2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) 
    
    Oct 17, 2021  
2018–2019 Walden University Catalog (September 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    EDUC 6771 - Bridging Learning Theory, Instruction, and Technology (Accelerating)


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course explore various learning theories and research on how the brain processes information as well as how they can use this knowledge to support the use of technology in the classroom. They explore and evaluate various technologies, such as computer-mediated instruction and virtual learning environments, as a means to foster learner-centered classrooms where students are motivated. Education professionals also learn how to support and enhance instructional practices using technology and how to integrate developmentally appropriate practices in teaching and learning with the latest digital resources available. Applying course concepts, they revise a lesson plan to support and facilitate student engagement using technology-based cognitive tools. 
     
  
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    EDUC 6772 - Supporting Information Literacy and Online Inquiry in the Classroom (Accelerating)♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals develop a new, expanded definition of what it means to be literate in today’s technology-rich world. Education professionals explore the use and application of multimedia and Internet technologies that enhance learning and support collaborative problem-solving in a digital information society. They learn strategies for how to prepare students across the grade levels for the complex challenges related to reading, critical thinking, researching, and communicating in the 21st century. Synthesizing course concepts, they assess curriculum standards in their area and develop an inquiry-based unit plan designed to develop their students’ information and visual literacy skills and meet a specific learning outcome or standard in their subject area.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6775 - New and Emerging Technologies (Accelerating)


    (3 sem. cr.) Through this course, education professionals consider the future of teaching and learning, discover promising trends in technology, and investigate opportunities to become leaders in the field of technology and learning. They consider how to address school-wide challenges, such as limited resources and resistance to change, and they explore skills and strategies, such as grant writing and leading change. Additionally, they complete a capstone project that demonstrates their ability and willingness to become advocates and change agents who use technology to address challenges and create opportunities within the field of education. 
  
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    EDUC 6780 - Exploring Leadership, Collaboration, and Consultation♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Leadership and collaboration are essential skills for working with teams to provide effective services for individuals with exceptionalities. These are practices that special educators must embrace and continually refine. Educators in this course will analyze the skills and dispositions that build healthy leadership styles and produce positive collaborative relationships.  They will also examine the benefits and challenges of leading and collaborating with others to maximize the learning potential of every student.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6781 - Special Education: Honoring Due Process


    (3 sem. cr.) Special education teachers are constantly confronted with ever-changing rules and regulations. In order to effectively lead and collaborate with teachers, families, and other professionals, special education teachers must have a thorough knowledge of the history and current practices related to special education advocacy, policy, and law. When presented with real-life scenarios, candidates will create practical solutions grounded in law and policy.
  
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    EDUC 6782 - Supporting Effective Evaluation and Assessment Practices


    (3 sem. cr.) Special educators in today’s schools are responsible for working with a team to evaluate and assess to determine eligibility, create educational plans, and evaluate progress.  In order to do this, they must be aware of and be able to implement culturally responsive, valid, and reliable practices. In this course, candidates will synthesize formal and informal assessments to monitor progress and analyze achievement to drive instructional strategies and assistive technologies for students with exceptionalities.
  
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    EDUC 6783 - Creating Effective Behavior Interventions


    (3 sem. cr.) Behavior greatly impacts all students’ ability to learn. Special educators are the most frequently called-upon professionals to evaluate, assess, and create behavior interventions whether a student is in a self-contained classroom or an inclusive setting. Candidates will be presented with a case study and reflect together on the behavior by identifying the antecedents and consequences presented. Furthermore, they will develop intervention strategies and share resources of evidence-based practices for improving behavior.
  
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    EDUC 6784 - Adapting Instruction Using Evidence-Based Strategies


    (3 sem. cr.) Providing accommodations and differentiating instruction are essential practices for special educators. In this course, special education professionals will apply research-based strategies for designing, delivering, and adapting instruction for students with exceptionalities. Candidates will be presented with real-life scenarios and must debate appropriate research-based instructional strategies to optimize learning for all students.
  
