2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Oct 17, 2021  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    EDUC 7806 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Field experiences provide education professionals with authentic opportunities to apply learning as well as to expand understanding and ability. Building knowledge, skills, and dispositions for field experiences, education professionals also participate in two residencies in which they have the opportunity to meet face-to-face with faculty members to learn and hone skills, develop dispositions, and discuss ways to ensure productive and successful field experiences and meet the demands of the profession they are studying. The program requires a minimum of 320 hours or 40 eight-hour days (across 12 consecutive months) in elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school settings as an administrative aide to a licensed and practicing school principal. Field experience must include at least 40 hours or 1 week at each level that is not a part of education professionals’ primary teaching experience.
  
  •  

    EDUC 7850 - Foundations in Early Childhood: Developing a Shared Vision


    (6 sem. cr.) Early childhood, as a field, refers to young children (prenatally through 8 years old) as well as to those adults, programs, and agencies that have a significant impact on children’s development and learning. It is a field ripe with current research and opportunities to contribute to positive social change. Education professionals in this course explore the integrative and collaborative richness of the field from its history, values, and ethics to current issues and trends. As part of this foundational course, early childhood professionals learn the process of how to successfully complete their doctoral (Ed.D.) or education specialist (Ed.S.) degree, understanding how Walden supports them in developing (a) facility with Walden University’s online learning environment; (b) understanding the university’s and the program’s support systems, expectations, and outcomes; and (c) advanced graduate-level critical-thinking, research, and writing skills.
  
  •  

    EDUC 7851 - Global Perspectives on Development and Learning


    (6 sem. cr.) Why is the well-being of young children vital to learning and later success in life? Research continues to indicate that early influences are critical to the development of children’s brains and lifelong health. Scientific evidence also indicates that there is intrinsic value for young children in experiencing the joy and discovery of childhood. Such experiences not only generate later positive outcomes to society, but they also contribute to viewing life with optimism, learning social skills, and coping with stress. In this course, early childhood professionals study current national and international thinking with regard to early childhood development. Course content also includes global perspectives related to designing, implementing, and evaluating experiences for every child. Special attention is paid to brain research; factors that promote and impede development and learning; and effective assessment of development, learning, and teaching/programmatic practices.
  
  •  

    EDUC 7852 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and of the appropriate use of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
  •  

    EDUC 7853 - Influences of Family, Culture, and Society in Early Childhood


    (6 sem. cr.) Early childhood professionals understand that building reciprocal relationships with children’s families and community members is essential to promoting positive outcomes for children. Whether early childhood professionals intend to impact positive social change by working with children and families in early childhood settings or in related professions, understanding the complexities of such relationships and the skills of relationship building are essential. The focus of this course is on research-based knowledge of family dynamics and the vital role relationships play in children’s lives. Special attention is paid to relationship building through the lens of cultural responsiveness and by studying how identities are defined and evolve related to ethnicity, race, economic class, gender, and sexual orientation. Education professionals are challenged to delve deep into issues related to risk factors such as trauma, poverty, bias, stereotyping, and homelessness as well as to study factors that support resilience.
  
  •  

    EDUC 7854 - Dynamics of Early Childhood Policies and Systems


    (6 sem. cr.) Healthy development of children from prenatal stages throughout early childhood does not depend on one group of people, one type of agency, or even a continuum of quality early childhood education. Rather, public policy, government processes, funding streams, and research from disciplines such as medicine, psychology, and public health all have an impact—positive and negative—on whether children and families thrive. In this course, educators examine existing early childhood systems—how they function and how they interact—with the goal of improving services for young children and families. Education professionals research and evaluate case studies to develop a deep understanding of the ways that systems are impacted by funding and public policy, determine services, function in today’s society, and ultimately affect the lives of young children and families.


     

  
  •  

    EDUC 7856 - Capstone: Advocacy and Leadership for Positive Social Change


    (6 sem. cr.) What knowledge, skills, and dispositions should early childhood leaders exemplify? The field needs leaders who (a) know the history and understand the values and ethics of the field; (b) who approach the present and the future as critical and creative thinkers committed to positive change; and (c) who are advocates, researchers, relationship builders, data-driven decision makers, and managers of change with a keen understanding of diversity, humane interaction, organizational development, and system-oriented thinking. In this course, professionals engage in the study of leadership for positive social change in the early childhood field, which culminates in a capstone project that requires participants to apply the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of a leader to effect change in an early childhood setting of their choice.
  
  •  

    EDUC 7902 - Teacher Leadership Capstone: Trends, Issues and Global Perspectives


    (6 sem. cr.) The current state of knowledge is guaranteed to change as research and technological innovations continue; therefore, it is necessary to function as lifelong learners. In this course, education professionals examine intriguing and potentially critical directions in teaching and learning, including brain research, new technologies, and globalization influences. They examine and reflect on effects of these trends on their own areas of interest. This capstone course concludes the program by providing education professionals the opportunity to engage in a practical application of knowledge and skills gained throughout the program. Working in a consultative role as a K–12 teacher, education professionals engage in a real-world, problem-solving project within their work environment.
  
  •  

    EDUC 7905 - Capstone: EdS in Curriculum, Instruction, and Professional Development


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals conclude their program with this capstone course in which they are provided the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills gained throughout the program to an actual educational environment. Serving as consultants, education professionals examine a school or district’s curriculum plans against a set of data and make recommendations for improvement and reform. (Prerequisite(s): All other courses.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 8002 - Leading the Future of Education


    (5 cr.) As an advanced graduate student, you are about to embark on one of the most exciting journeys of your life. This practical course provides meaningful skills you will need to select your path, complete your degree, and become a successful leader of educational change in the 21st century. Networking and research skills, scholarly writing, critical thinking, use of Walden resources, and the three advanced graduate paths (e.g., Ph.D., Ed.D., Ed.S.)—this course addresses all of these in a manner that provides a solid foundation of skill sets upon which to base your journey. You will find a balance of assignments (e.g., case studies, discussions, application assignments) that will ignite your passion for learning, that will allow you to collaborate with others, and that will guide your current and future work. This course is designed to reflect Walden’s social change mission and provide you with meaningful tools for success as an advanced graduate student.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8005 - Foundations: The Changing Context of Postsecondary and Adult Teaching and Learning♦


