2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Nov 28, 2021  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    MRKT 4513 - Media Planning and Purchasing♦


    (5 cr.) There is more to marketing a product or service than creating an engaging commercial or a colorful ad. A critical aspect of implementing a marketing plan involves deciding how to distribute the message, whom the message will reach, and through which media avenue the message is delivered. With the rise of technology and telecommunications, this task is becoming more and more challenging. In this course, students explore these challenges and become grounded in fundamental concepts of media planning, such as gross rating points and effective reach. They use modeling tools that allow them to see the effects of different media plans in putting into operation a media strategy as part of a larger plan. Ultimately, students learn to develop an effective plan with appropriate reach and impact.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 6100 - Integrated Marketing in the Digital Age


    (3 sem. cr.) Marketing strategies continue to change as a result of new and innovative digital opportunities. To remain competitive in today’s fast-paced environment, organizations must have an integrated strategy. Students in this course explore a variety of marketing tools and platforms—both traditional and digital—and the role they play in a strategic marketing mix. Students will examine the role of marketing within an organization and learn how consumer insights and online behavior can influence product, price, distribution, and promotion. Course content also includes the coordination of mass, direct, and online marketing activities and channels; market analysis; and the challenges and opportunities that marketing technologies bring.
  
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    MRKT 6110 - Digital Marketing♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Through the use of digital marketing tools and strategies, organizations can assess how digital campaigns are performing and can respond in real time. The response may be content change, keyword search modifications, or even budget allocations across channels. Digital marketing, however, relies on the marketer knowing advanced concepts and best practices for emerging media platforms to reach and influence consumers. Students can learn to assess online analytics and interpret performance results to determine campaign return on investment (ROI). Insights are provided about the best website design practices, as well as about the ways in which web-based tools support digital marketing, search engine optimization (SEO), online advertising, and the integrations of channels such as mobile, display, video, and social media.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 6120 - Relationship Marketing♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Discover how to foster consumer loyalty and increase customer retention through the application of relationship marketing. Throughout this course, students can explore ways to leverage Internet communication channels and technologies to engage, convert, and retain customers in both business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-consumer (B2C) markets. Additionally, students examine how to plan, design, and execute fully integrated customer relationship management (CRM) systems to get insight into customers’ preferences, provide personalization, and provide targeted messaging automation. Other relationship marketing topics include database marketing across traditional and digital media, digital/social CRM, and customer experience management (CEM).
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 6130 - Communicating Using Social and Digital Media♦


    (3 sem. cr.) While some companies may still be asking, “Why should we care about social media?” most are now asking, “How can we leverage the power of social media?” In this course, students examine how social media has changed the way consumers interact with brands and apply elements of storytelling to develop a social media strategy for an organizational scenario. In addition, students explore issues of ethics, privacy, and media law that are heightened by social media and digital communication distribution. Topics include types of social media, audience appropriateness, reputation management, social media strategy, evaluation methods, and the communications regulatory environment, including media law and privacy.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 6140 - Market Research and Customer Insights♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Understanding consumer behavior is essential for developing and effectively marketing products and services. In this course, students can learn how to use customer data and insights to improve strategic marketing decisions and improve performance. Students have the opportunity to analyze factors that influence buyer behavior during all stages of the purchasing process and to consider how learnings can be translated into product strategy and related marketing decisions. Additionally, students will study market segmentation and targeting practices as key means of differentiation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 6150 - Marketing Communications, Storytelling, and Persuasion♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Whether one is addressing a customer, an audience, or a jury, the aim is to use the tools of persuasion to influence individuals to take action. Especially in social media, it is critically important to establish an appropriate tone, voice, and personality. Tying these strategies to the overall brand positioning is even more important. It has been found that storytelling is one of the most effective tools of persuasion. Rather than simply stating the facts, the story puts facts into a meaningful context, so that the consumer can understand and empathize with the characters in the story and, therefore, identify with the brand’s social media personality. In this course, students explore the elements of the story and the approaches used to develop content. Understanding the impact of individual channels on a strategy for integrated marketing communications and positioning allows the marketer to allocate budgets more effectively and efficiently.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 6160 - Design Thinking: Strategy and the Creative Process♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The ability to marry creative artistry with the strategic business needs of the client is essential for success. In this course, students explore the concepts of design thinking, strategy, and the creative process as tools to solve business problems. Topics covered in this course include an overview of the design business landscape, understanding the creative brief, audience insight, and cultural awareness as foundational to the creative process. Students focus on developing creative, problem-solving approaches that are relevant to real-world business needs.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 6170 - Brand and Product Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Key differences exist between brand and product management, and, yet, both are crucial to the success of a product or service. In this course, students will explore the many elements of brand management, including brand architecture, the development and sustainability of the brand, brand positioning, and the perceived value of the brand. Students will analyze competitive information, and can learn to apply that knowledge in areas such as product differentiation. Throughout the course, students also will examine the critical business skills, tools, and techniques necessary for effective product management. Students will focus on the stages of a product’s lifecycle, consumer demand and pricing, multichannel product management, and the fundamentals of profit and loss management.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 6180 - Optimizing Marketing Performance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) How does one know which marketing channel is contributing to new sales? How does one optimize the online marketing spend to decrease acquisition costs and improve conversion? In today’s budget-conscious corporate environment, marketing professionals are tasked not only with optimizing their marketing dollars, but also with being accountable for performance associated with each activity. In this course, students can learn how to determine relevant metrics, analyze and interpret performance data, forecast results, calculate return on investment (ROI), optimize marketing performance, and present campaign results.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MRKT 6900 - From Marketing Strategy to Execution♦


