2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Jan 27, 2022  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    PPPA 8322 - Critical Incident Planning and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Who is responsible for emergency management, and what elements should be included in an emergency management plan? Students in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions as they examine the principles of emergency planning, selection of leaders, specialized planning (e.g., schools, tourism), mutual aid, and leadership theories. Students analyze case studies, identifying weaknesses in current methods as well as potential solutions. Through this analysis, students develop new strategies and perspectives in regard to responding to and planning for critical incidents. Public administrators or students planning to enter the field of public administration build a basic foundation to develop a critical incident plan and to gain a thorough understanding of leadership models and methods.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8330 - Holding Up the Mirror: Understanding Different Cultures and Increasing Global Consciousness


    (5 cr.) Professionals in all areas of public policy and administration work with individuals and organizations of different cultures on a daily basis; therefore, global consciousness is vital to effective communication and interaction in the field. In this course, students explore and analyze the cultural values and styles of communication, reasoning, and leadership unique to their home culture. Students apply these concepts to better understand the people, values, and policies of other cultures. They also identify and become familiar with challenges that American nonprofit organizations face as they work internationally or cross-culturally within the United States. Sharpening critical-thinking skills, students research and assess an organization within their own community that has international links; through this assessment, students gain further awareness of different cultures and the importance of cross-cultural ties.  (Prerequisite(s): A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly advised.)
  
  •  

    PPPA 8331 - Crossing Borders: U.S. and International NGO Organizational Cultures and Environments


    (5 cr.) In this course, students study in depth the cultures, structures, and activities of NGOs in select countries and compare their activities, organizational cultures, structures, and working environments with nonprofits in the United States. (Prerequisite(s): A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly advised.)
  
  •  

    PPPA 8332 - Placing NGOs in the Global Context


    (5 cr.) Modern public policy and administration professionals use knowledge of international culture to understand the operations and structure of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in different countries, thus leading to well-informed, globally responsible decisions. In this course, students engage in a comprehensive study of the cultures, structures, and activities of NGOs in select countries. Students compare the activities, organizational cultures, structures, and working environments of these countries with nonprofit organizations in the United States. Through discussions, research, and topical writing assignments, students identify and assess the values, actions, and beliefs of a selected culture to gain an in-depth understanding of that culture’s voluntary or NGO environment. (Prerequisite(s): A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly advised.)
  
  •  

    PPPA 8350 - Historical and Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice


    (5 cr.) Decision- and policymakers must possess a fundamental understanding of crime theory, including the history of crime development, to be able to address knowledgeably and effectively modern issues of crime. In this course, students explore the evolution of crime and punishment, including lone criminals to worldwide syndicates, using the scientific rigor built into selected readings, peer discussions, and practical assignments. They examine the philosophy of community- and problem-oriented policing, transnational crime, terrorism, and the new nexus between them. Employing quantitative and qualitative research methods, students continue their assessment of contemporary issues of crime. They also learn to use existing information to consider new methods of addressing crime. In this course, students who are current leaders or those hoping to enter a leadership role will acquire a framework upon which to build the knowledge and depth of understanding to assess and manage the opportunities, innovations, and challenges in their profession.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8351 - Policy Analysis in the Criminal Justice System


    (5 cr.) Criminal justice professionals must understand the various factors that influence the development of criminal justice policy, and how to evaluate whether existing policy meets its objectives. In this course, students will examine the principles of policy analysis and the role that scientific information plays in the development of criminal justice policy. Topics explored include policing, corrections, and sentencing; juvenile justice; the relationship among drugs, race, and crime; deterrence as a crime control policy; and the use of public registries. Through further analysis of criminal justice policies, students determine how these policies have changed over time, gaining insight into possible future trends of policy development and analysis.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8352 - Leadership: Putting Theory Into Practice in Criminal Justice Administration


    (5 cr.) There are many challenges plaguing the criminal justice system, from economic hardship to growing threats of terrorism. Leaders in the system must be adept in problem-solving, and they must possess the ability to think critically and proactively. Through this course, students are introduced to the problems that currently confront the criminal justice system administration as well as problems predicted for the future. Students prepare to lead efforts to address these challenges  by engaging in practical assignments focusing on powerful models for strategic, critical, and reflective thinking. Students also engage in discussions about the major components of effective justice administration, including organizational thought and theory, leadership, human capital, policy development and implementation, and collaboration with other public safety and community organizations.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8360 - Public Safety Issues


    (5 cr.) In consideration of technological innovation, terrorism, and other modern factors, threats to the American public are changing, thus requiring professionals who have the ability to identify, plan for, and mitigate crime and disaster incidents. In this course, students examine foundational public safety concepts and investigate issues faced by public safety agencies and personnel at the local, state, and national level, including police and sheriff, emergency medical, fire services, and related organizations. They explore and discuss the ways in which public safety organizations communicate and coordinate and learn why effective interaction is vital to emergency management. They also gain practical experience employing tools used by public safety professionals, such as a public safety constituency matrix, through which students assess competing demands on the various agencies. In this course, students work toward gaining the skills needed to anticipate the needs of various constituents to develop effective public safety initiatives. 
  
  •  

    PPPA 8361 - Managing Public Safety Organizations


    (5 cr.) Public safety leaders are responsible for finding solutions to major issues confronting their community and organizational operating systems through research, analysis, planning, and decision making. In this course, students assess these tools and solutions to learn the intricacies of managing public safety organizations. They engage in written assignments and discussions on a variety of topics, such as systems approaches, environmental analyses, contingency planning, implications for change, coordination, and controls. Students learn ways to apply classic business management techniques and leadership principles to public safety operations. They also apply concepts presented in the course to the development of solutions and alternatives to varied situations confronting public safety managers.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8380 - Policy and Politics in American Political Institutions


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the crafts of policymaking and policy analysis in the U.S. democratic system. Students examine the tasks involved in the policy process, including setting agendas, using policy analysis tools, managing the political process, implementing policy, and providing evaluations and feedback. Through this analysis, students develop the skills necessary to conduct policy and economic analyses as well as to determine the political feasibility of proposed policies. They learn about regulation as a policy choice. They also work toward enhancing their ability to develop alternatives and to assess strategies proposed to achieve certain policy objectives. Students engage in scholarly writing assignments and discussions on policy areas of interest, such as communications, immigration, transportation, housing, labor, arts, and environmental policies. 
  
