Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in either a public, private, or nonprofit organization or a combined or networked one. Students are engaged as learners in a collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration as they apply a strategic planning and management approach to the implementation of public policy. Learners are introduced to planning, general management, financial management, performance management, and contracting processes in organizations whose purpose is to implement public policy.
  
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    SOCW 8801 - Clinical Seminar II


    (3 cr.) Students in this second clinical seminar will build on advanced clinical practice knowledge and develop an understanding of the various models of clinical supervision in social work. With a focus on professional development as a clinical supervisor, students will use tools of self-reflection to identify personal biases and clinical perspectives. Throughout this course, students will analyze strategies, techniques, and conceptual approaches to supervision within various clinical social work settings. Students will identify best practices as well as the ethical and legal issues related to clinical social work supervision. The purpose of this course is to assist students in developing an advanced level of practice as a supervisor within a social work setting.
  
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    SOCW 8802 - Clinical Seminar I


    (5 cr.) Doctoral students taking this first clinical seminar receive a comprehensive overview of the history, development, and evolution of clinical social work knowledge and practice with individual and family clients.
     
  
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    SOCW 8809 - Fundamentals of Law and Public Policy


    (5 cr.) Legal decisions and the law have an impact on the creation of public policy. Students in this course explore the relationship between law and public policy and the significance of court decisions on law and public policy. Students examine the role of administrative agencies in the creation and execution of law and public policy and the role of the courts in resolving challenges to agency rule-making; conflicts between executive and legislative branches of government; and conflicts between and among federal, state, and local laws. Students apply fundamental legal concepts and processes to the creation and execution of law and public policy.
  
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    SOCW 8815 - Contemporary Gerontology/Geriatric Psychology


    (5 cr.) Statistical data indicate that people are living longer and the number of older persons is continually increasing. As the population ages, society must prepare to address their needs. Students in this course are provided with a multidisciplinary approach to the study of aging in contemporary societies. Students examine the biological, psychological, social, and societal contexts of aging. They also explore the historical and cross-cultural perspectives on aging, social theories of aging, managing chronic diseases, cognitive changes associated with aging, mental health issues, sexuality, and social interactions. Through a series of taskforce reports on various topics, such as sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, and elder abuse, students apply course concepts and critically examine current issues in gerontology.


     

  
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    SOCW 9000 - Dissertation


    (5 credits per quarter for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion) Doctoral students are offered the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study in this course. Students complete the dissertation independently, with the guidance of a dissertation supervisory committee chair and committee members. Students complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and dissertation. Once students register for SOCW 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 4 quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Dissertation with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8100, RSCH 8200, and RSCH 8300.)

  
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    SPLB 671L - Pre-Practicum 1


    (0 cr.) By participating in a Walden Pre-Practicum, students gain skills in their development as scholar-practitioners. Through their Pre-Practicum experiences, students expand their network of peers and faculty members while developing their professional skills and identity. In Pre-Practicum 1, students begin to apply the core skills and techniques introduced in their Techniques course. Students begin to develop the multicultural competencies needed for counseling. Per program requirements, there is a synchronous experience in this course. Students continue to expand their knowledge of counselor credentialing.
  
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    SPLB 672L - Pre-Practicum 2


    (0 cr.) In Pre-Practicum 2, students continue to develop core skills from Pre-Practicum 1 and integrate advanced skills in their development as scholar-practitioners. Through their Pre-Practicum experiences, students expand their network of peers and faculty members while continuing to develop their professional skills and identity. In Pre-Practicum 2, students begin to develop group leadership skills, integrate counseling theory, and continue to demonstrate cultural competency skills. Students engage in developing their upcoming field experience plan and continue credentialing skills activities. (Prerequisite(s): GRPL 6100 and COUN 6250 for those in Addiction Counseling; Marriage, Family, and Couple Counseling; and Clinical Mental Health Counseling programs. GRPL 6100 and COUN 6350 for those in School Counseling programs.)
  