    (6 sem. cr.) Learning in adulthood is imperative for individuals to realize the opportunities of 21st-century workplaces, technology, and society. Providing these learning experiences requires committed and responsive adult and postsecondary education leaders. In this course, education professionals investigate contemporary trends and issues in teaching and learning in postsecondary and adult education settings. The course also provides education professionals with an introduction to the expectations of graduate work in Adult Education and College Teaching and Learning programs. Education professionals learn to work effectively within Walden University’s online learning environment and develop an understanding of university and program support systems, expectations, and outcomes.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8011 - Foundations for Doctoral Study in Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment


    (6 sem. cr.) Providing systemic leadership at the district, regional, state, or federal level in curriculum, instruction, and assessment is a complex, challenging process. This course is a foundation for education professionals to navigate this process and lead so that they can promote the success of all K–12 students within their organizations by developing quality educational programs. Education professionals examine the critical elements of a framework for leading for excellence, including curriculum, instruction, and assessment; data-driven instructional improvement; professional learning time for improvement; and leadership skills that produce results. They also learn the process for completing their doctoral degree successfully by examining how Walden University supports them in developing facility with Walden’s online learning environment; understanding of the university’s and the program’s support systems, expectations, and outcomes; and doctoral-level critical-thinking, research, and writing skills.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8012 - Leadership for Today’s Schools


    (6 sem. cr.) Today’s schools are dynamic places and require leaders who understand how learning communities operate and thrive and are prepared to deal with the demands of internal and external forces. In this course, education professionals make connections between change theory and the continual appraisal of evolving needs of the learning community and application of a grounded knowledge base of theory and practical strategies supported by research. Education professionals are empowered to explore current and future technology as they assess educational trends and issues. Education professionals also analyze their own and others’ paradigms and leadership styles, and they determine best practices to promote positive social change.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8021 - Understanding the Adult Learner


    (5 cr.) Unique and distinctive skills are required to engage and teach adult learners. Education professionals will explore adult learning and developmental theory and the wide range of research that supports it, including andragogy and transformation, phase and stage developmental theories, and effects of gender and culture on adult learning. Educators will also be provided with the opportunity to reflect on the relationship of course material with their own experiences as adult learners. Education professionals complete a variety of realistic assignments through which they practice communicating and presenting complex concepts, critique the work of major theorists, apply adult learning and development theories to educational practice, and construct their own positions on adult learning as scholar-practitioners.  
  
  •  

    EDUC 8040 - Foundations: Teacher Leadership


    (6 sem. cr.) The purpose of this foundations course is to engage education professionals with the environment, expectations, and content of doctoral work in the Teacher Leadership specialization. Education professionals develop facility with Walden University’s online learning environment; understanding of the university’s and the program’s support systems and expectations and outcomes; knowledge about the field, which they synthesize with reflection on their own experience and goals; and doctoral-level, critical-thinking and writing skills.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8081 - Completing the Prospectus


    (0 sem. cr.)  The prospectus is a brief document that helps education professionals organize, delineate, and make decisions regarding their doctoral study and appropriate research methodology. In this course, education professionals design the prospectus in collaboration with their committee members. Education professionals learn best practices for developing the prospectus and analyze past examples. They refine their doctoral study questions and explore research methods and project types that they may incorporate into their study. Finally, they engage in the iterative process of writing the prospectus, incorporating feedback from peers and committee members. Ultimately, the prospectus is offered by education professionals as a document for review for consideration by potential mentors for their doctoral study, which is completed during EDUC 8090 - Doctoral Study Intensive. 
  
  •  

    EDUC 8090 - Doctoral Study Intensive


    (12 sem. cr.–6 sem. cr. per term for 2 terms) Students demonstrate in the doctoral study their scholarly abilities to examine, critique, and synthesize knowledge so that new ideas can be tested; best practices identified, established, and verified; or theoretical or policy constructs evaluated and advanced. In all cases, the doctoral study is to be a rigorous, original inquiry that results in new knowledge, demonstrating its efficacy in the world of practice. The goal of the doctoral study is for the education professional to conduct an investigation that focuses on learning, teaching, and leading within a designated community.  (Prerequisite(s): All other course requirements and the residency must be completed prior to registration in EDUC 8090). Note: EDUC 8090 must be taken for a minimum of two terms for a total of 12 semester credits. If more time is needed to complete the doctoral study, additional terms of EDUC 8090 will be required to use university services and support. Additional credits for EDUC 8090 are not reflected in the overall credit requirements needed for graduation, but these additional credits will appear on the transcript.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8101 - How Adults Learn: Theory and Research


    (6 sem. cr.) Adult learning is similar to and different from learning at any other age. In this course, education professionals examine these similarities and differences, focusing on adult learning and developmental theory and the wide range of research that supports it. Education professionals explore adult learning theories, including andragogy and transformation; phase and stage developmental theories; and effects of gender and culture on adult learning. They also have the opportunity to reflect on the relationship of this material to their own experiences. Education professionals complete a variety of written application assignments through which they practice communicating and presenting complex concepts, critique the work of a major theorist, apply adult learning and development theories to educational practice, and construct their own positions on adult learning as scholar-practitioners.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8102 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and the appropriate use of qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8103 - Designing and Assessing Learning Experiences


    (6 sem. cr.) Research has considerably expanded the knowledge of adult learning and development in recent years. These gains have resulted in a new paradigm for the design and assessment of learning experiences. In this course, education professionals advance their understanding of research methods as they examine literature about design and assessment. They also apply research-based principles in the design of a project to develop learning experiences for a specific population of adults using on-site, online, or hybrid models.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8104 - Facilitating Adult Learning


    (6 sem. cr.) Using research and theory on differences in learning, education professionals in this course explore the repertoire of practices that facilitate adult learning from a teaching and learning perspective. These practices range from mentoring and coaching to collaborative engagement and reflective practices. Education professionals deepen their understanding of research methods by critiquing articles and designing research studies to investigate specific learning practices.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8105 - Adult Learning: Trends, Issues, Global Perspectives