  •  

    PPPA 8381 - Public Policy and Evaluation


    (5 cr.) There are a variety of tools available to policymakers and policy analysts to evaluate the impact of social programs. In this course, students examine these tools and work toward gaining the skills needed to develop plans for evaluation and to assess social programs effectively. Students engage in discussions and assignments designed to provide practical application of content on a variety of topics, such as selecting programs to evaluate, crafting program descriptions, identifying stakeholders and their interests, developing logic models, framing evaluation questions, applying utilization-focused evaluation techniques, using quantitative and qualitative tools to complete formative and summative evaluations, and providing evaluation reports and feedback to decision makers. Using concepts presented in the course, students gain hands-on experience developing an evaluation design for a social program.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8382 - Public Policy and Finance


    (5 cr.) Public policymakers often rely on microeconomic and macroeconomic models to formulate new policies and reevaluate existing polices. In this course, students examine the use of such models in the public policy setting and assess how public finance influences policy choices as well as implementation alternatives. Through weekly, analytical writing assignments and peer discussions, students explore tax policies and tax incentive models; budgeting for public/private models; market influences on policy; the impact of government expenditures on income redistribution; and economic considerations of welfare, food stamps, workers’ compensation, Social Security, and outsourcing of public programs. Synthesizing course content and applying critical-thinking skills, students assess a local government jurisdiction, examine the decisions of policymakers, and recommend improvements based on economic models.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8390 - Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Students in this course engage in a collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration. Students apply a systems perspective to construct a public enterprise “mental” model of a public organization to understand the strategic context for practical action and the stakeholder relations involved. Students demonstrate their knowledge of the interrelated flows of money, knowledge, and influence, as they weave these elements in their model. They engage in readings and practical assignments that emphasize management and leadership in a time of unprecedented and unpredictable change. Students also work toward developing professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8391 - Transformative Change in a Shared-Power World


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8392 - The Language of Leadership


    (5 cr.) In today’s complex environment, leaders engaged in shaping public policy must know how to use the emotional as well as the intellectual power of language to motivate, inspire, and competently manage their organizations. In this course, students examine techniques, such as effective communication, used in dynamic leadership that affect conscious and unconscious influences on human behavior. Through discussions, group assignments, and individual projects, students apply theoretical and practical course content to demonstrate the necessary components for making effective human connections. Students also learn why stories, symbols, and metaphors are essential elements in the language of leadership.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8401 - Public Health Leadership and Systems Thinking♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore leadership models and theories, the core principles of public health leadership, and the application of systems thinking to public health. They examine how to create strategies and solutions that efficiently utilize public health and healthcare resources. Students also discuss descriptive and prescriptive systems, focusing on the application of these processes to current public health issues and challenges at the organizational and community levels.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8405 - Ethics and Social Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. In this course, students examine the philosophy of ethics as well as responsibility and social justice—basic tenets of public service. Students explore the complex social, political, and related ethical challenges leaders face as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. They examine ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students also assess demographic data and current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community. Applying concepts presented in the course, students engage in an in-depth assessment of an emerging or persistent ethical or social justice issue, through which they demonstrate their ability to make recommendations for improvement or change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8420 - Health Economics♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the application of economic principles to healthcare managerial decision making regarding the amount, structure, and distribution of healthcare resources and services. Because of the complexity and uncertainty of the healthcare system, as well as the scope of resources consumed by health and health-related organizations, managers must appreciate the economic implications of decisions regarding allocation of resources. Students advance their knowledge of economic principles as reflected in the population demand for health; the demand for healthcare and medical care; the supply of health organizations and practitioners; the role of insurance, moral hazard, and adverse selection; the practice of cost-shifting; the structure, competitive nature, and dynamics of markets; differing objectives of for-profit and non-profit organizations; variation in consumer access to and utilization of services; roles of uncertainty and information asymmetry; strategies for consumer cost-sharing; and the challenges healthcare organizations face in the pricing, production, allocation, and distribution of health and medical services. Special attention is devoted to understanding how health services differ in a variety of competitive markets.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8431 - Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector♦


    (5 cr.) Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. Students in this course examine finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. They assess theories for motivating major fiscal-policy debates, and they explore and discuss auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems, the use of dashboards for financial reporting, and the impact of globalization on finance and budget. Students read and analyze budgets, financial statements, and reports. They contextualize their learning as they apply knowledge gained from their analysis to develop a new budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8465 - Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination♦


    (5 cr.) In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public and nonprofit organizations plan strategies to fulfill the organizational mission and enhance stakeholder satisfaction. Students in this course explore the role and process of strategic planning, including collaboration, cooperation, and coordination. They also examine the benefits, challenges, and pitfalls of strategic planning, in addition to the impact of globalization. Students apply these concepts to real-life scenarios and develop a strategic plan for a nonprofit or public organization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8540 - Strategic Planning, Management, and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in various types of organizations. In this course, learners engage in a collaborative study of strategic planning, management, and leadership in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. Students in this course identify, analyze, and evaluate the intricate relationships between strategic planning, management, and leadership from an international perspective. Students connect three key institutional elements: thinking, acting, and leading strategically. Students apply a management systems approach as they develop, adopt, manage, and lead a strategic plan for an international public or nonprofit organization or with an international focus. Students will understand the strategic context for practical decision making for international public and nonprofit organizations, emphasizing the central role of the environment in the strategic planning process. Students are offered a hands-on approach in this course that tests their ability to make effective and timely management and leadership decisions in complex and uncertain conditions.

     
  
  •  

    PPPA 8540i - Strategic Planning, Management, and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in various types of organizations. In this course, learners engage in a collaborative study of strategic planning, management, and leadership in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. Students in this course identify, analyze, and evaluate the intricate relationships between strategic planning, management, and leadership from an international perspective. Students connect three key institutional elements: thinking, acting, and leading strategically. Students apply a management systems approach as they develop, adopt, manage, and lead a strategic plan for an international public or nonprofit organization or with an international focus. Students will understand the strategic context for practical decision making for international public and nonprofit organizations, emphasizing the central role of the environment in the strategic planning process. Students are offered a hands-on approach in this course that tests their ability to make effective and timely management and leadership decisions in complex and uncertain conditions.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8541 - Sustainable Development for Global Communities


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change; assess community needs and resources; create community visions; promote stakeholder interest and participation; analyze community problems; and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models, and they apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning.

