2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Nov 28, 2021  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    PSYC 6790 - Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector


    (5 cr.) Nonprofit organizations (NPOs) can serve to positively affect people’s lives through social change, but they require leaders who have a fundamental understanding of the nonprofit sector, including related ethical, legal, and global perspectives. Students in this course explore these viewpoints as well as the history, foundations, and types of NPOs. They also examine the diverse political, social, and economic contexts within which NPOs exist. Students explore and apply marketing, public relations, and communication concepts and strategies to case studies and contemporary situations. Gaining practical insight, students also apply theories presented in the course to the development of a concept paper guiding the development of a nonprofit organization.
  
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    PSYC 6791 - Organizational Management and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Public and nonprofit leaders in all areas of public administration require a thorough understanding of the expectations of their roles as leaders and managers of diverse and complex organizations. Students use theoretical and applied perspectives from which they study the intricacies of these roles, including the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development. Students gain a practical understanding of these topics through the application of principles and concepts to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 6793 - Board Governance and Volunteer Management♦


    (5 cr.) The success of nonprofit organizations (NPOs) is largely dependent on the effective management of program volunteers and board members—individuals who often serve as the lifeblood of NPOs. Students in this course explore the volunteer management process, including volunteer recruitment, orientation, training, supervision, and evaluation. They focus on methods that organizations use to create and maintain an effective Board of Directors to ensure that the board governs and guides the organization toward their mission. Students design a board development or volunteer management plan based on processes presented in the course and fundamental concepts acquired earlier in the program.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 6800 - Applied Psychology Research Methods


    (5 cr.) In this research course, students are provided with core knowledge and skills for collecting, analyzing, and interpreting quantitative data at the graduate level. Students are provided practical skills in conducting applied research activities including methodological approaches, data collection, and management. They also explore basic exploratory, descriptive, and inferential analyses and apply statistical techniques to analyze data.
  
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    PSYC 6805 - Holistic Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Holistic psychologists provide therapy to patients by incorporating all aspects of the individual, including mental, physical, and spiritual. Students in this course are provided with a foundation in holistic psychology. Students examine topics in holistic and transpersonal psychology, as well as influences of theory and research in the areas of spirituality and mind/body relationships. While focusing on the integration of various perspectives, students also examine states of consciousness, emotional and psychosomatic disorders, spiritual emergencies, death and dying, and integral psychology. They share perspectives and assess current issues through discussions, and they demonstrate knowledge through a final written assignment on a major topic of choice related to holistic psychology.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 6810 - Community Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Through collaborative research and action, community psychologists work to enhance the well-being of individuals and community by understanding how communities function on many different levels. Students in this course explore the fundamental concepts and practice of community psychology. They examine guiding values and assumptions of the field, basic ecological concepts, and models of intervention. Evaluating traditional and topical research, students explore diversity in community psychology, strategies for social change, primary and secondary prevention, community mental health, empowerment, stress, and resiliency. They also have the opportunity to assess and discuss their personal and professional experiences, values, and cultural background and to consider how these factors are likely to influence their work as community psychologists.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 6815 - Contemporary Gerontology/Geriatric Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Statistical data indicate that people are living longer and the number of older persons is continually increasing. As the population ages, society must prepare to address their needs. Students in this course are provided with a multidisciplinary approach to the study of aging in contemporary societies. Students examine the biological, psychological, social, and societal contexts of aging. They also explore the historical and cross-cultural perspectives on aging, social theories of aging, managing chronic diseases, cognitive changes associated with aging, mental health issues, sexuality, and social interactions. Through a series of taskforce reports on various topics, such as sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, and elder abuse, students apply course concepts and critically examine current issues in gerontology.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 6825 - Psychology of Gender♦


    (5 cr.) Gender has been the focus of many stereotypes developed over time; but how much does the biological sex of an individual actually influence one’s behavior, development, or emotions? Students in this course are introduced to theories and research on gender role expectations and their influence on the psychosocial developmental experience of women, men, and children. Students apply current gender research to understanding achievement, work, relationships, sexuality, violence, and physical health and illness. They also engage in readings and assignments that emphasize the responses of women and men to life stresses, women as clients in psychotherapy, and the increasing role of gender research in the mental health professions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 6830 - Psychology of Sexuality♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore sexuality through a variety of frameworks, including historical, psychological, sociological, anthropological, biological, public health, and media and cultural studies. Using a variety of theoretical perspectives, including essentialist and constructivist notions of sex, sexuality, and sexual identity, students examine traditional understandings of sexuality, including male and female sexual anatomy, physiology, and response; variations across the lifespan; sexual communication; love and interpersonal attraction; and sexual disorders. They also explore and discuss different expressions of sexual identity, including heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality as well as different expressions of gender identity from cross-cultural and interdisciplinary viewpoints. Students complete an integrative final paper incorporating research, ideas, and peer feedback from discussions on a topic related to the psychology of sexuality.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 6831 - Current Issues in Homeland Security♦


    (5 cr.) Since its inception, the Department of Homeland Security has profoundly impacted public policy and administration. Students are provided with an in-depth analysis of homeland security, including history, concepts, policies, and strategies of prevention and response. Students examine and discuss current, relevant topics, including ethical issues, telecommunications, technology, threat assessment, contingency planning, and risk management. Students hone their critical-thinking and analytic skills through the application of fundamental concepts and principles of homeland security to case studies and current issues.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 6832 - Terrorism: Legislation and Policy♦


    (5 cr.) The events of September 11, 2001, resulted in a new and intense focus on the issue of terrorism in the United States and abroad. Through traditional literature and a wealth of contemporary journal articles and media sources, students explore the history of terrorism, the evolution and international context of terrorist groups, and the causes of and motivations for terrorist acts. They learn about the laws, regulations, and legislation related to terrorism. They also analyze possible future trends in terrorism as well as the current role of the media, governmental agencies, and entities in the prevention of and response to terrorism. Students use concepts presented in the course and additional research to develop a proposal to change and improve an existing counterterrorism policy.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 6912 - Mental Health Law♦


    (5 cr.) Mental health counseling professionals in all areas, especially criminal forensic psychological practice, may encounter various conflicts regarding psychological and legal approaches to treatment. Therefore, it is important for counselors to have a firm understanding of mental health law to avoid conflicts, such as issues of liability and malpractice. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to examine several different aspects of the law related to mental health issues, including those constituting forensic psychological practice, such as civil matters (personal injury and civil competency issues) and criminal matters (competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, diminished capacity, and death-penalty issues). Students employ recent court decisions and laws, such as the Tarasoff ruling, mandated reporting, and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), to examine how mental health law influences the practice of psychology and mental health counseling.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8000 - Foundations for Graduate Study in Psychology


    (6 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals, and they develop a program of study, a professional development plan, and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. They engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.
  