    (6 sem. cr.) Invariable advances in research and technology continue to change the current state of knowledge; therefore, it is necessary to function as lifelong learners. In this course, education professionals examine intriguing and potentially critical directions in adult learning, including brain research, new technologies, and the impact of globalization. They also have the opportunity to examine and reflect on the effects of these trends in their own areas of interest.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8106 - Research in Practice


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators build on their knowledge of and experience with research design and methodology through a hands-on, in-depth study of specific data collection and analysis skills, which they need to become effective producers of research. Educators apply concepts and practice skills in research design, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of results. They complete practical exercises and engage in discussions that emphasize qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8110 - Development of the Scholar-Practitioner


    (4 cr.) Building on the Carnegie Foundation’s metaphor of “stewards of the discipline,” education professionals in this course explore the role of the scholar-practitioner and the expectations and responsibilities inherent in obtaining a PhD in Education. Using this understanding, education professionals develop a professional development plan to guide their progress through the program. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop strategies for online success. They also explore resources used throughout the program and engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence. Note: Taken concurrently with EDUC 8111.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8111 - Principles of Social Change


    (4 cr.) Consistent with the mission of Walden University, this course is a foundation for the remainder of the program. Through this couse, education professionals aquire a framework for their work as scholar-practitioners and agents of positive social change in education. Education professionals examine foundational theories of education while considering their future role in the discipline. Through an integrative process of developing an essay comparing theories of social change, they also begin to hone their skills as scholarly writers. Note: Taken concurrently with EDUC 8110.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8112 - Social Change in Education


    (4 cr.) The choice to effect positive social change in education demands that scholar-practitioners have the requisite skills and abilities to take responsibility for generating new knowledge, conserving the values of education, and communicating information to others. In this course, education professionals examine these key principles of disciplinary stewardship while building strategies to effect positive social change. Demonstrating their understanding of course concepts, they develop a social change proposal that fills an area of need in their organization, workplace, or community. Through this proposal, they analyze prospective requirements, challenges, and effects of their proposed plan of action. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8110 and EDUC 8111.) Note: Taken concurrently with RSCH 8100.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8113 - The Learner Across the Lifespan


    (4 cr.) Educational scholars recognize the important role of human development in the educational process. In this course, education professionals gain an understanding of the theories and frameworks relevant to the development and experiences of individuals from birth through old age. They engage in coursework that emphasizes application of this knowledge to educational settings, and they discuss a range of topics, such as personal teaching experiences, theory-based approaches to a contemporary problem, influences of moral development, and intergenerational relationships, among others.  Education professionals also explore different strands of development across the lifespan as well as how they relate to the individual as a learner. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8111.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 8114 - Learning and Instruction


    (4 cr.) The processes of teaching and learning are central to the educational enterprise. In this course,  education professionals examine learning from a variety of perspectives, focusing on supporting academic and co-curricular success in education. They explore curriculum theory and design, with emphasis on the theoretical, practical, and political aspects of curricula. Through a variety of written and applied assignments, they investigate learned societies; make connections to research; develop a course proposal, including a course outline that identifies learning objectives; analyze the influence of technology on education; review and reflect on the importance of the curriculum development process and the role of curriculum to guide instruction and assessment; and develop their own approach to instruction and learning. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8112.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 8115 - Assessment and Accountability in Education


    (4 cr.) Increasingly, schools and educational committees ask educators at all levels to account for the influence of the educational process on learners and to make research-based decisions. In this course, education professionals build on their knowledge of theories of development and learning as they gain foundational skills in assessing and evaluating student learning, developmental outcomes, and educational programs. Acquiring key evaluation concepts, they also examine the purposes for collecting student data as well as the distinctions among various approaches to assessing learning. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8112.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 8116 - Leadership in a Global Society


    (4 cr.) Leadership roles in education take a wide range of forms, from the teacher in the kindergarten classroom to the president of a university. Academic leaders recognize the interplay between local challenges and national and global influences as well as the unique societal pressures on the educational process. Education professionals in this course explore these challenges and influences to gain an understanding of the skills and sensibilities needed to lead in a global society. They examine leadership theories and research as well as the principles of leadership within educational communities. They also have the opportunity to analyze their own leadership skills in the context of these theories and principles. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8114.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 8117 - Educational Organizations and Contexts


    (4 cr.) Research efforts to support the educational process and effective leadership demand an understanding of schools and academic institutions as complex systems and units of change. In this course, education professionals examine theories of organizational functioning and apply these insights to the behaviors of individuals and groups within educational systems. They also explore systems thinking and organizational effectiveness that supports teaching and learning. Education professionals engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of course content through which they analyze ethical behavior in organizational development; summarize, test, and evaluate theories; construct an organizational development scenario; evaluate a case study related to organizational development; and assess their own educational organization. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8115.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 8118 - Innovation and Change in Education


    (4 cr.) Understanding the impact of new innovations and change has emerged as a field of theory and research in education. Education professionals in this course build on the principles of social change as well as research and theories of leadership and organizational functioning as they focus on the challenges inherent in initiating and managing change in educational organizations. They explore the role of change agents as well as the influences of technological innovations on the academic process. Applying course concepts, education professionals design plans to implement and evaluate new programs to support change. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8116 and EDUC 8117 OR EDUC 8841.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 8140 - Leadership for Today’s Schools


    (6 sem. cr.) Today’s schools are dynamic places and require leaders who understand how learning communities operate and thrive and are prepared to deal with the demands of internal and external forces. In this course, education professionals make connections between change theory and the continual appraisal of evolving needs of the learning community and application of a grounded knowledge base of theory and practical strategies supported by research. Education professionals are empowered to explore current and future technology as they assess educational trends and issues. Education professionals also analyze their own and others’ paradigms and leadership styles, and they determine best practices to promote positive social change.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8141 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and the appropriate use of qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8142 - Teaching and Learning: Theory and Research


    (6 sem. cr.) Research has considerably expanded the knowledge of teaching and learning in recent years. A new paradigm for the design and assessment of learning experiences is a result of these gains. In this course, education professionals advance their understanding of research methods as they examine literature about design and assessment. They also apply research-based principles, via technological means, to collect, analyze, and present data with the goal of solving a learning problem in their school or district.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8143 - Collegial Interactions and Professional Development