     
  
  •  

    PPPA 8541i - Sustainable Development for Global Communities


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change; assess community needs and resources; create community visions; promote stakeholder interest and participation; analyze community problems; and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models, and they apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8542 - Transformative Change in a Global Environment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8740 - Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma♦


    (5 cr.) There is no shortage of natural and human-made disasters, such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities. Individuals and communities impacted by such disasters often need assistance from professionals who understand the social, cultural, and psychological complexities of crisis and trauma. Students in this course investigate how these incidents impact the psychology of individuals and groups. They assess traditional and current literature and complete practical exercises to learn about theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with trauma. Considering the various ways crisis professionals can promote positive social change, students devote special attention to the importance and development of culturally appropriate, service-delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disasters.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8741 - Psychology of Terrorism♦


    (5 cr.) Many sources define terrorism as a type of psychological warfare, as it induces fear and feelings of vulnerability. Therefore, professionals need to understand all aspects of terrorism to help prevent further terroristic acts and respond to victims who have been affected psychologically. Students in this course explore terrorism from a psychological perspective. They examine types of terrorism; contributing factors related to the development of terrorists and terrorist organizations; counterterrorism agencies and laws; the impact of terrorist events on individuals, families, and communities; prevention, intervention, and postvention with survivors; media coverage of terrorist events; human rights and ethical issues; and future trends related to the psychology of terrorism. Students also examine the threat of terrorism in their own community and evaluate the potential impact. Using concepts presented in the course, they consider applications for preventative measures as well as strategies to promote resiliency among individual and families who may become victims of terrorism.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8810 - Fundamentals of Law and Public Policy♦


    (5 cr.) Legal decisions and the law often have a major impact on the creation of public policy. In this course, students explore and discuss the relationship between laws and public policy and the impact that court decisions have on policy and policy leaders. They examine the role of administrative agencies in the creation and execution of law and public policy and the role of the courts in resolving challenges to agency rule making; conflicts between executive and legislative branches of government; and conflicts between and among federal, state, and local laws. Students have the opportunity to sharpen their critical-thinking and research-database skills as they search for real-world examples of how fundamental legal concepts and processes affect the creation and execution of law and public policy.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8811 - Legal Research for Policy Practitioners♦


    (5 cr.) There is a wealth of vital legal knowledge available to public policy practitioners. In this course, students explore the many print and electronic resources available for legal research. Students examine how practitioners use the law to inform the creation of public policy. They engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of content to learn how to navigate legal libraries, cite cases, and employ research to support public policy. Students also gain experience in applying legal research to case studies and contemporary issues.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8812 - Contemporary Cases and Issues in the Courts♦


    (5 cr.) Major issues in the Supreme Court continue to have an impact on public policy at the state and local levels. In this course, students examine major past and current U.S. Supreme Court cases related to abortion, privacy, due process, personal property, and freedom of religion and speech. They also examine major cases related to state powers, government entitlement, and powers of the judicial and federal branches of government. From this assessment, students determine how outcomes of such cases affect public policy. Students also explore and discuss individual rights, property rights, administrative law, immigration law, and foreign policy as well as contemporary issues and case studies, to which they apply legal research and verdicts.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8820 - Elements of Sustainable and Livable Communities♦


    (5 cr.) Creating and maintaining sustainable and livable communities requires leaders who understand the connections among the natural, built, and social environments, and who can address these connections in a holistic and integrated fashion. Students in this course examine concepts of sustainability and livability and explore popular approaches to creating and maintaining communities that are more environmentally sound, economically prosperous, and socially equitable. They also focus on strategies to halt urban sprawl and to promote alternative modes of transportation. Students define and explore these concepts through case studies and examples drawn from local communities.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8821 - Tools for Sustainable Community Development♦


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change; assess community needs and resources; create community visions; promote stakeholder interest and participation; analyze community problems; and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models, and they apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8822 - Current Issues in Regional and Local Public Policy♦


    (5 cr.) Public decision makers must understand and address a variety of complex and interrelated issues, such as land use and transportation, energy and environment, housing and schools, and regional economic development. In this course, students learn how leaders attend to these issues in light of existing policies and contemporary social, economic, political, demographic, and technological trends. Students explore and discuss planning processes, tools, approaches, strategies, and policies used to create sustainable and livable communities through collaborative processes involving multiple stakeholders. Through the development of a policy-option written assignment, students assess critical issues and identify problem-solving strategies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8830 - Current Issues in Homeland Security


    (5 cr.) Since its inception, the Department of Homeland Security has profoundly impacted public policy and administration. Students in this course examine homeland security history, concepts, policies, and strategies of prevention and response. Topics include ethical issues, telecommunications, technology, threat assessment, contingency planning, and risk management. Students apply fundamental concepts and principles of homeland security to case studies and current issues.

     

  
  •  

    PPPA 8831 - Critical Incident Leadership and Planning


    (5 cr.) Strategic leadership and planning are required to effectively prevent, respond to, and recover from critical incidents that threaten homeland security. Students in this course explore the role and importance of leadership and planning in critical incident management and the application of tools, strategies, and systems to specific critical incidents. Through the evaluation of case studies, students examine the impact of critical incidents on individuals and communities as well as roles of government agencies and nongovernment organizations in managing such incidents. Using concepts and theories presented in the course, students develop a critical incident management plan for their community through which they consider new strategies and perspectives in regard to critical incident leadership and planning.