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    PSYC 8002 - Foundations for Graduate Study in Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students build a foundation for academic and professional success as social change agents. They assess the relationship of Walden’s mission and vision to professional goals. They establish connections with their peers and the broader Walden community. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of scholarly writing, critical-thinking skills, academic integrity, ethics, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence within the field of psychology.
  
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    PSYC 8002L - Foundations for Graduate Study in Clinical Psychology


    (5 cr.) This course is an introduction to Walden University and to the profession of clinical psychology. Students receive a foundation for success in online education and for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. The beginning of the course provides an overview of the mission and vision of Walden, the student’s program of study, and tools for success in the online program. The remainder of the course provides a systematic introduction to clinical psychology as a profession. Topics include varieties of clinical practice, professional competencies, ethical and multicultural competencies, emerging issues, and organizations within the profession and clinical psychology. Through course assignments, students focus on practical applications of writing and critical-thinking skills, self-reflection, and promotion of professional and academic excellence.
  
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    PSYC 8003 - Foundations for Graduate Study in Counseling Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the profession of counseling psychology. A foundation for success in online education and for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent is provided. Students have an overview of the mission and vision of Walden, the student’s program of study, and tools for success in the online program at the beginning of the course. The remainder of the course is a systematic introduction to counseling psychology as a profession. Topics include varieties of counseling practice, professional competencies, ethical and multicultural competencies, emerging issues, and organizations within the profession and counseling psychology. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills, self-reflection, and promotion of professional and academic excellence.



  
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    PSYC 8004 - Foundations for Graduate Study in Psychology


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals, and they develop a program of study, a professional development plan, and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. They engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.
  
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    PSYC 8113 - Ethical Issues and Professional Responsibilities in Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course acquire the contemporary knowledge needed to apply ethical practice and professional responsibilities while working as a forensic psychologist. The American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as the American Psychology-Law Society’s Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology are mainstays in this course. Additionally, the various roles and responsibilities of a forensic psychologist are covered.
  
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    PSYC 8115 - Writing a Quality Prospectus


    (5 cr.) This 5-credit course is focused specifically on the process of writing the doctoral study prospectus. Students will use their preliminary research plan, developed previously, and develop a problem statement, to be used in the doctoral study. They further refine the problem statement and carry out the planning and the library research that will bring them to the formulation of a doctoral study prospectus. The prospectus is a brief paper, typically 15–20 pages in length, that lays out the background for the problem statement, the problem statement itself, a survey of the relevant literature (typically 25–75 references), and a research, implementation, and evaluation plan for the solution of the problem.
  
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    PSYC 8116 - Understanding Forensic Psychology Research


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will better understand how to be astute consumers of forensic psychology research. Basic principles of statistics, such as reliability and validity, are covered. At the same time, students learn how to critically read forensic psychology research and how best to apply research results to forensic clinical settings.
  
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    PSYC 8125 - Assessment in Forensic Psychology Settings


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover the varied assessment techniques and instruments used in the forensic psychology arena. Some of the assessment areas covered include risk assessment, juvenile evaluations, lie detection, custody evaluations, and many of the psychological tests and instruments that are used in these assessments. Students acquire a solid foundation of the knowledge of forensic psychology techniques and assessment, rather than specific skills, in administering and interpreting psychological tests.
  
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    PSYC 8131 - Theories of Learning


    (5 cr.) Participants in this course study in-depth modern learning theory, its historical context, theoretical ideas, research, and applications in various learning environments. The theoretical ideas of the major paradigms of learning, such as behaviorism, gestalt, cognitivism, information-processing, constructivism, and humanism, will be covered. Students also review current theories of cognitive processes, such as language, memory, and intelligence, and how differences in cognitive level throughout the lifespan mediate learning of educational subject matters. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8760.)
  
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    PSYC 8135 - Criminal Behavior♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course survey contemporary views and theories of maladaptive and criminal behavior. A broad conceptualization of criminal behavior, such as that which comes from the sociological and anthropological perspectives, is discussed. Theories and application of criminal profiling will be discussed. Additionally, more specific views of criminal behavior germane to groups such as psychopaths, serial offenders, and sexually violent predators will be addressed.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8201 - Social Cognition♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, the student is oriented to key elements in social cognitive processing as a subspecialty of social psychology, including attribution theory, schema theory, social cognition relative to self, the role of attention/consciousness in social cognition, errors and biases in social thought, heuristics, person memory, affect and cognition, attitudes, social influence, and behavior relative to social cognition. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8247.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8202 - Survey Research Methods♦


    (5 cr.) An in-depth study of a range of survey methods administered via in-person interview, self-report, phone interview, and Internet administration is introduced in this course. Topics will include survey design, administration, analysis, and addressing sources of bias. Students also review theoretical and empirical research on question and questionnaire effects. Students prepare in the practice of writing questions and designing questionnaires, both in general and in light of existing research.