    (3 sem. cr.) How can a marketing plan help a business meet its goals and objectives? How can a marketing plan help capitalize on consumer insights and trends? How can the latest innovations and communication strategies be used to reach the target audience? In this course, students will be immersed in all aspects of developing a comprehensive 3-year marketing plan that aligns with an organization’s business strategy and helps marketers make better decisions about their products, services, customers, brand, and competition. Students can learn to apply best practices for market segmentation, consumer insights, competitive analysis, brand positioning and strategy, and consumer acquisition and retention strategies, as well as developing tactical ideas for each strategy, and providing financial justification for the plan.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 5100 - Critical Issues in Emergency Management


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the theories and concepts underpinning contemporary emergency management and how to understand the phenomena of natural and human-caused disasters. Students examine the historical context of emergency management, the general process of risk assessment, the emergency management cycle, communications within emergency management and crisis planning, and the general policy and legal framework surrounding the process of emergency management in the United States with a focus on the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Case studies of major catastrophes are used to explore contemporary and practical hazard management. Students can complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute courses IS-100.b - Introduction to Incident Command System and either IS-800.b - National Response Framework: An Introduction or IS700.a - National Incident Management System as part of this course. Nationally recognized certificates are awarded for successful completion of FEMA courses.
  
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    MSEM 5363 - Public Safety Issues♦


    (5 cr.) In consideration of technological innovation, terrorism, and other modern factors, threats to the American public are changing, thus requiring professionals who have the ability to identify, plan for, and mitigate crime and disaster incidents. In this course, students examine foundational public safety concepts and investigate issues faced by public safety agencies and personnel at the local, state, and national levels, including police and sheriff, emergency medical services, fire services, and related organizations. They explore and discuss the ways in which public safety organizations communicate and coordinate, and they learn why effective interaction is vital to emergency management. They also have the opportunity to gain practical experience employing tools used by public safety professionals, such as a public safety constituency matrix through which they assess competing demands on the various agencies. In this course, students work toward gaining the skills necessary to anticipate the needs of various constituents to develop effective public safety initiatives.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 5364 - Managing Public Safety Organizations♦


    (5 cr.) Public safety leaders are responsible for finding solutions to major issues confronting their community and organizational operating systems through research, analysis, planning, and decision making. In this course, students assess these tools and solutions to learn the intricacies of managing public safety organizations. They engage in written assignments and discussions on a variety of topics, such as systems approaches, environmental analyses, contingency planning, implications for change, coordination, and controls. Students explore ways to apply classic business management techniques and leadership principles to public safety operations. They also apply concepts presented in the course to the development of solutions and alternatives to varied situations confronting public safety managers. Additionally, students learn about the concepts of “first planner” and “first responder.”
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 5480 - Applied Research and Evaluation Methods♦


    (5 cr.) Organizational credibility, community trust, and fund-raising are increasingly dependent upon demonstration of program effectiveness and success. Students in this course are introduced to research and evaluation methods in the public and nonprofit sectors to study ways to measure and assess a program’s effectiveness and potential success as well as to address problems or issues in the field. Students examine the strengths, limitations, and threats to validity; models, quantitative metrics, and tools used to evaluate programs and policies; and legal and ethical issues associated with research and evaluation methods. Using these parameters and other concepts presented in the course, students critically evaluate sample research, consider ways to communicate results to an intended audience, and reflect on trends and challenges that could affect future program evaluation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6100 - Critical Issues in Emergency Management


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the theories and concepts underpinning contemporary emergency management and how to understand the phenomena of natural and human-caused disasters. Students examine the historical context of emergency management, the general process of risk assessment, the emergency management cycle, communications within emergency management and crisis planning, and the general policy and legal framework surrounding the process of emergency management in the United States with a focus on the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Case studies of major catastrophes are used to explore contemporary and practical hazard management. Students can complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute courses IS-100.b - Introduction to Incident Command System and either IS-800.b - National Response Framework: An Introduction or IS700.a - National Incident Management System as part of this course. Nationally recognized certificates are awarded for successful completion of FEMA courses.
     
  
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    MSEM 6115 - Foundations of Graduate Study♦


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6116 - Foundations for Graduate Study


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.
  
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    MSEM 6137 - The Nature of Crime and Criminology♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to contemporary views and theories of maladaptive and criminal behavior. They examine a broad conceptualization of criminal behavior from an interdisciplinary perspective as well as theories and application of criminal profiling. Students also explore specific views of criminal behavior germane to groups, such as psychopaths, serial offenders, and sexually violent predators. At the end of this course, students will have an understanding of the theories and practices that are the foundations of the field of criminology.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6200 - Risk Assessment, Preparedness, and Disaster Mitigation


    (5 cr.) Risk assessment and mitigation are key components to effective emergency management and all-hazard planning and response. Students in this course focus on the methods and techniques required to assess an organization or government’s risk associated with the protection of human life and capital assets. They study ways to evaluate the social vulnerabilities to disaster and the special needs of at-risk populations, and they explore methods to reduce vulnerabilities and build capacity through structural and nonstructural mitigation. Additionally, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS-393.a: Introduction to Hazard Mitigation as part of this course.
  
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    MSEM 6215 - Controversies in Criminal Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Justice is at the heart of the U.S. democratic system, yet opposing viewpoints surrounding and within the system often muddle interpretations of the law and the development of policies to promote and enforce justice. In this course, students examine events that have significantly changed how the legal system interprets the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Code, and the U.S. Patriot Act, for example, the terrorist acts of September 11, 2001. They learn how social and historical changes have shifted perspectives and sparked debates on expanding the rights of government versus safeguarding personal civil rights and civil liberties. Through discussion with peers, assessment of contemporary articles, and examination of Supreme Course cases, students have the opportunity to reflect on and potentially broaden their own opinions and perspectives on current criminal justice affairs in regard to issues of law enforcement, public perception, policy development, and ethics.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6217 - Technological Solutions and 21st-Century Crime♦


