2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Jun 14, 2021  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    MMHA 6451 - Public Policy Analysis


    (5 cr.) Contemporary public administrators work in a dynamic, partisan environment with unprecedented access to public policy data—conditions leading to extraordinary opportunities and, often times, severe constraints. Students in this course thoroughly examine key stakeholders involved in the public policy process and devote special attention to their function, impact, and constraint on policy development. In addition, students explore professional ethics related to the role of the policy analyst and consider the significant social outcomes of public policy. They examine the theories and strategies used by policy makers and policy analysts to develop, implement, execute, evaluate, and promulgate public policy. They also assess the impact and consequences of public policy and evaluate it through a social justice framework. Using critical-thinking and communication skills, students craft a policy memorandum regarding a current public policy problem, for which they consider and evaluate competing policy alternatives.
  
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    MMHA 6452 - Board Governance and Volunteer Management


    (5 cr.) The success of nonprofit organizations (NPOs) is largely dependent on the effective management of program volunteers and board members—individuals who often serve as the lifeblood of NPOs. Students in this course explore the volunteer management process, including volunteer recruitment, orientation, training, supervision, and evaluation. They focus on methods that organizations use to create and maintain an effective Board of Directors to ensure that the board governs and guides the organization toward their mission. Students design a board development or volunteer management plan based on processes presented in the course and fundamental concepts acquired earlier in the program.
  
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    MMHA 6475 - Program Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation


    (5 cr.) Students in this course promote competency in strategic planning; program planning; and design, implementation, and evaluation. They receive an overview of public health program planning and development, as well as needs and assets assessment. Students focus on the methods required to develop a strategic plan, linking it to implementing programs and evaluating their efficacy. Students discuss the administration and coordination of public health program interventions and activities, and they explore the variety of methods used to facilitate public health research (quantitative, qualitative, and/or mixed-methods) in practice settings.
  
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    MMHA 6500 - Human Resource Management and Organizational Development and Leadership for Healthcare Administrators♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine organizational behavior as well as the roles and responsibilities of management and leadership within healthcare organizations through the macro (organization-wide) and micro (individual and team performance) perspectives. Students also focus on understanding organizational values, mission, and vision; management and leadership principles to help manage change; and effective delivery of services in an increasingly global environment. They also learn and apply theories of organizational design, governance, and alternative organizational structures, and they consider the theory and practice of managing individuals and groups through motivation, communication, teamwork, leadership, organizational change, coalition building, negotiation, and conflict management and resolution. Through group assignments and personal assessments, students work toward developing self-awareness and effective management styles and strategies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMHA 6510 - Essentials of the U.S. Healthcare Delivery System and Population Health


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will analyze health and the healthcare systems from a population health perspective. Emphasis includes the role of health education and health administration, workforce, public health foundations, and technological developments in improving health from local, national, and global perspectives. Various approaches used historically to improve population health and health equity in the United States will be explored. Current and emerging U.S. health transformation efforts, including steps to reduce cost and improve prevention strategies, and quality of care will be considered. Students will also consider the provider, payment, and public health perspectives in improving health outcomes and explore various perspectives and trends such as international settings and lessons currently being taken from these settings and developments in the use of technology. Investigation and analysis of the coordination among various stakeholders who play a role in prevention, health, and healthcare systems will be addressed.
  
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    MMHA 6520 - Health Informatics and Population Health Analytics


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore health informatics strategies to enhance and promote population health initiatives, new forms of data to be used to measure healthcare delivery, and improve patient outcomes. In this introductory course, participants explore the value propositions for population health clinical integration and the role of analytics, big data, and predictive medicine in supporting a data-driven population health-driven healthcare system.
  
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    MMHA 6530 - Disease Prevention and Care Management


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore evidence-based population health programs and how they assist in addressing and promoting best practices in disease and preventive care management. In this course, students will learn how population health interventions teach individuals and populations how to manage chronic diseases and take responsibility for understanding how to best care for themselves. Students will also explore health administrator and health educator leadership strategies and interventions to manage and prevent chronic disease.
  
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    MMHA 6540 - Population Health Management Applications


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will apply the skills needed to manage population health programs and initiatives to enhance the health of a defined population. Students focus on health behaviors, public and business influences, health policy, economic forces, and other related healthcare system issues in health promotion and disease prevention.
  
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    MMHA 6550 - Practicum


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in the practicum have the opportunity to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the MHA program and to further develop key professional competencies. Students engage in a field experience in a select public health setting, which they align to their academic and professional goals. Supervision by an on-site preceptor is a critical component of the practicum. The on-site supervisor and the course instructor monitor and evaluate students’ performance throughout the entire practicum experience. Students are required to complete 120 hours of practicum work. They must also participate in an accompanying online course and begin to develop an ePortfolio based on assigned professional development activities.
  
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    MMHA 6560 - Capstone


    (3 sem. cr.) This capstone course is the continuation of the practicum. The capstone experience is an opportunity for students to demonstrate their mastery of principles, concepts, and content presented throughout the program and through their practicum field experience. In this course, students complete their ePortfolio based on their field experience, and they develop a substantive written paper or project. Students also engage in group discussions during which they consider career development plans, reflect on the promotion of social change, and exchange feedback on final portfolio work and lessons learned.
  
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    MMHA 6600 - Healthcare Informatics and Technology Management♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course have the opportunity to learn how sustainable health information technologies and applications inform organizational strategies and transformation in the healthcare environment. They can also learn how these complex systems help organizational decision makers to improve patient care outcomes and organizational behaviors. Topics include evolving technologies such as data analytics, eHealth, and social media; using technology applications to manage population health; and personalized medicine. Students are challenged by scenario-based discussions that analyze best information technology practices across multiple industries.  
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMHA 6699 - Strategic Planning in Healthcare Administration


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students gain an understanding of the importance and process of formulating, implementing, and evaluating a strategic plan. They examine the role of strategic planning in achieving organizational performance as well as the notion of planning as a cyclical process within the healthcare organization. Students also explore key concepts in strategic planning, including identifying the relationship of the plan to the organization’s mission, values, and vision; assessing the competition; identifying external influences and resources; forecasting trends in organizational performance; setting goals; selecting strategies; implementing marketing actions; identifying implications of the strategic plan on organizational finances and human resources; and evaluating the plan’s progress. Students apply course concepts, including strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis, as they research and develop components of a strategic plan for a specific healthcare organization.
  