      (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8100 and RSCH 8200.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    PSYC 8203 - Attitudes/Attitude Change♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover classic and contemporary models of attitudes, their functions, and how they are formed and maintained. The connection between attitudes and behavior and how attitudes are changed through the process of persuasion and cognitive dissonance will also be examined. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8247.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8204 - Intergroup Relations♦


    (5 cr.) Participants in this course study in depth basic and applied research and theory on both group processes and group relations, including some of the following topics: prejudice, discrimination, stereotyping, social categorization, minority and majority influence, group decision making, leadership, group structure, group socialization, bargaining and negotiation, intergroup conflict and cooperation, collective action and cognition, collective self and identity, social identity, language and identity, ethnic and cultural relations, and social dilemmas. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8247.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8207 - History and Systems of Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course focus on the historical and philosophical roots of psychology and counseling. Topics include structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, psychoanalysis, gestalt, and existentialism, as well as contemporary perspectives including evolutionary psychology, positive psychology, postmodernism, and feminist psychology. Themes of diversity and multiculturalism in psychology and counseling are highlighted within each of the perspectives.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8214 - Consulting for Organizational Change♦


    (5 cr.) Organizational and professional development (OPD) professionals promote and implement organizational change by using fundamental techniques of change management. Students in this course examine and apply these tools, including consulting competencies, approaches, and organizational change models to learn the skills of an OPD consultant. Students explore methods for accelerating individual, group, and organizational performance through consulting, coaching, and change management. They also explore related topics, such as organizational assessment; team development; strategic planning; group dynamics; power, politics, and influence; leadership; and conflict management. Students apply course concepts to the assessment of an organization and the development of strategies to address identified needs for change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8215 - Lifespan Development♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an advanced overview of human development through the lifespan, including prenatal, childhood, adolescent, adult, and late-adult phases. Students examine and apply basic processes and theories to developmental milestones that occur within these phases of development. They explore factors of heredity and environmental elements on human development, and they consider ethical issues, research considerations, and global perspectives as they assess strategies to promote optimal development. Students also engage in coursework and discussions that highlight themes of diversity and social change.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8216 - Dynamics of Contemporary, International, and Virtual Organizations♦


    (5 cr.) Globalization, technological innovation, and market factors continually change the context of business, requiring professionals who understand how organizations function to work through challenges and harness opportunities for change. In this course, students explore the implications of the changing nature of organizations as well as the emergence of international and virtual organizations in a global economy. Through contextual and application-based assignments, students address the unique opportunities and challenges for government, for-profit, nonprofit, international, and virtual organizations. Applying acquired knowledge and skills, students provide a diagnosis and recommendations for a specific organization’s development efforts.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8221 - Psychology of Personality♦


    (5 cr.) Professionals study personality in a variety of contexts to better understand the factors that compose an individual’s psychological framework, including feelings, thoughts, and motivations. Students in this course are introduced to the major theories of personality and personality assessment approaches. Students examine research that supports multiple theories as well as basic concepts and principles of the various schools of thought. They also explore and discuss related topics, such as various aspects of psychology, including psychoanalytic, biological, behaviorist, learning, social-cognitive, trait and skill, humanistic, and existential, in addition to individual, cultural, and gender differences in personality. Students consider themes of diversity throughout the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8224 - Psychology of Work


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine work and career development from a theoretical perspective. Major theories of vocational psychology are explored and integrated as students examine the critical role of work and vocation from a developmental perspective, spanning from childhood through late adulthood, and from a multicultural and global perspective. The meaning of work for individuals, groups, families, and societies is explored. Work will be also be explored in its interrelationship with family and other lifestyle roles and factors.
  
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    PSYC 8226 - Biopsychology♦


    (5 cr.) An important branch of psychology, known as biopsychology, combines neuroscience with basic psychological models for the purpose of understanding how the brain and neurotransmitters influence human behavior. In this course, students examine the structure and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems and explore the impact of neurobiology, endocrinology, and physiology on human behavior. They learn about brain functioning, including exploration of neural conduction; effects of neurotransmitters; sensory systems; and mechanisms of attention, memory, perception, and language. Students also explore literature addressing issues related to neuroplasticity, lateralization, and regeneration. Applying knowledge and skills gained throughout the course, students develop a final research paper through which they synthesize biopsychology concepts, critically analyze related research, and demonstrate APA-writing ability.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8238 - Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course review core theories of cognition and affect and their roles in human functioning. Students review basic components of cognition, including knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, language and various aspects of thinking, and emotions. Participants also focus on the multidimensional and interactive characteristics of human cognitive and affective functioning. A specific emphasis is placed on theories and research bearing on how cognition and affect interact in important areas of human functioning such as emotional regulation, construction of reality, motivation, psychopathology, and health.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8241 - Human Motivation♦


    (5 cr.) What are the factors that drive human behavior and in what ways can professionals harness this information to help individuals achieve their goals? Through the exploration of historical and contemporary theories and perspectives, students in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions and gain foundational knowledge of the study of human motivation. Students examine the physiological, psychological, learned, social, cognitive, and emotional aspects of motivation. They work toward developing a conceptual understanding of theories associated with motivation, which they apply to personal, professional, and contemporary social issues. Students engage in readings and assignments that incorporate themes of diversity as they relate to human motivation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8242 - Changing Health Behavior: Theory and Practice♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will review past and current models of health behavior change, disease prevention, disease management, and relapse prevention. Coverage of health-related issues includes dietary needs, tobacco and drug use, safer sexual practices, and stress management. In addition, students will examine the analysis of behavior change within specific populations (young, elderly, cognitively impaired, etc.) and factors that predict or serve as obstacles to lifestyle change and adherence. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8745.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8247 - Social Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Factors of cognitions and social behavior are at the root of nearly all experiences pertaining to individuals in society. In this course, students use the lens of social psychology to examine perceptions, attitudes, relationships and attraction, motivation to help others, prejudice and aggression, conformity and obedience, group behavior, and the influence of culture. Students apply knowledge and skills gained in the course to a final project in which they develop a plan for using social psychology research to address a significant social problem. Moreover, students consider ways to extend lessons learned to their personal and professional lives to effect positive social change as scholar-practitioners.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8252 - Themes and Theories of Psychology


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are introduced to theories, research, and themes that form the tenets of psychology. Basic theoretical models will be reviewed, including psychodynamic, cognitive, developmental, social learning/socio-cognitive, behaviorist, learning and motivation, systems, biopsychosocial, and gender theories. Theories encompassing diverse populations, including cross-cultural and feminist theories, will also be examined. Students will critically examine the strengths and limitations of these theories and their utility in the field of psychology. Contemporary themes in psychology will be explored, with an emphasis on application of theories designed to effect positive social change. 
  
