2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Jul 23, 2021  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    EIDT 6121 - Multimedia Design and Development I


    (3 sem. cr.) In this first of two multimedia courses, students take a systematic approach to the design and development of multimedia for instruction. Specifically, students will explore various applications within the Adobe Creative Cloud. Applying basic principles of visual literacy, students gain practical experience with text, graphics, and web design for the creation of interactive learning experiences.
  
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    EIDT 6122 - Multimedia Design and Development II


    (3 sem. cr.) In this second of two multimedia courses, students take a systematic approach to the design and development of multimedia for instruction. Specially, students will continue to explore the various applications within the Adobe Creative Cloud, as well as Adobe Captivate. Applying basic principles of visual literacy, students gain practical experience with audio, video, and screen capturing for the creation of interactive learning experiences.
  
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    EIDT 6130 - Program Evaluation♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Program evaluation is the final step in an effective systematic approach to instructional design. In this course, educators explore the models, principles, and practices employed in conducting effective and thorough evaluations of instructional and performance improvement programs. They learn how to select an evaluation approach; develop an evaluation plan; design or select data collection tools; and collect, analyze, and interpret data related to authentic cases.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EIDT 6210 - Online Instructional Strategies♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective instruction in an online setting requires strategies that leverage the unique characteristics of distance learners and online environments. In this course, educators apply their knowledge of instructional design and distance learning to analyze, select, and design instructional strategies that are most effective for engaging and teaching online learners. They learn methods for managing and delivering online instruction, with the goal of integrating effective strategies with course management tools and multimedia technologies in synchronous and asynchronous environments.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EIDT 6211 - Assessments in Online Environments♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Instructors are provided with the opportunity to reach beyond traditional practices and explore new ways of assessing student learning outcomes in the online environment. In this course, educators apply their knowledge of learning theory, assessment practices, and instructional design principles to the development of assessment strategies in online education and training environments. They review research and practical strategies for assessing student learning in synchronous and asynchronous environments.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EIDT 6500 - Performance Improvement♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, educators survey the research, models, and issues associated with improving human performance in workplace settings. They explore methods and techniques for recognizing and analyzing performance gaps, conducting needs assessments, determining appropriate instructional and performance support interventions, and measuring the results of implemented solutions. They engage in assignments that emphasize how to determine whether instructional or other performance support interventions are appropriate for addressing identified needs. Educators also use results from analyses to inform the design of job aids, instruction, and other performance support systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EIDT 6501 - Training and Development♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The ability to manage and deliver training is an essential skill for human resource and performance improvement professionals. In this course, educators explore models, techniques, and best practices for managing and delivering training systems and modules. They focus on a range of topics, including managing the learning environment, selecting appropriate materials and assessments, and tracking learner performance and completion. Educators also explore technologies that support the planning, presenting, and managing of instructor-led and self-directed courses and training systems in face-to-face and virtual environments.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EIDT 6510 - Online Instructional Strategies♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective instruction in an online setting requires strategies that leverage the unique characteristics of distance learners and online environments. In this course, educators apply their knowledge of instructional design and distance learning to analyze, select, and design instructional strategies that are most effective for engaging and teaching online learners. They learn methods for managing and delivering online instruction, with the goal of integrating effective strategies with course management tools and multimedia technologies in synchronous and asynchronous environments.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EIDT 6511 - Assessments in Online Environments♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Instructors are provided with the opportunity to reach beyond traditional practices and explore new ways of assessing student learning outcomes in the online environment. In this course, educators apply their knowledge of learning theory, assessment practices, and instructional design principles to the development of assessment strategies in online education and training environments. They review research and practical strategies for assessing student learning in synchronous and asynchronous environments.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EIDT 6910 - Capstone: Practical Application of Instructional Design


    (3 sem. cr.) This course is the culminating experience for the program. Educators are provided with the opportunity to exhibit their knowledge, skills, and creativity in an authentic situation. They demonstrate their ability to integrate instructional design principles and practical skills and apply them to a real-world learning or performance problem. Educators work with a client in a consultative capacity or explore a case study that may include front-end analyses; design, development, and implementation of performance support and instructional materials; and/or evaluation of an instructional or performance support program. (Prerequisite(s): Completion of all other program coursework.)
  
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    EMBA 6010 - Leading in a Dynamic Era


    (3 sem. cr.) An Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) program is a journey of personal and professional transformation. As with a physical journey, this one begins “where you are” (in this case, as a leader and manager). Two of the key goals for this first course of the EMBA Program, then, include determining each person’s status and setting the trajectory for the transformational journey. To help candidates begin, in this course, each student will develop the skills for critical reflection by asking questions like:

    • What are each student’s strengths and weaknesses and what is missing?
    • What are each student’s responsibilities as a leader now and tomorrow?
    • How does the student make decisions as a manager/leader?
    • What are the values that shape the student’s behavior?
    • How does the student deal with difficult problems?
    • What are the student’s aspirations?

    Another important theme of this course is being a leader in turbulent times. Being an effective and genuine leader in a dynamic era requires an understanding of leadership concepts, how leaders think and act, and how various management styles impact situations and relationships within an organization. Yet, being an effective leader also demands a strong set of competencies such as motivating self and others, leading creativity in an organization, cultural intelligence, and navigating through ambiguity. Through a self-reflective process, work with an executive mentor, and accompanied by the study of key leadership concepts, each student will begin to craft a Personal and Professional Development Plan that will be utilized and further developed throughout the EMBA Program. This plan will serve as the road map for developing the leadership posture and competencies critical for success; and students will take their first steps toward applying the plan to their career during this course.
     

  
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    EMBA 6020 - Economic Decision Making


    (3 sem. cr.) Global markets are increasingly turbulent, and understanding how these markets work is critical to the student’s success as a business leader. The course is designed to show how the student can use economic theory to frame the challenges associated with operating a firm in a competitive environment. To facilitate this understanding, students in this course integrate concepts of both micro- and macroeconomics. From a micro perspective, students study managerial decisions, particularly in terms of demand, supply, opportunity costs, profitability, and competitive strategies. Students also analyze real-world industries, markets, and firms using the key concepts of microeconomics. From a macro perspective, students develop the skills to create a basic model of the macro economy emphasizing real-world data and relationships. By the end of the course, students can evaluate and resolve economic problems in real time.
     
  
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    EMBA 6030 - Creativity, Innovation, and Foresight


    (3 sem. cr.) In the first course of the Executive MBA, students were introduced to the notion of being a leader in an era of disruptive change. Students take this course to continue the discussion on disruptive change by focusing on the importance of innovation in achieving business success. Innovation is not an end result. Rather, through creativity and foresight, it is a way of thinking that enables individuals and organizations to define critical problems, identify possible solutions, and foster positive change more effectively.