     

  
  •  

    PPPA 8832 - Terrorism: Legislation and Policy♦


    (5 cr.) The events of Sept. 11 resulted in a new and intense focus on the issue of terrorism in the United States and abroad. In this course students explore the history of terrorism; laws, regulations, and legislation related to terrorism; and the roles of the media, governmental agencies, and entities in the prevention of and response to terrorism. Students apply their knowledge to case studies and current trends related to terrorism.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8841 - Health Policy and Management


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the factors that influence and improve health outcomes of individuals and populations, with attention to the goals of Healthy People 2010 and the main components and issues of organization, financing, and delivery of health services and public health systems in the United States. Topics include management theories and processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. The policy process is addressed, as well as the advocacy role of the public health professional in influencing local, state, and federal policy. The impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems is also considered.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8843 - Legal and Regulatory Aspects of Public Health♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the role of federal, state, and local government in the assurance of public health through legislation and regulation. Consideration is given to contemporary legal and regulatory issues arising in public health practice and emergencies with attention to public health security and preparedness in response to bioterrorism and disasters.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8850 - Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector♦


    (5 cr.) Nonprofit organizations (NPOs) can serve to positively affect people’s lives through social change, but they require leaders who have a fundamental understanding of the nonprofit sector, including related ethical, legal, and global perspectives. Students in this course explore these viewpoints as well as the history, foundations, and types of NPOs. They also examine the diverse political, social, and economic contexts within which NPOs exist. Students explore and apply marketing, public relations, and communication concepts and strategies to case studies and contemporary situations. Gaining practical insight, students also apply theories presented in the course to the development of a concept paper guiding the development of a nonprofit organization.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8851 - Board Governance and Volunteer Management♦


    (5 cr.) The success of nonprofit organizations (NPOs) is largely dependent on the effective management of program volunteers and board members—individuals who often serve as the lifeblood of NPOs. Students in this course explore the volunteer management process, including volunteer recruitment, orientation, training, supervision, and evaluation. They focus on methods that organizations use to create and maintain an effective Board of Directors to ensure that the board governs and guides the organization toward their mission. Students design a board development or volunteer management plan based on processes presented in the course and fundamental concepts acquired earlier in the program.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 8852 - Resource Development♦


    (5 cr.) All nonprofit organizations require financial resources. Obtaining philanthropic financial support is essential to program delivery and stability. Students in this course explore the concepts of philanthropy and development, identification of funding sources, donor/prospect cultivation and education, and solicitation and appreciation strategies. They focus on processes and strategies for creating an organizational philanthropic culture based on ethics and donor relationships. Using these strategies and other concepts presented in the course, students create a resource development plan for a nonprofit organization.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PPPA 9000 - Dissertation


    (5 credits per quarter for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion) Through the final dissertation, students demonstrate their scholarly ability to examine, critique, and synthesize knowledge and experience, so that new ideas can be tested; best practices identified, established, and verified; and theoretical, practice, or policy constructs evaluated and advanced. Doctoral students have the opportunity to integrate their Program of Study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area, culminating in the completion of their dissertation research study in this course. Students complete the dissertation independently, with the guidance of a supervisory committee chair and committee members. Students complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and a final oral presentation and written dissertation. Ultimately, every dissertation should make a fresh contribution to the field of public policy and administration.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 4 quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Dissertation with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook. (Prerequisite(s): Core KAMs, RSCH 8100P, RSCH 8200P, and RSCH 8300P.) Note: When students register for PPPA 9000, they will be registered automatically each term until successful completion of the dissertation.

  
  •  

    PREL 3001 - Principles of Public Relations♦


    (5 cr.) How is communication conducted between a community and private entities and in what ways can this communication affect decision making and outcome of actions? Preparing students to answer such questions and to understand, appreciate, and apply the fundamentals of public relations (PR) is a goal of this course. Students learn about the relationships practitioners have with both internal and external communities who are affected by, and who affect, an organization’s actions or planning. Students also build their command of the basic principles and practices of PR, while applying these concepts to real-world scenarios and a written plan that includes the various phases of the PR process.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PREL 4101 - Publicity and Public Relations♦


    (5 cr.) Public relations (PR) professionals play an important role in promoting a positive image for a wide variety of organizations, such as corporations and schools, and influential individuals, such as celebrities and politicians. In this course, students build on PR proficiencies to apply the principles and concepts of PR, specifically targeting positive publicity of persons, places, and purposes. Students assess the risks and benefits of PR tools to inform and influence the community and assess the use of social media in PR efforts. Through the extensive use of case studies, students also have the opportunity to develop expertise in promoting constructive publicity in PR through analyzing both successes and failures in the real world.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PREL 4102 - Applied Public Relations♦


    (5 cr.) Building brand relationships, fostering interactions between marketers and customers, and reaching consumers through new means of cost-effective technology now often rely on the combined efforts of advertising through marketing and the guidance of public relations (PR) professionals. Students in this course learn to apply the principles and practices of PR using the medium of advertising to achieve desired end results. Outlining the process of a PR plan, students draw upon the combined knowledge and skills in media relations, effective communications, market awareness, and integrated messaging to practice creating leverage and opportunity for organizations, individuals, products, and places.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PREL 4103 - Crisis Communications♦


    (5 cr.) Rapid shifts in the economy, changes in political leaders, and negative news reports are just a few of the factors affecting marketing campaigns and public relations (PR) efforts. In this course, students can learn the value of managing internal and external communications effectively in situations of risk, crisis, and sudden change—a critical competence for PR professionals and organizations. Students examine successful and unsuccessful crisis communication efforts and consider issues of contingency planning, speed, transparency, multiple modalities, stakeholder analysis, and ethics. They engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of content through which they gain experience developing a communication plan to mitigate and solve issues of crisis in PR.
      (Prerequisite(s): PREL 3001 or HLTH 3115.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 1002 - Global Issues in Politics♦


    (5 cr.) Professionals working in the political science and public administration arena must have a firm understanding of current political, social, economic, and religious issues to successfully engage in decision making, political debates, policy making, and other responsibilities inherent to the profession. In this course, students develop their understanding of global society through political issues. They identify the major challenges to peace and sustainability in the global environment. They also explore and discuss issues related to energy, trade, human rights, healthcare, sex and drug trafficking, and the disparity between rich nations and poor nations. Through this course, students gain skills needed to stay abreast of global issues in politics, and they consider how these issues can affect their daily personal and professional lives.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 1003 - Political Controversies♦


    (5 cr.) The Declaration of Independence asserts that all men are entitled to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; though, society continues to argue over how to guarantee these inalienable rights. In this course, students apply the principles of the U.S. Constitution and examine several modern political controversies, such as same-sex marriage, the role of the media in society, the debate over gun control, and others in light of their relationship to larger enduring political debates. Students employ course concepts to practical applications on a variety of topics, such as critiquing argument, protecting personal privacy, ensuring equal opportunity, predicting debate outcomes, and evaluating profiling, among others.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 2001 - Principles of Public Administration♦