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, the role of teacher leadership expands from the classroom to the school community. Education professionals in this course focus on the development of knowledge, abilities, and dispositions necessary for effective and productive leadership in effecting professional partnerships, participating in collegial study teams, facilitating professional development of other educators, and adeptly using collegial and collaborative processes, such as coaching and mentoring.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8144 - Teacher Leadership: Trends, Issues, and Global Perspectives


    (6 sem. cr.) Invariably, advances in research and technology continue to change the current state of knowledge; therefore, it is necessary to function as lifelong learners. In this course, education professionals examine intriguing and potentially critical directions in adult learning, including brain research, new technologies, and the impact of globalization. They also have the opportunity to examine and reflect on the effects of these trends in their own areas of interest.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8145 - Research in Practice


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators build on their knowledge of and experience with research design and methodology through a hands-on, in-depth study of specific data collection and analysis skills, which they need to become effective producers of research. Educators apply concepts and practice skills in research design, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of results. They complete practical exercises and engage in discussions that emphasize qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8304 - Effective College Teaching: Engaging Diverse Learners


    (6 sem. cr.) As colleges and universities broaden their missions to serve new groups of learners, and as more people pursue a college education, college educators must strive to engage increasingly diverse student populations. At the same time, changing workplace needs and growing demands for accountability require that college educators must be able to help demonstrate that learners have met important learning goals. In this course, education professionals will investigate the research-based teaching and assessment strategies that can support all learners. Education professionals also assess methods for critically reflecting upon their own practice, engaging in education scholarship, and collaborating with colleagues on the continuous improvement of learning experiences and environments.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8306 - Effective College Teaching: Using Technology to Support Learning


    (6 sem. cr.) Technology is a tool that can support student engagement and the development of critical knowledge and skills. College educators must learn how to harness the growing number of new technologies for constructive use in diverse learning contexts. In this course, education professionals consider how to stay abreast of available technologies and related research as well as how to use these tools and research most effectively in face-to-face, hybrid, and online environments. Through a variety of contextual and application-based assignments, education professionals practice making critical decisions on when and how to implement technological solutions, how to assess the value of these tools for students in particular learning contexts, and how to maximize the power of technology for learning in a global environment.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8342 - Emerging and Future Technologies


    (5 cr.) Conceive of a world where emerging and future technologies are a seamless facet of learning and work. Learners explore this world through social networking, mobile technologies, gaming and simulations, collaborative tools and strategies, and more, to become thought leaders in their field. Critical thinking and decision-making skills are developed to analyze obsolete technologies, assess new technologies, and predict future technological movements. Insights are examined from the view of a futurist, guiding learners as they become experts in the evaluation and use of emerging and future technologies.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8343 - Creating Digital Media


    (5 cr.) The effective use of digital media in learning environments requires leaders in the field to be both consumers and creators. Learners become knowledgeable developers of digital media by applying principles of instructional design and pedagogy to multimedia. Learners collaborate in the design and creation of digital and interactive media based on visual design principles.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8344 - Innovations and the Diffusion of Learning Technologies


    (5 cr.) Thought leaders instigate change in the workplace. Learners explore Rogers’s diffusion of innovations theory, research effective practices for integrating technology and overcoming resistance to change, and apply methods for being a catalyst for change. Playing a diffusion simulation game enables learners to analyze the power of gaming in instructional environments. Learners analyze the needs of an organization and demonstrate their skills of persuasion to convince key stakeholders to adopt a technological innovation in their workplace.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8470 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and the appropriate use of qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8541 - Foundations in Reading and Literacy Leadership


    (6 sem. cr.) Literacy may be understood in multiple ways across various settings and populations. Candidates taking this course lay a foundation for leaders to define literacy based on the sociopolitical landscape, the influence of social media and technological innovation, and influences coming from Common Core standards that influence literacy programs in P–20 and beyond. As part of this foundational course, candidates also learn the process for how to succeed as a graduate student at Walden University, understanding how Walden supports students in developing (a) facility with Walden University’s online learning environment; (b) understanding of the university and the program support systems, expectations, and outcomes; and (c) graduate-level critical thinking, research, and writing skills.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8542 - Literacy Leadership for Today’s Schools


    (6 sem. cr.) The field of literacy education demands leaders who are not only knowledgeable in this subject area but who can articulate a dynamic vision that motivates collaboration, creativity, and positive social change. Candidates taking this course, grounded in knowledge about literacy professional standards of practice, examine the high-stakes nature of literacy acquisition in the context of limited financial and human resources. Leadership skills explored include decision making to solve complex problems, facilitation for reaching goals, mentoring, and the building of staff capacity for literacy infusion across content areas. Candidates study leadership and change theory at both the research and application levels.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8543 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and of the appropriate use of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8544 - Learners and the Changing Literacy Landscape


    (6 sem. cr.) Literacy is essential for individual learning and is also a means by which an individual participates in the intellectual, social, and commercial life of the community. Students in this course examine language development within the context of culture, the value placed on literacy within the community, and diversity of learner ability. Topics include the developmental nature of literacy competencies from early childhood to the adult learner, potential barriers to literacy that learners of all ages must overcome, theoretical research, and approaches to curriculum and instruction that facilitate literacy across settings. Specific attention is given to the challenges second language learners face in school. Candidates will practice analyzing, evaluating, and applying research methods appropriate to data-driven planning and decision making.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8545 - Assessment and Data Analysis to Support Systemic Literacy Programs


    (6 sem. cr.) Designing systems that effectively promote and support high levels of literacy proficiency requires the use of data that accurately describe the status of student, teacher, and school performance. Students in this course examine a variety of assessment tools and validity issues for addressing individual and classroom needs as well as district and state mandates. Topics include a focus on data analysis for tiered intervention decision making and the interpretation of data to drive recommendations at a systemic level. Skills of collaboration and stakeholder inclusion are examined. Quantitative and qualitative methods appropriate to understanding institutions, programs, and stakeholder interests are also explored.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8546 - Research in Practice


    (6 sem. cr.) Candidates build on their prior explorations of research design and methodology by providing hands-on, in-depth study of specific data collection and analysis skills needed to become producers of research. Candidates apply concepts and practice skills in research design, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of results. By completing practical exercises and participating in discussion, candidates emphasize both qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8547 - Program Development and Professional Development