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    EDUC 6785 - Implementing Literacy-Based Instructional Interventions


    (3 sem. cr.) Reading, writing, and communication are literacy competencies that impact the quality of life for all people, especially individuals with exceptionalities. Special education professionals will devise appropriate and effective interventions for individuals with exceptionalities. Candidates will engage in a variety of conceptual and application-based assignments that emphasize ongoing assessment of literacy skills, strategies, and dispositions. Additional areas of emphasis include cultural and linguistic diversity, assistive technologies, and inclusive environments.
  
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    EDUC 6791 - Special Education: Honoring Due Process (Accelerating)♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Special education teachers are constantly confronted with ever-changing rules and regulations. In order to effectively lead and collaborate with teachers, families, and other professionals, special education teachers must have a thorough knowledge of the history and current practices related to special education advocacy, policy, and law. When presented with real-life scenarios, candidates will create practical solutions grounded in law and policy. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6793 - Creating Effective Behavioral Interventions (Accelerating)


    (3 sem. cr.) Behavior greatly impacts all students’ ability to learn. Special educators are the most frequently called upon professionals to evaluate, assess, and create behavior interventions whether a student is in a self-contained classroom or an inclusive setting.  Candidates will be presented with a case study and reflect together on the behavior by identifying the antecedents and consequences presented. Furthermore, they will develop intervention strategies and share resources of evidence-based practices for improving behavior. 
  
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    EDUC 6795 - Implementing Literacy-Based Instructional Interventions (Accelerating)


    (3 sem. cr.) Reading, writing, and communication are literacy competencies that impact the quality of life for all people, especially individuals with exceptionalities. Special education professionals will devise appropriate and effective interventions for individuals with exceptionalities. Candidates will engage in a variety of conceptual and application-based assignments that emphasize ongoing assessment of literacy skills, strategies, and dispositions. Additional areas of emphasis include cultural and linguistic diversity, assistive technologies, and inclusive environments.
  
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    EDUC 6801 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Through field experiences, principal candidates have authentic opportunities to apply what they have learned in courses and expand what they know and are able to do. All principal candidates in the program are required to spend a total of 240 hours in three settings (elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school) mentored by licensed and practicing school principals. Field experience must include at least 160 hours in the candidate’s preferred level or primary teaching experience and 40 hours at each of the other two levels.
  
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    EDUC 6802 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Through field experiences, principal candidates have authentic opportunities to apply what they have learned in courses and expand what they know and are able to do. All principal candidates in the program are required to spend a total of 240 hours in three settings (elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school) mentored by licensed and practicing school principals. Field experience must include at least 160 hours in the candidate’s preferred level or primary teaching experience and 40 hours at each of the other two levels.
  
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    EDUC 6803 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Through field experiences, principal candidates have authentic opportunities to apply what they have learned in courses and expand what they know and are able to do. All principal candidates in the program are required to spend a total of 240 hours in three settings (elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school) mentored by licensed and practicing school principals. Field experience must include at least 160 hours in the candidate’s preferred level or primary teaching experience and 40 hours at each of the other two levels.
  
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    EDUC 6804 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Through field experiences, principal candidates have authentic opportunities to apply what they have learned in courses and expand what they know and are able to do. All principal candidates in the program are required to spend a total of 240 hours in three settings (elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school) mentored by licensed and practicing school principals. Field experience must include at least 160 hours in the candidate’s preferred level or primary teaching experience and 40 hours at each of the other two levels.
  
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    EDUC 6805 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Through field experiences, principal candidates have authentic opportunities to apply what they have learned in courses and expand what they know and are able to do. All principal candidates in the program are required to spend a total of 240 hours in three settings (elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school) mentored by licensed and practicing school principals. Field experience must include at least 160 hours in the candidate’s preferred level or primary teaching experience and 40 hours at each of the other two levels.
  
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    EDUC 6806 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Through field experiences, principal candidates have authentic opportunities to apply what they have learned in courses and expand what they know and are able to do. All principal candidates in the program are required to spend a total of 240 hours in three settings (elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school) mentored by licensed and practicing school principals. Field experience must include at least 160 hours in the candidate’s preferred level or primary teaching experience and 40 hours at each of the other two levels.
  