    (5 cr.) Public administrators make daily decisions and implement programs that impact our lives in countless ways. In this course, students explore how public administrators and managers conduct the business of government, such as implementing public policy. They assess and discuss the issues and challenges these figures encounter while performing their jobs as well as future trends and potential issues they may face in the future. Students engage in short writing assignments through which they apply learning and reflect on how course concepts apply to the real world and their lives. Through this course, students come to understand the variety of jobs that public administrators perform and their crucial role in the successful operation of government.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 2002 - The Making of Public Policy♦


    (5 cr.) What is public policy? Who develops it and how is it made? In this course, students explore how the government makes decisions and the impact these decisions have on people and communities. Students learn how issues become important, how groups exercise power, and how government policies are evaluated and modified. Students also examine whether the public policy process is generally fair to the majority of citizens or whether it provides unfair advantage to certain groups. In this course, students have an opportunity to engage in the exploration of many of the questions and issues surrounding the development of public policy.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 2030 - Leadership and Volunteerism♦


    (5 cr.) Volunteers are one of the most important resources for nonprofit organizations. Through this course, students learn the crucial importance of volunteers to organizations and groups striving to build better communities and address important social problems. Students explore how successful leaders recruit qualified volunteers, retain their commitment over time, and empower them to act on behalf of shared goals. They identify the key challenges facing organizations that rely heavily on volunteers and the most effective means of addressing these challenges. Students also examine and discuss the particular leadership skills required in volunteer organizations and consider how they can develop these proficiencies to lead future volunteer efforts and effect positive social change.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 2050 - Social Entrepreneurship♦


    (5 cr.) Society often associates entrepreneurship with the business world in which creative individuals use their imagination and skills to amass large fortunes. In this course, students explore a new breed of entrepreneur—the social entrepreneur. Students learn how social entrepreneurs help others by combining resources in unique ways to change underlying social structures for the greater good. Students examine social entrepreneurship methods, practices, and values. They also explore and discuss the impact of social entrepreneurship on social change. Students synthesize knowledge and apply course concepts as they work toward developing an original social-entrepreneurial venture.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 3001 - Constitutional Law♦


    (5 cr.) The Constitution is the foundation for all law in the United States. In this course, students examine how the Constitution protects individual rights, legal processes, and historical conceptions. Students use landmark Supreme Court cases to examine enduring constitutional themes, including civil rights/civil liberties, federalism, property rights, the death penalty, the rights of the accused, freedom of religion, and others. Students also explore how people attempt to use the law to promote as well as to inhibit positive social change. Through this course, students gain a fundamental understanding of constitutional law, which provides the framework for informed decision making in the professional arena.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 3002 - Ethics in Public Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a key element of successful government and nonprofit leadership. Ethically, on individual and institutional levels, many things can go wrong in government and nonprofit organizations. Students in this course gain insight into causes, obstacles, and barriers to ethical leadership. They explore how successful public sector leaders build organizations that reflect strong ethical values. Students examine qualities of ethical leaders, ethical organizations, and ethical decision making. They use practical tools for achieving ethical public leadership in case studies and real-life scenarios.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSPA 1002, PSPA 1003, PSPA 2001, PSPA 2002, and POLI 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 3010 - Civil Law♦


    (5 cr.) With the exception of the occasional traffic ticket, most individuals do not have many encounters with the criminal justice system. However, frequent interactions with the American legal system through civil law are not uncommon. Students in this course explore family law, employment law, property rights, malpractice issues, torts, and other aspects of civil law. They learn how civil law is relevant to human resource managers, healthcare professionals, and public administrators. Through written assignments and other application-based activities, students further examine topics related to civil law, such as contracts, negligence analysis, independent contractors versus employees, and commercial leases.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 3020 - Principles of Public Personnel Management and Human Resources♦


    (5 cr.) How do managers most effectively motivate and lead organizations and people to accomplish organizational goals? In this course, students explore many of the tools, techniques, and challenges of modern management, such as leadership, personnel systems, affirmative actions, performance management, and strategic planning. Students learn the tools, techniques, and challenges of managing organizations and people successfully in the public and nonprofit sectors. Through discussions and practical application assignments, students gain an understanding of basic leadership principles, strategic planning, modern personnel systems, and performance management. Students culminate their learning in a final analysis through which they apply course concepts to a current issue related to human resource management.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 3030 - Social Change in the Community♦


    (5 cr.) How can we address contemporary challenges resulting from unforeseen market shifts, unemployment, home foreclosures, and other issues confronting community? In this course, students identify and apply the skills that are needed by individuals and groups to produce positive social change. They explore how positive social change takes place on a community level, and they examine the major obstacles to positive social change efforts. Additionally, students examine the key features of effective strategies, such as organization of people as well as economic and political resources. Using basic principles presented in the course, students develop a social change action plan through which they gain the practical skills and knowledge needed to effect positive social change in their own community.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 3040 - Global Social Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Globalization has brought with it a shared understanding of human rights and a new set of social problems. Students in this course examine the issues of social justice that are prominent in the new global community. They also explore the role of women, environmental justice, the responsibility of richer nations to poorer nations, the promotion of diversity, the protection of human rights, and other contemporary issues. Students learn about the international organizations dedicated to promoting social justice and consider the importance of social justice in international relations. Throughout the course, students reflect on and respond to personal questions regarding perspectives, responsibilities, and roles in achieving global social justice. Finally, students consider how their personal ideology on global social justice has changed as a result of course readings, discussions, and applications.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 4010 - Contemporary Legal Debates♦


    (5 cr.) Many of society’s most intractable problems are resolved through the legal system. In this course, students examine issues at the foundation of many legal debates, such as immigration, abortion, reproductive rights, intellectual property, and the separation of church and state. Students engage in contextual and application-based assignments that highlight the legal aspects of several social issues. They share perspectives through peer discussions on topical issues, such as legal views and decisions, right to privacy, race, the death penalty, and the responsibilities of corporations as members of society. Students practice their research, persuasive-writing, and analysis skills through a final project on a contemporary legal debate.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 4020 - New Skills for Leaders in the Public Sector♦


    (5 cr.) Contemporary public managers use a variety of new tools and strategies to implement public policy and conduct business. Students in this course learn about the new skills required of public administrators to be successful in a rapidly changing environment. They examine a variety of topics, such as team building, contracting, procurement, compliance, grant writing, and outsourcing/insourcing. Through this course, students also have the opportunity to explore job opportunities at the government level as well as in the nonprofit sector.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 4030 - Communication for Social Change♦