    (5 cr.) In consideration of modern technological innovation and the spread of knowledge through digital means, the relationship between technology and criminal activity is increasing. In this course, students explore this relationship and gain a comprehensive view of cyber crime, including current trends. They learn how law enforcement agencies use technology to track and apprehend criminals. Through real-world scenarios, students examine legal responses to cyber crime and learn different approaches and techniques for solving cyber crimes and handling related challenges. Students also have the opportunity to gain a comprehensive understanding of building cases and prosecuting crimes through practical exercises in identification, data mining, and the protection and gathering of evidence.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6300 - Disaster Response and Recovery


    (5 cr.) A major concern of disaster response professionals is meeting basic and humanitarian needs of disaster-affected populations. In this course, students explore a range of issues, including evacuation, relocation, and tactical and strategic decisions in the immediate aftermath of an emergency episode. Students study important federal policies related to disaster response and recovery, including the National Response Framework (NRF), and they can gain an understanding of how local, state, and federal policies mesh in response and recovery efforts. Through their exploration, they study how recovery begins once the immediate threat of the emergency wanes and the focus shifts to restoring disaster-affected areas. As part of this course, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS208.a: State Disaster Management.
  
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    MSEM 6320 - Public Policy Implications of Terrorism Legislation and Policies♦


    (5 cr.) Critical issues, such as infectious diseases, inadequate healthcare access, and an aging population, require leaders who have a diverse skill set as well as the professional and ethical sensibilities needed to lead efforts that improve quality of life for individuals and communities. In this course, students examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. They explore ethical choices, values, professionalism, opportunities for advocacy, and application of principles of social justice implicit in public health decisions and practice. Students study ways to employ collaborative methods for working with and motivating diverse communities and constituencies, and they consider methods and develop new strategies for evaluating and solving current problems in healthcare.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    MSEM 6363 - Public Safety Issues♦


    (5 cr.) In consideration of technological innovation, terrorism, and other modern factors, threats to the American public are changing, thus requiring professionals who have the ability to identify, plan for, and mitigate crime and disaster incidents. In this course, students examine foundational public safety concepts and investigate issues faced by public safety agencies and personnel at the local, state, and national levels, including police and sheriff, emergency medical services, fire services, and related organizations. They explore and discuss the ways in which public safety organizations communicate and coordinate, and they learn why effective interaction is vital to emergency management. They also have the opportunity to gain practical experience employing tools used by public safety professionals, such as a public safety constituency matrix through which they assess competing demands on the various agencies. In this course, students work toward gaining the skills necessary to anticipate the needs of various constituents to develop effective public safety initiatives.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    MSEM 6364 - Managing Public Safety Organizations♦


    (5 cr.) Public safety leaders are responsible for finding solutions to major issues confronting their community and organizational operating systems through research, analysis, planning, and decision making. In this course, students assess these tools and solutions to learn the intricacies of managing public safety organizations. They engage in written assignments and discussions on a variety of topics, such as systems approaches, environmental analyses, contingency planning, implications for change, coordination, and controls. Students explore ways to apply classic business management techniques and leadership principles to public safety operations. They also apply concepts presented in the course to the development of solutions and alternatives to varied situations confronting public safety managers. Additionally, the course introduces students to concepts of “first-planner” and “first-responder.”
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6390 - Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course engage in a collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration. Students apply a systems perspective to construct a public enterprise “mental” model of a public organization to understand the strategic context for practical action and the stakeholder relations involved. Students demonstrate their knowledge of the interrelated flows of money, knowledge, and influence as they weave these elements in their model. They engage in readings and practical assignments that emphasize management and leadership in a time of unprecedented and unpredictable change. Students also work toward developing professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6391 - Transformative Change in a Shared-Power World♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course engage in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6392 - The Language of Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) In today’s complex environment, leaders engaged in shaping public policy must know how to use the emotional as well as the intellectual power of language to motivate, inspire, and competently manage their organizations. In this course, students examine techniques, such as effective communication, used in dynamic leadership that affect conscious and unconscious influences on human behavior. Through discussions, group assignments, and individual projects, students apply theoretical and practical course content to demonstrate the necessary components for making effective human connections. Students also study why stories, symbols, and metaphors are essential elements in the language of leadership.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6420 - Organizational Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Public and nonprofit leaders in all areas of public administration require a thorough understanding of the expectations of their roles as leaders and managers of diverse and complex organizations. Students use theoretical and applied perspectives from which they study the intricacies of these roles, including the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development. Students gain a practical understanding of these topics through the application of principles and concepts to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.
  
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    MSEM 6480 - Applied Research and Evaluation Methods♦


    (5 cr.) Organizational credibility, community trust, and fund-raising are increasingly dependent upon demonstration of program effectiveness and success. Students in this course are introduced to research and evaluation methods in the public and nonprofit sectors to study ways to measure and assess a program’s effectiveness and potential success as well as to address problems or issues in the field. Students examine the strengths, limitations, and threats to validity; models, quantitative metrics, and tools used to evaluate programs and policies; and legal and ethical issues associated with research and evaluation methods. Using these parameters and other concepts presented in the course, students critically evaluate sample research, consider ways to communicate results to an intended audience, and reflect on trends and challenges that could affect future program evaluation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6540 - Management and Leadership in a Global Context


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in various types of organizations. In this course, learners engage in a collaborative study of strategic planning, management, and leadership in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. Students in this course identify, analyze, and evaluate the intricate relationships among strategic planning, management, and leadership from an international perspective. They connect three key institutional elements: thinking-acting-and-leading strategically. Students apply a management systems approach as they develop, adopt, manage, and lead a strategic plan for an international public or nonprofit organization or with an international focus. They have the opportunity to understand the strategic context for practical decision making for international public and nonprofit organizations, emphasizing the central role of the environment in the strategic planning process. Students are offered a hands-on approach in this course that tests their ability to make effective and timely management and leadership decisions in complex and uncertain conditions.
  