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    MMHA 6700 - Healthcare Operations Management♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the factors that affect performance outcomes within healthcare organizations; methods to monitor, adjust, and improve performance; and techniques and tools of quantitative analysis of operations and decision support that assist in management of capacity issues, reengineering, staffing, scheduling, productivity, and supply chain. Other important concepts that students examine include understanding operational assessment; understanding patient care and related support-care processes through creating flowcharts of steps in the process; taking a systems perspective on the organization and delivery of services; identifying problems and improvement opportunities using analytical techniques; and monitoring performance data to identify trends and variation based on current operations and those resulting from changes and improvements.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMHA 6800 - Marketing Management and Business Communication for Healthcare Administrators♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course apply principles, theories, and relevant contemporary concepts of healthcare marketing. They evaluate the effectiveness of healthcare marketing tools, such as advertisement campaigns and social media, develop data collection tools for marketing research, and create a marketing plan for a healthcare organization. The interrelationship of a healthcare organization’s strategic plan, business plan, marketing plan, and healthcare consumerism is analyzed. Students will apply best practices of business communications as they practice effective oral and written business communication skills.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMHA 6880 - Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation: A Global Perspective


    (5 cr.) Social entrepreneurs are gaining international attention motivated by the desire for change and to see the world as it can be, not as it is. Students in the course will learn how social entrepreneurs have developed creative solutions to address social problems. The intention of the course is to develop knowledge, appreciate of the role of social entrepreneurs who create social change, deepen students’ understanding of the world around them, and to inspire them to use their skills and knowledge to be, as Gandhi said, “the change you wish to see in the world.”

    Students in this course will gain knowledge about social entrepreneurs and how they are creating solutions to address societal problems, learn how to develop creative solutions to address social problems, and empower students to see social entrepreneurship as a force for social change. The course is designed for those who want to gain valuable tools to prepare them to make an impact on the lives of others. This course will be housed in the School of Public Policy and Administration for future upgrades and course maintenance.

  
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    MMHA 6881 - Grant Writing


    (5 cr.) Grant writing is a highly marketable skill that requires many nonprofit, educational, and community organizations to secure external funding in order to provide needed services to the community. In this course, students will explore the basic skills needed for grant writing including identifying potential funding sources, creating objectives and a needs statement, preparing and justifying a budget, identifying appropriate assessment plans, and writing an executive summary. Course assignments will allow students to directly apply what they are reading and discussing by writing a full grant proposal based on an actual Request for Proposal (RFP).
  
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    MMHA 6882 - Improving Healthcare Performance Through Social Entrepreneurship


    (5 cr.) Social entrepreneurship is a dynamic approach to problem solving that individuals, entrepreneurs, or scholar-practitioners can use to address societal needs and problems related to healthcare. In this course, students select a healthcare issue and develop an entrepreneurial project to address it. Students will define beneficiaries and stakeholders and develop tactics to identify and address opponents, allies, and the ambivalent. Students will test, evaluate, and identify both opportunities and potential weaknesses of their proposed entrepreneurial solutions. By the end of the course, students will have experienced the process of developing concept statements supported by research, articulating business propositions, defining the market and competition, and addressing the sociopolitical landscape. Finally, students will evaluate the feasibility of their proposed entrepreneurial healthcare solutions. 
  
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    MMHA 6900 - Healthcare Quality Management♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the basis for quality and patient safety and are provided an overview of healthcare quality, methods of assessing quality, and techniques for improving quality. They can learn key terminology and concepts, including defining quality care; measuring quality in terms of the structure-process-outcomes model; distinguishing between clinical and customer service quality; identifying techniques to avoid adverse clinical events; and exploring customer service quality in terms of defining, measuring, and improving patient satisfaction. Students also explore and discuss the roles of governmental agencies in promoting and reporting quality information regarding hospitals and other health organizations, accrediting bodies, and recent performance initiatives of government and private payers. They apply course concepts to current issues of improving clinical and service quality in healthcare organizations, with special consideration of the 5 Million Lives Campaign—a national effort initiated by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement designed to improve medical care in the United States.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMHA 6999 - Strategic Planning in Healthcare Administration♦


    (5 cr.) Throughout this course, students review and apply the phases of strategic planning, integrating the principles and practices presented throughout the Master of Healthcare Administration program. They examine the role of strategic planning in achieving organizational performance excellence, as well as the notion of planning as a cyclical process within the healthcare organization. Students submit a comprehensive strategic plan and recommend courses of action that help healthcare organizations address their strategic and tactical needs and the needs of their communities.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 5200 - Introduction to Public Administration


    (5 cr.) Public administrators work to increase the efficacy of government and organizations on a local and international level. In this course, students explore the diverse political, social, and economic contexts within which public administrators carry out responsibilities. They also examine the history, foundations, and theories of public administration as well as public policy and organizational environments. Students engage in coursework focused on ethical and legal issues, governance, fiscal planning, and current topics and trends in public administration. Gaining real-world insight into the field, they examine the overall history, purpose, and operation of a public organization of their choice. They also assess and describe the operation and health of their organization through the application of public administration theory.
  
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    MMPA 5405 - Ethics and Social Justice


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. In this course, students explore ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends, and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.
  
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    MMPA 5420 - Organizational Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Public and nonprofit leaders require a deep understanding of their roles as leaders and managers of diverse and complex organizations. Students in this course examine the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development from theoretical and applied perspectives. Students apply principles to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.
  
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    MMPA 5431 - Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector


    (5 cr.) Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. Students in this course examine finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. They assess theories for motivating major fiscal-policy debates, and they explore and discuss auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems, the use of dashboards for financial reporting, and the impact of globalization on finance and budget. Students read and analyze budgets, financial statements, and reports. They contextualize their learning as they apply knowledge gained from their analysis to develop a new budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.
  
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    MMPA 5435 - Human Resource Management: Building a Capable Workforce


    (5 cr.) The acquisition, development, and retention of talent are critical elements in the success of any organization. In this course, students examine theories, approaches, and systems related to hiring, managing, training, and retaining employees in government and nonprofit organizations. Through the use of case studies, students explore topics that include legal and ethical considerations, diversity, performance management, the establishment and implementation of policy, technology, and conflict management. Students apply principles and concepts learned in this course to real-world situations encountered in public, private, and nonprofit organizations.
  