    (6 sem. cr.) As research and technology continue to provide new perspectives on literacy, educational leaders are charged with the responsibility for leading the selection or development and implementation of innovative programs that support high levels of literacy achievement for all learners. In this course, educational leaders emphasize program development, monitoring, and evaluation for continuous improvement of literacy teaching and learning. They integrate the important role the literacy leader plays in supporting effective professional development. Topics also include the creation of a literacy environment and the use of technology to promote both student learning and the professional development of teachers. Research highlights current issues in the field of literacy as they relate to program development, evaluation, and professional development.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8640 - The Learning-Centered Institution


    (6 sem. cr.) Institutions of higher education exist to create learning that is achieved by students, pursued through scholarship, and developed in the daily practice of faculty members and staff. The concepts of the learning institution, which place learning at the center of all of its programs, services, and operations, are introduced in this course. Through the exploration of the learning-centered institution, education professionals gain a foundation for the EdD with a specialization in Higher Education Leadership. Through participation in course activities, they develop facility with Walden University’s online learning environment and understanding of the university’s and the program’s support systems, expectations, and outcomes; knowledge about the field, which they synthesize with reflection on their own experience and goals; and doctoral-level critical-thinking and writing skills.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8641 - The New Higher Education Enterprise


    (6 sem. cr.) Creating and sustaining learning-centered institutions in today’s global economy is no small feat. Leaders of today’s colleges and universities must embrace their role in the enterprise of higher education and engage in new entrepreneurial, collaborative practices to promote, develop, and ensure the quality and sustainability of their programs and services. In this course, education professionals examine the current landscape of higher education, emerging trends and issues that require new types of leadership, and the historical and philosophical foundations of these issues. They investigate the social role of postsecondary education in promoting educational attainment, civic engagement, and globalization, as well as policy issues that are raising the stakes for accountability and quality assurance. They engage in activities and discussions to explore strategies for leveraging resources, achieving sustainability, and supporting new initiatives in this environment.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8642 - Transformative Leadership in Higher Education


    (6 sem. cr.) Effective leadership in higher education goes beyond managing or reacting to change; it anticipates change and seeks out opportunities for growth for the institution and its members while keeping the institution focused on its mission and goals for learning. Education professionals in this course focus on key leadership skills, such as communication, negotiation, decision making, strategic planning, and conflict management. They research and discuss strategies for navigating the complex political environment of today’s colleges and universities, cultivating a culture of evidence, and developing the institution’s intellectual and human resources. They also practice analyzing, evaluating, and applying research methods appropriate to data-driven planning and decision making.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8643 - Achieving Coherence in Complex Institutions


    (6 sem. cr.) Higher education, as an enterprise, as well as individual institutions, grow more complex every day. Meeting the needs of diverse stakeholder groups, operating within an increasingly convoluted legal and regulatory environment, and adapting to changes in society can lead to fragmentation and divisiveness within institutions. In this course, education professionals examine ways in which leaders can bridge traditional gaps between academic affairs, student affairs, business and external affairs, and community partners to promote collaboration on learning-centered goals. They investigate strategies for leading change within and across different parts of the institution to implement new requirements, seize opportunities, or plan responses to crises and challenges. Moreover, education professionals explore the use of research methods appropriate to understanding institutions, programs, and stakeholder interests.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8644 - Research in Practice


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators build on their knowledge of and experience with research design and methodology through a hands-on, in-depth study of specific data collection and analysis skills, which they need to become effective producers of research. Educators apply concepts and practice skills in research design, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of results. They complete practical exercises and engage in discussions that emphasize qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8645 - Managing Resources to Drive Change in Higher Education


    (6 sem. cr.) Managing resources—financial, technological, human, and intellectual—is higher education leaders’ most significant concern. In this course, participants focus on how leaders in higher education can effectively plan, prioritize, allocate, and track the use of resources toward achieving learning-focused goals. Candidates research and discuss the meaning of efficiency, productivity, and sustainability in higher education and ways to maximize these across the institution. Activities include analysis of various budgeting, planning, and fund-raising strategies and how these can be used to identify new and reallocated resources to enable growth and sustainability of quality programs. Candidates will also investigate research approaches appropriate to planning and resource management.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8745 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and of the appropriate use of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8750 - Systemic Curriculum Design: Rigor, Relevance, and Results


    (6 sem. cr.) Designing curriculum with rigor, relevance, and results requires broad understanding of the key concepts behind each of these attributes. In this course, education professionals examine the contribution of learning theory to what defines rigor as they explore alignment of standards and design models as well as the role of collaboration between educators and the needs of an ever-increasing diverse student population, including English-language learners, special education educators, gifted students, and students of poverty. As leaders of learning, education professionals examine the connection between relevant curriculum and global trends, social-emotional, and character development, and the integration of technology for student engagement. In addition, they gain an understanding of what constitutes results that acknowledge the demands of accountability from multiple constituents, such as parents, community members, school administrators, and government oversight. They also gain practice analyzing, evaluating, and applying quantitative research methods appropriate to data-driven planning and decision making.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8751 - Data-Driven Instruction and Assessment


    (6 sem. cr.) Instructional leaders must have the ability to diagnose by reviewing data and practices, set a vision for where they want to go, prioritize the work by utilizing relevant data, identify measurable goals, develop an action plan, and then monitor their results. Education professionals in this course examine this inextricable link between instruction and assessment. They engage in a diagnostic process designed to meet diverse student and systemic needs. They also examine the role of formative and summative assessments in making decisions, the various forms and purposes of assessment, and how the ongoing use of assessment data can move curriculum and instruction beyond mediocrity to support rigorous learning for all students. Additionally, they explore qualitative research methods appropriate to understanding institutions, programs, and stakeholder interests.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8752 - Effective Professional Development


    (6 sem. cr.) Effective professional development is foundational to improving a school system’s ability to raise student achievement. Using adult learning theory as a foundation, educators explore models that look at adult learning strategies and skills that build strong professional development opportunities promoting new knowledge and skills that affect teacher practice and student learning. Educators learn how to use collaboration, facilitation, coaching, and mentoring that support a culture of learning that involves students, educators, parents, and community. As evaluating the impact of professional development efforts is crucial to ongoing success, leaders learn to collect and analyze data from student work and teacher practice to make informed decisions that lead to continuous improvement. Communicating and disseminating results to multiple constituents within the school system are emphasized. Educators also investigate mixed-methodology research approaches appropriate to planning and resource management.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8753 - Research in Practice