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    MSEM 6541 - Sustainable Development for Global Communities


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change; assess community needs and resources; create community visions; promote stakeholder interest and participation; analyze community problems; and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models, and they apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning.
  
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    MSEM 6542 - Transformative Change in a Global Environment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
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    MSEM 6740 - Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma♦


    (5 cr.) There is no shortage of natural and human-made disasters, such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities. Individuals and communities affected by such disasters often need assistance from professionals who understand the social, cultural, and psychological complexities of crisis and trauma. Students in this course investigate how these incidents impact the psychology of individuals and groups. They assess traditional and current literature and complete practical exercises to study theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with trauma. Considering the various ways crisis professionals can promote positive social change, students devote special attention to the importance and development of culturally appropriate, service-delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disasters.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6771 - Terrorism: A Systematic Approach for Emergency Preparedness♦


    (5 cr.) Terrorism continues to be a constant threat to the American public, facilitating the need for accurate information, organized resources, and established approaches to respond to emergencies and keep the public informed. Students in this course examine terrorism and related public policy on a local, national, and international level. They also assess the need and function of systemic approaches for emergency preparedness. Students explore and discuss topical issues, such as terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyber terrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Using analytic skills and tools, students assess recommendations that policy makers use in decisions to prevent or respond to terrorism. They also gain hands-on experience initiating the development and/or analysis of a terrorism-preparedness infrastructure.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6830 - Current Issues in Homeland Security♦


    (5 cr.) Since its inception, the Department of Homeland Security has had a profound impact on public policy and administration. Students in this course are provided with an in-depth analysis of homeland security, including history, concepts, policies, and strategies of prevention and response. Students examine and discuss a range of topics, including ethical issues, telecommunications, technology, threat assessment, contingency planning, and risk management. Students hone their critical-thinking and analytic skills through the application of fundamental concepts and principles of homeland security to case studies and current issues.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6831 - Critical Incident Leadership and Planning♦


    (5 cr.) Strategic leadership and planning are required to prevent, respond to, and recover from critical incidents that threaten homeland security. Students in this course explore the role and importance of leadership and planning in critical incident management and the application of tools, strategies, and systems to specific critical incidents. Through the evaluation of case studies, students examine the impact of critical incidents on individuals and communities as well as roles of government agencies and nongovernment organizations in managing such incidents. Using concepts and theories presented in the course, students develop a critical incident management plan for their community through which they consider new strategies and perspectives in regard to critical incident leadership and planning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSEM 6832 - Terrorism Legislation and Policy


    (5 cr.) The events of September 11, 2001, resulted in a new and intense focus on the issue of terrorism in the United States and abroad. Through traditional literature and a wealth of contemporary journal articles and media sources, students explore the history of terrorism, the evolution and international context of terrorist groups, and the causes of and motivations for terrorist acts. They learn about the laws, regulations, and legislation related to terrorism. They also analyze possible future trends in terrorism as well as the current role of the media, governmental agencies, and entities in the prevention of and response to terrorism. Students use concepts presented in the course and additional research to develop a proposal to change and improve an existing counterterrorism policy.
  
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    MSEM 6910 - Capstone Seminar


    (5 cr.) In this course, students complete a capstone project through which they apply an action research model that fosters social change in public administration or nonprofit management and leadership. Through this project, students demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and competencies acquired in their master’s degree program. Students also have the opportunity to reflect on how the project and the program have contributed to their personal, scholarly, and professional growth.
  
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    MSPM 6010 - Managing People and Promoting Collaboration


    (3 sem. cr.) Contemporary business environments are increasingly competitive, global, fast paced, and knowledge intensive. In these environments, effective use of human capital is vital to an enterprise’s success and survival. In this course, students will explore practical issues related to developing individuals and managing collaboration and will examine the skills and strategies necessary to address them effectively. Students will examine ethical and legal implications of managing a diverse workforce including issues that arise from cross-cultural differences and virtual work settings. The importance of communication as a tool to manage internal and external relationships is emphasized as it relates to the effectiveness of managing people to achieve organizational goals. Topics include planning and executing staffing strategies, developing individuals, fostering positive work environments, creating and sustaining teams, maintaining influence in the organization, managing a global workforce, managing programs for productivity improvement, and planning and managing the human side of organizational change.
  
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    MSPM 6100 - Foundations for Graduate Study in Project Management


    (1 sem. cr.) Students taking this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence as they relate to project management.
  
  •  

    MSPM 6101 - Foundations for Graduate Study in Project Management


    (1 cr.) Students taking this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence as they relate to project management.
  
  •  

    MSPM 6102 - Practices in Project Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques needed to successfully manage projects throughout the life of a project, known as the project life cycle. By learning about the project management Knowledge Areas and Process Groups as well as the distinguishing characteristics of each, students gain an appreciation for how these two dimensions of project management interact in initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSPM 6111 - Leading Vibrant and Diverse Teams


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective leaders at all levels of organization apply their knowledge of group dynamics to create productive groups. They produce desirable goal-oriented behaviors within their groups, maximize the impact of diversity of people and perspectives on group functioning, and create cultures of trust and justice. Students investigate these aspects of the leadership role and how it creates vibrant, diverse communities, organizations, and groups. Students examine diversity in a myriad of contexts and explore the particular challenges of building effective teams that are fueled by diversity. Through assignments focused on personal assessments, real-world contextual frameworks, and application of theory integrated with personal experience, students sharpen their critical-thinking and writing skills while working toward becoming more effective leaders.
  
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    MSPM 6125 - Project Scheduling


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course are introduced to a comprehensive framework for proactively building, managing, and controlling project schedules from initiation to closeout. They explore the importance of defining deliverables, establishing project and product requirements, defining scope boundaries and building a detailed work breakdown structure as prerequisites to building network diagrams using both critical path and critical chain approaches. Students explore the challenges of project scheduling under uncertainty, address techniques for addressing resource constraints, and develop procedures for proactively managing and controlling the scheduling process throughout the project’s lifecycle.
  