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    EDUC 6880 - Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation: A Global Perspective


    (3 sem. cr.) Social entrepreneurs are gaining international attention motivated by the desire for change and to see the world as it can be, not as it is. Students in the course will learn how social entrepreneurs have developed creative solutions to address social problems. The intention of the course is to develop knowledge, appreciate of the role of social entrepreneurs who create social change, deepen students’ understanding of the world around them, and inspire them to use their skills and knowledge to be, as Gandhi said, “the change you wish to see in the world.”

    Students in this course will gain knowledge about social entrepreneurs and how they are creating solutions to address societal problems, learn how to develop creative solutions to address social problems, and empower students to see social entrepreneurship as a force for social change. The course is designed for those who want to gain valuable tools to prepare them to make an impact on the lives of others. This course will be housed in the School of Public Policy and Administration for future upgrades and course maintenance.

  
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    EDUC 6881 - Grant Writing


    (3 sem. cr.) Grant writing is the method by which external funding can be secured by educational institutions, community organizations, and nonprofit agencies to provide services to the community. In this course, students will understand processes and gain basic skills needed for successful grant writing. These processes and skills consist of developing a project idea, identifying a funding agency, writing a compelling needs statement with goals and measurable objectives, developing a budget, collaborating with other people, submitting the grant application, understanding the grant review process, responding to the review, and managing the grant award. Course assignments allow students to apply and practice grant writing skills by developing a grant proposal based on an actual Request for Proposal (RFP).
  
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    EDUC 6960 - Capstone: Master’s Project


    (3 sem. cr.) Through the master’s capstone experience, education professionals have the opportunity to integrate and apply their learning to real-world issues or problems. Education professionals research and create a product that addresses a critical issue in a particular institution or area of higher education. Examples of such products include a design for a program or service that could be implemented at a particular institution, a professional development program or resource, or a position paper that addresses a particular issue in depth. Education professionals choose an issue or problem that is of sufficient scope to enable them to apply theories, concepts, and practices gained from multiple areas of prior coursework. (Prerequisite(s): All other courses.)
  
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    EDUC 6990 - Capstone: Practical Application in the Early Childhood Field


    (3 sem. cr.) Through the master’s capstone experience, education professionals are provided an opportunity to integrate and apply learning to real-world situations, issues, or problems. Education professionals choose a field project, issue, or problem related to their specialization that is of sufficient scope to enable them to apply theories, concepts, and practices from across their prior coursework. (Prerequisite(s): All other courses.)
  
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    EDUC 7000 - Leading the Future of Education


    (5 cr.) Advanced graduate students are about to embark on one of the most exciting journeys of their lives. This practical course provides meaningful skills students will need to select their path, complete their degree, and become a successful leader of educational change in the 21st century. Networking and research skills, scholarly writing, critical thinking, use of Walden resources, and the three advanced graduate paths (e.g., Ph.D., Ed.D., Ed.S.)—this course addresses all of these in a manner that provides a solid foundation of skill sets upon which students can base their journey. Students will find a balance of assignments (e.g., case studies, discussions, application assignments) that will ignite their passion for learning, that will allow students to collaborate with others, and that will guide their current and future work. This course is designed to reflect Walden’s social change mission and provide students with meaningful tools for success as an advanced graduate student.
  
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    EDUC 7002 - Foundations: Educational Leadership and Administration


    (3 sem. cr.) This course begins by building candidates understanding of the philosophy, requirements, and community of Walden University, The Richard W. Riley College of Education and Leadership, and the program. Candidates complete a pre-assessment, and develop an individual learning plan.

    Following this essential introductory work, candidates begin their study of school leadership by focusing on the structures of school organizations and leadership styles.

  
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    EDUC 7004 - Foundations: Teacher Leadership


    (6 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course are introduced to the environment, expectations, and content of post-master’s work in the Ed.S. in Teacher Leadership program. Through participation in the course, education professionals develop facility with Walden University’s online learning environment, and they gain an understanding of the university’s and the program’s support systems, expectations, and outcomes. They also gain knowledge about the field, which they synthesize with reflection on their own experience and goals.
  