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    PSYC 8281 - Psychology Practicum I


    (3 cr.) This course is the first of the four-course, year-long practicum sequence. Students are able to engage in a supervised experience that integrates theory and research with practice. As students work in collaboration with their site supervisor and course instructor, their practicum experience includes guided development of intermediate conceptual, assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills; awareness of professional and ethical issues; professional and interpersonal growth; development of cultural competence; and effective use of supervision. (Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of AYR.)
  
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    PSYC 8283 - Psychology Practicum II


    (3 cr.) This course is the second of the four-course, year-long practicum sequence. Students continue their practicum applying the principles and methods of empirically supported treatments and approaches learned from their coursework. Working in collaboration with their site supervisor and course instructor, the practicum experience includes guided development of intermediate conceptual, assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills; awareness of professional and ethical issues; professional and interpersonal growth; development of cultural competence; and effective use of supervision.
  
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    PSYC 8284 - Psychology Practicum III


    (3 cr.) This course is the third of the four-course, year-long practicum sequence. Students continue their practicum, applying the principles and methods of empirically supported treatments and approaches learned from their coursework. Students bring closure to their work on real-world problems that they developed with their preceptors. Students evaluate and complete their practicum project and present their project in the workplace and in the online classroom.
  
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    PSYC 8285 - Psychology Practicum IV


    (3 cr.) This course is the fourth of the four-course, year-long practicum sequence. Students continue their practicum, applying the principles and methods of empirically supported treatments and approaches learned from their coursework. Students bring closure to their work on real-world problems that they developed with their preceptors. Students evaluate and complete their practicum project and present their project in the workplace and in the online classroom.
  
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    PSYC 8292 - Clinical Psychology Internship I


    (3 cr.) The internship course is taken in conjunction with a supervised clinical experience and is intended to prepare clinical psychology students for readiness to enter practice. After completion of the practicum sequence, students take this course, which is designed to develop intermediate intervention and assessment skills, integrate professional knowledge and skills with evidence-based practices, and continue focused development in specialization areas. A minimum of 2,000 clock hours with at least 900 clock hours of direct client contact must be documented.
  
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    PSYC 8293 - Clinical Psychology Internship II


    (3 cr.) The internship course is taken in conjunction with a supervised clinical experience and is intended to prepare clinical psychology students for readiness to enter practice. After completion of the practicum sequence, students take this course, which is designed to develop intermediate intervention and assessment skills, integrate professional knowledge and skills with evidence-based practices, and continue focused development in specialization areas. A minimum of 2,000 clock hours with at least 900 clock hours of direct client contact must be documented.
  
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    PSYC 8294 - Clinical Psychology Internship III


    (3 cr.) The internship course is taken in conjunction with a supervised clinical experience and is intended to prepare clinical psychology students for readiness to enter practice. After completion of the practicum sequence, students take this course, which is designed to develop intermediate intervention and assessment skills, integrate professional knowledge and skills with evidence-based practices, and continue focused development in specialization areas. A minimum of 2,000 clock hours with at least 900 clock hours of direct client contact must be documented.
  
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    PSYC 8295 - Clinical Psychology Internship IV


    (3 cr.) The internship course is taken in conjunction with a supervised clinical experience and is intended to prepare clinical psychology students for readiness to enter practice. After completion of the practicum sequence, students take this course, which is designed to develop intermediate intervention and assessment skills, integrate professional knowledge and skills with evidence-based practices, and continue focused development in specialization areas. A minimum of 2,000 clock hours with at least 900 clock hours of direct client contact must be documented.
  
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    PSYC 8300 - Philosophical Foundations in Psychological Research♦


    (5 cr.) Students are introduced to the nature of scientific discovery and explanation as it applies to the social sciences and to psychology in particular in this course. Students explore the etiology and epistemology of science, the relationship between philosophy and science, the nature of scientific explanation, and the progress of science (the “paradigm”). They also examine philosophical movements that influence research and research priorities, including positivism, constructivism, and other post-modern research paradigms (including feminist, race, and gay/lesbian psychologies). Students apply concepts involving scholarly inquiry and research to various written assignments designed to provide practical application of content.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8304 - Statistics 1♦


    (5 cr.) Psychology practitioners use statistics in a variety of professional undertakings, such as creating studies to assess human behavior or deciding which treatment approaches are most effective for a specific client. Students in this course are provided with a thorough analysis of basic descriptive and inferential statistical methods commonly used in the social sciences. Students work toward developing the skills with which to write, analyze, and critique social science research. They learn various methods, including computation and analysis of frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, and statistical hypothesis testing. Students also examine statistical tests (and underlying assumptions), including z-score; single-sample, independent-sample, and related-sample t-tests; analysis of variance; correlation, regression; and chi-square tests. Students are introduced to the SPSS statistical software package.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8305 - Statistics 2♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students review and expand on statistical techniques mastered in Statistics 1, such as the t-test, correlation analysis, ANOVA, and chi-square tests. Students explore underlying assumptions and applications of factorial, repeated measures (within groups), mixed-design ANOVA, multiple regression, and logistic regression. They learn statistical and analytical applications as well as how to critically read and write about psychological research—skills and techniques needed to complete the doctoral dissertation. Students also engage in analyses involving the use of the SPSS statistical software package. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8304.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8306 - Multivariate Analysis and Data Mining


    (5 cr.) Univariate analyses, such as the t test, ANOVA and ANCOVA, chi square, correlation, multiple linear regression, and multiple binary logistic regression, are limited to the analysis of a single dependent variable and yield a single statistical solution. Students in this course in multivariate analysis are introduced to procedures to simultaneously analyze multiple independent and multiple dependent variables that yield more than one statistical solution. Covered in this course are several of the most common multivariate and data mining procedures, including MANOVA, discriminant analyses, factor analysis, canonical correlation, and cluster analysis. Students examine appropriate conditions for the use of each procedure and demonstrate understanding in applied discussion assignments, application assignments using IBM SPSS, and journal quality report of results. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8305.)
  