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    MSPM 6130 - Budgeting and Management of Operations♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective project management requires leaders with interdisciplinary knowledge and skills who understand the relationships between operational factors, such as business processes and product design. Students in this course learn about these relationships, in addition to other elements imperative in project management, including  project goal attainment, positive operating cash flow, risk mitigation strategy, and operational alignment. Students also explore the role of budgeting and management of operations in an organizational environment. They engage in practical exercises designed to help them develop budget and operational plans based on an organization’s accounting and financial data, project plans, and goals. Students also examine planning considerations associated with global operations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSPM 6140 - Enterprise and Project Risk Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Project management involves an ongoing, and nearly inevitable, variation of risks to which managers must be attuned and ready to mitigate. In this course, students learn how to plan, analyze, respond to, and control qualitative and quantitative risk in projects. They examine the internal risks associated with managing projects and the external risks associated with customer behavior, the supply chain, transportation and distribution channels, and acts of nature within the framework of the organization’s overall risk strategy. Assessing real-world examples of project risks, students learn about strategies for working with project stakeholders to identify and respond to risk within defined ethical and legal standards.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSPM 6150 - Planning and Administering Project Contracts♦


    (3 sem. cr.) A major responsibility of many project managers is planning and administering project contracts for the purchase or acquisition of project resources from external sources. In this course, students learn about planning for purchases and acquisitions, requests for proposal, vendor selection, contract administration, and contract closure. They consider and discuss the role of the project manager in the procurement process as it relates to project requirements for purchases or acquisitions, managing the relationship between buyer and seller, assessing vendor performance, contract change control, and conflict resolution. Students also have the opportunity to reflect on theory presented in the course as well as how they can apply these concepts to professional practice.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSPM 6160 - Stakeholder Management and Organizational Behavior♦


    (3 sem. cr.) One role of the project manager is to lead teams in complex and diverse organizational settings while concurrently communicating with all stakeholders. In this course, students analyze this dual role and examine how individual and group behavior impacts organizational effectiveness. They discover how using influence, rather than organizational power, leads to more successful project management. Students learn ways to design projects to support organizational goals and how to build and engage organizational capital (intellectual, human, physical, financial, and structural). They also assess communications management as a tool to manage internal and external relationships with stakeholders, partners, vendors, and customers.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSPM 6170 - Sustainability in Project, Portfolio, and Program Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) How do project managers ensure that their organization’s initiatives allow for sustainable business and promote positive change through products for a sustainable environment? Students in this course are provided with an opportunity to answer such questions as well as to develop their understanding of managing projects at the portfolio and program levels. Students learn about the nature of sustainability in project management in terms of how project management processes align with the three fundamentals of sustainable development: social equity, economic efficiency, and environmental performance. Students work toward gaining a real-world understanding of concepts through the examination of current research illustrating sustainability in project management and by assessing actual products developed through projects.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MSPM 6180 - Business Process Management and Systems


    (3 sem. cr.) Modern organizations are constantly seeking ways to improve business processes and systems for greater efficiency and effectiveness. to ensure stakeholder’s needs are met and business prospers. In this course, students learn how to harness the tools needed to help businesses gain competitive advantage through business processes and systems. Students examine strategies for managing the flow of business information within and across organizational boundaries. They become familiar with the concept of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems and learn how these systems can lead to novel ways of efficiently managing project execution and business innovation. Students also assess and discuss technologies for business process integration, automation, and optimization, and they examine and practice using practical tools of enterprise.
  
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    MSPM 6900 - Capstone: Social Impact in Project Management


    (3 sem. cr.) This course is designed to allow students to bring together knowledge gained through the program and to demonstrate mastery of the various course competencies. Students synthesize concepts and skills in an integrative project that combines multiple aspects of their program, illustrating  how ethics, internal culture, and external forces shape project managers’ behaviors when executing projects within an organization. Students articulate how project managers within an organization can drive social change and sustainability through the example they set in their everyday work.
  
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    NASC 1001 - Environmental Science♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students learn about environmental processes and the influence of human activities upon them. Students explore ecological concepts, population growth, natural resources, and current environmental problems from scientific, social, political, and economic perspectives. Students also become familiar with the scientific method. Applying course concepts, students engage in a range of practical assignments, such as an assessment of their ecological footprint, a comparison of developed nations vs. less-developed nations, an evaluation of water pollution sources, and an assessment of an area’s air-quality compliance. Through this course, students gain a foundational understanding of environmental interrelationships and contemporary environmental issues.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    NMPG 6541 - Sustainable Development for Global Communities


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change; assess community needs and resources; create community visions; promote stakeholder interest and participation; analyze community problems; and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models, and they apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning.
  
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    NMPG 6542 - Transformative Change in a Global Environment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
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    NPMG 5200 - Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector


    (5 cr.) Nonprofit organizations serve as the foundation for many social change efforts. Students in this course explore the history, foundations, and types of nonprofit organizations, as well as the diverse political, social, and economic contexts within which they exist. Students examine and apply marketing, public relations, and communication concepts and strategies to case studies and contemporary situations. Ethical, legal, and global lenses are applied to the study of the nonprofit sector. Students develop a concept paper guiding the development of a nonprofit organization.
  
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    NPMG 5405 - Ethics and Social Justice


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. Students in this course explore ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends, and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.
  
  •  

    NPMG 5420 - Organizational Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Public and nonprofit leaders in all areas of public administration require a thorough understanding of the expectations of their roles as leaders and managers of diverse and complex organizations. Students use theoretical and applied perspectives from which they study the intricacies of these roles, including the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development. Students gain a practical understanding of these topics through the application of principles and concepts to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.
  