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    MMPA 5451 - Public Policy Analysis


    (5 cr.) Contemporary public administrators work in a dynamic, partisan environment with unprecedented access to public policy data—conditions leading to extraordinary opportunities and, often times, severe constraints. Students in this course thoroughly examine key stakeholders involved in the public policy process and devote special attention to their function, impact, and constraint on policy development. In addition, students explore professional ethics related to the role of the policy analyst and consider the significant social outcomes of public policy. They examine the theories and strategies used by policy makers and policy analysts to develop, implement, execute, evaluate, and promulgate public policy. They also assess the impact and consequences of public policy and evaluate it though a social justice framework. Using critical-thinking and communication skills, students craft a policy memorandum regarding a current public policy problem, for which they consider and evaluate competing policy alternatives.
  
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    MMPA 5480 - Applied Research and Evaluation Methods


    (5 cr.) Organizational credibility, community trust, and fundraising are increasingly dependent upon demonstration of program effectiveness and success. Students in this course are introduced to research and evaluation methods in the public and nonprofit sectors to learn ways to measure and assess a program’s effectiveness and potential success as well as to address problems or issues in the field. Students examine the strengths, limitations, and threats to validity; models, quantitative metrics, and tools used to evaluate programs and policies; and legal and ethical issues associated with research and evaluation methods. Using these parameters and other concepts presented in the course, students critically evaluate sample research, consider ways to communicate results to an intended audience, and reflect on trends and challenges that could affect future program evaluation.
  
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    MMPA 6101 - Critical Issues in Emergency Management♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the theories and concepts underpinning contemporary emergency management and how to understand the phenomena of natural and human-caused disasters. Students examine the historical context of emergency management, the general process of risk assessment, the emergency management cycle, communications within emergency management and crisis planning, and the general policy and legal framework surrounding the process of emergency management in the United States with a focus on the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Case studies of major catastrophes are used to explore contemporary and practical hazard management. Students can complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute courses IS-100.b - Introduction to Incident Command System and either IS-800.b - National Response Framework: An Introduction or IS700.a - National Incident Management System as part of this course. Nationally recognized certificates are awarded for successful completion of FEMA courses.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6115 - Foundations for Graduate Study


    (3 cr.) To promote strategies for academic success, course instructors explain the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum and the rules of academic integrity. They help students explore the resources available at the Walden University Library, the Writing Center, and other Walden services. By gaining practice in scholarly writing and critical thinking through course discussions and assignments, students have the opportunity to relate Walden’s mission and vision to their professional goals and build a foundation for future success as scholar-practitioners.

     

  
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    MMPA 6116 - Foundations for Graduate Study


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study, a Professional Development Plan, and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence and integrity.
  
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    MMPA 6137 - The Nature of Crime and Criminology♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to contemporary views and theories of maladaptive and criminal behavior. They examine a broad conceptualization of criminal behavior from an interdisciplinary perspective as well as theories and application of criminal profiling. Students also explore specific views of criminal behavior germane to groups, such as psychopaths, serial offenders, and sexually violent predators. At the end of this course, students will have an understanding of the theories and practices that are the foundations of the field of criminology.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6200 - Principles of Public Administration♦


    (5 cr.) Public administrators work to increase the efficacy of government and organizations on a local and international level. In this course, students explore the diverse political, social, and economic contexts within which public administrators carry out responsibilities. They also examine the history, foundations, and theories of public administration as well as public policy and organizational environments. Students engage in coursework focused on ethical and legal issues, governance, fiscal planning, and current topics and trends in public administration. Gaining real-world insight into the field, they examine the overall history, purpose, and operation of a public organization of their choice. They also assess and describe the operation and health of their organization through the application of public administration theory.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6201 - Risk Assessment, Preparedness, and Disaster Mitigation♦


    (5 cr.) Risk assessment and mitigation are key components to effective emergency management and all-hazard planning and response. Students in this course focus on the methods and techniques required to assess an organization or government’s risk associated with the protection of human life and capital assets. They study ways to evaluate the social vulnerabilities to disaster and the special needs of at-risk populations, and they explore methods to reduce vulnerabilities and build capacity through structural and nonstructural mitigation. Additionally, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS-393.a: Introduction to Hazard Mitigation as part of this course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6215 - Controversies in Criminal Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Justice is at the heart of the U.S. democratic system, yet opposing viewpoints surrounding and within the system often muddle interpretations of the law and the development of policies to promote and enforce justice. In this course, students examine events that have significantly changed how the legal system interprets the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Code, and the U.S. Patriot Act, for example, the terrorist acts of September 11, 2001. They learn how social and historical changes have shifted perspectives and sparked debates on expanding the rights of government versus safeguarding personal civil rights and civil liberties. Through discussion with peers, assessment of contemporary articles, and examination of Supreme Course cases, students have the opportunity to reflect on and potentially broaden their own opinions and perspectives on current criminal justice affairs in regard to issues of law enforcement, public perception, policy development, and ethics.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6217 - Technological Solutions and 21st-Century Crime♦


    (5 cr.) In consideration of modern technological innovation and the spread of knowledge through digital means, the relationship between technology and criminal activity is increasing. In this course, students explore this relationship and gain a comprehensive view of cyber crime, including current trends. They learn how law enforcement agencies use technology to track and apprehend criminals. Through real-world scenarios, students examine legal responses to cyber crime and learn different approaches and techniques for solving cyber crimes and handling related challenges. Students also have the opportunity to gain a comprehensive understanding of building cases and prosecuting crimes through practical exercises in identification, data mining, and the protection and gathering of evidence.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6301 - Disaster Response and Recovery♦


    (5 cr.) A major concern of disaster response professionals is meeting basic and humanitarian needs of disaster-affected populations. In this course, students explore a range of issues, including evacuation, relocation, and tactical and strategic decisions in the immediate aftermath of an emergency episode. Students study important federal policies related to disaster response and recovery, including the National Response Framework (NRF), and they can gain an understanding of how local, state, and federal policies mesh in response and recovery efforts. Through their exploration, they study how recovery begins once the immediate threat of the emergency wanes and the focus shifts to restoring disaster-affected areas. As part of this course, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS208.a: State Disaster Management.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6320 - Public Policy Implications of Terrorism Legislation and Policies


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to develop a broad perspective on the history of the U.S. Patriot Act, terroristic legislation and immigration laws, and their policy implications on law enforcement, governmental entities, organizations, and individuals. Students gain a foundation to build the skills that public administrators and public policy analysts use to draft and implement public policy and enforce and/or respond to potential terroristic threats while simultaneously upholding and protecting constitutional freedoms. Students examine topics through a wide variety of resources, including contemporary texts, websites, case studies, and material representing international, national, and local governments and organizations. They critically review and analyze the U.S. Patriot Act and similar terroristic 297 legislation and policies, and they participate in discussions about these laws and their implications on U.S. constitutional freedoms.
  