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    PSYC 8311 - Research Design♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to build a foundation in the design of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches to psychological research. Students learn the strengths and limitations of each method and under what circumstances each approach would be the most appropriate research design. They also learn the importance of scholarly writing as well as how to identify a topic for research and how to conduct a literature search. Students gain hands-on practice developing a research proposal through which they address key elements, such as collecting and analyzing data, writing an introduction, stating a purpose for the study, identifying research questions and hypotheses, using theory, and defining the significance of the study. Additionally, students consider the legal and ethical issues associated with human subjects’ protection. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8304.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8315 - Program Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) The skills required to assess research and work effectively with stakeholders are among the many proficiencies required of professionals who evaluate and develop programs. In this course, students examine these skill sets as well as the history, theory, and major approaches underlying program evaluation. Students learn how to select appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative models and techniques to perform evaluations, demonstrate program effectiveness, and disseminate results. Additionally, students explore the procedures and techniques involved in offering their evaluation services to a specific group or organization. They also examine strategies to gain stakeholder interest in developing appropriate standards, research progress, and evaluation outcomes. Students acquire practical experience evaluating a program of interest through which they outline organizational structure, identify stakeholders, employ evaluation models, explain steps in planning, and predict possible challenges or stakeholder fears, for which they recommend solutions. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8304 and PSYC 8311.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8316 - Tests and Measurement♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of the different types of tests used in clinical, educational, and organizational settings. Students engage in a comprehensive examination of psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. They examine normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, test score interpretation, and test development. Students also consider related ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues, including cultural bias and fairness. Professional standards for testing provide a foundation for the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8331 - Interviewing and Observational Strategies♦


    (5 cr.) Personal attitudes, values, and beliefs often affect a counselor’s ability to establish an appropriate relationship and rapport with clients. In this course, students learn to evaluate their personal attitudes and beliefs to positively influence their counseling approaches. They explore principles and skills related to interviewing and observation, and they examine related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings. Synthesizing concepts, skills, and personal reflections, students demonstrate their ability to engage in a counseling session using techniques learned throughout the course. Note: Students are required to have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8343 - Psychotherapy Interventions 2


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn methods of applying empirically supported treatment and interventions to client issues ranging from living problems to severe mental disorders in selected populations. Students gain hands-on experience implementing intervention models, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, person-centered therapy, short-term dynamic psychotherapy, and integrative psychotherapy. They engage in topical readings and course assignments that emphasize culturally competent interventions within an ethical framework for clinical practice. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8344.)
  
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    PSYC 8344 - Interventions I


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on the acquisition and demonstration of clinical and counseling skills in the context of empirically supported modes of intervention. Students apply skills in treatment-planning exercises, clinical vignettes, and face-to-face simulations of psychotherapy sessions.
  
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    PSYC 8356 - Marriage, Couple, and Family Therapy


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive a foundation in the theoretical perspectives and empirical framework necessary for marriage, couple, and family therapy. The theoretical perspective includes general systems theory and its applications, as well as psychosocial, psychodynamic, transgenerational, strategic, cognitive-behavioral, and social constructionist models. Students learn to conceptualize presenting issues within a systemic perspective and context. Empirically based techniques for assessment and intervention of marriages, couples, and families are reviewed and analyzed.
  
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    PSYC 8393 - MS in Psychology Capstone


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with the opportunity to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program into a practical project designed to promote positive social change in a capstone project. During this course, students work on a capstone project in which they complete a major integrative paper on a topic related to their specialization, incorporating theoretical and practical knowledge as well as social scientific research skills acquired throughout the program. The instructor may approve other capstone projects presented by students.
  
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    PSYC 8412 - Research Foundations


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine and receive support for student readiness regarding the use of quantitative and qualitative research approaches. They study research fundamentals, including the distinction between social problems and research problems, the functions of research problems versus research purpose statements, and the role of theory and conceptual framework in informing research. Students examine quantitative and qualitative concepts central to research methods, design, and analysis. They also study how research design, methods, and analyses properly align for both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Students demonstrate their knowledge by creating two research outlines, using quantitative and qualitative approaches, which they develop throughout the course. They determine appropriate conditions for the use of mixed-methods approaches and differentiate between types of mixed-methods research designs. Students engage in pre- and post-assessments of skills and knowledge. 
  
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    PSYC 8511 - Treatment of Forensic Populations♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive the basic knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations. Various forensic populations such as sex offenders, substance abusers, victims of crime, and employee assistance to law enforcement personnel will be covered. The use of traditional forms of intervention, such as individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice, will be addressed.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8521 - Police Psychology


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is directed at the various roles a psychologist might have when working within a police department. Issues such as officer selection and training, stress management, critical incident stress debriefing, and upper-management consultation are mainstays of the police psychologist and will be covered. Additionally, less-well-known roles such as training in hostage negotiations and the selection of special operations officers (S.W.A.T., snipers, tactical commanders) will be reviewed.
  
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    PSYC 8522 - Psychology in the Courts


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover the major roles that a forensic psychologist could have within the court system. Issues such as expert testimony, jury selection, eyewitness testimony, and consultation with attorneys will be covered. Additionally, practical skills such as documentation and report writing will be addressed.
  