  •  

    NPMG 5431 - Finance and Budgeting for the Nonprofit Sector


    (5 cr.) Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. Students in this course examine finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. They assess theories for motivating major fiscal-policy debates, and they explore and discuss auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems, the use of dashboards for financial reporting, and the impact of globalization on finance and budget. Students read and analyze budgets, financial statements, and reports. They contextualize their learning as they apply knowledge gained from their analysis to develop a new budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.
  
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    NPMG 5435 - Human Resource Management: Building a Capable Workforce


    (5 cr.) The acquisition, development, and retention of talent are critical elements in the success of any organization. In this course, students examine theories, approaches, and systems related to hiring, managing, training, and retaining employees in government and nonprofit organizations. Through the use of case studies, students explore topics that include legal and ethical considerations, diversity, performance management, the establishment and implementation of policy, technology, and conflict management. Students apply principles and concepts learned in this course to real-world situations encountered in public, private, and nonprofit organizations.
  
  •  

    NPMG 5451 - Board Governance and Volunteer Management


    (5 cr.) The success of nonprofit organizations (NPOs) is largely dependent on the effective management of program volunteers and board members—individuals who often serve as the lifeblood of NPOs. Students in this course explore the volunteer management process, including volunteer recruitment, orientation, training, supervision, and evaluation. They focus on methods that organizations use to create and maintain an effective Board of Directors to ensure that the board governs and guides the organization toward their mission. Students design a board development or volunteer management plan based on processes presented in the course and fundamental concepts acquired earlier in the program.
  
  •  

    NPMG 5461 - Resource Development


    (5 cr.) Students explore the concepts of philanthropy and development; types of funding sources; and ethical, legal, and diversity considerations. They also analyze and apply a resource development process—including donor and/or prospect research, cultivation, and education; solicitation; and appreciation—and they create a resource development plan for a nonprofit organization.
  
  •  

    NPMG 5480 - Applied Research and Evaluation Methods


    (5 cr.) Organizational credibility, community trust, and fundraising are increasingly dependent upon demonstration of program effectiveness and success. Students in this course are introduced to research and evaluation methods in the public and nonprofit sectors to learn ways to measure and assess a program’s effectiveness and potential success as well as to address problems or issues in the field. Students examine the strengths, limitations, and threats to validity; models, quantitative metrics, and tools used to evaluate programs and policies; and legal and ethical issues associated with research and evaluation methods. Using these parameters and other concepts presented in the course, students critically evaluate sample research, consider ways to communicate results to an intended audience, and reflect on trends and challenges that could affect future program evaluation.
  
  •  

    NPMG 5645 - Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination


    (5 cr.) In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public, private, and nonprofit organizations need to be strategic in planning and creating effective, collaborative programs and services. Students in this course explore the role and process of strategic planning with an emphasis on collaboration, cooperation, and coordination within and among organizations. Students apply these concepts to real-life situations and organizations.
  
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    NPMG 6115 - Foundations of Graduate Study


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study, a Professional Development Plan, and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence and integrity.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6116 - Foundations for Graduate Study


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study, a Professional Development Plan, and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence and integrity.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6200 - Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector♦


    (5 cr.) Nonprofit (NPO) and non-government (NGO) organizations can serve to affect people and communities through positive social change. NPO and NGO leaders require a fundamental understanding of the nonprofit sector, including related ethical, legal, financial, and global perspectives. Through the lens of the NPO and NGO leadership, students in this course explore social entrepreneurship, marketing, communication, and governance. Gaining practical insight, students also apply theories presented in the course either to build a business plan for a new NPO/NGO or to evaluate an existing one. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NPMG 6333 - Holding Up the Mirror: Understanding Different Cultures and Increasing Global Consciousness


    (5 cr.) Students have an opportunity to explore and understand the cultural values and styles of communication, reasoning, and leadership unique to their home culture. Students apply their increased understanding to other cultures. They also identify and become familiar with the challenges American nonprofit organizations face as they work internationally or cross-culturally within the United States.
  
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    NPMG 6334 - Crossing Borders: U.S. and International NGO Cultures and Environments


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine in depth the cultures, structures, and activities of NGOs in select countries and compare their activities, organizational cultures, structures, and working environments with nonprofit organizations in the United States.
  
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    NPMG 6335 - Placing NGOs in the Global Context


    (5 cr.) Through this course students are offered knowledge and understanding about the geopolitical and economic contexts in which international, nongovernmental, and voluntary agencies function in other countries. Students analyze the historical, political, social, and cultural contexts in which nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) work and the implications these contexts have on the work of local and international NGOs. Students identify strategies that make the international and cross-cultural efforts of NGOs successful.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6405 - Ethics and Social Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. In this course, students examine the philosophy of ethics as well as responsibility and social justice—basic tenets of public service. Students explore the complex social, political, and related ethical challenges leaders face as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. They examine ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students also assess demographic data and current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community. Applying concepts presented in the course, students engage in an in-depth assessment of an emerging or persistent ethical or social justice issue, through which they demonstrate their ability to make recommendations for improvement or change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6420 - Organizational Management and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Public and nonprofit leaders in all areas of public administration require a thorough understanding of the expectations of their roles as leaders and managers of diverse and complex organizations. Students use theoretical and applied perspectives from which they study the intricacies of these roles, including the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development. Students gain a practical understanding of these topics through the application of principles and concepts to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6431 - Finance and Budgeting for the Nonprofit Sector♦


    (5 cr.) Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in the nonprofit sector. In this course, students examine finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. Students learn about the theories underlying fiscal policy, and they read and analyze budgets, financial statements, and financial reports. They also explore and discuss related topics, such as auditing practices; financial relationships with government, donors, and other sources of revenue; financial management; budgetary reform; and financial technology systems. Students apply theories and concepts presented in the course to the development of budget and financial projects relevant to nonprofit organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6435 - Human Resource Management: Building a Capable Workforce♦