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    MMPA 6321 - Terrorism: A Systemic Approach for Emergency Preparedness


    (4 cr.) Terrorism continues to be a constant threat to the American public, facilitating the need for accurate information, organized resources, and established approaches to respond to emergencies and keep the public informed. Students in this course examine terrorism and related public policy on a local, national, and international level. They also assess the need and function of systemic approaches for emergency preparedness. Students explore and discuss topical issues, such as terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyber terrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Using analytic skills and tools, students assess recommendations that policy makers use in decisions to prevent or respond to terrorism. They also gain hands-on experience initiating the development and/or analysis of a terrorism-preparedness infrastructure.
  
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    MMPA 6333 - Holding Up the Mirror: Understanding Different Cultures and Increasing Global Consciousness♦


    (5 cr.) This course offers students an opportunity to explore and understand the cultural values and styles of communication, reasoning, and leadership unique to their home culture. Students apply their increased understanding to other cultures. They also identify and become familiar with the challenges American nonprofits face as they work internationally or cross-culturally within the United States. (Prerequisite(s): A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly advised.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6333 - Holding Up the Mirror: Understanding Different Cultures and Increasing Global Consciousness♦


    (5 cr.) Students have an opportunity to explore and understand the cultural values and styles of communication, reasoning, and leadership unique to their home culture. Students apply their increased understanding to other cultures. They also identify and become familiar with the challenges American nonprofit organizations face as they work internationally or cross-culturally within the United States.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6334 - Crossing Borders: U.S. and International NGO Cultures and Environments♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students study in depth the cultures, structures, and activities of NGOs in select countries and compare their activities, organizational cultures, structures, and working environments with nonprofits in the United States. (Prerequisite(s): A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly advised.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6335 - Placing NGOs in the Global Context♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course acquire knowledge and understanding about the geopolitical and economic contexts in which international, nongovernmental (NGO), and voluntary agencies function in other countries. Students analyze the historical, political, social, and cultural contexts in which NGOs work and the implications these contexts have on the work of local and international NGOs. Students identify strategies that make the international and cross-cultural efforts of NGOs successful. (Prerequisite(s): A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly encouraged.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6346 - Terrorism: A Systemic Approach for Emergency Preparedness♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive an overview of terrorism—local, national, and international—and the need to develop a systemic approach for emergency preparedness. Topics include, but are not limited to, terrorism overview, terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyber terrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Course participants begin the development and/or analysis of a terrorism preparedness infrastructure and participate in online discussions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6347 - Critical Incident Planning and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the principles of emergency planning, selection of leaders, specialized planning (e.g., schools, tourism), mutual aid, and leadership theories. They receive a basic foundation for public administrators to develop a critical incident plan and also understand leadership theories. Course participants critically analyze case studies, identifying weaknesses and potential solutions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6380 - Policy and Politics in American Political Institutions


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the crafts of policymaking and policy analysis in the U.S. democratic system. Students examine the tasks involved in the policy process, including setting agendas, using policy analysis tools, managing the political process, implementing policy, and providing evaluations and feedback. Through this analysis, students work toward developing skills to conduct policy and economic analyses as well as to determine the political feasibility of proposed policies. They learn about regulation as a policy choice. They also work toward enhancing their ability to develop alternatives and to assess strategies proposed to achieve certain policy objectives. Students engage in scholarly writing assignments and discussions on policy areas of interest, such as communications, immigration, transportation, housing, labor, arts, and environmental policies. 
  
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    MMPA 6381 - Public Policy and Evaluation


    (5 cr.) There are a variety of tools available to policymakers and policy analysts to evaluate the impact of social programs. In this course, students examine these tools and work toward gaining the skills needed to develop plans for evaluation and to assess social programs effectively. Students engage in discussions and assignments designed to provide practical application of content on a variety of topics, such as selecting programs to evaluate, crafting program descriptions, identifying stakeholders and their interests, developing logic models, framing evaluation questions, applying utilization-focused evaluation techniques, using quantitative and qualitative tools to complete formative and summative evaluations, and providing evaluation reports and feedback to decision makers. Using concepts presented in the course, students gain hands-on experience developing an evaluation design for a social program.
  
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    MMPA 6382 - Public Policy and Finance♦


    (5 cr.) Public policymakers often rely on microeconomic and macroeconomic models to formulate new policies and re-evaluate existing polices. In this course, students examine the use of such models in the public policy setting and assess how public finance influences policy choices as well as implementation alternatives. Through weekly, analytical writing assignments and peer discussions, students explore tax policies and tax incentive models; budgeting, public/private models; market influences on policy; the impact of government expenditures on income redistribution; and economic considerations of welfare; food stamps, workers’ compensation, Social Security, and outsourcing of public programs. Synthesizing course content and applying critical-thinking skills, students assess a local government jurisdiction, examine the decisions of policy makers, and recommend improvements based on economic models.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6390 - Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Students in this course engage in a collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration. Students apply a systems perspective to construct a public enterprise “mental” model of a public organization to understand the strategic context for practical action and the stakeholder relations involved. Students demonstrate their knowledge of the interrelated flows of money, knowledge, and influence, as they weave these elements in their model. They engage in readings and practical assignments that emphasize management and leadership in a time of unprecedented and unpredictable change. Students also work toward developing professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
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    MMPA 6391 - Transformative Change in a Shared-Power World


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
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    MMPA 6392 - The Language of Leadership


    (5 cr.) In today’s complex environment, leaders engaged in shaping public policy and programs must know how to use the emotional and intellectual power of language to motivate, inspire, and competently manage their organizations. In this course, students examine dynamic leadership techniques, such as effective communication, that effect conscious and unconscious influences on human behavior. Through discussions, group assignments, and individual projects, students apply theoretical and practical course content to demonstrate the necessary components for making effective human connections. Students also learn why stories, symbols, and metaphors are essential elements in the language of leadership. 
  