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    PSYC 8551 - I/O Tests and Measurement♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an in-depth study of measurement theory and the tests used in organizational settings. They review a comprehensive examination of psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments, including classical test theory, item response theory (IRT), and item forensics approaches to testing. Topics include normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, test score interpretation, and test development. Students also address ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues, including cultural bias and fairness. Professional standards for testing provide a foundation for the course.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8552 - Psychology of Motivation at Work♦


    (5 cr.) Participants in this course study in depth major topics in micro-level organizational behavior. Accountability, organization citizenship behaviors, forms of organizational attachment, motivation, goal theory, and issues of equity and justice will be covered.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8573 - Child and Adolescent Health♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover diseases and disorders in children and adolescents. Topics include diabetes, anorexia, headaches, epilepsy, burn injuries, cystic fibrosis, asthma, addiction, and adolescent obesity. Health promotion for children and adolescents is discussed, including cardiovascular health, nutrition, and exercise. Also covered are insights into special issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder, daily stress, sexually transmitted diseases, sleep disorders, and ethical and legal issues in pediatric and adolescent health psychology. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8745.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8574 - Women’s Health♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine healthcare issues in women and girls. Topics include healthy development, trauma, coping, self-esteem, resilience, self-care, well-being, sexual health, relationships, roles, family, schooling, careers, motherhood, transitions, violence, security, bereavement, and positive aging. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8745.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8576 - Advanced Personnel Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Students explore advanced selection validation models and techniques, performance measurement approaches, and talent management systems as well as underlying legal implications and policy issues. In this course, students prepare as future scholar-practitioners to conduct and apply research in the field of personnel psychology.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8579 - Job Attitudes, Measurement, and Change


    (5 cr.) Participants in this course study in depth major theories of job attitudes, as well as their antecedents, correlates, and consequences. Topics will include job satisfaction, organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behavior, withdrawal behavior, and counterproductive organizational behavior. Application of learning will be demonstrated through an applied-attitude survey research project.
  
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    PSYC 8620 - Adult Learning Theory and Application


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore the history and development of adult education as a distinct entity from child and/or adolescent learning. Students examine the various adult learning environments, including but not limited to professional training and online learning. They examine adult learning theory and how andragogy is applied via theoretical principles in multiple contexts. Special attention is paid to specific challenges and needs of the adult learner. Students in this course become familiar with current research in the field of adult education and generate a comprehensive analysis that synthesizes scholarly research in the area.
  
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    PSYC 8630 - Theories of Learning and Motivation


    (5 cr.) Students explore classic and contemporary learning and motivation theory in the context of educational settings. The theoretical ideas of the major paradigms of learning, such as behaviorism, gestalt, cognitivism, information processing, constructivism, and humanism as well as cognitive processes, such as language, memory, and intelligence, will be covered. Students examine the physiological, psychological, learned, social, cognitive, and emotional aspects of motivation as they apply to learning. They apply constructs such as culture and technology to their understanding of learning theory and student motivation to develop their own philosophy of teaching. Of particular focus is the application of theoretical concepts of learning and motivation to practical, real-world challenges found in present-day educational settings.
  
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    PSYC 8640 - Applied Social Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students are introduced to the goals and methods of applied social psychology. Topics explored include attitudes, social identity, social influence, attribution, social relations, diversity, and group dynamics in the context of educational, environmental, health, legal, and organizational settings as they relate to real-world social issues, practical problems, and the social domains of daily life. Emphasis is placed on exploring the contributions and contemporary applications of social psychological constructs, principles, theories, and interventions in these settings to promote positive social change.
  
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    PSYC 8700 - Psychology and Social Change♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students analyze and evaluate theories of social and personal change. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application assignments focused on power and social inequalities, ethnic inequalities, global environment, and issues related to gender and sexism, such as homophobia. In addition, students examine the impact of social change theories on children, families, and societies. They explore the concepts of change agent and change advocate as well as the role of the psychologist as change agent. Students also engage in an integrative written assignment to synthesize theories and analyze a current social problem in their community, for which they propose an action to address the issue and drive positive social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8701 - Culture and Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Culture often has a profound influence on individual beliefs, personality development, and social behavior. Therefore, mental health professionals must have a fundamental understanding of the impact and psychological implications of culture. In this course, students focus on core themes of cross-cultural psychology—specifically, cultures representing different parts of the world and cultural influences on human psychology. Students explore the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology, and they assess the overall impact of culture on the field of psychology around the world. Additionally, they engage in readings and practical assignments to gain a better understanding of human development and the interactions between culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8702 - Dissertation Literature Review Lab


    (2 cr.) The purpose of this course is to help students prepare to write a well-structured, soundly presented critical literature review. Students taking this course cover topic selection, research analysis, writing, and editing. Upon completing the course, students produce an annotated bibliography and an outline of a literature review using a minimum of 10 self-selected research articles. This course is appropriate for doctoral students who are preparing for their dissertation research.
  
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    PSYC 8703 - Ethics and Standards of Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the origins of professional codes of ethics and standards of scientific psychology. Topics include ethical issues in academics (research, teaching, supervision), various work settings (assessment, consulting), and ethics involved in working with diverse populations. Additionally, students are introduced to forensic psychology and ethical issues related to the legal system. Students also explore how cultural factors are addressed in various ethical codes and the implications for scholar-practitioners.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8705 - Ethics and Standards of Professional Practice♦


    (5 cr.) What constitutes fraudulent practice, and how can psychologists avoid it? In this course, students have the opportunity to answer questions such as this as they examine the psychologist’s principles of conduct, code of ethics, and standards of practice. They identify and analyze the guidelines for practice in specific psychological services and with identified populations, and they assess the ethical decision-making process. Students engage in weekly discussions on topical issues, including informed consent, confidentiality, duty to warn, mandated reporting, record keeping, the limits of competency, and dual relationships. They also consider the function of professional development, such as supervision, peer consultation, and continuing education, in reaching career goals and acquiring more diverse skill sets.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8706 - Advanced Social Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an advanced analysis of social psychology, including a review of the historical context and cultural grounding of social psychological theory. Students devote special attention to sociocultural psychology and the broad base of knowledge related to history, research methods, and applications to social and cultural processes. They explore and discuss topics related to small-group processes and dynamics and shared cognition, attitude development and shifting, social cognition and emotion, self-concept and self-regulation, conformity, affiliation and independence in groups, group performance, leadership, cross-cultural psychology, and biopsychosocial diversity. Students demonstrate their understanding of theories and concepts through a final analysis of a social problem occurring in their own community for which they propose an intervention to ameliorate the problem. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8247.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8710 - Clinical Neuropsychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an introduction to the field of clinical neuropsychology—a subfield of psychology that deals with the treatment of patients with injuries to the brain or neurocognitive disorders. Students explore and discuss cortical organization, including functions, anatomy, and neuropathology, and higher cortical functions of memory, language, emotions, attention, and perception in disordered brain functions in adults. They also examine neuropsychological approaches, including cognitive neuropsychology. Students share with their peers assessments of current articles relevant to contemporary issues in neuropsychology. They also apply course concepts through a literature review and final paper on a topic of choice in the field. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8226.)
  