    In particular, students in this course focus on increasing their abilities as creative leaders, those who can readily apply imagination to resolve complex problems and who can unleash the creative talents of others by establishing a work environment that facilitates creative thinking. The ultimate goal of this course is to provide students with a set of proven creativity methods, skills, and strategies that enable innovative breakthroughs to occur in a much more deliberate and predictable manner.

    To accomplish this task, students describe why creativity and innovation are considered crucial 21st-century skills; learn to manage their judgment, so that they become more flexible, tolerant of ambiguity, and open to new ideas and possibilities; employ a variety of creative thinking tools useful in resolving problems that do not have easy answers; apply design thinking principles aimed at user empathy and rapid prototyping; identify what creative leaders do to promote innovation in their teams and organizations; and recognize how a systematic approach to creativity enhances the probability of innovative breakthroughs.
     

  
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    EMBA 6040 - Accounting Measurement for Leaders


    (3 sem. cr.) Accounting is a measurement process. Leaders are required to create meaningful measures. To do that they need to know what to measure, how to measure, and what the consequences of the measurement might be. Students in this course take a rigorous stakeholder approach and integrate fundamental managerial accounting topics with strategic analysis. By the end of the course, students are able to use accounting information within a firm to make effective business decisions, design control systems, and evaluate the impact on various stakeholder groups.
  
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    EMBA 6050 - Managing People and Teams in Globally Diverse Organizations


    (3 sem. cr.) Contemporary business environments are increasingly competitive, global, fast paced, and knowledge intensive. In these environments, effective use of human capital is crucial to an enterprise’s success and survival. In this course, students have the opportunity to learn practical issues such as planning and executing staffing strategies, creating and sustaining teams, maintaining influence in the organization, managing a global workforce, managing programs for productivity improvement, and planning and managing the human side of organizational change. This course will be especially useful for those planning careers as general managers as well as management consultants.
  
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    EMBA 6060 - Money and the Firm


    (3 sem. cr.) The focus of this course is on the utilization of financial information for internal decision-making purposes. The course is designed for the executive who will be using, rather than producing, financial information. Students will cover a range of contemporary topics and techniques relevant to sound and ethical financial decision making using a stakeholder-analysis framework. This framework requires decision makers to develop an array of possible financial decisions and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each. The tradeoffs and consequences of each alternative are considered in terms of satisfying stakeholders’ interests while maximizing firm value. Students in this course will rely on critical-thinking skills to apply and, at times, challenge traditional financial theory, while balancing various stakeholder interests in the financial decision-making process.
  
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    EMBA 6070 - Leveraging Systems and Operations for Performance


    (3 sem. cr.) One of the most critical challenges for leadership in maintaining organizational performance is identifying core strengths and weaknesses within the organization and across the more general value creation landscape. Students in this course explore systems thinking as a process whereby problems are viewed as individual components within a larger system. A framework is provided for analyzing relationships within a system and for avoiding the risks associated with viewing problems in isolation. Learners will use systems-thinking tools to model single-, double-, and multiple-loop feedback systems, both at the micro and macro levels of analysis. In addition, students are introduced to scenario building and will examine how the practice of systems thinking lays the foundation for creating sustainable outcomes for organizations and society.
  
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    EMBA 6080 - Competing in the Global Marketplace


    (3 sem. cr.) A fundamental shift in the world economy is underway and is accelerating. No longer are national economic interests and business operations largely confined within well-defined geographic borders. Phenomena such as enhanced communication technologies, outsourcing, and the reduction in political barriers to cross-border trade have all contributed to the creation of a truly global economy.

    Students in this course focus on the global environment of business and explore how the international sociocultural, political, legal, economic, physical, and historical environments impact business practices and policies. A key goal of the course is to provide students with the skills and methodologies required for developing business strategies on a global scale. In particular, students will identify the internal and external forces impacting an organization’s ability to compete in the international marketplace.
     

  
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    EMBA 6090 - Establishing and Cultivating Customer Markets


    (3 sem. cr.) When students see a highly successful product they may wonder whether the product was itself truly innovative or whether the product was unremarkable, but the marketing program was exceptional. Not surprisingly, a clear understanding of the importance of marketing, as well as a grasp of effective marketing practices, is essential for anyone who wishes to achieve a position of leadership. In this course, students gain a working knowledge of both marketing theory and the practical application of innovative marketing strategies. Students also come to understand how product, price, place, and promotion contribute to the marketing mix as they explore research-based insights into consumer behavior.
  
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    EMBA 6100 - Capstone: Business Strategy for Sustainable Competitive Advantage


    (3 sem. cr.) The purpose of this capstone course is to facilitate the integration of what students have experienced during their Executive MBA program. First, working with an executive mentor, students complete a Personal and Professional Development Plan that has both charted their transformational journey thus far and will serve as the starting point of the next phase of their career development. Second, students seek to integrate the knowledge they have gained through the program using the “lens” of developing business strategies capable of achieving sustainable competitive advantage.

    To help students think in an integrative fashion, they will take the perspective of the CEO throughout the course. Students whose primary experience has been in one of the functional areas of management (e.g., finance, marketing) have opportunities to relate their experience to the contents of other functional areas and to develop the multifunctional perspective required of the general manager.

    The most important outcome of the course is that students are able to think and act in a strategic (rather than a tactical) fashion. Overall, the course aims to improve the actual practice of management; i.e., the students’ ability to manage a variety of strategic and operational situations. These situations may be complex, and students should be able to cope with a considerable amount of ambiguity.
     

  
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    ENGL 1000 - Academic Writing♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the basic elements of academic writing. Students’ primary focus is on gaining fundamental skills necessary for writing college-level essays and research papers. They engage in weekly writing assignments for iterative practice with grammar, punctuation, and the formation of sentences and paragraphs. Through these assignments and a final reflective essay, students demonstrate effective academic writing and the skills requisite to ENGL 1001 - English Composition. Note: This course will be considered an elective.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ENGL 1001 - English Composition♦


    (5 cr.) Students explore subject areas through different perspectives, make convincing arguments, and support research findings in a clear, scholarly manner. In this course, students develop the skills necessary for persuasive and research-based writing at the college level. Students focus on the use of rhetoric, argument, and supporting evidence. They also study the use of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines to cite sources and examine the steps involved in conducting research. Through practice of the planning, writing, and revision process, students gain skills necessary to write effective academic persuasive essays with supporting evidence.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ENGL 1010 - Writing With Confidence and Purpose♦