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    MMPA 6400 - Public Health Leadership and Systems Thinking♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore leadership models and theories, the core principles of public health leadership, and the application of systems thinking to public health. They examine how to create strategies and solutions that efficiently utilize public health and healthcare resources. Students also discuss descriptive and prescriptive systems, focusing on the application of these processes to current public health issues and challenges at the organizational and community levels.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6405 - Ethics and Social Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. In this course, students examine the philosophy of ethics as well as responsibility and social justice—basic tenets of public service. Students explore the complex social, political, and related ethical challenges leaders face as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. They examine ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students also assess demographic data and current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community. Applying concepts presented in the course, students engage in an in-depth assessment of an emerging or persistent ethical or social justice issue, through which they demonstrate their ability to make recommendations for improvement or change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6420 - Organizational Management and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Public and nonprofit leaders in all areas of public administration require a thorough understanding of the expectations of their roles as leaders and managers of diverse and complex organizations. Students use theoretical and applied perspectives from which they study the intricacies of these roles, including the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development. Students gain a practical understanding of these topics through the application of principles and concepts to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6421 - Health Economics♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the application of economic principles to healthcare managerial decision making regarding the amount, structure, and distribution of healthcare resources and services. Because of the complexity and uncertainty of the healthcare system as well as the scope of resources consumed by health and health-related organizations, managers must appreciate the economic implications of decisions regarding allocation of resources. Students advance their knowledge of economic principles as reflected in the population demand for health; the demand for healthcare and medical care; the supply of health organizations and practitioners; the role of insurance, moral hazard, and adverse selection; the practice of cost-shifting; the structure, competitive nature, and dynamics of markets; differing objectives of for-profit and nonprofit organizations; variation in consumer access to and utilization of services; roles of uncertainty and information asymmetry; strategies for consumer cost-sharing; and the challenges healthcare organizations face in the pricing, production, allocation, and distribution of health and medical services. Special attention is devoted to understanding how health services differ in a variety of competitive markets.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6431 - Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector♦


    (5 cr.) Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. In this course, the term “public” is synonymous with government. Nonprofit organizations are included because they rely on special tax-exempt status conferred by the government and often receive government funding. Students in this course examine finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. They assess theories for motivating major fiscal-policy debates, and they explore and discuss auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems, the use of dashboards for financial reporting, and the impact of globalization on finance and budget. Students read and analyze budgets, financial statements, and reports. They contextualize their learning as they apply knowledge gained from their analysis to develop a new budget and financial plan for either a public or nonprofit organization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6435 - Human Resource Management: Building a Capable Workforce♦


    (5 cr.) The acquisition, development, and retention of talent are critical elements in the success of any organization. In this course, students examine theories, approaches, and systems related to hiring, managing, training, and retaining employees in government and nonprofit organizations. Through the use of case studies, students explore topics that include legal and ethical considerations, diversity, performance management, the establishment and implementation of policy, technology, and conflict management. Students apply principles and concepts learned in this course to real-world situations encountered in public, private, and nonprofit organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6451 - Public Policy Analysis♦


    (5 cr.) Contemporary public administrators work in a dynamic, partisan environment with unprecedented access to public policy data—conditions leading to extraordinary opportunities and, often times, severe constraints. Students in this course thoroughly examine key stakeholders involved in the public policy process and devote special attention to their function, impact, and constraint on policy development. In addition, students explore professional ethics related to the role of the policy analyst and consider the significant social outcomes of public policy. They examine the theories and strategies used by policymakers and policy analysts to develop, implement, execute, evaluate, and promulgate public policy. They also assess the impact and consequences of public policy and evaluate it through a social justice framework. Using critical-thinking and communication skills, students craft a policy memorandum regarding a current public policy problem, for which they consider and evaluate competing policy alternatives.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6465 - Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination♦


    (5 cr.) In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public and nonprofit organizations plan strategies to fulfill the organizational mission and enhance stakeholder satisfaction. Students in this course explore the role and process of strategic planning, including collaboration, cooperation, and coordination. They also examine the benefits, challenges, and pitfalls of strategic planning, in addition to the impact of globalization. Students apply these concepts to real-life scenarios and develop a strategic plan for a nonprofit or public organization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6480 - Applied Research and Evaluation Methods♦


    (5 cr.) Organizational credibility, community trust, and fundraising are increasingly dependent upon demonstration of program effectiveness and success. Students in this course are introduced to research and evaluation methods in the public and nonprofit sectors to learn ways to measure and assess a program’s effectiveness and potential success as well as to address problems or issues in the field. Students examine the strengths, limitations, and threats to validity; models, quantitative metrics, and tools used to evaluate programs and policies; and legal and ethical issues associated with research and evaluation methods. Using these parameters and other concepts presented in the course, students critically evaluate sample research, consider ways to communicate results to an intended audience, and reflect on trends and challenges that could affect future program evaluation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6540 - Management and Leadership in a Global Context


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in various types of organizations. In this course, learners engage in a collaborative study of strategic planning, management, and leadership in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. Students in this course identify, analyze, and evaluate the intricate relationships among strategic planning, management, and leadership from an international perspective. Students connect three key institutional elements: “thinking-acting-and-leading” strategically. Students apply a management systems approach as they develop, adopt, manage, and lead a strategic plan for an international public or nonprofit organization or with an international focus. Students will understand the strategic context for practical decision making for international public and nonprofit organizations, emphasizing the central role of the environment in the strategic planning process. Students are offered a hands-on approach in this course that tests their ability to make effective and timely management and leadership decisions in complex and uncertain conditions.
  
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    MMPA 6541 - Sustainable Development for Global Communities


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change; assess community needs and resources; create community visions; promote stakeholder interest and participation; analyze community problems; and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models, and they apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning.
  
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    MMPA 6542 - Transformative Change in a Global Environment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
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    MMPA 6740 - Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma♦


    (5 cr.) There is no shortage of natural and human-made disasters, such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities. Individuals and communities impacted by such disasters often need assistance from professionals who understand the social, cultural, and psychological complexities of crisis and trauma. Students in this course investigate how these incidents impact the psychology of individuals and groups. They assess traditional and current literature and complete practical exercises to learn about theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with trauma. Considering the various ways crisis professionals can promote positive social change, students devote special attention to the importance and development of culturally appropriate, service-delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disasters.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6741 - Psychology of Terrorism♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore terrorism from a psychological perspective. Topics include types of terrorism; contributing factors related to the development of terrorists and terrorist organizations; counterterrorism agencies, laws, and regulations; the impact of terrorist events on individuals, families, and communities; prevention, intervention, and postvention with survivors; media coverage of terrorist events; human rights and ethical issues; and future trends related to the psychology of terrorism. Students examine the threat of terrorism in their own community; evaluate the potential impact; and apply prevention, intervention, and postvention strategies to promote resiliency among individual and families within the community. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6810 - Fundamentals of Law and Public Policy


    (5 cr.) Legal decisions and the law often have a major impact on the creation of public policy. In this course, students explore and discuss the relationship between laws and public policy and the impact that court decisions have on policy and policy leaders. They examine the role of administrative agencies in the creation and execution of law and public policy and the role of the courts in resolving challenges to agency rule making; conflicts between executive and legislative branches of government; and conflicts between and among federal, state, and local laws. Students have the opportunity to sharpen their critical-thinking and research-database skills as they search for real-world examples of how fundamental legal concepts and processes affect the creation and execution of law and public policy.
  