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    PSYC 8718 - Psychology of the Exceptional Individual


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the cognitive, social-emotional, and psychomotor characteristics of individuals significantly deviating from the norm in behavior and/or adjustment. They learn ways to understand and work with individuals with learning disabilities (including emotional, behavioral, and intellectual disorders; autism; brain injury; hearing and vision loss; physical disabilities; and health disorders) and those who are gifted and talented. Students explore topical issues, including inclusion, transition to adulthood, and multicultural diversity. Through this course, students work toward gaining the knowledge and skills for developing research-based educational and therapeutic interventions.
  
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    PSYC 8719 - Developmental Psychopathology


    (5 cr.) In this course, students learn about formal psychopathology, including emotional and behavioral disorders and classification systems of infants, children, and adolescents. Students examine contrasting models of psychopathology, classification and epidemiology of childhood psychopathology, co-morbidity rates, differential issues from the current diagnostic manual’s outcome of childhood disorders, therapeutic approaches and their efficacy, and developmental resilience. They examine and discuss literature and topics related to assessment, diagnosis, and treatment; a wide range of disorders and disruptive behaviors; and abuse and neglect. Applying course concepts, students assess case studies of diagnostic issues for a contemporary and practical understanding of psychopathology.
  
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    PSYC 8720 - Diagnosis and Assessment♦


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with an overview of what is commonly referred to as abnormal psychology; however, students also consider factors constituting normalcy from multiple perspectives. Students explore the application of diagnostic criteria in various mental health work settings, such as schools, rehabilitation facilities, community agencies, and private practices. Using the scholar-practitioner model, students consider environmental and biological factors contributing to behavioral disorders. Students also examine techniques commonly used for the diagnosis and treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial problems. Through coursework and discussions, students consider multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis as well as current trends and contemporary issues in clinical assessment and diagnosis.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8721 - Advanced Psychopathology♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students engage in an in-depth examination of current theory and research associated with major psychological disorders and their diagnoses. Students explore the primary classification systems in terms of their applicability and limitations as well as the factors that impact the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders along a continuum of mental health. Students engage in practical assignments, focusing on applications of the diagnostic criteria in terms of case conceptualization. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8221.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8723 - Multicultural Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with the opportunity to increase their knowledge of multicultural counseling and the delivery of psychological services as well as related skills needed in professional practice. Students explore diversity and identity issues and discuss their impact on the therapeutic relationship. They examine the application of traditional theoretical orientations and current multicultural theories to culturally diverse groups. Through a variety of assignments designed to provide practical application of content, students also investigate counseling concepts related to race and ethnicity, sex and gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, and ability.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8724 - Child Psychotherapy


    (5 cr.) What are some of the special considerations of therapeutic treatment approaches in children? In this course, students have the opportunity to answer this question as they explore the psychological treatment of children from an array of theories and techniques, including play therapy. Students examine and discuss fundamentals and contemporary issues related to playroom organization; intake interviews; and psychological assessment, treatment, evaluation, and intervention. They also explore typical play behaviors of children at various levels of development, cross-cultural aspects of play and their meanings, as well as issues of cultural sensitivity and ethical practice. Students complete a final written assignment to synthesize course concepts and demonstrate their understanding of child psychotherapy. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8215.)
  
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    PSYC 8725 - Group Therapy


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a comprehensive review of clinical and counseling approaches to group therapy. Students examine the theoretical bases of different approaches to group therapy, including psychoanalytic, existential, person-centered, gestalt, transactional, behavioral, rational-emotive, and reality therapy. Through an in-depth literature review as well as weekly discussions and written assignments, students focus on various types of groups, the efficacy of using group therapy as the treatment method with various multicultural populations, the stages of group development, and related professional and ethical considerations.
  
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    PSYC 8726 - Couples and Family Counseling


    (5 cr.) An important skill for clinicians is to have a fundamental understanding of the dynamics and functioning of couples and families. Students in this course are introduced to concepts and applications in theoretical perspectives and techniques, classical schools of thought, and recent developments in couples and family therapy. Students explore culture, gender, and ethnicity factors in family development. They also review and compare theoretical frameworks in couples and family therapy, including psychosocial, psychodynamic, transgenerational, strategic, cognitive-behavioral, and social constructionist models. Additionally, students assess the roles of culture, spirituality, and values in understanding families.
  
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    PSYC 8728 - Substance Abuse Counseling


    (5 cr.) The impact of substance abuse on the lives of people with addictions, and the lives of their families, makes for a highly complex and challenging area of mental health counseling. Counselors working with these individuals must possess a comprehensive understanding of the background, controversies, and current approaches in regard to the treatment of substance abuse. In this course, students examine psychological aspects of addictions involving alcohol, prescription medications, and illegal substances. They also examine current research in the field of dependency and addiction. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application-based assignments on diagnosing patients, choosing among models of treatment, planning treatment, using group and family treatment plans, and ensuring treatment efficacy. They also consider strategies to promote change, including the trans-theoretical model of behavior change.
  