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    EDUC 7005 - Foundations: EdS in Curriculum, Instruction, and Professional Development


    (3 sem. cr.) In this introductory course, education professionals explore the connection between curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development as well as the importance of each on student achievement. Education professionals examine leadership, in addition to change and systems theory, within the context of developing and implementing a shared vision for student learning that is embraced by all educators and families within a school community. Additionally, education professionals are introduced to Walden University’s Richard W. Riley College of Education and Leadership and the requirements of the Education Specialist (EdS) program.
  
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    EDUC 7006 - Foundations: Assessment, Evaluation, and Accountability


    (4 cr.) In this foundational course, educators are prepared for joining the academic community with a focus on acquiring common language for the field of assessment, evaluation, and accountability within the context of educational organizational effectiveness. Key issues in the field are explored while learning the process for how to successfully complete the education specialist degree, with Walden support in developing (a) facility with Walden University’s online learning environment; (b) understanding of the university’s and the programs support systems, expectations, and outcomes; and (c) advanced graduate-level critical-thinking, research, and writing skills.
  
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    EDUC 7010 - Foundations: The Changing Context of Postsecondary and Adult Teaching and Learning♦


    (6 sem. cr.) Learning in adulthood is imperative for individuals to realize the opportunities of 21st-century workplaces, technology, and society. Providing these learning experiences requires committed and responsive adult and postsecondary education leaders. In this course, education professionals investigate contemporary trends and issues in teaching and learning in postsecondary and adult education settings. The course also provides education professionals with an introduction to the expectations of graduate work in Adult Education and College Teaching and Learning programs. Education professionals learn to work effectively within Walden University’s online learning environment and develop an understanding of university and program support systems, expectations, and outcomes.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 7011 - How Adults Learn: Theory and Research♦


    (6 sem. cr.) Working effectively with learners in any postsecondary setting, from traditional college classrooms to workplace training, requires a sound understanding of how adults learn. In this course, candidates examine key concepts in adult learning theory, focusing on developmental theory and the wide range of research that supports it. Candidates explore adult learning theories from andragogy to transformation, including phase and stage developmental theories, and they examine effects of gender and culture on adult learning. They also have the opportunity to reflect on the relationship of this material to their own learning or teaching experiences.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 7012 - Applied Research in Education♦


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and of the appropriate use of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 7013 - Designing and Assessing Learning Experiences♦


    (6 sem. cr.) Research has considerably expanded knowledge of adult learning and development in recent years. These gains have resulted in a new paradigm for the design and assessment of learning experiences. In this course, candidates 1) advance their understanding of research methods as they examine literature about design and assessment; and 2) apply research-based principles to design a project that develops learning experiences for a specific population of adults, whether on-site, online, or through a blended hybrid model.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 7014 - Facilitating Adult Learning♦


    (6 sem. cr.) Grounded in research and theory about learning differences, this course explores the repertoire of practices that facilitate adult learning from both the teaching and learning perspectives. These practices range from mentoring and coaching to collaborative engagement and reflective practices. Learners deepen their understanding of research methods both through critiquing articles and by designing research studies to investigate specific learning practices.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 7015 - Adult Education Capstone: Trends, Issues, and Global Perspectives


    (6 sem. cr.) New research and technological innovations continue to change the current state of knowledge; therefore, it is necessary that everyone functions as a lifelong learner. In this course, education professionals examine intriguing and potentially critical directions in adult learning, including new technologies and the impact of globalization. The concluding capstone project provides education professionals with the opportunity to demonstrate the ability to apply theories, concepts, and skills gained throughout the program. Working in a consultative role as an adult education professional, candidates engage in a real-world, problem-solving project within their work environment.
  
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    EDUC 7102 - Principles of Distance Education


    (4 cr.) Different theories, paradigms, and the history of distance education will be explored. Learners critique current research and assess online learning programs including hybrid and fully online delivery. Accessibility issues, open source, best practices to facilitate learning, global trends, and the move from elite to mass higher education will be analyzed. Synchronous versus asynchronous platforms will be contrasted.
  