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    STAT 2001 - Statistics♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the fundamentals of probability and descriptive and inferential statistics. Students learn concepts of hypothesis testing, simple regression, and correlation analysis, focusing on the application of these techniques to business decision making. Applying these concepts to analyze hypothetical case scenarios, students learn practical ways that they can use statistics in their daily life. Students also have the opportunity to share insight and gain new perspectives on these topics through weekly discussions.
      (Prerequisite(s): MATH 1030 or 1040.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    STAT 2002 - Business Statistics♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the fundamentals of probability and descriptive and inferential statistics. Students learn concepts of hypothesis testing, simple regression, and correlation analysis, focusing on the application of these techniques to business decision making. Applying these concepts to analyze hypothetical case scenarios, students can learn practical ways that they can use statistics in their daily life. Students also have the opportunity to share insight and gain new perspectives on these topics through weekly discussions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    STAT 3001 - Statistical Methods and Applications♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course gain a foundation in statistical methodology as well as ways to use critical judgment in analyzing data sets. Through technology applications and hands-on lab work, students learn concepts of descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, t-test, one-way analysis of variance, correlation, and non-parametric methods (e.g., chi-square tests). Students gain the knowledge and skill to be able to analyze and apply statistics to research problems and everyday life situations.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    STAT 3401 - Statistical Concepts♦


    (5 cr.) Evaluation of software quality depends on statistics for many functions, such as assessing the number of bugs in different software routines and evaluating the efficiency of a program. Students in this course are introduced to statistics in assessing the quality of software. Students synthesize theory with practical applications to learn the fundamentals of statistical reasoning, use of numeric and graphical descriptive statistics, parameter estimation and inferential methods, research design, and linear regression. Students also have the opportunity to practice using a statistical software package to solve statistics problems. (Prerequisite(s): ITEC 2020.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    SWLB xxx - Social Work Skills Lab II


    (1 cr.) The Social Work Skills Lab II is a 1-credit, 6-week hybrid class that includes 3 weeks of online content, followed by a 4-day face-to-face residential component, and then closes with 2 weeks of online content. Students in the Social Work Skills Lab II reinforce the content covered in the Second Year MSW courses with an emphasis on clinical skills development and advanced topics in diversity and inclusion, evidence-based practice, ethics, and development of the professional self. Material covered includes practice labs focused on clinically informed individual engagement and assessment, group development and leadership, and an understanding of how to advocate within organizations and communities. A key component of the skills lab is to prepare and assess students for their readiness to enter the field.
  
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    SWLB 0651 - Skills Lab I


    (1 cr.) The Social Work Skills Lab is a 1-credit, 6-week hybrid class that includes 3 weeks of online content, followed by a 4-day face-to-face residential component, and then closes with 2 weeks of online content. Students in the Social Work Skills Lab I reinforce the content covered in the Second Year MSW courses with an emphasis on clinical skills development and advanced topics in diversity and inclusion, evidence-based practice, ethics, and development of the professional self. Material covered includes practice labs focused on clinically informed individual engagement and assessment, group development and leadership, and an understanding of how to advocate within organizations and communities. A key component of the skills lab is to prepare and assess students for their readiness to enter the field. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6002 and SOCW 6101.)
  
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    SWLB 0652 - Skills Lab II


    (1 cr.) The Social Work Skills Lab II is a 1-credit, 6-week hybrid class that includes 3 weeks of online content, followed by a 4-day face-to-face residential component, and then closes with 2 weeks of online content. Students in the Social Work Skills Lab II reinforce the content covered in the Second Year MSW courses with an emphasis on clinical skills development and advanced topics in diversity and inclusion, evidence-based practice, ethics, and development of the professional self. Material covered includes practice labs focused on clinically informed individual engagement and assessment, group development and leadership, and an understanding of how to advocate within organizations and communities. A key component of the skills lab is to prepare and assess students for their readiness to enter the field. (Prerequisite(s): SOCW 6002, SOCW 6510, and Advanced Standing.)
  
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    SWLB 0652A - Social Work Skills Lab IIA – Advanced Standing


    (1 cr.) The Social Work Skills Lab II and IIA is a 1-credit 6-week hybrid class that includes 3 weeks of online content, followed by a 4-day face-to-face residential component and then closes with 2 weeks of online content. The Social Work Skills Lab II/IIA serves to reinforce the content covered in the Second Year MSW courses with an emphasis on clinical skills development, and advanced topics in diversity and inclusion, evidence-based practice, ethics, and development of the professional self. Material covered includes practice labs focused on clinically informed individual engagement and assessment, group development and leadership, and an understanding of how to advocate within organizations and communities. A key component of the skills lab is to prepare and assess students for their readiness to enter field.
  