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    PSYC 8740 - Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma♦


    (5 cr.) There is no shortage of natural and human-made disasters, such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities. Individuals and communities impacted by such disasters often need assistance from professionals who understand the social, cultural, and psychological complexities of crisis and trauma. Students in this course investigate how these incidents impact the psychology of individuals and groups. They assess traditional and current literature and complete practical exercises to learn about theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with trauma. Considering the various ways crisis professionals can promote positive social change, students devote special attention to the importance and development of culturally appropriate, service-delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disasters.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8741 - Psychopharmacology♦


    (5 cr.) Psychopharmacology is the study of how drugs affect the mind and behavior. This course is designed to provide a foundation in psychopharmacology for health psychology students. Students will cover pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, structure of the nervous system, and neurotransmitters. The focus will be on medications used in the treatment of mental illness and on illicit drug use. Special populations will include age-based groups as well as those with pre-existing conditions. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8226.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8742 - Conflict, Conflict Resolution, and Peace♦


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students engage in a study of conflict, conflict resolution, and peace from psychological and social psychological perspectives. Students examine the concept of conflict and methods of addressing it, including management, resolution, and transformation; theories related to conflict resolution; approaches to conflict resolution, including negotiation and third-party interventions; and social psychological factors that influence conflict and conflict resolution. They also consider the influence of culture in conflict and conflict resolution; the role of ethics; intractable and international conflicts; the concept of peace; and how third-party approaches can contribute to the peace process. Students apply conflict resolution approaches to conflicts at all levels, from interpersonal to those involving whole nations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8743 - Psychology of Terrorism♦


    (5 cr.) Many sources define terrorism as a type of psychological warfare, as it induces fear and feelings of vulnerability. Therefore, professionals need to understand all aspects of terrorism to help prevent further terroristic acts and respond to victims who have been affected psychologically. Students in this course explore terrorism from a psychological perspective. They examine types of terrorism; contributing factors related to the development of terrorists and terrorist organizations; counterterrorism agencies and laws; the impact of terrorist events on individuals, families, and communities; prevention, intervention, and postvention with survivors; media coverage of terrorist events; human rights and ethical issues; and future trends related to the psychology of terrorism. Students also examine the threat of terrorism in their own community and evaluate the potential impact. Using concepts presented in the course, they consider applications for preventative measures as well as strategies to promote resiliency among individual and families who may become victims of terrorism.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8745 - Health Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Health psychologists work toward positive change in healthcare and health behavior through the study of relationships between patients and providers, how individuals and groups adapt to illness, damaging health behaviors, health cognitions, and many other related issues. In this course students explore the field of health psychology with a focus on the biopsychosocial model. They discuss behavioral and biomedical theories as well as the effect of psychological (personality), behavioral (health behaviors and coping), and social factors (stress and physician-patient relationships) on physical health and wellness. Through the examination of current literature and peer discussions, students explore and address issues related to cardiovascular and immune health, including heart disease, stroke, cancer, and HIV/AIDS. They demonstrate their understanding of course material and consider how topics apply to their personal and professional life through the development of taskforce papers, a health brochure, and a final essay. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8747 - Psychoneuroimmunology


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the current theory and interdisciplinary (psychological and medical) research associated with psychoneuroimmunology (PNI). Topics include the mind/body interaction, its effects on overall health through modulation of the immune system, and mind/body interventions. Students explore recent advances in medical science that have contributed to the knowledge of biological processes and how the mind can be used as a potent force in modifying the biological mechanisms involved in wellness and illness. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6225 or 8226 and PSYC 6748 or 8748.)
  
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    PSYC 8748 - Stress and Coping♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine contemporary theories on the perception of stress, appraisal of stressors, ways of coping, and the psychophysiological mechanisms involved in the stress response. They explore topical issues, including psychoneuroimmunology, behavioral nutrition, psychophysiology, traumatic stress, chronic pain, and stress-related psychophysiological and medical disorders as they relate to stress and coping. Students engage in discussions designed to provide practical application of course content. Demonstrating breadth and depth of knowledge and critical-thinking skills, students explore a topic of interest through a final research proposal and paper on a current issue related to course concepts. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8226.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8749 - Leadership Development♦


    (5 cr.) An understanding of the psychological principles of leader development often enhances leadership skills and ability to influence others to work toward common goals. In this course, students examine the psychology of leadership and leader development through cross-cultural, social, psychological, and political contexts. They identify and assess the psychological theories of leadership, leadership styles, qualities of great leaders, global leadership competencies, and instruments used to assess leadership and leadership potential. Students apply these psychological theories to assess and develop their own capacity for leadership.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8750 - Foundations of Industrial/Organizational Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) An understanding of the psychological principles of leader development often enhances leadership skills and ability to influence others to work toward common goals. In this course, students examine the psychology of leadership and leader development through cross-cultural, social, psychological, and political contexts. They identify and assess the psychological theories of leadership, leadership styles, qualities of great leaders, global leadership competencies, and instruments used to assess leadership and leadership potential. Students apply these psychological theories to assess and develop their own capacity for leadership.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8751 - Leadership Coaching: Process and Practice♦


    (5 cr.) The intent of leadership coaching is to facilitate psychological change that leads to goal attainment and enhanced performance. In this course, students apply evidence-based psychological approaches to coaching case studies. They assess coaching roles and settings; skills and competencies; models and frameworks; and current issues and future trends. Students employ critical-thinking skills and synthesize concepts learned in the course to develop a plan for implementing effective coaching in a real-world setting.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    PSYC 8752 - Psychology of Organizational Behavior


    (5 cr.) Effective leadership coaches must be fully capable of working with clients immersed in different organizational cultures that present unique challenges. In this course, students apply models, approaches, and frameworks; individual and team coaching strategies; and ethical guidelines to multiple case studies related to coaching for leadership development. Students gain practical insight on the characteristics, factors, and conditions that influence coaching efficacy, assessment, and evaluation. In addition, students consider diversity, ethics, and professional issues and challenges in the context of leadership coaching. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8750.)
  
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    PSYC 8753 - Career Counseling


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to develop practical skills in career and vocational assessment as well as functional knowledge of how career assessment can assist in the exploration and understanding of the interrelationship among work, family, and life roles. They examine major sources of career and work information available on the Internet as well as through printed material and computer-based guidance systems. Gaining practical career counseling experience, students administer, score, and interpret printed and computer-based assessments of career interests, beliefs, and values. Students learn how to integrate career development theory and assessment results with career clinical interventions. They also examine clinical and assessment issues, devoting attention to computer-based applications and multicultural implications.
 

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