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    EDUC 7103 - Leading and Managing Educational Technology


    (4 cr.) Education professionals in this course explore issues related to leadership regarding the integration of technology in business and in education at any level, including  K–12 schools, community colleges, teacher education, or higher education. They explore such areas as leadership, strategic planning, systems acquisition, coordination, implementation, technology management and its implications for teaching and learning, and administrative functions. Moreover, they share perspectives through discussions on policies that affect human resource development, staff development, information access, security, management control, and evaluation.
  
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    EDUC 7104 - Designing Instruction for Distance Education


    (4 cr.) Instructional design for distance education involves understanding educational experiences, what makes these experiences effective, and the ways in which students learn in the online environment. This course provides education professionals with the opportunity to gain a practical understanding of these topics through the examination of learning styles, learning theory, social networking and collaborative group influences, assessment, global perspectives, and diversity. They also analyze effective online educational experiences from education and the workplace. Focusing on the design and delivery of distance education, education professionals engage in applied assignments that emphasize developing, field testing, and revising a web-based unit. They also explore ways to employ engaging instructional electronic strategies to enhance design and development. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8842 or 7102).
  
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    EDUC 7105 - Learning Theory and Educational Technology


    (4 cr.) In this course, education professionals extend their knowledge of learning theory, including behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism, to the application of educational technology as they explore ways to translate theory to practice. Education professionals explore instructional interventions and their potential improvement through the application of technology. They also use a variety of theories, such as multiple intelligences, constructivism, computers as mind tools, brain-based learning, and connectivism to learn how technology facilitates learning. Through a collaborative constructivist activity, education professionals critically analyze constructivist learning theorists to determine how their principles apply to educational technology. Using knowledge gained from these analyses, education professionals identify and explain related challenges regarding the use of constructivist and collaborative activities for learning as well as solutions for overcoming these barriers.
  
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    EDUC 7115 - Assessment and Accountability in Education


    (4 cr.) Increasingly, educators at all levels are asked to document the impact of the educational process on learners and to make research-based decisions. This course provides educators with grounding in assessing and evaluating student learning, developmental outcomes, and educational programs. They also examine the purposes for collecting student data, acquire key evaluation concepts, and examine the distinctions among various approaches to assessing learning.
  
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    EDUC 7117 - Educational Organizations and Contexts


    (4 cr.) Research efforts to support the educational process and effective leadership demand an understanding of schools and academic institutions as complex systems and units of change. Education professionals examine theories of organizational functioning and apply these insights to the functioning of individuals and groups within educational systems. Topics include systems thinking, assuring organizational effectiveness that supports teaching and learning, and conflict management. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 7006 and EDUC 7115.)
  
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    EDUC 7200 - Teaching and Learning for School Leaders


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective educational leaders influence the quality of teaching by understanding how to recognize outstanding teaching and facilitate improvement by communicating how and why learner-centered teaching enhances the learning outcomes of every student. This course introduces candidates to the latest research on education, teaching, and learning, and fosters the development of an understanding of how effective approaches to instruction are informed by research.
  
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    EDUC 7201 - Communication and Collaboration for Leaders


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective educational leaders work to foster shared understanding of and commitment to making sure that every student learns and succeeds; this requires the ability to communicate and the capacity to create conditions and processes that foster collaborative problem solving and decision making. Education professionals in this course explore the characteristics of effective leaders. They learn how to model open and responsive communication as well as how to create time and use tools to ensure that such interactions are common within the school and throughout the school community. They also explore the role of schools in communicating with and drawing upon community resources of various types, including public agencies and organizations that serve youth and families. Through this course, education professionals work toward establishing the personal, ethical, and moral platforms to become effective leaders who model and promote ethical and productive civic behavior.
  
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    EDUC 7202 - Ensuring Quality Education for Students With Diverse Needs


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course explore and analyze the issues, complexities, responsibilities, and opportunities associated with leading schools with diverse student populations. By acknowledging differences among learners, as well as biases, discrimination, prejudices, and stereotypes, school leaders can identify diversity as a dynamic contributing factor to a rich learning environment in which individual differences are honored and respected. A focus of the course is also on one of the most challenging tasks facing schools today: to substantially increase the achievement of students placed at risk because of limited facility with English, and physical, mental, and emotional disability. Candidates will study diverse and inclusive approaches that have proven most effective in supporting all language learners and students with special needs to reach high standards of performance.
  