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    MMPA 6811 - Legal Research for Policy Practitioners


    (5 cr.) There is a wealth of vital legal knowledge available to public policy practitioners. In this course, students explore the many print and electronic resources available for legal research. Students examine how practitioners use the law to inform the creation of public policy. They engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of content to learn how to navigate legal libraries, cite cases, and employ research to support public policy. Students also gain experience in applying legal research to case studies and contemporary issues.
  
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    MMPA 6812 - Contemporary Cases and Issues in the Courts


    (5 cr.) Major issues in the Supreme Court continue to have an impact on public policy at the state and local levels. In this course, students examine major past and current U.S. Supreme Court cases related to abortion, privacy, due process, personal property, and freedom of religion and speech. They also examine major cases related to state powers, government entitlement, and powers of the judicial and federal branches of government. From this assessment, students determine how outcomes of such cases affect public policy. Students also explore and discuss individual rights, property rights, administrative law, immigration law, and foreign policy as well as contemporary issues and case studies, to which they apply legal research and verdicts.
  
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    MMPA 6820 - Elements of Sustainable and Livable Communities


    (5 cr.) Creating and maintaining sustainable and livable communities require leaders who understand the connections among the natural, built, and social environments, and who can address these connections in a holistic and integrated fashion. Students in this course examine concepts of sustainability and livability and explore popular approaches to creating and maintaining communities that are more environmentally sound, economically prosperous, and socially equitable. They also focus on strategies to halt urban sprawl and to promote alternative modes of transportation. Students define and explore these concepts through case studies and examples drawn from local communities.
  
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    MMPA 6821 - Tools for Sustainable Community Development


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change; assess community needs and resources; create community visions; promote stakeholder interest and participation; analyze community problems; and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models, and they apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning.

  
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    MMPA 6822 - Current Issues in Regional and Local Public Policy


    (5 cr.) Public decision makers must understand and address a variety of complex and interrelated issues, such as land use and transportation, energy and environment, housing and schools, and regional economic development. In this course, students learn how leaders attend to these issues in light of existing policies and contemporary social, economic, political, demographic, and technological trends. Students explore and discuss planning processes, tools, approaches, strategies, and policies used to create sustainable and livable communities through collaborative processes involving multiple stakeholders. Through the development of a policy-option written assignment, students assess critical issues and identify problem-solving strategies.
  
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    MMPA 6830 - Current Issues in Homeland Security


    (5 cr.) Since its inception, the Department of Homeland Security has profoundly impacted public policy and administration. Students are provided with an in-depth analysis of homeland security, including history, concepts, policies, and strategies of prevention and response. Students examine and discuss current, relevant topics, including ethical issues, telecommunications, technology, threat assessment, contingency planning, and risk management. Students hone their critical-thinking and analytic skills through the application of fundamental concepts and principles of homeland security to case studies and current issues.
  
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    MMPA 6831 - Critical Incident Leadership and Planning


    (5 cr.) Strategic leadership and planning are required to effectively prevent, respond to, and recover from critical incidents that threaten homeland security. Students in this course explore the role and importance of leadership and planning in critical incident management and the application of tools, strategies, and systems to specific critical incidents. Through the evaluation of case students, students examine the impact of critical incidents on individuals and communities as well as roles of government agencies and nongovernment organizations in managing such incidents. Using concepts and theories presented in the course, students develop a critical incident management plan for their community through which they consider new strategies and perspectives in regard to critical incident leadership and planning.
  
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    MMPA 6832 - Terrorism: Legislation and Policy


    (5 cr.) The events of September 11, 2001, resulted in a new and intense focus on the issue of terrorism in the United States and abroad. Through traditional literature and a wealth of contemporary journal articles and media sources, students explore the history of terrorism, the evolution and international context of terrorist groups, and the causes of and motivations for terrorist acts. They learn about the laws, regulations, and legislation related to terrorism. They also analyze possible future trends in terrorism as well as the current role of the media, governmental agencies, and entities in the prevention of and response to terrorism. Students use concepts presented in the course and additional research to develop a proposal to change and improve an existing counterterrorism policy.
  
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    MMPA 6840 - Health Policy and Management


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the factors that influence and improve health outcomes of individuals and populations, with attention to the goals of Healthy People 2010 and the main components and issues of organization, financing, and delivery of health services and public health systems in the United States. Topics include management theories and processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. The policy process is addressed, as well as the advocacy role of the public health professional in influencing local, state, and federal policy. The impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems is also considered.


     

  
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    MMPA 6842 - Leadership, Professionalism, and Ethics in Public Health Practice♦


    (5 cr.) Critical issues, such as infectious diseases, inadequate healthcare access, and an aging population, require leaders who have a diverse skill set as well as the professional and ethical sensibilities needed to lead efforts that improve quality of life for individuals and communities. In this course, students examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. They explore ethical choices, values, professionalism, opportunities for advocacy, and the application of principles of social justice implicit in public health decisions and practice. Students learn how to employ collaborative methods for working with and motivating diverse communities and constituencies, and they consider methods and develop new strategies for evaluating and solving current problems in healthcare.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPA 6850 - Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector


    (5 cr.) Nonprofit (NPO) and non-government (NGO) organizations can serve to affect people and communities through positive social change. NPO and NGO leaders require a fundamental understanding of the nonprofit sector, including related ethical, legal, financial, and global perspectives. Through the lens of the NPO and NGO leadership, students in this course explore social entrepreneurship, marketing, communication, and governance. Gaining practical insight, students also apply theories presented in the course either to build a business plan for a new NPO/NGO or to evaluate an existing one. 
  