    (5 cr.) In a society influenced by technological innovation and virtual spread of information, we can use technology to rekindle friendships with grade-school acquaintances and we can instantaneously follow every action of our favorite entertainers. But it is also our responsibility to know how to use these same social networking techniques and other more traditional means of communication as catalysts for positive social change. In this course, students learn how to use modern communication tools to promote positive social change and mobilize communities. They analyze the use of electronic tools for public and nonprofit sector organizations. Students also examine the key elements of a communication strategy—message development, target audience identification, selection of communication tools, and obtaining feedback—and apply these to current social issues.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 4040 - Service in the Global Community♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore how groups and organizations are making a difference by serving the global community. Students examine the function, operation, and relationship between organizations that address global issues, such as disaster relief, HIV, hunger, education, women’s rights, and healthcare; such organizations include intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). They examine the strategies and techniques that successful organizations use in responding to global challenges. Students also consider current issues that have potential to become global crises, and they discuss the future of public service in the global community. Applying concepts of service and related governance issues, students complete a final research project on a major issue currently affecting the global society.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSPA 4080 - Capstone


    (5 cr.) A capstone project provides students with the opportunity to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program into a practical, integrative project designed to promote positive social change. In this capstone course, students examine American democracy, the political system in the United States, and the relationships among special interest groups and political parties. They also assess how the U.S. political system affects public administration or political roles and how these roles can effect positive social change. Students employ knowledge of leadership skills as well as concepts from the course and their program to propose a public policy with implications of social change for a virtual community.
     
  
  •  

    PSYC 1001 - Introduction to Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students will be introduced to the scientific study of observable behavior and internal experiences such as thoughts and feelings. Psychological facts, principles, and theories associated with methods of analysis, learning, memory, brain functioning, sensation, perception, motivation, emotions, personality, social behavior, human development, and psychological disorders and treatment will be introduced. Students will learn to understand human behavior by examining the integrative influences of biological, psychological, and social-cultural factors. The concepts in this course will prepare psychology majors for more in-depth study of the major areas of psychology, and will provide a foundational understanding of human behavior for non-psychology majors.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 2000 - Psychology Seminar♦


    (5 cr.) In this survey course, BS in Psychology program majors assess their marketable skills, career needs, and career goals. Students learn to make informed choices and plans regarding graduate training in psychology or other related fields of study, as well as job-seeking skills in psychology. Additional topics covered are introductory-level approaches to critical thinking, information literacy skills, and writing in the format and style of the discipline. Students will also reflect on how their chosen major of psychology relates to Walden’s mission of social change. This course is graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 2001 - Cross-Cultural Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Contemporary life requires the ability to relate to people who are different. In this course, students will explore major areas of psychology in light of culture’s influence, challenging their own world views and unconscious biases in order to develop greater sensitivity to the impact of cultural differences on interactions in a variety of settings. Topics include definitions and approaches to understanding culture; the role of psychology in understanding bias; cultural aspects of cognition and intelligence; emotion; motivation; development and socialization; disorders; and applications of cross-cultural psychology. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 2002 - Human Development: Childhood and Adolescence♦


    (5 cr.) Humans experience many developmental changes throughout the lifespan, but those of greatest significance occur from conception to young adulthood. In this course, students examine key theories related to various aspects of development in infants, children, and adolescents. Students apply social, biological, and cognitive maturation processes and perspectives to better understand their own development and personal experiences. They also discuss related topics, such as cross-cultural issues, attachment and temperament, language and personality development, and puberty and sexual development.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 2003 - Human Development: Adulthood♦


    (5 cr.) Adulthood represents a rich developmental experience including many significant life transitions. In this course, students explore the key theories, transitions, and applications of adult development. They examine the social, biological, and cognitive maturation processes that define development of adulthood into older age. Students engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of theories to specific transitions and topical issues, such as career changes, attachment and marital satisfaction, personality, retirement, and cognition. Applying concepts presented in the course, students discuss cross-cultural issues in development, emotional development, adult roles, memory, and physical aging.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 2004 - Motivation and Emotion♦


    (5 cr.) What drives people to do what they do? In this course students have the opportunity to answer this question as they explore basic theories of motivation and emotion. They also explore bodily needs, such as hunger, thirst, and sex, that drive people to action; concepts in motivation, such as achievement, altruism, and conflict; and concepts related to emotion, including happiness, hormonal influences, and mood. Students assess content and share different perspectives through peer discussions on related topics, such as sources of motivation, hunger and eating, need for power, extraversion, goals, and decision making.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 2005 - Social Influences on Behavior♦


    (5 cr.) Individuals are often influenced by others and by the social situations in which they find themselves. Students in this course examine the basic concepts and applications of social psychology, including attitudes, beliefs, and behavior; stereotyping; prejudice and discrimination; interpersonal relationships; group behavior; and the effect of environmental stress on behavior. They also learn how bias can sway objective conclusions as well as how ethical factors influence research in social psychology. Students apply principles and theories presented in the course to case studies and situations in daily life, including instances of stereotyping and discrimination. They also use these theories to understand strategies for helping others and reducing aggressive behavior.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 2006 - Introduction to Addiction♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the nature of addiction and the impairment in individuals who suffer from addictions. It includes a review of theories on substance disorders and approaches to identification, prevention, and treatment. Topics include historical perspectives, diagnoses, types of addictive behaviors, treatment, and current research. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 2008 - Learning♦


    (5 cr.) How do people learn, and what strategies maximize learning? In this course, students have an introduction to the behavioral and cognitive bases of learning and memory. Students engage in contextual and application-based assignments, such as simulation lab work, focusing on classical and operant conditioning, cognitive theories of learning, and introductory concepts of memory. Students apply learning principles and concepts, such as social learning theory and locus of control, to real-world behavior and performance.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 2009 - Theories of Personality♦