    (5 cr.) Reading and writing are processes, not events. The journey is as important as the destination. Students in this course build upon their professional and personal reading and writing experiences and prepare to read with authority and to write with confidence in college-level study and the workplace. A Personalized Learning Plan provides practice in grammar and usage related to individual needs. Using relevant case studies drawn from multiple college majors, guided reading, critical thinking, writing, and revision as tools, students will master academic writing skills such as the development of arguments supported by evidence. Assignments emphasize a milestone process through which students complete weekly tasks that build on each other and result in a short essay for the final project. Students in the course learn and are provided with practice in basic elements of research and attribution.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ENGL 1015S - Composition for College: Principles of Reading and Writing♦


    (5 cr.) Using self-paced interactive resources, along with an instructor and a course mentor, students can develop planning, writing, and revision skills for persuasive and research based college-level writing—all within a dynamic online learning environment. Students should consider this course if they have a solid foundation in grammar use and sentence structure, can learn independently, have previous college experience, and would like to increase their skills and competency with research and persuasive writing.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    ENGL 2002 - Professional Writing for Successful Communication♦


    (5 cr.) Clear and persuasive writing is a fundamental professional skill. In this course, students learn the basic tenets of written communication in a professional setting, including the importance of understanding audience and the purpose of the communication, as well as choices of modality, timing, and idiom. Students examine examples of professional communication, such as business letters, résumés, briefing memos, newsletters, and proposals and requests for proposals, among others. Applying course concepts, students also engage in a range of applied assignments that reinforce fundamental writing skills, such as grammar and sentence structure, punctuation, style, citation, and word choice.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ENGL 2050 - Women’s Literature and Social Change♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students encounter a variety of historical and contemporary literary works written by women in the form of essays, short fiction, drama, and poetry/lyrics. Topics include social change as it relates to women’s experiences of work, family, and community; health and well-being; education; and the future. Students use critical-thinking, reading, and writing skills to articulate an understanding of course themes. (Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1001 or ENGL 1010.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ENGL 2050c - Women’s Literature and Social Change


    (5 cr.) Students examine a variety of historical and contemporary literary works written by women in the form of essays, short fiction, drama, and poetry/lyrics. Topics include social change as it relates to women’s experiences of work, family and community, health and well-being, education, and the future. Students use critical-thinking, reading, and writing skills to articulate an understanding of course themes.
  
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    ENGL 2110 - Creative Writing: Fundamentals of Short Fiction♦


    (5 cr.) Storytelling was a way for our ancestors to pass on values, spiritual beliefs, and history. One of the ways in which we continue this heritage today is through short fiction. In this course, students encounter the processes and concepts of creative writing through short fiction. Students examine established authors, narrative techniques, and structures, which they use as a guide to write short stories that model voice, purpose, and elements of story writing. Through this course, students gain critical-thinking and analytical skills in writing, revising, and publishing creative fiction.
      (Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1001 or ENGL 1010.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ENGL 3110 - Creative Writing: Contemporary Nonfiction and Poetry♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore the creation of poetry and nonfiction writing for children and adults. Students analyze various forms of creative writing, including memoirs, personal essays, nature essays, prose poems, and poetry, by reading the works of established authors and modeling writing techniques in preparation for publication. They acquire essential skills in critical and analytical thinking to be able to write and revise creative works for adults and children.
      (Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1001 or ENGL 1010.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ENGL 3110C - Creative Writing: Nonfiction and Poetry♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore the creation of poetry and nonfiction writing for children and adults. Students analyze various forms of creative writing, including memoirs, personal essays, nature essays, prose poems, and poetry, by reading the works of established authors and modeling writing techniques in preparation for publication. They acquire essential skills in critical and analytical thinking to be able to write and revise creative works for adults and children.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 3001 - Financial Management♦


    (5 cr.) All organizations must collect and analyze financial information to make important decisions regarding operations, such as payments, budgeting, and investing in new business. Students in this course learn to use financial and managerial finance theory, concepts, and tools to make better financial management decisions as well as to conduct sound financial analysis. They examine the principles of finance from an applied perspective through the examination of difficult strategic and operational decisions that exist in the business environment. Students gain hands-on financial management experience as they compile financial statements, analyze and report financial results, and calculate elements of time value of money for single or multiple cash flows.
      (Prerequisite(s): ACCT 1003 or 1004S.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 4101 - Corporate Finance♦


    (5 cr.) Managers in all types of corporations must make vital financial decisions on a daily basis, such as choosing between competing investment opportunities, valuing assets, measuring risk and return, financing a firm’s operations, making dividend policy and capital structure decisions, and valuing financial instruments. Students in this course learn the basics of finance and can gain the tools needed to create long- and short-term planning decisions. They collaborate with their peers through a group case study project to gain real-world insight into the corporate finance arena. Students add to their portfolio by completing a project assignment in which they demonstrate concepts learned in the course through a specific contextual application.
      (Prerequisite(s): FNCE 3001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 4102 - Financial Institutions and Markets♦


    (5 cr.) One of the main causes of economic failure in the United States is the assumption of too much financial risk, including overspending and bad investments. The best way to mitigate risk factors is for financial managers to understand the impact of spending on financial markets. In this course, students investigate the implications of these risk factors and examine various aspects of financial markets, including money, bond, mortgage, stock, foreign exchange, and derivative security. Students learn about the operation and regulation of commercial banks, thrift institutions, insurance companies, securities firms, investment banks, finance companies, mutual funds, and pension funds. Through this course, students have the opportunity to gain the skills and knowledge that financial managers use to predict and manage risk and future trends.
      (Prerequisite(s): FNCE 4101.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 4103 - International Finance♦


    (5 cr.) To maintain a competitive advantage, organizations must engage in business and financial investing on a global scale and financial managers must understand the challenges, risks, and methods of dealing with firms in the global economy. In this course, students learn about the nuances, concepts, and principles in the field of international finance. Primarily, students engage in assignments focused on international financial markets and the macroeconomics of international financial flows. They examine specific topics, including foreign exchange, international securities markets, and international banking. Through this course, students have the opportunity to acquire the tools needed to make important international financial decisions based on existing financial principles and current factors in the market.
      (Prerequisite(s): FNCE 3001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 6000 - Decision-Making Tools for Today’s Financial Professional♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Today’s effective finance professionals use a variety of financial management tools as they seek to evaluate alternatives and make sound financial recommendations. Students will gain practical experience of a financial professional’s role by using financial modeling tools such as breakeven and cost-volume-profit analysis for model pricing and cost sensitivity; forecasting and cost prediction; variance cost analysis; relevant cost analysis; project valuation; and prioritization using payback, rates of return, and discounted cash flow methods. Students’ increased diagnostic critical-thinking skills will help them to construct effective, ethical, fact-based arguments, which are among the fundamental capabilities required for financial decision-making. Using relevant management articles, case studies, and topic analyses, students also examine how to align business needs with fact-based solutions, how to identify new opportunities, and how to manage and enhance an organization’s competitive position.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 6010 - Analysis and Communication for the Financial Professional♦