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    MMPA 6851 - Board Governance and Volunteer Management


    (5 cr.) The success of nonprofit organizations (NPOs) is largely dependent on the effective management of program volunteers and board members—individuals who often serve as the lifeblood of NPOs. Students in this course explore the volunteer management process, including volunteer recruitment, orientation, training, supervision, and evaluation. They focus on methods that organizations use to create and maintain an effective Board of Directors to ensure that the board governs and guides the organization toward their mission. Students design a board development or volunteer management plan based on processes presented in the course and fundamental concepts acquired earlier in the program.
  
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    MMPA 6852 - Resource Development


    (5 cr.) All nonprofit organizations require financial resources. Obtaining philanthropic financial support is essential to program delivery and stability. Students in this course explore the concepts of philanthropy and development, identification of funding sources, donor/prospect cultivation and education, and solicitation and appreciation strategies. They focus on processes and strategies for creating an organizational philanthropic culture based on ethics and donor relationships. Using these strategies and other concepts presented in the course, students create a resource development plan for a nonprofit organization.
  
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    MMPA 6880 - Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation: A Global Perspective


    (5 cr.) Social entrepreneurs are gaining international attention motivated by the desire for change and to see the world as it can be, not as it is. Students in the course will learn how social entrepreneurs have developed creative solutions to address social problems. The intention of the course is to develop knowledge, appreciate of the role of social entrepreneurs who create social change, deepen students’ understanding of the world around them, and to inspire them to use their skills and knowledge to be, as Gandhi said, “the change you wish to see in the world.”

    Students in this course will gain knowledge about social entrepreneurs and how they are creating solutions to address societal problems, learn how to develop creative solutions to address social problems, and empower students to see social entrepreneurship as a force for social change. The course is designed for those who want to gain valuable tools to prepare them to make an impact on the lives of others. This course will be housed in the School of Public Policy and Administration for future upgrades and course maintenance.

  
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    MMPA 6881 - Grant Writing


    (5 cr.) Grant writing is a highly marketable skill that requires many nonprofit, educational, and community organizations to secure external funding in order to provide needed services to the community. In this course, students will explore the basic skills needed for grant writing including identifying potential funding sources, creating objectives and a needs statement, preparing and justifying a budget, identifying appropriate assessment plans, and writing an executive summary. Course assignments will allow students to directly apply what they are reading and discussing by writing a full grant proposal based on an actual Request for Proposal (RFP).
  
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    MMPA 6882 - Improving Healthcare Performance Through Social Entrepreneurship


    (5 cr.) Social entrepreneurship has become prominent as a dynamic approach to address societal needs and problems. Healthcare organizations and their leaders who embrace social entrepreneurship can accomplish their missions by using social entrepreneurship to overcome some of the barriers that inhibit the widespread promotion of innovation and performance in the healthcare environment. In this course, students will examine the principles, the case and need, and role of social entrepreneurship in healthcare, the common traits to become a social entrepreneur, and the organizational models needed to facilitate and promote social entrepreneurship. Additionally, students will learn how to leverage, implement, and integrate social entrepreneurship models into the “health for all” formula, develop new solutions and innovative strategies to address global, local population, community, and individual healthcare needs, and to improve healthcare performance. 
  
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    MMPA 6910 - Master of Public Administration Capstone


    (5 cr.) In this course, students complete a capstone project using action research that fosters social change in public administration or nonprofit management and leadership. In the project they demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and competencies acquired in their master’s degree program. The project employs an action research model. Students reflect on how the project and the program have contributed to their personal, scholarly, and professional growth.
  
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    MMPP 5111 - Leadership and Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Successful public sector organizations require high-caliber leaders who are accountable to multiple constituencies. A rapidly accelerating rate of change and blurring of organizational boundaries contribute to the need for leaders who are equipped to meet the challenge. Students explore the theoretical underpinnings of leadership and the important role of the leader in organizational change. By exploring leadership theory, current research, and practice within an area of public administration or nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations, students will demonstrate their understanding leadership in organizations that are increasingly complex in nature. Ethical dimensions, boundary spanning functions, and how leaders influence positive social change are key factors of this course. Historical and current events, as well as the personal experiences of students are used to examine the demands of leadership.
  
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    MMPP 5280 - Policy and Politics in American Political Institutions


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are introduced to the crafts of policymaking and policy analysis in the American democratic system. It covers the policy process—setting agendas, using policy analysis tools, managing the political process, implementing policy, and providing evaluations and feedback. Students develop skills in policy and economic analyses as well as in determining the political feasibility of proposed policies. Regulation as a policy choice will be discussed. Students completing this course will enhance their abilities to develop alternatives and to assess strategies proposed to achieve certain policy objectives. Policy areas of interest to students form the foundation of this course and may include communications, immigration, social, transportation, housing, labor, arts, and environmental policies.
  
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    MMPP 5281 - Program Evaluation


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are introduced to the tools used by policymakers and policy analysts to evaluate the impact of social programs. Topics include selecting programs to evaluate, crafting program descriptions, identifying stakeholders and their interests, developing logic models, framing evaluation questions, applying utilization-focused evaluation techniques, using quantitative and qualitative tools to complete formative and summative evaluations, and providing evaluation reports and feedback to decision-makers. By the end of the course, each student will develop a program-evaluation design for a social program.
  
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    MMPP 5282 - Public Policy and Finance


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover microeconomic and macroeconomic models used in policy formulation and how public finance influences policy choices as well as implementation alternatives. Students examine tax policies and tax incentive models, budgeting, public/private models, market influences on policy, the impact of government expenditures on income redistribution, and economic considerations of welfare, food stamps, workers’ compensation, and Social Security. Outsourcing of public programs is also examined.
  
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    MMPP 5379 - Advanced Methods in Public Policy Analysis and Evaluation


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive an in-depth examination of the methods and processes policy analysts use to assist policymakers in identifying problems, formulating and evaluating alternative solutions, and implementing preferred policies. The course includes cost benefit analysis; econometric analysis; policy modeling; the role of economic and political factors in public decision-making and policy formulation; marshaling resources and advocacy; and various applications to specific public policy topics. The course focuses on various quantitative and qualitative techniques used by policy analysts.
  
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    MMPP 5405 - Ethics and Social Justice


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. Students in this course explore ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends, and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.

     

  
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    MMPP 6100 - Critical Issues in Emergency Management


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the theories and concepts underpinning contemporary emergency management and how to understand the phenomena of natural and human-caused disasters. Students examine the historical context of emergency management, the general process of risk assessment, the emergency management cycle, communications within emergency management and crisis planning, and the general policy and legal framework surrounding the process of emergency management in the United States with a focus on the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Case studies of major catastrophes are used to explore contemporary and practical hazard management. Students can complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute courses IS-100.b - Introduction to Incident Command System and either IS-800.b - National Response Framework: An Introduction or IS700.a - National Incident Management System as part of this course. Nationally recognized certificates are awarded for successful completion of FEMA courses.
  