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators build on their knowledge of and experience with research design and methodology through a hands-on, in-depth study of specific data collection and analysis skills, which they need to become effective producers of research. Educators apply concepts and practice skills in research design, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of results. They complete practical exercises and engage in discussions that emphasize qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8760 - Foundations: Special Education


    (6 sem. cr.) Special education as a field is dynamic, with a growing research base of best practices and changing implementation efforts that seek to balance effective and efficient education for students with disabilities. Education professionals in this course explore evolving trends that reflect this balance and a range of related topics, such as issues of equity, assistive technology, collaborative instruction between regular and special educators, delivery approaches with and without student categorization, and ethical practice. As part of this foundational course, education professionals learn the process of how to complete their doctoral or education specialist degree successfully. They gain facility with Walden University’s online learning environment; knowledge of the university’s and the program’s support systems, expectations, and outcomes; and advanced, graduate-level critical-thinking, research, and writing skills.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8761 - Leadership, Advocacy, Policy, and Law


    (6 sem. cr.) Leadership and advocacy go hand-in-hand when seeking to promote policies that support effective practices in education for early childhood and school-age students. In this course, education professionals analyze the connections among advocacy, leadership, and policy by examining the evolution of education legislation and pivotal case law in the United States. They examine change theory and leadership styles, allowing them to reflect on their own and others’ paradigms and to determine best practices to promote positive social change. They also engage in a culminating project through which they construct a professional plan for advocacy and leadership in an area of interest that includes issues of diversity and special needs.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8762 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and of the appropriate use of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8763 - Specialized Instruction


    (6 sem. cr.) A growing body of research exists around evidence-based instructional practices in special education. Educators in this course review the literature specific to specialized instruction for students with disabilities in language, reading, writing, math, and content areas. Topics also include effective practices for instruction and evaluation for students with social-emotional and behavioral needs, including applied behavior analysis and positive behavioral interventions and skill building. Related brain research will be examined, as well as assistive technology and methods of delivery, whether in isolation, small group, or inclusive settings.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8764 - Research Methodology and Special Education


    (6 sem. cr.) To document the effectiveness of practices in special education, different research questions are needed that call for different types of methodologies. Educators examine four types of research methodologies important to special education: experimental group, correlation, single-subject, and qualitative designs. Particular attention is given to single-subject research designs that are used to study behavioral change in an individual or a group as a result of an intervention. Topics include reliable measurement, repeated measurement, description of conditions, baseline and treatment conditions, and single-variable rules.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8765 - School-Wide Intervention Models


    (6 sem. cr.) Response to intervention (RTI) is a school-wide approach that integrates assessment and intervention within a multitiered prevention system to maximize student achievement and to reduce behavioral problems. Educators examine RTI research and other problem-solving processes for best practices for using data to identify students at risk of academic, social, or emotional failure; methods of disability identification and monitoring student progress; and data-based decision making for instruction, universal instruction, and interventions useful for all students. Professional development of regular and special education teachers and the role of parents will be explored. Functional behavioral assessment is examined as an evaluation tool for understanding behavior, and effective practices for school-wide positive behavioral support (SWPBS) are also explored.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8766 - Research in Practice


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators build on their knowledge of and experience with research design and methodology through a hands-on, in-depth study of specific data collection and analysis skills, which they need to become effective producers of research. Educators apply concepts and practice skills in research design, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of results. They complete practical exercises and engage in discussions that emphasize qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8767 - Sustaining and Supporting Effective Practices in Special Education


    (6 sem. cr.) Once effective practices for special education are in place, a clear plan is needed for implementation fidelity that addresses program integrity and sustains commitment within the professional learning community. Candidates will examine critical contributing components such as program evaluation, professionalism, cultural resonance, and policy to support continuous improvement. (Prerequisite(s): All other courses.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 8800 - Research Forum


    (6 cr.) The purpose of this forum is to assist students with making steady progress toward earning a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree. Students prepare a plan of action, engage in regular scholarly discussion with a faculty mentor and fellow doctoral students, and submit a personal progress report. Students submit drafts of Learning Agreements, Knowledge Area Modules (KAMs), and dissertations to the faculty mentor for feedback. Information and resources related to KAMs, dissertations, residencies, research and writing, courses, and doctoral program expectations are provided for guidance.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8842 - Principles of Distance Education


    (4 cr.) Different theories, paradigms, and the history of distance education will be explored. Learners critique current research and assess online learning programs including hybrid and fully online delivery. Accessibility issues, open source, best practices to facilitate learning, global trends, and the move from elite to mass higher education will be analyzed. Synchronous versus asynchronous platforms will be contrasted. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8118, RSCH 8200, and RSCH 8300.)
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 8900.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 8843 - Leading and Managing Educational Technology


    (4 cr.) Education professionals in this course explore issues related to leadership regarding the integration of technology in business and in education at any level, including  K–12 schools, community colleges, teacher education, or higher education. They explore such areas as leadership, strategic planning, systems acquisition, coordination, implementation, technology management and its implications for teaching and learning, and administrative functions. Moreover, they share perspectives through discussions on policies that affect human resource development, staff development, information access, security, management control, and evaluation.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8844 - Designing Instruction for Distance Education


    (4 cr.) Instructional design for distance education involves understanding educational experiences, what makes these experiences effective, and the ways in which students learn in the online environment. Education professionals have the opportunity to gain a practical understanding of these topics through the examination of learning styles, learning theory, social networking and collaborative group influences, assessment, global perspectives, and diversity. They also analyze effective online educational experiences from education and the workplace. Focusing on the design and delivery of distance education, education professionals engage in applied assignments that emphasize developing, field testing, and revising a web-based unit. They also explore ways to employ engaging instructional electronic strategies to enhance design and development. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8842 or EDUC 7102.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 8850 - Foundations in Early Childhood: Developing a Shared Vision