    (3 sem. cr.) An essential skill for nearly all financial professionals is the ability to effectively communicate with the organization to manage internal and external relationships. The importance of communication in finance is emphasized, and students are presented with the opportunity to practice using the tools required for effectual and efficient presentation of information while gaining critical-thinking, reading, and scholarly writing skills. Students explore various written and presentational forms of communication that financial professionals use within organizational and managerial settings. Students examine techniques for developing and presenting white papers, memoranda used to communicate issues and recommendations to management, and financial and nonfinancial information. They learn about concepts in balanced communication coverage and how to adapt to constantly changing modes of communication, including social networking, blogging, and using professional organizations and training programs to their advantage. Through these activities, students gain a better understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the financial professional as well as the ethical methodologies required to maintain a professional obligation to the community and their clients.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 6020 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Accounting and Finance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In the news, it is too often that we hear about cases of financial fraud and misconduct involving major corporations. It is a social and professional obligation of financial professionals to be concerned and knowledgeable on topics involving legal and ethical issues in accounting and financial reporting. In this course, students learn to appreciate this role and explore the various legal and professional responsibilities of which financial professionals must be aware when developing financial statements and reports. They examine a variety of issues, such as the differences between statute and regulation and between common and statutory law. Students also assess the role of bankruptcy and its impact on business relationships. Through the extensive use of current and seminal case studies, students take a practical approach to examining the best practices of doing business in today’s sociopolitical climate from a legal and ethical perspective.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 6030 - Managerial Finance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Today’s companies are challenged to constantly do more with less. Effective managers know how to deploy scarce financial resources in ways to achieve optimum returns on these resources. Students will discover the latest financial tools and analytic methods to strengthen the capital investment decision-making process. Students will use critical-thinking skills to apply and, at times, challenge traditional financial theory, while balancing various stakeholder interests in the financial decision-making process. Students will examine a range of contemporary issues and techniques relevant to sound and ethical financial decision-making. Topics include the role of stakeholders in optimizing firm value, assessment of an organization’s financial position, effective communication of financial information and goals, the analysis of risk and reward in financial decision-making, the impact of financial decisions and capital structure on firm value, the role of ethics in financial decision-making, and the evaluation of financial decisions to enter international markets.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 6600 - Managing Operational and Financial Business Risks♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Accountants and business managers must be astute and proactive in managing a business to combat the inevitable threat of operational and financial risks, including those involving credit, market, liquidity, reputation, technology, and legality. In this course, students assess the tools used by accountants and managers in managing these risks. They explore the various processes used to identify, analyze, and assess risks, and they learn the appropriate use of financial and operational controls to mitigate such risks. Additionally, students examine ways to implement techniques, such as developing a risk control matrix and using the concepts of the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) framework to improve an organization’s enterprise risk management.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 6610 - Managing Regulatory Compliance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Regulatory compliance involves the policies and processes that organizations use to ensure that they follow the rules and regulations in place by the firms that control financial activity in a given jurisdiction. In this course, students explore the facets of regulatory compliance, focusing on the role of accounting with respect to corporate governance within an organizational setting. They also focus on how organizations build transparency into their governance and compliance systems. Students review and explore the responsibilities of management in terms of compliance and auditing and explore the complex processes of checks and balances that comprise compliance systems. Students further develop their understanding of regulatory compliance through a review of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, in addition to an evaluation of decisions made by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Public Corporation Accounting Oversight Board.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 6630 - Tax Analysis and Decision Making♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of current topics in taxation strategies for individuals and corporations. They learn about the Internal Revenue Service Code on tax differences, including book and tax accounting, inclusions, exclusions, deductions, credits, and tax aspects of property transactions. Students employ a “walk-through” technique through which they gain first-hand experience in the use of tax research services. Students also explore how economic, social, and cultural forces influence tax policy.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 6635 - Financial Budgeting and Forecasting Analysis♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Managers are continually faced with the complexities of budgeting and forecasting their business operations. Complexities include many factors, such as one-time and ongoing expenses; investments; and risk related to investment proposals, time periods, and other financial considerations. Students will explore budgeting and forecasting along with related processes within the organizational context. Students will also review the implications of budgeting and forecasting as well as methods to plan for and prioritize the use of scarce resources, while considering ethical issues related to sustainability.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 6640 - Advanced Managerial Finance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The focus of this course is on how students use financial information for internal decision-making purposes. It is designed for the leader who will be using, rather than producing, financial information. Decision making is an art. Good decision makers need to be able to anticipate the alternatives, evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of each, and recognize the tradeoffs inherent in each alternative. Students in this course will approach financial decision making using this framework that also overtly includes rigorous stakeholder analysis and implications. Stakeholder analysis sometimes leads to controversial decision alternatives, but it is this exercise that will develop the students’ talents for challenging the traditional and finding the balance between stakeholder expectations and creating opportunity for the organization. The objective of this course is for students to apply finance theory and principles to the analysis of important business problems. Specific topics will include capital budgeting, cost of capital, real options, capital structure, payout policy, and enterprise valuation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 6643 - Applications in Corporate Finance I♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Corporate finance managers use a variety of financial management tools when identifying possible alternatives for recommendations on financial management decision-making. Students in this course use the tools of finance to help managers maximize their firm’s value. Topics include the time value of money, net present value, internal rate of return, capital budgeting, capital structure, working capital management, multinational concepts, and dividend policy.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 6647 - Applications in Corporate Finance II♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course build on what they learned in Corporate Finance I and focus more deeply on contemporary issues and optimal financial decision-making. Students participate with hands-on demonstrations of how to become more skillful in various financial management environments. Topics include valuation, advanced capital budgeting, cost of capital, risk, standard deviation, variance, covariance, capital asset pricing model, and beta. Additional topics include multinational concepts, leasing, option pricing, derivatives, hedging, and other advanced financial applications.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 6650 - Insurance Planning


    (3 sem. cr.) Insurance coverage is an important element on ensuring financial security. Students in this course will examine risk management and insurance decisions for financial planning. Topics for this course include insurance for life, health, disability, property, and liability risks, as well as annuities, group insurance, and long-term care.
  
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    FNCE 6655 - Investment Theory and Portfolio Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Investments and portfolio management is a combination of different investment assets for the purpose of achieving investor goals while minimizing overall investment risk. Students in this course examine capital markets with an emphasis on securities valuation. Topics covered in this course include fixed-income markets, measuring risk with alphas and betas, asset pricing, portfolio management strategies, equity markets, and derivatives markets.
  