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    WLDN 2010 - What’s Your Problem?♦


    (5 cr.) Life can be viewed as a series of problems to solve and questions to answer. Students in this course will build a foundation for developing and applying practical problem-solving skills to questions that are relevant in today’s world. They will identify a problem, gather information, analyze and interpret the information collected, and ultimately present a proposed solution to various audiences. These problem-solving skills can be applied to academic, personal, and professional situations. As a result of taking this course, students will develop knowledge and skills for approaching everyday life events in a more effective manner. (Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1001 OR ENGL 1010.)
    Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information - See more at: http://catalog.waldenu.edu/preview_pro
  
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    WLDN 2050 - Developing a Prior Learning Portfolio


    (5 cr.) Learning takes place in a variety of settings, not simply in a classroom. On-the-job experience, volunteer work, corporate training, military service, and rigorous independent study provide opportunities for authentic learning that often equates to college-level, academic credit. In this course, students align their prior learning with current Walden University course and program outcomes. Students design an academic work product in the form of a portfolio to demonstrate mastery of academically relevant, college-level learning. They have the option to submit this portfolio for credit consideration toward an undergraduate degree.
  
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    WMBA 4990 - Business Essentials


    (0 sem. cr.) A background in the basics of business is often a key to making the most of a graduate business or management program. In this foundational course, students can build their business acumen in major functional areas that are essential to business success including business leadership and management, business ethics, the legal environment of business, accounting, finance, economics, quantitative methods and statistics, information systems management, global business, marketing, and strategic management.
  
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    WMBA 4991 - Business Essentials


    (0 sem. cr.) A background in the basics of business is often a key to making the most of a graduate business or management program. In this foundational course, students can build their business acumen in major functional areas that are essential to business success including business leadership and management, business ethics, the legal environment of business, accounting, finance, economics, quantitative methods and statistics, information systems management, global business, marketing, and strategic management.
  
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    WMBA 5000 - Dynamic Leadership


    (3 sem. cr.) Being an effective leader is essential in business and demands that an individual has a strong set of competencies including the ability to understand one’s self, motivate others, understand organizational culture, and manage ambiguity. In this course, students begin their personal and professional transformation by closely examining their current strengths and weaknesses, values, decision-making processes, and approaches to dealing with difficult problems. Students also explore leadership in turbulent times by examining how effective leaders think as well as how various management styles impact situations and relationships within an organization. Topics include key leadership concepts with applications to authentic situations; personal leadership and competency assessment; personal and professional development planning; and ethical values-based leadership decision making.
  
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    WMBA 5010 - Managing People and Promoting Collaboration


    (3 sem. cr.) Contemporary business environments are increasingly competitive, global, fast paced, and knowledge intensive. In these environments, effective use of human capital is vital to an enterprise’s success and survival. In this course, students will explore practical issues related to developing individuals and managing collaboration and will examine the skills and strategies necessary to address them effectively. Students will examine ethical and legal implications of managing a diverse workforce including issues that arise from cross-cultural differences and virtual work settings. The importance of communication as a tool to manage internal and external relationships is emphasized as it relates to the effectiveness of managing people to achieve organizational goals. Topics include planning and executing staffing strategies, developing individuals, fostering positive work environments, creating and sustaining teams, maintaining influence in the organization, managing a global workforce, managing programs for productivity improvement, and planning and managing the human side of organizational change.
  
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    WMBA 5020 - Fostering a Culture of Innovation


    (3 sem. cr.) In today’s complex and uncertain environment, innovation is important to achieving business success. In this course, students will examine how to be an effective creative leader who can readily apply imagination to resolve complex problems. Additionally students explore methods to establish a work environment conducive to creative thinking. Students will gain a set of proven methods, skills, and strategies that enable innovative breakthroughs to occur in a much more deliberate and predictable manner. Topics include: an overview of the concepts of creativity, foresight, and innovation; the diversity of different creative thinking styles; the “design thinking” process for business problem solving; work environments that stimulate creativity; characteristics of leaders who exemplify creativity that often leads to innovation; and the application of creativity and innovation concepts in organization settings.
  
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    WMBA 5030 - Managing Business Information Systems


    (3 sem. cr.) The need for information and dependence on information systems and enabling technologies are ubiquitous in business. Businesses use information systems to collect, process, store, and manage data, which can be aggregated and disseminated in the form of information to support effective decision making. Students in this course explore how to realize optimum benefit from information systems and technology to support and improve business decisions, processes, and services at all levels of business in alignment with business goals to achieve competitive advantage and sustainable business performance. Topics include cost, selection, implementation, and use of information systems; quality, reliability, and process standards; and use of information systems to drive strategic advantage.
  