    (6 sem. cr.) Early childhood, as a field, refers to young children (prenatally through 8 years old) as well as those adults, programs, and agencies that have a significant impact on children’s development and learning. It is a field ripe with current research and opportunities to contribute to positive social change. Educators explore the integrative and collaborative richness of the field from its history, values, and ethics to current issues and trends. As part of this foundational course, early childhood professionals learn the process of how to successfully complete their doctoral (EdD) or education specialist (EdS) degrees, understanding how Walden supports them in developing (a) facility with Walden University’s online learning environment; (b) understanding the university’s and the program’s support systems, expectations, and outcomes; and (c) advanced graduate-level critical-thinking, research, and writing skills.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8851 - Global Perspectives on Development and Learning


    (6 sem. cr.) Why is the well-being of young children vital to learning and later success in life? Research continues to indicate that early influences are critical to the development of children’s brains and lifelong health. Scientific evidence also indicates that there is intrinsic value for young children in experiencing the joy and discovery of childhood. Such experiences not only generate later positive outcomes to society, but they also contribute to viewing life with optimism, learning social skills, and coping with stress. In this course, early childhood professionals study current national and international thinking with regard to early childhood development. Course content also includes global perspectives related to designing, implementing, and evaluating experiences for every child. Special attention is paid to brain research, factors that promote and impede development and learning, and effective assessment of development, learning, and teaching/programmatic practices.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8852 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and of the appropriate use of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8853 - Influences of Family, Culture, and Society in Early Childhood


    (6 sem. cr.) Early childhood professionals understand that building reciprocal relationships with children’s families and community members is essential to promoting positive outcomes for children. Whether early childhood professionals intend to impact positive social change by working with children and families in early childhood settings or in related professions, understanding the complexities of such relationships and the skills of relationship building are essential. The focus of this course is on research-based knowledge of family dynamics and the vital role relationships play in children’s lives. Special attention is paid to relationship building through the lens of cultural responsiveness and by studying how identities are defined and evolve related to ethnicity, race, economic class, gender, and sexual orientation. Education professionals are challenged to delve deep into issues related to risk factors such as trauma, poverty, bias, stereotyping, and homelessness as well as to study factors that support resilience.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8854 - Dynamics of Early Childhood Policies and Systems


    (6 sem. cr.) Healthy development of children from prenatal stages throughout early childhood does not depend on one group of people, one type of agency, or even a continuum of quality early childhood education. Rather, public policy, government processes, funding streams, and research from disciplines such as medicine, psychology, and public health all have an impact—positive and negative—on whether children and families thrive. In this course, educators examine existing early childhood systems—how they function and how they interact—with the goal of improving services for young children and families. Education professionals research and evaluate case studies to develop a deep understanding of the ways that systems are impacted by funding and public policy, determine services, function in today’s society, and ultimately affect the lives of young children and families.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8855 - Research in Practice♦


    (6 sem. cr.) Educators build on their prior explorations of research design and methodology by studying in depth the hands-on specific data collection and analysis skills needed to become producers of research. Education professionals apply concepts and practice skills in research design, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of results. Practical exercises and discussion will emphasize both qualitative and quantitative research methods.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8856 - Advocacy and Leadership for Positive Social Change


    (6 sem. cr.) What knowledge, skills, and dispositions should early childhood leaders exemplify? The field needs leaders who (a) know the history and understand the values and ethics of the field; (b) approach the present and the future as critical and creative thinkers committed to positive change; and (c) are advocates, researchers, relationship builders, data-driven decision makers, and managers of change with a keen understanding of diversity, humane interaction, organizational development, and system-oriented thinking. In this course, professionals engage in the study of leadership for positive social change in the early childhood field, which culminates in a capstone project that requires participants to apply the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of a leader to effect change in an early childhood setting of their choice.
  
  •  

    EDUC 8900 - Dissertation Companion


    (0 cr.) The purpose of this dissertation companion course is to assist education professionals in making steady progress toward completing their degrees. This course is a companion that education professionals use as a forum for ongoing exchange of ideas, input, and feedback between them and the dissertation chair as they complete coursework for their PhD in Education degree and prepare to begin their dissertation. The instructor of record for a section of the companion is the chair of the dissertation committee. Section participants are education professionals working with the faculty mentor at the early stages of their dissertation. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8110, EDUC 8111, EDUC 8112, EDUC 8113, EDUC 8114, EDUC 8115, EDUC 8116, EDUC 8117, EDUC 8118 RSCH 8100D, RSCH 8200D, and RSCH 8300D or EDUC 8110, EDUC 8111, EDUC 8112, EDUC 8113, EDUC 8115, EDUC 8841, EDUC 8843, EDUC 8845, RSCH 8100D, RSCH 8200D, and RSCH 8300D if in the Educational Technology specialization.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 9001 - Dissertation


    (20 cr.) During the first quarter in which they have active dissertation committees, doctoral students are automatically enrolled in this dissertation status course. In this course, students have the opportunity to integrate their program of study by conducting an in-depth exploration of a topic of interest and by completing an original research study, called a dissertation, on that topic. With the guidance of a chair and committee members, students develop an approved prospectus, an approved proposal (the first three dissertation chapters), and an application for Institutional Review Board approval. They then collect and analyze data and, afterward, finalize their approved dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare their dissertations for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation.  (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8110, EDUC 8111, EDUC 8112, EDUC 8113, EDUC 8114, EDUC 8115, EDUC 8116, EDUC 8117, EDUC 8118, EDUC 8210, EDUC 8211, EDUC 8212, EDUC 8213, EDUC 8214, RSCH 8100D, RSCH 8200D, and RSCH 8300D or EDUC 8840, EDUC 8841, EDUC 8842, EDUC 8843, EDUC 8844, EDUC 8845, EDUC 8846, EDUC 8847, EDUC 8848, RSCH 8100D, RSCH 8200D, and RSCH 8300D if in the Educational Technology specialization.)
  
  •  

    EDUC 9002 - Research Forum


    (4 cr.) The purpose of this forum is to assist students with making steady progress toward earning a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree. Students prepare a plan of action, engage in regular scholarly discussion with a faculty mentor and fellow doctoral students, and submit a personal progress report. Students submit drafts of Learning Agreements, Knowledge Area Modules (KAMs), and dissertations to the faculty mentor for feedback. Information and resources related to KAMs, dissertations, residencies, research and writing, courses, and doctoral program expectations are provided for guidance.
  