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    FNCE 6660 - Derivatives and Risk


    (3 sem. cr.) Derivatives are financial contracts with values that are derived from the behavior of something else, such as interest rates, stock indexes, mortgages, commodities, or even the weather. Students in this course examine the types of market risk managers face in their day-to-day operations and the use of financial derivatives. The students focus on the theory and practice of the valuation of derivative securities such as forward contracts, futures contracts, swaps, and options and how they are used to mitigate risk. They also examine the risks faced by the market’s underlying properties of each of these instruments and their use in managing the various risks faced by market participants.
  
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    FNCE 6665 - Retirement and Estate Planning


    (3 sem. cr.) Retirement and estate planning allows not only for individuals to have a successful retirement, but also contribute to the lives of one’s children or grandchildren. Students in this course focus on estate planning and the efficient conservation and transfer of wealth. They explore legal, tax, financial, and nonfinancial aspects of estate planning. Topics also include trusts, wills, probate, advanced directives, charitable giving, wealth transfers, and related taxes.
  
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    FNCE 6685 - Creating Sustainable Solutions Through Systems Thinking


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course explore systems thinking as a process whereby problems are viewed as individual components within a larger system. Students are provided a framework for analyzing relationships within a system and for avoiding the risks associated with viewing problems in isolation. Students will use systems-thinking tools to model single-, double-, and multiple-loop feedback systems, both at the micro and macro levels of analysis. In addition, students will be introduced to scenario building and will examine how the practice of systems thinking lays the foundation for creating sustainable outcomes for organizations and society.
  
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    FNCE 6781 - Information Security Governance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course cover information security issues in an organizational context, recognizing the increasing stakes in keeping systems safe from tampering and disclosure. Topics include management structures and processes for enterprise information security; information security in the supply chain; legal, regulatory, audit, and policy issues; risk management; and the business case for information security.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FNCE 6900 - CFA Capstone


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students review content from prior Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) exams on a variety of topics, including ethics and professional standards, corporate finance, financial reporting and analysis, quantitative methods, alternative investments, derivatives, equity investment, and fixed income. Students conduct research, discuss with peers, and analyze the answers to actual CFA exam items to gain a thorough understanding of the format, concepts, and principles on which exam questions are based, gaining confidence and preparedness for taking the CFA exam.
  
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    FNCE 6905 - Financial Planning Capstone


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students review content based on prior Certified Financial Planner™ (CFP®)* Certification exams on a variety of topics, including financial and insurance planning, investment planning and strategies, income taxes, and retirement planning. Students conduct research, discuss with peers, and analyze the answers to actual CFP® Certification exam items to gain a thorough understanding of the format, concepts, and principles on which exam questions are based, gaining confidence and preparedness for taking the CFP® Certification exam.

    *CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and CFP® are certification marks owned by Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. (“CFP Board”).

  
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    FPLB 631L - Pre-Practicum 1


    (0 cr.) By participating in a Walden Pre-Practicum, students gain skills in their development as scholar-practitioners. Through their Pre-Practicum experiences, students expand their network of peers and faculty members while developing their professional skills and identity. In Pre-Practicum 1, students begin to apply the core skills and techniques introduced in their Techniques course. Students begin to develop the multicultural competencies needed for counseling. Per program requirements, there is a synchronous experience in this course. Students will continue to expand their knowledge of counselor credentialing.
  
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    FPLB 632L - Pre-Practicum 2


    (0 cr.) In Pre-Practicum 2, students continue to develop core skills from Pre-Practicum 1 and integrate advanced skills in their development as scholar-practitioners. Through their Pre-Practicum experiences, students expand their network of peers and faculty members while continuing to develop their professional skills and identity. In Pre-Practicum 2, students begin to develop group leadership skills, integrate counseling theory, and continue to demonstrate cultural competency skills. Students engage in developing their upcoming field experience plan and continue credentialing skills activities. (Prerequisite(s): GRPL 6100 and COUN 6250 for those in Addiction Counseling; Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling; and Clinical Mental Health Counseling programs. GRPL 6100 and COUN 6320 for those in School Counseling program.)
  
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    FPSY 2005 - Social Influences on Behavior


    It has been said that no person is an island; meaning, in part, that people are influenced by others and by the social situations in which they find themselves. Students in this course focus on the basic concepts and applications of social psychology, includes topics such as attitudes, beliefs, and behavior; stereotyping; prejudice and discrimination; interpersonal relationships; group behavior; and the effect of environmental stress on behavior. Students apply principles learned in case studies and to situations in daily life. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, PSYC 1002, or PSYC 1003).
  
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    FPSY 2101 - Introduction to Forensic Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore a wide range of adult, juvenile, family, and community topics of interest to students, practitioners, and administrators. Topics include the uses of psychological assessments in court, issues of criminal responsibility, criminal profiling, predicting dangerousness, jury processes and decision making, eyewitness testimony, the use of psychological knowledge in prisons, and the psychology of criminal behavior. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001 .)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 4102 - The Criminal Mind♦


    (5 cr.) What makes the criminal unique? Criminal justice professionals confront criminal behavior in many forms. Students taking this course explore theories and research that provide cognitive, behavioral, and psychological explanations of criminal behavior. Knowledge of these theories enhances the student’s ability to interact effectively with offenders.  (Prerequisite(s): CRJS 1001).
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 4111 - Forensic Interviewing and Investigation♦


    (5 cr.) The basic procedures for interviewing both witnesses and suspects are provided in this course. Students have the opportunity to learn the difference between accusatory and non-accusatory interview strategies. In addition, effective behavioral observation strategies are identified. Methods for effectively recording information from interviews and observations are covered, and best practices for preparing forensic reports are presented. (Prerequisite(s): FPSY 2101 .)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 4112 - Forensic Assessment♦


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the basic knowledge and skills required to select appropriate assessment instruments used in the field of forensic psychology with children and adults. Types of assessments include child custody evaluations, juvenile assessment, expert witness assessment, fitness to stand trial, civil commitment assessment, and substance abuse assessment. (Prerequisite(s): FPSY 2101 .)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 4920 - Capstone


    (5 cr.) In this course, students gain the contemporary knowledge needed to apply ethical practice and professional responsibilities while working in the field of forensic psychology. The American Psychological Society’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as the American Psychology–Law Society’s Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology are mainstays in this course. Additionally, the various roles and responsibilities of a forensic psychologist are covered. (Prerequisite(s): This must be the last class taken.
  
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    FPSY 5101 - Introduction to Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an expansive overview of forensic psychology, including basic tenets, practices, and procedures. Students explore subspecialties of forensic psychology; roles and responsibilities; and related legal, ethical, and diversity issues. They learn how forensic psychology links to the criminal justice system as they explore related topics, including criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, and correctional psychology. Through this course, students acquire a broad understanding of forensic psychology theories and concepts, which they apply to the analysis of controversial issues and contemporary challenges within the field.
  