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    EDUC 7203 - Policy and Law in School Organizations


    (3 sem. cr.) This course includes a study of selected general legal principles, case and statute law, and law-making agencies that impact leaders and their educational institutions. Key content areas include but are not limited to the legal status of the local school district; the role of federal, state, and local governments that  may apply; governance of schools; and policies, rules, and regulations. Educators in the course will also cover the legal rights, responsibilities, and obligations of administrators, teachers, students, parents, and school boards, community education, civil rights, collective bargaining, torts and contracts, and legal research, as well as the development of policy to meet regulations and other provisions.
  
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    EDUC 7204 - Using Data to Strengthen Schools


    (3 sem. cr.) Education leaders must use data extensively to guide them in defining needs, setting and prioritizing goals, monitoring and evaluating progress, and identifying effective strategies for improvement. The continuing analysis of the gaps between student performance and student learning goals defines the actions of effective school leaders. Decision-makers must understand the array of data that are needed for school improvement. They must know the principles and techniques of measurement, evaluation, and data analysis. They must use a multitude of strategies to analyze data to propel teaching and learning and school improvement. They should use technology to support the collection and use of data. They need to engage the school community (teachers, parents, and students) in understanding and supporting data to guide the analysis of strengths, weaknesses, threats, and opportunities in the ongoing pursuit of school improvement.
  
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    EDUC 7205 - Budgeting and Allocating Resources


    (3 sem. cr.) Research on effective schools provides guidance on the most productive ways to organize time, people, money, technology, and other resources. To use these resources most effectively, leaders need to have a strategy that defines the most important priorities, the overall educational design, and the organizational structures that best match the necessary goals for improvement. Effective leaders need to be able to (1) link whole-school strategic plans to effective instructional practices and improved use of time and money; (2) ensure individualized attention where needed in subject areas; (3) evaluate alternative paths to school improvement; (4) invest wisely in improving teaching quality; and (5) organize staff and use other resources in new ways that allow focused investment in teaching and learning.
  
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    EDUC 7206 - Creating Positive, Safe, and Effective Learning Environments


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective educational leaders develop capabilities to foster cultures for learning based on mutual respect among students, teachers, staff, parents, and the larger community. Strategies for fairly and effectively administering discipline and resolving conflict are addressed. This course is intended to help leaders understand and treat individual and group differences and potential conflict as opportunities for developing the dispositions, knowledge, and skills that result in social competencies essential to civic participation and interpersonal effectiveness in school and beyond. Candidates also study issues related to safety and violence in schools, considering both methods of prevention and ways to respond to unsafe and violent situations.
  
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    EDUC 7207 - Leading Curriculum Initiatives: Literacy and Math


    (3 sem. cr.) To be effective, school leaders must understand the foundational principles of teaching—curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Education professionals in this course also focus on the considerations with which they need to engage as they plan for the adoption and implementation of a new or substantially revised program to enhance student learning in a content domain. Literacy and math are two content areas that are problematic in many schools, especially those serving diverse students and students who are underperforming. Thus, while the lessons are applicable to other subjects, the focus here is on how to ensure that content standards, curriculum materials, assessment, instruction, professional development, and parental and community involvement, among other initiatives, are aligned in ways that foster student achievement in literacy and math.
  
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    EDUC 7208 - Recruiting, Evaluating, and Retaining School Personnel


    (3 sem. cr.) Candidates study human resources policies and practices for recruiting, selecting, hiring, inducting, developing, evaluating, and retaining or dismissing school personnel. Identifying teachers’ needs for professional growth is important, but leaders must also ensure that teachers have the opportunity and motivation to use their professional expertise and to participate in ongoing professional development focused on enhancing the learning of every student. As well, school leaders must be able to identify characteristics of productive teacher evaluation processes and programs; distinguish between supervising teaching and supervising learning; and utilize a process and structure for evaluating school personnel that is productive and supportive, motivates improvement, results in retention of highly competent staff members, embodies standards of due process, and takes into account the provisions of the contractual agreements for staff.
  