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    WMBA 6000 - Dynamic Leadership♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Being an effective leader is essential in business and demands that an individual has a strong set of competencies including the ability to understand one’s self, motivate others, understand organizational culture, and manage ambiguity. In this course, students begin their personal and professional transformation by closely examining their current strengths and weaknesses, values, decision-making processes, and approaches to dealing with difficult problems. Students also explore leadership in turbulent times by examining how effective leaders think as well as how various management styles impact situations and relationships within an organization. Topics include key leadership concepts with applications to authentic situations; personal leadership and competency assessment; personal and professional development planning; and ethical values-based leadership decision making.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6010 - Managing People and Promoting Collaboration♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Contemporary business environments are increasingly competitive, global, fast paced, and knowledge intensive. In these environments, effective use of human capital is vital to an enterprise’s success and survival. In this course, students will explore practical issues related to developing individuals and managing collaboration and will examine the skills and strategies necessary to address them effectively. Students will examine ethical and legal implications of managing a diverse workforce including issues that arise from cross-cultural differences and virtual work settings. The importance of communication as a tool to manage internal and external relationships is emphasized as it relates to the effectiveness of managing people to achieve organizational goals. Topics include planning and executing staffing strategies, developing individuals, fostering positive work environments, creating and sustaining teams, maintaining influence in the organization, managing a global workforce, managing programs for productivity improvement, and planning and managing the human side of organizational change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6020 - Fostering a Culture of Innovation♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In today’s complex and uncertain environment, innovation is important to achieving business success. In this course, students will examine how to be an effective creative leader who can readily apply imagination to resolve complex problems. Additionally students explore methods to establish a work environment conducive to creative thinking. Students will gain a set of proven methods, skills, and strategies that enable innovative breakthroughs to occur in a much more deliberate and predictable manner. Topics include: an overview of the concepts of creativity, foresight, and innovation; the diversity of different creative thinking styles; the “design thinking” process for business problem solving; work environments that stimulate creativity; characteristics of leaders who exemplify creativity that often leads to innovation; and the application of creativity and innovation concepts in organization settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6030 - Managing Business Information Systems♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The need for information and dependence on information systems and enabling technologies are ubiquitous in business. Businesses use information systems to collect, process, store, and manage data, which can be aggregated and disseminated in the form of information to support effective decision making. Students in this course explore how to realize optimum benefit from information systems and technology to support and improve business decisions, processes, and services at all levels of business in alignment with business goals to achieve competitive advantage and sustainable business performance. Topics include cost, selection, implementation and use of information systems; quality, reliability, and process standards; and use of information systems to drive strategic advantage.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6040 - Improving Business Performance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) One of the most critical challenges in maintaining and improving organizational performance is identifying core strengths and weaknesses within the organization and across the more general value creation landscape. The focus of this course is on the challenges and opportunities for managers to create value and to increase organizational performance through the effective deployment of systems thinking and change management skills. Students in the course explore systems thinking as a process whereby problems are viewed as individual components within a larger system, and explore how various operational and systems thinking frameworks such as the Theory of Constraints and Lean Six Sigma can be utilized to optimize organizational performance in both industrial and service settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6050 - Accounting for Management Decision Making♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Accounting is the language of business. Managers must understand and be able to effectively use this language to create meaningful measures upon which to make appropriate decisions. They must know what to measure, how to measure, and what the consequences of the measurement might be. In this course, students will take a rigorous stakeholder approach that integrates fundamental managerial accounting topics with strategic business analysis. Topics include the use of accounting information to make effective business decisions; analysis of the impact of decisions on various stakeholder groups; and the development of sustainable solutions based on the information that is measured, analysis of various types of budgets, strategic planning, and forecasting as well as communicating accounting information effectively to various stakeholders. Various specific accounting tools and their usefulness to managers will be evaluated.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6060 - Marketing for Competitiveness♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective managers know that a clear understanding of the role of marketing, as well as a grasp of effective marketing practices, is essential for organizations to succeed in today’s fast-paced, competitive environment. In this course, students gain a working knowledge of both marketing theory and the practical application of innovative marketing tools and strategies. Students also explore how product, price, place, promotion, and people contribute to the marketing mix as they explore research-based insights into consumer behavior. Topics include product and service differentiation, competitive analysis, relationship marketing, coordination of marketing functions, and distribution strategies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6070 - Managerial Finance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Today’s companies are challenged to constantly do more with less. Effective managers know how to deploy scarce financial resources in ways to achieve optimum returns on these resources. Students will discover the latest financial tools and analytic methods to strengthen the capital investment decision-making process. Students will use critical-thinking skills to apply and, at times, challenge traditional financial theory, while balancing various stakeholder interests in the financial decision-making process. Students will examine a range of contemporary issues and techniques relevant to sound and ethical financial decision making. Topics include the role of stakeholders in optimizing firm value, assessment of an organization’s financial position, effective communication of financial information and goals, the analysis of risk and reward in financial decision making, the impact of financial decisions and capital structure on firm value, the role of ethics in financial decision making, and the evaluation of financial decisions to enter international markets.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6600 - U.S. Healthcare Delivery System