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    MMPP 6111 - Leadership and Organizational Change♦


    (5 cr.) Successful public sector organizations require high-caliber leaders who are accountable to multiple constituencies. A rapidly accelerating rate of change and blurring of organizational boundaries contribute to the need for leaders who are equipped to meet the challenge. Students taking this course explore the theoretical underpinnings of leadership and the important role of the leader in organizational change. By exploring leadership theory, current research, and practice within an area of public administration or nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations, students demonstrate their understanding of leadership in organizations that are increasingly complex in nature. Ethical dimensions, boundary-spanning functions, and how leaders influence positive social change are key factors of this course. Students draw on historical and current events, as well as their personal experiences, to examine the demands of leadership.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6112 - Governance and Public Policy♦


    (5 cr.) Democratic principles are the foundation of modern life. In this course, students are provided an overview of democratic governance in public administration, public policy, or nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations in modern society. Students will examine the theoretical underpinnings of democratic governance and public policy in their chosen area of specialization necessary for doctoral-level research. Students will review fundamental theories of governance, research current literature on a specialized topic, and apply best practices within the area of specialization. The emphasis is on the context in which public and nonprofit leaders function and the social institutions that influence public policy and guide administrative decision making.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6115 - Foundations for Graduate Study♦


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. They build a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Topics include the relation of mission and vision to professional goals, development of the program of study, strategies for online success, introduction to the online library, and an introduction to critical thinking, professional writing, and academic integrity. Course assignments focus on the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6116 - Writing a Quality Prospectus


    (5 cr.) This five-credit course is focused specifically on the process of writing the doctoral study prospectus. Students will use their preliminary research plan, developed previously, and develop a problem statement, to be used in the doctoral study. They further refine the problem statement and carry out the planning and the library research that will bring them to the formulation of a doctoral study prospectus. The prospectus is a brief paper, typically 15–20 pages in length, that lays out the background for the problem statement, the problem statement itself, a survey of the relevant literature (typically 25–75 references), and a research, implementation, and evaluation plan for the solution of the problem. Note:  This course is for students who wish to matriculate into the PhD in Public Policy and Administration-PPPA 8115. 
  
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    MMPP 6117 - Foundations for Graduate Study


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. They are provided a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Topics include the relation of mission and vision to professional goals, development of the program of study, strategies for online success, introduction to the online library, and an introduction to critical thinking, professional writing, and academic integrity. Course assignments focus on the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence.
  
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    MMPP 6137 - The Nature of Crime and Criminology♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to contemporary views and theories of maladaptive and criminal behavior. They examine a broad conceptualization of criminal behavior from an interdisciplinary perspective as well as theories and application of criminal profiling. Students also explore specific views of criminal behavior germane to groups, such as psychopaths, serial offenders, and sexually violent predators. At the end of this course, students will have an understanding of the theories and practices that are the foundations of the field of criminology.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6200 - Risk Assessment, Preparedness, and Disaster Mitigation♦


    (5 cr.) Risk assessment and mitigation are key components to effective emergency management and all-hazard planning and response. Students in this course focus on the methods and techniques required to assess an organization or government’s risk associated with the protection of human life and capital assets. They study ways to evaluate the social vulnerabilities to disaster and the special needs of at-risk populations, and they explore methods to reduce vulnerabilities and build capacity through structural and nonstructural mitigation. Additionally, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS-393.a: Introduction to Hazard Mitigation as part of this course.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6215 - Controversies in Criminal Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Justice is at the heart of the U.S. democratic system, yet opposing viewpoints surrounding and within the system often muddle interpretations of the law and the development of policies to promote and enforce justice. In this course, students examine events that have significantly changed how the legal system interprets the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Code, and the U.S. Patriot Act, for example, the terrorist acts of September 11, 2001. They learn how social and historical changes have shifted perspectives and sparked debates on expanding the rights of government versus safeguarding personal civil rights and civil liberties. Through discussion with peers, assessment of contemporary articles, and examination of Supreme Course cases, students have the opportunity to reflect on and potentially broaden their own opinions and perspectives on current criminal justice affairs in regard to issues of law enforcement, public perception, policy development, and ethics.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6217 - Technological Solutions and 21st-Century Crime♦


    (5 cr.) In consideration of modern technological innovation and the spread of knowledge through digital means, the relationship between technology and criminal activity is increasing. In this course, students explore this relationship and gain a comprehensive view of cyber crime, including current trends. They learn how law enforcement agencies use technology to track and apprehend criminals. Through real-world scenarios, students examine legal responses to cyber crime and learn different approaches and techniques for solving cyber crimes and handling related challenges. Students also have the opportunity to gain a comprehensive understanding of building cases and prosecuting crimes through practical exercises in identification, data mining, and the protection and gathering of evidence.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6280 - Policy and Politics in American Political Institutions♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about the crafts of policymaking and policy analysis in the U.S. democratic system. They cover the policy process: setting agendas, using policy analysis tools, managing the political process, implementing policy, and providing evaluations and feedback. Students develop skills in policy and economic analyses as well as in determining the political feasibility of proposed policies. Regulation as a policy choice will be discussed. Students completing this course will enhance their abilities to develop alternatives and to assess strategies proposed to achieve certain policy objectives. Policy areas of interest to students form the foundation of this course and may include communications, immigration, social, transportation, housing, labor, arts, and environmental policies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6281 - Program Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the tools used by policymakers and policy analysts to evaluate the impact of social programs. Topics include selecting programs to evaluate, crafting program descriptions, identifying stakeholders and their interests, developing logic models, framing evaluation questions, applying utilization-focused evaluation techniques, using quantitative and qualitative tools to complete formative and summative evaluations, and providing evaluation reports and feedback to decision makers. By the end of the course, each student will develop a program-evaluation design for a social program.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMPP 6282 - Public Policy and Finance♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover microeconomic and macroeconomic models used in policy formulation and how public finance influences policy choices as well as implementation alternatives. Students examine tax policies and tax incentive models, budgeting, public/private models, market influences on policy, the impact of government expenditures on income redistribution, and economic considerations of welfare, food stamps, workers’ compensation, and Social Security. Students also examine outsourcing of public programs.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
 

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