    (5 cr.) This course is an introduction to the theoretical approaches to understanding personality. Students examine key theorists and theories including psychoanalytic, neopsychoanalytic, humanistic, trait, biological, behaviorist, and social-cognitive approaches. Perspectives on personality are applied to personal and social issues. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 2100 - Workplace Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students will be introduced to the field of industrial organizational psychology where the principles of psychology are applied within the workplace. Key topics will illustrate how the tenets of industrial organizational psychology apply at three levels: the individual, group, and organizational levels. Students will also explore each side of the field: Industrial and Organizational sides. On the industrial side, students will examine job analysis, selection, training, and performance measurement. Focusing on the organizational psychology side, students will explore motivation, teams, communication, and leadership in organizations. Lastly, ethics, culture, and legal implications will be integrated throughout the course. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
  
  •  

    PSYC 2101 - Introduction to Forensic Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an expansive overview of forensic psychology, including basic tenets, practices, and procedures. Students explore subspecialties of forensic psychology; roles and responsibilities; and related legal, ethical, and diversity issues. They learn how forensic psychology links to the criminal justice system as they explore related topics, including criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, and correctional psychology. Through this course, students acquire a broad understanding of forensic psychology theories and concepts, which they apply to the analysis of controversial issues and contemporary challenges within the field. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 3001 - Cognitive Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a comprehensive overview of cognitive psychology, the scientific study of mental processes: How people acquire, store, transform, use, and communicate information. Topics may include perception, attention, language, memory, reasoning, problem solving, decision making, and creativity. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
  
  •  

    PSYC 3002 - Introduction to Basic Statistics♦


    (5 cr.) A hallmark of science is the use of numbers to convey research findings; understanding these numbers has both practical and academic value. In this course, students examine basic statistical principles and vocabulary, differentiating methods of data analysis, and interpreting statistical results. The goal of the course is for students to better understand the importance of statistics in research.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 3003 - Methods in Psychological Inquiry♦


    (5 cr.) A variety of factors may cloud judgment when interpreting experiences. In this course, students learn about research methods that psychologists use to test hypotheses in an objective and systematic manner to minimize biases, providing a framework for more accurate conclusions. Students examine experimental and non-experimental methods, issues related to the validity and reliability of measurement, dependent and independent variables, sampling, and ethical concerns related to psychological research. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000 or PSYC 3002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 3004 - Psychological Disorders♦


    (5 cr.) Psychological disorders form the basis of diagnosis in psychology. In this course, students examine a wide variety of common psychological disorders, including mood, thought, anxiety, substance abuse, sexual, personality, and dissociative disorders. Students also explore underlying causes, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatments. They examine concepts of normal and abnormal as related to psychology, methods used in the process of diagnosis, and the measurement of psychological functioning. Students also differentiate among disorders and learn limits to effective diagnosis. Applying concepts and theories learned in the course, students demonstrate their understanding through practical application and case study assignments.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 3005 - Racial and Ethnic Identities♦


    (5 cr.) Most people recognize and appreciate the individuality of human beings, including race and ethnicity as related to self-perception and to the perception of others. In this course, students explore their own racial and ethnic identities in the context of contemporary psychological knowledge as well as contemporary issues and challenges related to race and ethnicity. Students explore and discuss a variety of topics, including the development of racial and ethnic identities; social classification; privilege and stigma; perceptions of racial and ethnic identities; assimilation; inequalities in race and ethnicity; and the relationship of race and ethnicity to social change. Students apply psychological concepts to better understand their own sense of ethnic and racial identities and how these identities shape their experiences in the world.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 3006 - Psychology of Gender♦


    (5 cr.) Researchers have demonstrated that there are few psychological differences between men and women. And yet history and conventional thinking indicate otherwise. Students in this course are introduced to the basic theories, principles, and applications of gender and gender differences. Students explore distinctions between sex and gender, masculinity and femininity, and sexuality and sexual orientation; gender differences in social behavior, perception, and cognitive abilities; and cross-cultural research on gender and sexuality. Through discussions and applications, students debunk myths surrounding sex and gender similarities and differences, and they apply theories to case examples and individual experiences. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 3007 - Influence and Persuasion♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine major concepts and theories of influence and persuasion. Understanding the psychology of influence and persuasion, and recognizing how we use it in daily interactions—or how we experience it used by others—is a vital component of making positive decisions about relationships and careers, as well as everyday challenges and opportunities in our lives. Students will apply specific theories to common situations to analyze and evaluate the impact of influence and persuasion on their own and others’ attitudes, beliefs, and behavior. Particular areas of study include influence and persuasion in daily communication; cultural considerations; media and consumer behavior; and politics and leader influence. Throughout the course, students also apply self-reflection strategies to case studies and their personal experiences and also assess the ethical aspects of influence and persuasion. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 3009 - Psychology of Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Are leaders made or born? This question has been debated for decades. Building on requisite comprehension of psychology, such as understanding development and behavior, mental processes, and how people interact, students apply this knowledge in consideration of what makes a leader. They examine theories and principles of leadership and leader development. Students engage in coursework focused on leadership styles, characteristics and qualities of effective leaders, cultural issues, empowerment and development, ethics and values, and global leadership. They apply leadership concepts and principles to personal experiences to contextualize theory and further examine the leadership role.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 3011 - Addictions Assessment♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course focus on learning a systematic, multidisciplinary approach to the assessment and interpretation of data collected from clients with addictions. The most current screening, assessment, and documentation approaches will be reviewed. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 3012 - Prevention and Treatment of Addictions♦


    (5 cr.) Models and theories of addiction are covered, as well as various treatment approaches. Prevention in various settings is addressed, including the etiology, patterns, and risk factors of addiction, as well as strategies for prevention. Treatment methodology, treatment planning, goal setting, and evaluation are also addressed. The multicultural context of addiction and client diversity are included. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 4001 - Cultural Perspectives in Health Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) How does one’s culture influence health-related behavior and how does culture impact an individual’s response to stress, pain, and illness? In this course, students learn how biological, psychological, sociological, and cognitive factors affect individual health behaviors. Students engage in discussions and practical, application-based assignments on a variety of topics, including cultural responses to health, stress management, and coping mechanisms; pain theory and management techniques; health psychology theories and models; and strategies for helping people achieve health psychology goals when faced with illness. Students apply principles of health psychology to case studies and real-life examples related to promoting, achieving, and maintaining optimal health as well as psychological adjustment to illness in different cultures.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 4002 - Brain and Behavior♦