    (3 sem. cr.) Healthcare delivery is one of the largest industries in the United States. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to gain thorough insight into the current structure and components of health services and delivery; they are also presented with an abbreviated history addressing the nature of population illness and disease. Students identify and describe components of the system, including patients, healthcare professionals, public and private third-party payers, regulators, reimbursement methods, and technology. They engage in activities and discussions focused on the continuum of services related to healthcare, such as hospitals and hospital systems, ambulatory care, and long-term care. Students also explore issues related to these services, such as wellness, prevention, and community and public health, for a comprehensive understanding of the system. Students contextualize their study through the examination of current factors and challenges as well as the impact these challenges have on delivery and management.
  
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    WMBA 6601 - Managing First Things First


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective managers know how to identify, prioritize, and act upon the most important items of the myriad of tasks that can potentially distract them on any given day.  Students will explore  the qualities of effective managers and various management styles to identify those which resonate.  Students will examine critical skills  that are imperative to successful  management including organizing and handling priorities; communicating effectively; motivating, empowering,  and developing people; resolving issues and challenges; and managing oneself. Students will gain valuable skills and knowledge that they can apply immediately.
  
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    WMBA 6602 - Contemporary Topics in the U.S. Healthcare Delivery System♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course assess the causes and consequences of historical events on health and medical care in the United States. They appraise the impact of barriers related to cost, quality, and access to health and medical care. Students analyze unique and complex aspects of subsystems and differentiate vertical and horizontal integrated healthcare delivery systems. They compare characteristics of healthcare and medical care in the United States with healthcare and medical care systems in other countries. Students also evaluate current and future issues, trends, and forces in healthcare and medical care reform.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6603 - Health Policy and Economics


    (3 sem. cr.) Managers in healthcare must possess the skills needed to assess economic principles and policies to make important decisions regarding healthcare and services. In this course, students examine the application of health policy and economic principles in regard to managerial decision making. They learn about the process for policy development and implementation, key stakeholders and interest groups involved in the health policy process, and how health policy changes over time within the United States. Students assess and discuss key policy initiatives related to cost, quality, and access. They also engage in assignments designed to advance their understanding of and ability to apply economic principles, such as supply, demand, and the determination of market price.
  
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    WMBA 6604 - Law, Ethics, and Policy in Healthcare Administration♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The rapidly evolving healthcare system presents the healthcare administrator with complex challenges and risks. Healthcare administrators must possess the skills needed to assess external and internal healthcare polices to influence organizational design and delivery of healthcare services. Students assess and discuss key policy initiatives from the diverse perspectives of policymakers, interest groups, and other stakeholders. Through coursework, students focus on required knowledge of laws and regulations developed by policymakers that impact the healthcare organizations, and they review key laws that govern patient care delivery, employee relations, contracts, and fraud. Emphasis will be placed on legal and regulatory failure points that administrators must avoid in designing and implementing policies and practices within the healthcare organization. To help frame these concepts, students examine the ethical underpinnings and principles that healthcare organizations and administrators follow in the delivery of services to patients.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6605 - Finding Your Inner Leader


    (3 sem. cr.) Being an effective, authentic, and trustworthy leader requires considerable self-awareness based on commitment to candid self-reflection and the wisdom to recognize how to best serve others through creating shared vision for a better future. In this course, students examine their values, experiences, skills, capabilities, preferences, and knowledge in context of their leadership aspirations. Students examine factors that affect their ability to influence and inspire others and create plans to strengthen these leadership skills. Students learn strategies to navigate in turbulent, changing environments that often pose difficult choices and discover how leaders rise to meet challenges and opportunities.
  