  •  

    EIDT 2001 - Technology and Learning♦


    (5 cr.) Technology today facilitates and supports learning in ways never before possible. In this course, students learn how education professionals use computers, multimedia tools, and other educational technologies to differentiate the learning experience, provide access, and meet the needs of diverse learners. Students examine current trends and gain an understanding of the appropriate integration of technology and instruction.
      (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 1014.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    EIDT 2002 - Web Design I♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students learn the fundamental techniques and principles of effective web design. Students learn the basics of building websites that incorporate good functionality and design elements to meet the needs of a diverse audience. They explore a range of topics, including introductory hypertext markup language (HTML), common graphic and web publishing standards, web publication protocols, and basic principles of website layout and design.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    EIDT 2003 - Introduction to Distance Education♦


    (5 cr.) While distance learning is not a new concept, advances in technology and the Internet have been a catalyst for the rapid expansion of distance education to meet a variety of learning needs. Students in this course encounter a comprehensive overview of distance education. Students examine the field to gain a historical perspective and an understanding of current trends. They also learn basic concepts, models, and technologies of distance learning.
      (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 1014.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    EIDT 2004 - Instructional Design I♦


    (5 cr.) The instructional designer plays a key role in developing education and training programs in the public and private sectors. Students in this course are introduced to the field of instructional design. They gain an understanding of the role of instructional designers in constructing the learning experience. Students also explore the essential job functions and career paths available in this field.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    EIDT 3002 - Multimedia Tools♦


    (5 cr.) Multimedia tools allow instructional designers to be creative and develop innovative learning environments. Students in this course are introduced to the design, production, and evaluation of multimedia for instructional purposes. Students experiment with tools commonly used for the creation of multimedia elements and learn how to create basic multimedia components incorporating audio, video, and visual graphics.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    EIDT 3003 - Ethical and Fair Use of Instructional Materials♦


    (5 cr.) Instructional designers are faced with the challenge of finding and using materials from various resources. In this course, students examine the issues related to the use of licensed and copyrighted content in the development of instructional materials. Students also explore the legal and ethical implications of copyright, fair use, and Creative Commons licenses when designing materials for nonprofit and for-profit entities.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    EIDT 3004 - Instructional Design II♦


    (5 cr.) This course is a continuance of the principles learned in Instructional Design I. Students explore the basic elements of commonly used instructional design theories and models and compare the processes and procedures of these models. They gain a working knowledge of the instructional design process, including how to identify learning and performance gaps and how to design and implement instructional solutions. (Prerequisite(s): EIDT 2004 and EDUC 3004.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    EIDT 4001 - Instructional Design and Technology Capstone


    (5 cr.) Students in this capstone course have the opportunity to showcase their skills and creativity by applying their knowledge of instructional design, learning environments, and multimedia tools to an authentic task. Connecting theory to practice, students work with a client or explore a case study to identify an instructional need and construct an appropriate solution.
      (Prerequisite(s): Completion of all other program coursework.)
  
  •  

    EIDT 4002 - Web Design II♦


    (5 cr.) This is a project-based course in which students build on their basic knowledge of web design to learn more advanced design and development skills. Students apply their knowledge of web design, multimedia tools, and principles of visual literacy to the creation of a website. Students engage in assignments that emphasize the development of websites that incorporate multimedia elements for education and training.
      (Prerequisite(s): EIDT 2002 and EIDT 3002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    EIDT 4004 - Instructional Design III♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students apply the principles of instructional design to a learning situation. They also apply their knowledge of the instructional design process to define learning goals and outcomes as well as to create instructional materials and evaluate the effectiveness of those materials.
      (Prerequisite(s): EIDT 3004.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    EIDT 5100 - Instructional Design


    (5 cr.) In this course, students learn the foundational principles and elements of the instructional systems development process, from analysis through evaluation. Students explore commonly used instructional design models, such as ADDIE, and learn how to apply them in an education or training environment. They gain an understanding of the preliminary phases of instructional design models, such as writing instructional objectives and conducting analyses. Students also focus on incorporating sound instructional strategies into the design and development of instructional systems and into the development of prototypes in real-world instructional settings. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 5105).
  
  •  

    EIDT 5110 - Advanced Instructional Design


    (5 cr.) Through this course students’ knowledge will extend to application of the instructional design process. Students gain a deeper understanding of best practices for the implementation and evaluation of education and training programs. Emphasis is placed on delivery of instruction and the various strategies for assessing student learning both during and after instruction. Students demonstrate their learning by solving a real-world instructional or performance improvement problem. (Prerequisite(s): EIDT 5100.)
  
  •  

    EIDT 6100 - Instructional Design♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, educators learn the foundational principles and elements of the instructional systems development process, from analysis through evaluation. They explore commonly used instructional design models, such as ADDIE, and they learn how to apply them in an education or training environment. They gain an understanding of the preliminary phases of instructional design models, such as writing instructional objectives and conducting analyses. Educators also focus on incorporating sound instructional strategies into the design and development of instructional systems and into the development of prototypes in real-world instructional settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    EIDT 6110 - Advanced Instructional Design♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This course is designed to extend educators’ knowledge and application of the instructional design process. Educators gain a deeper understanding of best practices for implementing and evaluating education and training programs. They engage in a variety of assignments that emphasize the delivery of instruction and the various strategies for assessing student learning both during and after instruction. Educators demonstrate their understanding of course concepts by solving a real-world instructional or performance improvement problem. (Prerequisite(s): Intended to be taken after EIDT 6100.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    EIDT 6115 - Learning Theories and Instruction


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective instructional design begins with an understanding of the learning process. In this course, the behaviorist, cognitive, constructivist, and social learning theories, and their relationship to instructional practices and course design, are examined. Factors that influence learning, such as learning strategies, motivation, and engagement, are also explored.
  
  •  

    EIDT 6120 - Multimedia Design and Development♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, educators take a systematic approach to the design and development of multimedia for instruction. They combine their knowledge of effective instructional strategies with the basic principles of visual literacy, Web design, and multimedia design to develop effective and usable learning objects. Applying concepts learned in the course, educators gain practical experience creating an interactive learning experience, which they beta test in a learning management system.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
 

Page: 1 <- Back 108 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18Forward 10 -> 35