    (5 cr.) The acquisition, development, and retention of talent are critical elements in the success of any organization. In this course, students examine theories, approaches, and systems related to hiring, managing, training, and retaining employees in government and nonprofit organizations. Through the use of case studies, students explore topics that include legal and ethical considerations, diversity, performance management, the establishment and implementation of policy, technology, and conflict management. Students apply principles and concepts learned in this course to real-world situations encountered in public, private, and nonprofit organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6451 - Board Governance and Volunteer Management♦


    (5 cr.) The success of nonprofit organizations (NPOs) is largely dependent on the effective management of program volunteers and board members—individuals who often serve as the lifeblood of NPOs. Students in this course explore the volunteer management process, including volunteer recruitment, orientation, training, supervision, and evaluation. They focus on methods that organizations use to create and maintain an effective Board of Directors to ensure that the board governs and guides the organization toward their mission. Students design a board development or volunteer management plan based on processes presented in the course and fundamental concepts acquired earlier in the program.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6461 - Resource Development♦


    (5 cr.) All nonprofit organizations require financial resources. Obtaining philanthropic financial support is essential to program delivery and stability. Students in this course explore the concepts of philanthropy and development, identification of funding sources, donor/prospect cultivation and education, and solicitation and appreciation strategies. They focus on processes and strategies for creating an organizational philanthropic culture based on ethics and donor relationships. Using these strategies and other concepts presented in the course, students create a resource development plan for a nonprofit organization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6465 - Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination♦


    (5 cr.) In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public and nonprofit organizations plan strategies to fulfill the organizational mission and enhance stakeholder satisfaction. Students in this course explore the role and process of strategic planning, including collaboration, cooperation, and coordination. They also examine the benefits, challenges, and pitfalls of strategic planning, in addition to the impact of globalization. Students apply these concepts to real-life scenarios and develop a strategic plan for a nonprofit or public organization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6480 - Applied Research and Evaluation Methods♦


    (5 cr.) Organizational credibility, community trust, and fund-raising are increasingly dependent upon demonstration of program effectiveness and success. Students in this course are introduced to research and evaluation methods in the public and nonprofit sectors. They examine the strengths, limitations, and threats to validity; models, quantitative metrics, and tools used to evaluate programs and policies; and legal and ethical issues associated with research and evaluation methods. Students are asked to critically evaluate sample research, using these parameters.  
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6540 - Management and Leadership in a Global Context


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in various types of organizations. In this course, learners engage in a collaborative study of strategic planning, management, and leadership in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. Students in this course identify, analyze, and evaluate the intricate relationships among strategic planning, management, and leadership from an international perspective. This course connects three key institutional elements: thinking, acting, and leading strategically. Students apply a management systems approach as they develop, adopt, manage, and lead a strategic plan for an international public or nonprofit organization or with an international focus. Students will understand the strategic context for practical decision making for international public and nonprofit organizations, emphasizing the central role of the environment in the strategic planning process. Students are offered a hands-on approach in this course that tests their ability to make effective and timely management and leadership decisions in complex and uncertain conditions.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6540 - Strategic Planning, Management, and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in various types of organizations. In this course, learners engage in a collaborative study of strategic planning, management, and leadership in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. Students in this course identify, analyze, and evaluate the intricate relationships among strategic planning, management, and leadership from an international perspective.Three key institutional elements, thinking, acting, and leading strategically, are connected in this course. Students apply a management systems approach as they develop, adopt, manage, and lead a strategic plan for an international public or nonprofit organization or an organization with an international focus. Students will understand the strategic context for practical decision making for international public and nonprofit organizations, emphasizing the central role of the environment in the strategic planning process. Students are offered a hands-on approach in this course that tests their ability to make effective and timely management and leadership decisions in complex and uncertain conditions.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6541 - Sustainable Development for Global Communities


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change; assess community needs and resources; create community visions; promote stakeholder interest and participation; analyze community problems; and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models, and they apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6542 - Transformative Change in a Global Environment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex networked organizations that operate in today’s global environment. Students in the course explore the nature of the global environment and its challenges to the leaders that operate within it. They discuss the various kinds of organizations that operate across borders and the challenges these organizations face in accomplishing their goals. They discuss the global environment as a networked system in which organizations operate. Students evaluate the challenges of such complex systems to global leaders and the strategies that can be used to adapt to these challenges while promoting transformative change. They focus on the analysis of these challenges in a single organization through the development of a leadership case study.
  
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    NPMG 6820 - Elements of Sustainable and Livable Communities


    (5 cr.) Creating and maintaining sustainable and livable communities require leaders who understand the connections between the natural, built, and social environments, and those who can address these connections in a holistic and integrated fashion. Students in this course examine concepts of sustainability and livability and explore popular approaches to creating and maintaining communities that are more environmentally sound, economically prosperous, and socially equitable. They also focus on strategies to halt urban sprawl and to promote alternative modes of transportation. Students define and explore these concepts through case studies and examples drawn from local communities.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6821 - Tools for Sustainable Community Development


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change; assess community needs and resources; create community visions; promote stakeholder interest and participation; analyze community problems; and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models and apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning.
  
  •  

    NPMG 6822 - Current Issues in Regional and Local Public Policy


    (5 cr.) Public decision-makers must understand and address a variety of complex and interrelated issues, such as land use and transportation, energy and environment, housing and schools, and regional economic development. In this course, students learn how leaders attend to these issues in light of existing policies and contemporary social, economic, political, demographic, and technological trends. Students explore and discuss planning processes, tools, approaches, strategies, and policies used to create sustainable and livable communities through collaborative processes involving multiple stakeholders. Through the development of a policy-option written assignment, students assess critical issues and identify problem-solving strategies.
  