    (5 cr.) The study of the brain and how it functions has contributed significantly to the understanding of how people react and adapt to their environments. In this course, students examine basic brain physiology and learn how the brain functions to control behavior. Students explore specific applications of brain structure to memory and attention, sensation and perception, development, socialization, motivation and emotion, and socialization. They apply concepts and theories about the brain to psychological health and well-being.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 4003 - Case Management and Addictions♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore the definitions and methodologies of case management services. The course is designed to provide students with the most up-to-date research and clinical applications of services management in the practice of addictions counseling. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 4006 - Global Perspectives in Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) While traditional psychology in the United States has been Western in focus, increased globalization has promoted an examination into human behavior from a broader perspective that includes the influence of cultural and global trends on individual and group behavior. In this course, students explore a variety of global perspectives in psychology as well as some of the issues and controversies facilitated by differing cultures. They explore and discuss trends and research methods in global psychology, indigenous psychology, psychotherapy in a global world, and the role of psychologists internationally. Students critically evaluate psychological issues from a global rather than a domestic perspective.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 4008 - Intergroup Conflict and Peace Building♦


    (5 cr.) In a world encumbered with conflict, tension, and injustice, strategies for building peace are essential. In this course, students assess theories and principles of conflict management and resolution. They examine and employ theories and applications of intergroup dynamics; principles and underlying philosophies of non-violence; and social science principles to understand conflict and promote peace. Students gain practical experience applying principles of peace building to proposing solutions for contemporary, individual, and social issues.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 [or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003] and PSYC 2000.) 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 4010 - Psychology Capstone


    (5 cr.) In this course, students integrate knowledge and skills attained through their psychology coursework to create a final Capstone Paper that examines one area of psychology through a professional lens. In addition, students engage in scholarly discourse about key issues and theories, including ethics, learned throughout the program. Finally, students reflect on their experience in the program and consider career possibilities that might utilize their learning while considering ways to contribute to positive social change.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, PSYC 2000, and PSYC 2101.)
  
  •  

    PSYC 4110 - Forensic Evaluation


    (5 cr.) In this course students are introduced to the basic procedures for interviewing and evaluating individuals within the legal system. Students learn about various interview and evaluation strategies, including unique challenges presented when working with special populations. In addition, effective behavioral observation strategies are identified. Methods for effectively recording information from interviews and observations are covered, and best practices for preparing forensic reports are presented.
  
  •  

    PSYC 4920 - Applications of Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) In this course, students gain the contemporary knowledge needed to apply ethical practice and professional responsibilities while working in the field of forensic psychology. The American Psychological Society’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as the American Psychology–Law Society’s Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology are mainstays in this course. Additionally, the various roles and responsibilities of a forensic psychologist are covered. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, PSYC 2000, and PSYC 2101.)
  
  •  

    PSYC 5005 - Business Concepts for the Organizational Development Professional


    (5 cr.) Organizational success depends on many aspects, such as human and market factors. In this course, students explore these factors as well as the language of work, business, and management structures and processes. They also examine related topics, such as finance, marketing, accounting, strategic planning, organizational design, and quality and process improvement. Students apply concepts and theories to case study scenarios and real-life situations. They also demonstrate their knowledge through a health audit of an actual organization, for which they provide a synopsis of a variety of organization aspects, such as ethical and legal issues, organizational architecture, group relations, human factors, and accounting and financial factors, among others. Note: To register for this course, please contact the Academic Advising Team.
  
  •  

    PSYC 5102 - Introduction to Mental Health Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students are introduced to the mental health counseling profession in this course. The history, philosophy, and theoretical foundations of the profession, and the scope of practice, credentialing, and other professional issues are explored. The focus in this course is on the student as a future mental health counselor. Students receive an overview of the mental health counseling program, the profession, and professional competencies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    PSYC 5103 - Introduction to Addiction


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to aspects of professional functioning as an addiction counselor, including but not limited to role setting of addiction counselors; history, philosophy, and trends in addictions counseling; professional standards for addictions counselors; effects of crises and trauma-causing events on persons with addictions; self‐care; and ethical and culturally sensitive practice of addiction counseling. Students also explore competencies, credentialing, and other professional issues. Students explore the future as addiction counselors as well as an overview of the addiction counseling profession.
  
  •  

    PSYC 5202 - Theories, Treatment, and Case Management of Addiction


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore treatment intervention and case management strategies for addiction counseling, using various models of treatment, recovery, relapse prevention, and continuing care for addictive disorders. They learn treatment principles and philosophies of addiction-related programs, and they increase self-awareness as addiction counselors by assessing their own limitations; recognizing when they need additional resources and support; and knowing when and where to refer clients when appropriate. In addition, students examine substance abuse policies and regulatory processes that influence service delivery in addiction counseling.
  
  •  

    PSYC 5203 - Psychopharmacology and Biopsychosocial Considerations


    (5 cr.) The potential for addictive disorders to present like a variety of medical and psychological disorders is common. In this course, students examine how to treat addictions that may coexist with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive behavior, and other psychological disorders as described in the DSM-IV-TR. They survey a spectrum of psychotropic medications and their use in the treatment of mental, behavioral, and addictive disorders. Students also explore factors that increase the likelihood for a person, community, or group to be at risk for psychoactive substance use disorders. Through this course, students gain an understanding of the basic classifications, indications, and contraindications of commonly prescribed medications so that they make appropriate referrals within treatment teams.
  
  •  

    PSYC 5204 - Assessment in Counseling and Addiction


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive an overview of the different types of diagnostic and assessment tools used in addictions counseling based on professional standards for testing. Students engage in a comprehensive examination of psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. They learn various models and approaches to clinical evaluations for addictive disorders and examine the appropriate use of assessments for addictions. Moreover, students learn how to assess for a biopsychosocial and spiritual history, and they address ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues, including cultural bias and fairness.
  
  •  

    PSYC 5205 - History and Systems of Psychology


    (5 cr.) In this course, students focus on the historical and philosophical roots of psychology and counseling. Through conceptual and application-based assignments, students learn about structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, psychoanalysis, gestaltism, and existentialism as well as contemporary perspectives, including evolutionary psychology, positive psychology, postmodernism, and feminist psychology. Students demonstrate and apply their knowledge through an integrative writing assignment in which they address the developmental history of a major area of study within a subdivision of psychology. Students also explore and consider themes of diversity and multiculturalism in psychology and counseling within each of the perspectives. Note: To register for this course, please contact the Academic Advising Team.
 

Page: 1 <- Back 1023 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 -> 35