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    EDUC 7210 - Leadership for Today’s Schools


    (6 sem. cr.) Today’s schools are dynamic places and require leaders who understand how learning communities operate and thrive and are prepared to deal with the demands of internal and external forces. In this course, education professionals make connections between change theory and the continual appraisal of evolving needs of the learning community and application of a grounded knowledge base of theory and practical strategies supported by research. Education professionals are empowered to explore current and future technology as they assess educational trends and issues. Education professionals also analyze their own and others’ paradigms and leadership styles, and they determine best practices to promote positive social change.

    Students who successfully complete both EDAD 6805 - Facilitating Productive Working Relationships and School Culture to Enhance Student Learning (3 sem. cr.) and EDAD 6809 - Implementing Continuous School Improvement (3 sem. cr.) from the M.S. in Education specialization in Educational Leadership (Non-Licensure) (Grades K–12) program with a B or better may transfer out of this course. Students who successfully complete both EDUC 6647 - Dynamic Teacher Leadership (3 sem. cr.) and EDUC 6651 - Teacher Leadership in the Classroom: Increasing Learning and Achievement (3 sem. cr.) from the M.S. in Education specialization in Teacher Leadership program with a B or better may transfer out of this course.

     

  
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    EDUC 7211 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and the appropriate use of qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
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    EDUC 7212 - Teaching and Learning: Theory and Research


    (6 sem. cr.) Research has considerably expanded the knowledge of teaching and learning in recent years. A new paradigm for the design and assessment of learning experiences is a result of these gains. In this course, education professionals advance their understanding of research methods as they examine literature about design and assessment. They also apply research-based principles, via technological means, to collect, analyze, and present data with the goal of solving a learning problem in their school or district.
  
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    EDUC 7213 - Collegial Interactions and Professional Development


    (6 sem. cr.) This course expands the role of teacher leadership from the classroom to the school community. Education professionals in this course focus on the development of knowledge, abilities, and dispositions necessary for effective and productive leadership in effecting professional partnerships, participating in collegial study teams, facilitating professional development of other educators, and adeptly using collegial and collaborative processes, such as coaching and mentoring.
  
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    EDUC 7220 - Leading Effective Curriculum Design


    (3 sem. cr.) Curriculum design is effective when it aligns with a district’s beliefs about teaching and learning. In this course, education professionals examine current research on learning theory, and they consider how to use various curriculum design models to bring such theory to action. They learn how to develop curriculum initiatives that align with standards, contextualize content, and focus on the needs of diverse learners across all grades levels. Education professionals also engage in coursework that emphasizes the importance of building capacity among school leaders by launching learning communities that can lead, monitor, and support successful implementation of curriculum plans.
  
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    EDUC 7221 - Leading Research-Based Instructional Practices


    (3 sem. cr.) Content expertise, classroom instruction, and assessment play a vital role in the successful implementation of a system’s curriculum plan. Through this course, educators explore how to lead a system of school leaders who can implement research-based instructional practices that result in student success. Participants will engage in a process of analyzing achievement data, identifying concerns, and matching appropriate instructional strategies to meet student needs. They will learn how to lead others in making instructional decisions that are intentional, content-specific, differentiated to meet diverse student needs, and result in rigorous learning for all students. This course also includes the design of instructional interventions for struggling students, English language learners, and students who lack prior knowledge.

     

     

  
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    EDUC 7223 - Using Assessment and Data for School Improvement


    (3 sem. cr.) In an age of accountability, leaders must be able to use multiple forms of data to inform curricular and instructional decisions. In this course, education professionals examine the inextricable link between curricular content, instruction, and assessment within a system. They examine the role of formative and summative assessments in making decisions and the various forms and purposes of assessment. Education professionals learn how the ongoing use of assessment data can move curriculum and instruction beyond mediocrity to support rigorous learning for all students. Through conceptual and applied assignments, they explain how to use data to lead school reform, and they examine how to select curricular programs that support struggling students and how to articulate a system’s assessment targets to the larger educational community.
  