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    NPMG 6880 - Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation: A Global Perspective


    (5 cr.) This course is designed for individuals who have a passion for improving conditions for people and the environment, whether locally, regionally, nationally, or internationally. Social entrepreneurship and innovation are vehicles for moving beyond social change to widespread social transformation at the root cause and systemic levels of the biggest and most intransigent problems of the world. Students learn to become social innovators as they build citizen and community engagement and develop partnerships and multi-sector coalitions among social justice organizations, nonprofits, businesses, and public agencies. This course is intended to help students identify ways in which this concept, processes, and skills can be integrated into their work to increase their contribution to creating a just, sustainable, and peaceful world.

    Students will learn the process, find practical applications, and design a plan to (a) solve or find practical solutions to social and environmental problems; (b) innovate by finding a new product, service, or approach to a social problem; (c) create social value; and (d) transform or revolutionize dysfunctional systems or industries. Additionally, they will learn to use innovative, sustainable, scalable, and measurable approaches, apply social entrepreneurship and innovation skills, and anchor competencies.

  
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    NPMG 6881 - Grant Writing


    (5 cr.) Grant writing is a highly marketable skill that requires many nonprofit, educational, and community organizations to secure external funding in order to provide needed services to the community. In this course, students will explore the basic skills needed for grant writing including identifying potential funding sources, creating objectives and a needs statement, preparing and justifying a budget, identifying appropriate assessment plans, and writing an executive summary. Course assignments will allow students to directly apply what they are reading and discussing by writing a full grant proposal based on an actual Request for Proposal (RFP).
  
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    NPMG 6883 - Transformative Change in a Global Environment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex networked organizations that operate in today’s global environment. Students in the course will explore the nature of the global environment and its challenges to the leaders that operate within it. They will discuss the various kinds of organizations that operate across borders and the challenges these organizations face in accomplishing their goals. Students will discuss the global environment as a networked system in which organizations operate. They will evaluate the challenges of such complex systems to global leaders and the strategies that can be used to adapt to these challenges while promoting transformative change. Students will focus on the analysis of these challenges in a single organization through the development of a leadership case study.
  
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    NPMG 6910 - MS in Nonprofit Management and Leadership Capstone


    (5 cr.) In this course, students complete a capstone project using action research that fosters social change in public administration or nonprofit management and leadership. In the project they demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and competencies acquired in their master’s degree program. The project employs an action research model. Students reflect on how the project and the program have contributed to their personal, scholarly, and professional growth.
  
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    NRNP 6566 - Management of the Acutely Ill Adult-Gerontology Patient


    (3 cr.) This course is the first of three clinical courses in the Adult-Gerontology Acute Care curriculum. Students explore and integrate concepts of pathophysiology, pharmacology, assessment, and collaborative management of adolescents, adults, and older adults who are acutely/critically ill or experiencing an exacerbation of a chronic health problem. The clinical focus is on the role of the acute care nurse practitioner working with an interdisciplinary team across settings to facilitate the patient’s return to optimal health. Topics include cardiac, pulmonary, and renal issues, as well as cardiac, septic, distributive, neurogenic, and hypovolemic shock.
  
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    NSEI 3381 - Object-Oriented Programming for ISM♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students learn the fundamental concepts and practices of programming in an object-oriented language through substantial hands-on practice. Topics include fundamental models of hardware and software; representation of information and procedures; basic processes of software design and construction; object class design, selection, and use; use of documentation, software libraries, and system frameworks; and use of software development tool chains.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6030 - Principles of Programming♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The discipline of software development demands a variety of skills. Students in this course assess the fundamental practices and principles of designing and constructing object-oriented programs. They engage in substantial hands-on practice, reinforcing algorithmic thinking, logical design, precise coding, and careful attention to quality.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6110 - Software Architecture♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The architecture of a software system describes its principal components and their relationships. The overviews of this course are the architectural styles, domain-specific architectures, product-line architectures, and the role of architecture in the design and implementation of information systems. Issues related to building robust, scalable, and reliable software intensive systems in an effective way are discussed. The students learn to make optimal architectural choices and employ the most relevant methods, best practices, and technologies information systems, regardless of complexity and scale.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6112 - System and Service Architecture♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The focus of this course is on the “back end” of information system and service design: mapping the desired functions onto systems structures that possess desirable properties. Topics include system architecture processes and idioms; mapping architectures onto implementations; and designing for reliability, security, modularity, and scalability.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6113 - Information Technology in the Organization


    (3 sem. cr.) Through a review of modern computer systems and the social and economic issues related to their use, students in this course are introduced to the conceptual foundations for designing, developing, and deploying large-scale management information systems. They investigate the role of information technology in an organization—particularly the collection, storage, and distribution of information for operations, planning, and decision making.
  
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    NSEI 6115 - Computer Networking and Operating Systems♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Within this course, students can learn the concepts of computer operating systems, including the main functions, similarities, and differences. Students can explore a variety of topics, including configuration, file systems, security, administration, interfacing, multitasking, and performance analysis. In addition, they can further their understanding of computers through the study of computer networks by learning key networking concepts, components, and the design of information and communication infrastructure solutions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6140 - Data Modeling and Database Design♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Data are the lifeblood of nearly every business enterprise. Through careful planning and management, the organization can ensure that its critical data remain consistent, correct, secure, and available. Students learn in this theoretical and practical introduction to relational database systems about accepted practices for data modeling, database design, and implementation in a range of application contexts.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    NSEI 6145 - Enterprise Database Design


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students discuss the design, implementation, and operation of databases using a principal relational database management system (DBMS). Many fundamental topics are covered in this course including: data modeling using entity-relationship diagrams; data storage, manipulation, and queries using structured query language (SQL); functional dependencies, normalization concepts, data warehouse architectures, data warehouse modeling, and data analytics.
  
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    NSEI 6301 - Information System and Service Analysis and Design♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The focus of this course is on the “front end” of information system and service design: understanding user and customer behaviors and requirements and designing the functions and interfaces to support them. Topics include requirements analysis, contextual design and user modeling, iterative design, and human-computer interaction.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
 

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