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    WMBA 6607 - Financial Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the terminology, theory, concepts, and techniques used in the accounting and finance functions in healthcare organizations. They explore the important role of finance in healthcare organizations, in addition to the various techniques to develop, manage, and control finances. Using an applied approach to healthcare finance, students learn how to develop, apply, and interpret various financial tools, including budgets, sources of revenue/reimbursement by payer, income statements, balance sheets, dashboards, statements of cash flow, pro formas, return on investment analysis, financial ratios, capital budgeting, debt service and borrowing, depreciation, and cost allocation and cost accounting techniques. Students develop portions of a business/financial plan using these techniques and analyze the viability of their plan using accepted financial management tools.
  
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    WMBA 6608 - Healthcare Financial Management and Economics♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students gain knowledge of economics principles such as cost, quality, and access as they relate to the healthcare world. The principles of healthcare financial management, including accounting and finance, are vitally important to the viability and ongoing operations of a healthcare business. Students have the opportunity to interpret and analyze the financial statements of a business, use and analyze financial ratios, utilize variance analysis, understand and implement operating and capital budgeting, and develop knowledge of the business planning process. Students create portions of a business/financial plan using these techniques and analyze the viability of their plan using accepted financial management tools.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6610 - Talent Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) One of the most important assets of an organization is its talent, in other words, its human capital. However, too often there is little planning or strategy applied to the creation and management of this huge asset. In this course, students have the opportunity to develop the skills and knowledge to create and work effectively within a talent management and planning process. They explore recruiting strategies within a human capital development context and focus on building specific skills in managing an organization’s talent through position planning, talent selection and placement, and retention. Using industry best practices, students also engage in applications and group projects to practice developing initiatives that align with organizational strategies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6613 - Human Resource Metrics♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Understanding the specific value of the human resource (HR) capital of an organization is crucial. Metrics for HR management provide the tools for both measuring human capital value and for overseeing and managing an organization’s human resources. Students in this course explore HR metrics as tools for organizational and individual performance improvement. They work toward establishing a foundation for the effective deployment of performance metrics as part of the recruitment, training and development, and retention of human resources. Students learn which metrics to employ and how to manage the results – a pivotal responsibility of HR managers. Students in this course are provided with the tools to make informed decisions required to create, apply, interpret, and manage results of appropriate metrics as an HR professional.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6615 - Building Organizational Culture: Leaders as Architects


    (3 sem. cr.) Organizational leaders act as partners in shaping, and are shaped by, the organizational cultures they seek to influence. Students in this course learn to recognize the elements that make up an organization’s culture as well as ways to harness these for positive change and organizational success. They explore perspectives on how to make conceptual sense of the cultural landscape of organizations and examine the implications for leading and building effective communities at various levels of application. Students assess and discuss a variety of topics, such as tools of self-development, the reciprocal nature of leadership, and cultural components.
  
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    WMBA 6617 - Performance Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Performance management is a set of practices and processes that creates career opportunities to attract appropriate resources, establishes an environment that nurtures individual productivity and development, and smoothly transitions individuals to their next position or organization. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to address these three key sets of processes. They practice writing job descriptions, selecting the right employees, developing skill-based performance standards, effecting relevant onboarding programs, and implementing educational and training programs intended to drive the success of employees and the organization as a whole. They explore how to maximize employee productivity through structured feedback, coaching, reflective performance development conversations, effective compensation models, employee recognition programs, and career development paths. Students also examine ways to improve performance management systems by integrating feedback from the exit interviews of valued employees.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6620 - Practices in Project Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques needed to successfully manage projects throughout the life of a project, known as the project life cycle. By learning about the project management Knowledge Areas and Process Groups as well as the distinguishing characteristics of each, students gain an appreciation for how these two dimensions of project management interact in initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    WMBA 6623 - Enterprise and Risk Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Project management involves an ongoing, and nearly inevitable, variation of risks to which managers must be attuned and ready to mitigate. In this course, students learn how to plan, analyze, respond to, and control qualitative and quantitative risk in projects. They examine the internal risks associated with managing projects and the external risks associated with customer behavior, the supply chain, transportation and distribution channels, and acts of nature within the framework of the organization’s overall risk strategy. Assessing real-world examples of project risks, students learn about strategies for working with project stakeholders to identify and respond to risk within defined ethical and legal standards.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6627 - Stakeholder Management and Organizational Behavior♦