  •  

    FPSY 5102 - Intersection of Crime, Psychology, and the Law♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an expansive overview of forensic psychology, including basic tenets, practices, and procedures. Students explore subspecialties of forensic psychology; roles and responsibilities; and related legal, ethical, and diversity issues. They have the opportunity to learn how forensic psychology links to legal systems as they explore related topics, including criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, and correctional psychology. Through this course, students can acquire a broad understanding of forensic psychology theories and concepts, which they apply to the analysis of controversial issues and contemporary challenges within the fields.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    FPSY 5115 - Understanding Forensic Psychology Research


    (5 cr.) In this course, students will better understand how to be an astute consumer of forensic psychology research. Basic principles of statistics, such as reliability and validity, are covered. At the same time, emphasis in this course is placed on teaching the student how to read forensic psychology research critically and how best to apply research results to forensic clinical, correctional, court, public policy, and police settings.
  
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    FPSY 5125 - Assessment in Forensic Psychology Settings


    (5 cr.) Professionals in forensic psychology use assessments to gather data from different sources to arrive at conclusions and make decisions involving cases or issues. In this course, students examine assessments in various areas, including violence risk potential, competency to stand trial, insanity, pathology, and child custody. They examine the varied assessment instruments and procedures used in forensic settings with adults and juveniles. They also assess factors impacting assessments and related challenges, such as ethical issues and multicultural considerations. Students are provided with a foundation in the knowledge of forensic assessment rather than specific skills in administering forensic assessment instruments and interpreting results. Students demonstrate their knowledge as they apply concepts presented in the course to assess a forensic situation case study.
  
  •  

    FPSY 5126 - Understanding Violence, Risk, and Threat Assessment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore the various assessment techniques and instruments used within the forensic psychology arena. Some of the assessment areas covered include risk assessment, juvenile evaluations, child custody evaluations, and capital punishment, as well as the various psychological instruments that are used in these types of evaluations.
  
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    FPSY 5135 - Criminal Behavior


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a foundation in historical and contemporary biological, psychological, and sociological theories of criminal behavior. Students consider two important questions in forensic psychology: “Who is a criminal?” and “Is criminal behavior a mental illness?”  Students explore theoretical issues that result from attempts to explain criminal behavior in forensic populations. They examine groups of offenders, including mentally disordered offenders, sex offenders, violent offenders, and juvenile offenders. Students apply ethical guidelines and standards to the study and research of criminal behavior. They also use concepts and theories to assess the behavior of criminal offenders in case study scenarios.
  
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    FPSY 5136 - Criminal Behavior


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a foundation in historical and contemporary biological, psychological, and sociological theories of criminal behavior. Students consider two important questions in forensic psychology: “Who is a criminal?” and “Is criminal behavior a mental illness?”  Students explore theoretical issues that result from attempts to explain criminal behavior in forensic populations. They examine groups of offenders, including mentally disordered offenders, sex offenders, violent offenders, and juvenile offenders. Students apply ethical guidelines and standards to the study and research of criminal behavior. They also use concepts and theories to assess the behavior of criminal offenders in case study scenarios.
  
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    FPSY 5145 - Ethical Issues and Professional Responsibilities in Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) A fundamental responsibility of forensic psychologists is to provide treatment, assessment, research, and training in an ethical manner. Through this course, students have the opportunity to acquire contemporary knowledge needed to apply ethical practice and professional responsibilities while working as forensic psychologists. Students explore the various roles and responsibilities of forensic psychologists. They examine the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as the American Psychology-Law Society’s Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology. Students apply these guidelines as well as critical-thinking and scholarly writing skills to describe the ethical dilemmas, professional challenges, and approaches to overcome these issues within a professional forensic psychology role of their choice.
  
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    FPSY 5511 - Treatment of Forensic Populations


    (5 cr.) In this course, students gain the foundational knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations, such as sex offenders, substance abusers, and white-collar criminals. Students analyze the use of traditional forms of intervention, including individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice. Applying concepts and theories learned in the course, students develop a project scenario in which they feature an offender and describe treatment approaches as well as related ethical, legal, and multicultural factors that may impact treatment. Reflecting on the course, students also consider and discuss professional identity and goals.
  
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    FPSY 5720 - Abnormal Behavior


    (5 cr.) Understanding the characteristics and causes of atypical thoughts and actions—commonly known in mental health professions as abnormal behavior—is essential in determining accurate diagnoses, answering forensic referral questions, and planning effective treatment programs. In this course, students examine the history and evolution of abnormal psychology and how practitioners use contemporary diagnostic criteria of abnormal behavior in various settings, such as schools, rehabilitation facilities, community agencies, and forensic situations. They examine specific techniques for the diagnosis, assessment, and/or treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders, as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial problems. Using the scholar-practitioner model, students consider environmental and biological factors contributing to behavioral disorders. Students also investigate and discuss current and future trends, legal and ethical issues, and multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis and clinical assessment.
  
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    FPSY 6001 - Foundations for Graduate Study


    (2 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals, and they develop a program of study, a professional development plan, and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. They engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.
  
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    FPSY 6002 - Foundations of Graduate Studies in Psychology♦


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students build a foundation for academic and professional success as social change agents. They assess the relationship of Walden’s mission and vision to professional goals. They establish connections with their peers and the broader Walden community. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of scholarly writing, critical-thinking skills, academic integrity, ethics, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence within the field of psychology.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6100 - Critical Issues in Emergency Management


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the theories and concepts underpinning contemporary emergency management and how to understand the phenomena of natural and human-caused disasters. Students examine the historical context of emergency management, the general process of risk assessment, the emergency management cycle, communications within emergency management and crisis planning, and the general policy and legal framework surrounding the process of emergency management in the United States with a focus on the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Case studies of major catastrophes are used to explore contemporary and practical hazard management. Students can complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute courses IS-100.b - Introduction to Incident Command System and either IS-800.b - National Response Framework: An Introduction or IS700.a - National Incident Management System as part of this course. Nationally recognized certificates are awarded for successful completion of FEMA courses.
  