    (3 sem. cr.) One role of the project manager is to lead teams in complex and diverse organizational settings while concurrently communicating with all stakeholders. In this course, students analyze this dual role and examine how individual and group behavior impacts organizational effectiveness. They discover how using influence, rather than organizational power, leads to more successful project management. Students learn ways to design projects to support organizational goals and how to build and engage organizational capital (intellectual, human, physical, financial, and structural). They also apply stakeholder management practices to engage in and manage relationships with the community of project stakeholders.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6630 - Leadership in a Global Landscape♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Leaders encounter many challenges as people from different cultures, social structures, religions, and languages participate in a globalized landscape and workforce. Students in this course examine these challenges and develop an understanding of the interrelatedness of nations in the global economy. They also explore the changing nature of international business and leadership. Students evaluate and discuss the concepts of sustainable business strategies, international trade, foreign direct investment, and regional economic integration in relation to leadership in a global environment.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6633 - Personal Leadership: Mentoring and Coaching♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Mentoring requires an understanding and integration of many theories, including leadership, interaction, and communication, that support the development of effective leaders. Students in this course understand and apply skills of effective mentoring, such as active listening, learning, empowering, and enabling change. Students engage in practical exercises, such as using feedback to create interactive dialogue and asking questions to acquire a deeper understanding of mentoring and coaching processes. In consideration of modern and virtual environments, students explore the challenges of mentoring or coaching individuals in a virtual or team setting.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6635 - Harnessing the Power of Data and Information


    (3 sem. cr.) Effectively using data and information can make the difference in whether the best decisions are made or problems are solved correctly. There are multiple approaches to practical managerial problem solving that are rooted in the systematic collection, analysis, and display of relevant data and information. In this course, students examine the importance of data, beginning with the process of transforming data into information, and then focusing on the best methods for presenting that information in support of sound and ethical decision making. Students evaluate common misinterpretations or errors in working with data and determine how to detect data and information presented in a deceptive manner. Students explore current paradigms in data-based decision making and problem solving. They learn how they can use these analytical-thinking practices to improve their general managerial decision-making skills.
  
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    WMBA 6637 - Leadership in Action: Change Management and Conflict Resolution♦


    (3 sem. cr.) One of the more difficult and large-scale challenges of leadership is effecting successful change in the face of resistance and conflict. Students in this course explore this challenge as well as the various facets of leading organizational change. They engage in writing assignments designed to help them focus their ideas and critically assess major topics, such as conflict resolution strategies aimed at the personal and organizational level. Students also consider the implications of emotion and the multifaceted array of conflict-management styles—factors for which professionals must account when making decisions regarding leadership and conflict resolution.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6640 - Advanced Managerial Finance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The focus of this course is on how students use financial information for internal decision-making purposes. It is designed for the leaders who will be using, rather than producing, financial information. Decision making is an art. Good decision makers need to be able to anticipate the alternatives, evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each, and recognize the tradeoffs inherent in each alternative. Students in this course will approach financial decision making using this framework that also overtly includes rigorous stakeholder analysis and implications. Stakeholder analysis sometimes leads to controversial decision alternatives, but it is this exercise that will develop the students’ talents for challenging the traditional and finding the balance between stakeholder expectations and creating opportunity for the organization. The objective of this course is for students to apply finance theory and principles to the analysis of important business problems. Specific topics will include capital budgeting, cost of capital, real options, capital structure, payout policy, and enterprise valuation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6643 - Applications in Corporate Finance I♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Corporate finance managers use a variety of tools when identifying possible alternatives for recommendations on financial management decision making.  Students in this course use the tools of finance to help managers maximize their firm’s value.  Topics include the time value of money, net present value, internal rate of return, capital budgeting, capital structure, working capital management, multinational concepts, and dividend policy.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6647 - Applications in Corporate Finance II♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students taking this course build on WMBA 6643 and focus more deeply on contemporary issues and optimal financial decision making. Students participate in hands-on demonstrations of how to become more skillful in various financial management environments. Topics include valuation, advanced capital budgeting, cost of capital, risk, standard deviation, variance, covariance, capital asset pricing model, and beta. Additional topics include multinational concepts, leasing, option pricing, derivatives, hedging, and other advanced financial applications.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6650 - The Impact of Entrepreneurship♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students continue to build their entrepreneurial skills and knowledge base by addressing problems drawn from real-world organizations. Students analyze how the organization contributes to society (local, national, or international), how entrepreneurship and commercial activities affect the environment, and how the potential of forming “glocalities” (a combination of individuals, business organizations, and political agencies) becomes more significant in the future in terms of working in unison to better society.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6653 - New Venture Creation and Entrepreneurship♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course focus on the emerging trend of business organizations moving from a profit-only mentality to one in which they utilize their profits and other resources to enhance society. Students explore entrepreneurial concepts and processes that apply to startup enterprises as well as those that are well established with an innovative focus or entrepreneurial spirit. Topics such as market opportunity, risk management, change management, innovation, product development, financing and raising capital, intellectual property, and commercialization are covered. Students apply these and related concepts to problems common to real-world organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6657 - Managing a Sustainable Small Business♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Small businesses make up a large majority of all businesses in the United States. Students in this course are presented with the fundamentals of successfully establishing a sustainable small business enterprise. They address small business organization, operation, management, and sustainability. Business topics in the areas of planning, accounting, finance, and marketing are analyzed through the lens of the small business organization. Students analyze the unique relationships between government and small businesses. Topics include how to identify what determines the status of being a small business with local, state, and federal government agencies as well as how small businesses apply sustainable practices to be profitable. Students investigate the crucial role that technology plays in managing small business operations and evaluate popular software applications for efficiently managing those functions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6660 - Communicating Using Social and Digital Media♦


    (3 sem. cr.) While some companies may still be asking, “Why should we care about social media?,” most are now asking, “How can we leverage the power of social media?” In this course, students examine how social media has changed the way consumers interact with brands and apply elements of storytelling to develop a social media strategy for an organizational scenario. In addition, students explore issues of ethics, privacy, and media law that are heightened by social media and digital communication distribution. Topics include types of social media, audience appropriateness, reputation management, social media strategy, evaluation methods, and the communications regulatory environment, including media law and privacy.

     

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    WMBA 6663 - Market Research and Customer Insights♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Understanding consumer behavior is essential for developing and effectively marketing products and services. In this course, students can learn how to use customer data and insights to improve strategic marketing decisions and improve performance. Students have the opportunity to analyze factors that influence buyer behavior during all stages of the purchasing process and to consider how learnings can be translated into product strategy and related marketing decisions. Additionally, students will study market segmentation and targeting practices as a key means of differentiation.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    WMBA 6667 - From Marketing Strategy to Execution♦


    (3 sem. cr.) How can a marketing plan help a business meet its goals and objectives? How can a marketing plan help capitalize on consumer insights and trends? How can the latest innovations and communication strategies be used to reach the target audience? In this course, students will be immersed in all aspects of developing a comprehensive 3-year marketing plan that aligns with an organization’s business strategy and helps marketers make better decisions about their products, services, customers, brand, and competition. Students can learn to apply best practices for market segmentation, consumer insights, competitive analysis, brand positioning and strategy, and consumer acquisition and retention strategies, as well as developing tactical ideas for each strategy, and providing financial justification for the plan.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6670 - Applications in Global Business♦


    (3 sem. cr.) A fundamental shift is occurring in today’s business environment as international borders become less of a barrier to trade and investment. Successful businesses recognize the importance of a global mindset and a strong understanding of the global forces affecting them. In this course, students will examine the forces and institutions that are shaping international trade and investment flows, explore the many options for “going global,” and evaluate the complex challenges that organizations face when moving into new and diverse cultural, political, business, and economic environments. Topics include: an overview of multinational institutions; alternative methods for entering global markets; the effects of regional integration on multinational businesses; risks faced by multinational organizations; supply chain and Research and Development (R&D) considerations; sustainability in a global environment; and financial management and ethics.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6673 - Case Studies in Global Business♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, international business topics are explored in depth and in context through real-world case studies. Students analyze the success and failure of international business ventures across a wide range of industries, developing their analytical skills in the process.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    WMBA 6675 - Critical Thinking for Effective Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Managers encounter a variety of challenges on a daily basis, which require the ability to employ existing tools and strategies to strategically communicate with individuals and the organization at large and to understand the different types of attitudes and values of others. Individuals with these skills are most successful when their efforts are coupled with the ability to think critically and analytically. Students are provided with the opportunity to improve their overall critical-thinking and reasoning skills within a managerial context. Using relevant management articles, case studies, and current topics analyses, students sharpen their diagnostic-reading skills and learn to construct effective, ethical, evidence-based arguments, which are fundamental capabilities of effective managers. They also examine common fallacies in thinking and reasoning as well as the rhetorical use of language to formulate convincing and effective arguments.
 

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