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    FPSY 6101 - Introduction to Forensic Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an expansive overview of forensic psychology, including basic tenets, practices, and procedures. Students explore subspecialties of forensic psychology; roles and responsibilities; and related legal, ethical, and diversity issues. They learn how forensic psychology links to the criminal justice system as they explore related topics, including criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, and correctional psychology. Through this course, students acquire a broad understanding of forensic psychology theories and concepts, which they apply to the analysis of controversial issues and contemporary challenges within the field.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    FPSY 6102 - Intersection of Crime, Psychology, and the Law♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an expansive overview of forensic psychology, including basic tenets, practices, and procedures. Students explore subspecialties of forensic psychology; roles and responsibilities; and related legal, ethical, and diversity issues. They have the opportunity to learn how forensic psychology links to legal systems as they explore related topics, including criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, and correctional psychology. Through this course, students can acquire a broad understanding of forensic psychology theories and concepts, which they apply to the analysis of controversial issues and contemporary challenges within the fields.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6115 - Understanding Forensic Psychology Research♦


    (5 cr.) Forensic psychologists, and others in the field, often rely on psychological research for a variety of functions; for example, to extract empirical data about psychological tests or to determine the efficacy of different interrogation techniques. Through this course, students work toward becoming astute consumers of forensic psychology research, acquiring skills needed to understand and interpret data. Students assess the relevance of research as well as the significance of incorporating ethics into practice. They examine basic principles of statistics, such as reliability and validity. Students also learn how to critically read forensic psychology research and how best to apply research results to forensic situations in clinical, correctional, court, public policy, and police settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    FPSY 6125 - Assessment in Forensic Psychology Settings


    (5 cr.) Professionals in forensic psychology use assessments to gather data from different sources to arrive at conclusions and make decisions involving cases or issues. In this course, students examine assessments in various areas, including violence risk potential, competency to stand trial, insanity, pathology, and child custody. They examine the varied assessment instruments and procedures used in forensic settings with adults and juveniles. They also assess factors impacting assessments and related challenges, such as ethical issues and multicultural considerations. Students are provided with a foundation in the knowledge of forensic assessment rather than specific skills in administering forensic assessment instruments and interpreting results. Students demonstrate their knowledge as they apply concepts presented in the course to assess a forensic situation case study.
  
  •  

    FPSY 6126 - Understanding Violence, Risk, and Threat Assessment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore the various assessment techniques and instruments used within the forensic psychology arena. Some of the assessment areas covered include risk assessment, juvenile evaluations, child custody evaluations, and capital punishment, as well as the various psychological instruments that are used in these types of evaluations.

     

  
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    FPSY 6135 - Criminal Behavior


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with contemporary views, theories, and case study analysis of maladaptive and criminal behavior, victimology, and victim-offender relationships. A broad conceptualization of criminal behavior, such as that woven from biological, sociological, and psychological perspectives is explored and evaluated. Theories of crime and the application of risk factors associated with criminal behavior are examined. Additionally, students will be exposed to specific offender groups, both violent and nonviolent, including psychopaths, serial and mass murderers, criminal paraphiliacs, arsonists, white-collar thieves, scam artists, domestic terrorists, and others.

     

  
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    FPSY 6135 - Criminal Behavior♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with contemporary views, theories, and case-study analysis of maladaptive and criminal behavior, victimology, and victim-offender relationships. A broad conceptualization of criminal behavior, such as that woven from biological, sociological, and psychological perspectives is explored and evaluated. Theories of crime and the application of risk factors associated with criminal behavior are examined. Additionally, students will be exposed to specific offender groups, both violent and non-violent, including psychopaths, serial and mass murderers, criminal paraphiliacs, arsonists, white-collar thieves, scam artists, domestic terrorists, and others.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6137 - The Nature of Crime and Criminology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to contemporary views and theories of maladaptive and criminal behavior. They examine a broad conceptualization of criminal behavior from an interdisciplinary perspective as well as theories and application of criminal profiling. Students also explore specific views of criminal behavior germane to groups, such as psychopaths, serial offenders, and sexually violent predators. At the end of this course, students will have an understanding of the theories and practices that are the foundations of the field of criminology.
  
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    FPSY 6145 - Ethical Issues and Professional Responsibilities in Forensic Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) A fundamental responsibility of forensic psychologists is to provide treatment, assessment, research, and training in an ethical manner. Through this course, students have the opportunity to acquire contemporary knowledge needed to apply ethical practice and professional responsibilities while working as forensic psychologists. Students explore the various roles and responsibilities of forensic psychologists. They examine the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as the American Psychology-Law Society’s Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology. Students apply these guidelines as well as critical-thinking and scholarly-writing skills to describe the ethical dilemmas, professional challenges, and approaches to overcome these issues within a professional forensic psychology role of their choice.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6201 - Psychological Aspects of Violent Crime


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students explore the nature and extent of the psychological nexus of criminal homicide across various environments to include serial, mass, spree, workplace violence homicide, school shooter homicide, and child abduction homicide. Students will examine the theories and trends of these types of violent crime regarding offender and victim psychological and behavioral characteristics.
  
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    FPSY 6202 - Criminal Investigative Analysis and Profiling


    (5 cr.) In this course, students take on the role of the criminal investigative analyst/profiler as they delve into a criminal case. They explore a structured process of analyzing case file information from investigative, scientific, and behavioral perspectives utilized in assisting in the investigation and prosecution of violent criminal offenses. Within this process, they learn how to organize and analyze case file material; common profiling concepts relating to the offense, the victim, and the offender; various forms of logic, reasoning, or arguments used in analyses; and how to convey conclusions in a written report.
  
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    FPSY 6203 - Victimology


    (5 cr.) What is the relationship between victims and those who commit crimes against them, and how does the criminal justice system protect and respond to victims of crime? In this course, students have the opportunity to answer such questions through a comprehensive assessment of victimology, a relatively new discipline in the field of criminal justice. Students examine victim patterns and tendencies and learn how victims interact with the police and the legal system. They also examine how factors of class, race, and sexual orientation affect the perception of the victim by different constituents, including the public, the court system, and the media. Students assess and discuss the concept of primary and secondary victims and gain practical insight on a range of services and resources available to all types of victims.
  
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    FPSY 6204 - Sex Offender Behavior and Treatment


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore the traits and behaviors of both deviant and criminal sex offenders. Legal issues raised in both criminal and civil cases that involve sex offenses will be discussed. Students analyze the empirical evidence behind various assessment tools and treatment plans for sex offenders. They evaluate the risk for future sexual offense behavior and whether the protection of society outweighs the loss of civil liberty experienced by civil commitment for sex offenders. 
  
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    FPSY 6205 - Psychological Aspect of Cyber Crimes


    (5 cr.) In this course, students review the psychobehavioral factors of criminals who engage in criminal activities using digital social media and other online resources. Students analyze the types and trends of both domestic and global cyber crime. In addition, students will examine characteristics of cyber perpetrators and cyber victims. Students are also provided a foundational understanding of the origins and consequences of human trafficking; sexual exploitation of children from psychological, social, and legal perspectives; and how technology facilitates these types of crimes. Students in this course examine the best practices in preventing and responding to cyber crimes.
  
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    FPSY 6206 - Family Violence


    (5 cr.) In this course, students review the victims and the perpetrators of crimes involving intimate partner violence, child maltreatment and abuse, and elderly abuse. Students in this course focus on addressing the growing literature related to the psychological damage caused by these traumatic events, including the role of mental illness and how it impacts issues involving the criminal, civil, family, and juvenile law areas.
  
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    FPSY 6215 - Controversies in Criminal Justice


    (5 cr.) Justice is at the heart of the U.S. democratic system, yet opposing viewpoints surrounding and within the system often muddle interpretations of the law and the development of policies to promote and enforce justice. In this course, students examine events that have significantly changed how the legal system interprets the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Code, and the U.S. Patriot Act, for example, the terrorist acts of September 11, 2001. They learn how social and historical changes have shifted perspectives and sparked debates on expanding the rights of government versus safeguarding personal civil rights and civil liberties. Through discussion with peers, assessment of contemporary articles, and examination of Supreme Course cases, students have the opportunity to reflect on and potentially broaden their own opinions and perspectives on current criminal justice affairs in regard to issues of law enforcement, public perception, policy development, and ethics.
  
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    FPSY 6217 - Technological Solutions and 21st Century Crime


    (5 cr.) In consideration of modern technological innovation and the spread of knowledge through digital means, the relationship between technology and criminal activity is increasing. In this course, students explore this relationship and gain a comprehensive view of cyber crime, including current trends. They learn how law enforcement agencies use technology to track and apprehend criminals. Through real-world scenarios, students examine legal responses to cyber crime and learn different approaches and techniques for solving cyber crimes and handling related challenges. Students also have the opportunity to gain a comprehensive understanding of building cases and prosecuting crimes through practical exercises in identification, data mining, and the protection and gathering of evidence.
  
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    FPSY 6220 - Sex Offender Behavior


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide an oversight of sex-offending behavior. Legal issues raised in both criminal and civil cases that involve sex offending will be discussed, as will psychological interventions that have been determined according to empirical evidence in helping reduce sex-offending behavior. Students will be expected to learn about the sex-offender assessment tools used by psychologists to conduct legal and psychological research.
  
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    FPSY 6245 - Social Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students use the lens of social psychology to examine both social cognitions and social behavior—nearly all phenomena that pertain to the individual in society. Students explore the topics of perceptions, attitudes, relationships and attraction, the motivation to help others, prejudice and aggression, conformity and obedience, group behavior, and the influence of culture, and they consider how knowledge of these topics can be used to effect positive social change. The application of what students learn in this course culminates in a final project in which they develop a plan for using social psychology research to address a significant social problem. Moreover, their learning in this course will extend to their personal and professional lives and truly enable students to effect positive social change as scholar-practitioners committed to doing so.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6300 - Disaster Response and Recovery


    (5 cr.) A major concern of disaster response professionals is meeting basic and humanitarian needs of disaster-affected populations. In this course, students explore a range of issues, including evacuation, relocation, and tactical and strategic decisions in the immediate aftermath of an emergency episode. Students study important federal policies related to disaster response and recovery, including the National Response Framework (NRF), and they can gain an understanding of how local, state, and federal policies mesh in response and recovery efforts. Through their exploration, they study how recovery begins once the immediate threat of the emergency wanes and the focus shifts to restoring disaster-affected areas. As part of this course, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS208.a: State Disaster Management.
  
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    FPSY 6310 - Research Design♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to build a foundation in the design of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches to psychological research. Students learn the strengths and limitations of each method and under what circumstances each approach would be the most appropriate research design. They also learn the importance of scholarly writing as well as how to identify a topic for research and how to conduct a literature search. Students gain hands-on practice developing a research proposal through which they address key elements, such as collecting and analyzing data, writing an introduction, stating a purpose for the study, identifying research questions and hypotheses, using theory, and defining the significance of the study. Additionally, students consider the legal and ethical issues associated with human subjects’ protection. (Prerequisite(s): FPSY 6305.) Note: To register for this course, please contact the Academic Advising Team.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6314 - Program Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) The skills required to assess research and work effectively with stakeholders are among the many proficiencies required of professionals who evaluate and develop programs. In this course, students examine these skill sets as well as the history, theory, and major approaches underlying program evaluation. Students learn how to select appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative models and techniques to perform evaluations, demonstrate program effectiveness, and disseminate results. Additionally, students explore the procedures and techniques involved in offering their evaluation services to a specific group or organization. They also examine strategies to gain stakeholder interest in developing appropriate standards, research progress, and evaluation outcomes. Students acquire practical experience evaluating a program of interest through which they outline organizational structure, identify stakeholders, employ evaluation models, explain steps in planning, and predict possible challenges or stakeholder fears, for which they recommend solutions. (Prerequisite(s): FPSY 6305 and FPSY 6310.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6331 - Interviewing and Observational Strategies♦


    (5 cr.) Personal attitudes, values, and beliefs often affect a counselor’s ability to establish an appropriate relationship and rapport with clients. In this course, students learn to evaluate their personal attitudes and beliefs to positively influence their counseling approaches. They explore principles and skills related to interviewing and observation, and they examine related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings. Synthesizing concepts, skills, and personal reflections, students demonstrate their ability to engage in a counseling session using techniques learned throughout the course. Note: Students in this course are required to have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6333 - Vicarious Trauma and Compassion Fatigue


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students gain an understanding and awareness of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue for trauma-response-helping professionals. They examine intervention strategies and models of treatment and prevention of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue through the lens of counselor educators, supervisors, and clinicians. Applying course concepts, students gain hands-on practice conducting a needs assessment and examining the use of standardized instruments. They also propose social change recommendations related to vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue to promote informed and competent trauma-response-helping professionals. Students engage in course assignments that emphasize the ethical, legal, multicultural, and spiritual implications for wellness and self-care, including personal, professional, and organizational elements. As a final project, students interview a trauma-response-helping professional and develop an organizational wellness plan for their setting.
  
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    FPSY 6393 - MS in Psychology Capstone


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with the opportunity to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program into a practical project designed to promote positive social change in a capstone project. During this course, students work on a capstone project in which they complete a major integrative paper on a topic related to their specialization, incorporating theoretical and practical knowledge as well as social scientific research skills acquired throughout the program. The instructor may approve other capstone projects presented by students.
  
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    FPSY 6401 - Trauma, Crisis, and Stress with Military Personnel


    (5 cr.) The specific focus of this course is on combat trauma, crisis, and stress experiences and responses of military personnel—both wartime and post-war. Students develop an understanding of the short-term and long-term impact of post-traumatic stress and vicarious trauma. In addition to focusing on how combat and wartime experiences impact individual military personnel, students also explore the effects on families. As a result, students will be better prepared to provide services and mental health support to military personnel dealing with trauma, crisis, and stress.
 

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