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    EDUC 7304 - Effective College Teaching: Engaging Diverse Learners


    (6 sem. cr.) As colleges and universities broaden their missions to serve new groups of learners, and as more people pursue a college education, college educators must strive to engage increasingly diverse student populations. At the same time, changing workplace needs and growing demands for accountability require that college educators must be able to help demonstrate that learners have met important learning goals. In this course, education professionals will investigate the research-based teaching and assessment strategies that can support all learners. Education professionals also assess methods for critically reflecting upon their own practice, engaging in education scholarship, and collaborating with colleagues on the continuous improvement of learning experiences and environments.
  
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    EDUC 7306 - Effective College Teaching: Using Technology to Support Learning


    (6 sem. cr.) Technology is a tool that can support student engagement and the development of critical knowledge and skills. College educators must learn how to harness the growing number of new technologies for constructive use in diverse learning contexts. This course provides education professionals with the opportunity to demonstrate a practical application of theories, concepts, and skills gained throughout the program. Education professionals consider how to stay abreast of available technologies and related research as well as how to use these tools and research most effectively in face-to-face, hybrid, and online environments. Through a real-world, problem-solving project within their work environment, education professionals demonstrate their ability to make critical decisions on when and how to implement technological solutions, how to assess the value of these tools for students in particular learning contexts, and how to maximize the power of technology for learning in a global environment.

     

  
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    EDUC 7308 - Principles of Social Change


    (4 cr.) Consistent with the mission of Walden University, this course “sets the stage” for the remainder of the program, by providing students with a framework for their work as scholars and as agents of positive social change in education. Students examine foundational theories of education, while looking toward their future role in the discipline. Students also begin developing their skills as scholarly writers.
  
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    EDUC 7309 - Social Change in Education


    (4 cr.) The choice to effect positive social change in education demands that scholar-practitioners have the requisite skills and abilities to take responsibility for generating new knowledge, conserving the values of education, and communicating that information to others. In this second course on social change, students examine these key principles of disciplinary stewardship, while building strategies to engage the scholarship in education. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 7307 and EDUC 7308.)
  
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    EDUC 7312 - Innovation and Change in Education


    (4 cr.) Understanding the impact of new innovations and change has emerged as a field of theory and research in education. Building on the theories and research from previous courses, along with the principles of social change, students examine the challenges inherent in initiating and managing change in educational organizations. The role of “change agent” is explored, as well the influences of technological innovations on the academic process. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 7311).
  
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    EDUC 7314 - Capstone: Leadership for Social Change in Education


    (6 cr.) This is the final course in the Ed.S. in Leadership for Social Change in Education program and gives students an opportunity to individualize the content of the courses by integrating the concepts and principles learned in the program in a meaningful way. Acting as change agents or change advocates, students will identify a problem within their individual organizations; present data illustrating the nature of the problem, and make recommendations, based on relevant social change theory, concepts, and principles, that will lead to an improvement of the human and social conditions in their organizations. To extend the learning experience, students will collect feedback on the viability of their individual plans from at least 10 stakeholders, compare and contrast the views, and cite revisions that should be made to their original plans to improve the efficacy of the project. (Prerequisite(s): All other courses.)
  
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    EDUC 7341 - Trends and Issues in Educational Technology


    (5 cr.) Using new technologies in new ways sparks learning, creativity, and innovation. Trends and issues in educational technology are examined to discover how they influence learning and creativity in the workplace. Learners collaborate to demonstrate the evolution of a current technological trend, analyze its impact on learning and society, and evaluate the societal issues and problems caused by that trend.
  
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    EDUC 7343 - Creating Digital Media


    (5 cr.) The effective use of digital media in learning environments requires leaders in the field to be both consumers and creators of multimedia. Learners become knowledgeable developers of digital media by applying principles of instructional design and pedagogy to multimedia. Learners collaborate in the design and creation of digital and interactive media based on visual design principles.
  
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    EDUC 7344 - Innovations and the Diffusion of Learning Technologies


    (5 cr.) Thought leaders instigate change in the workplace. Learners explore Rogers’s diffusion of innovations theory, research effective practices for integrating technology and overcoming resistance to change, and apply methods for being a catalyst for change. Playing a diffusion simulation game enables learners to analyze the power of gaming in instructional environments. Learners analyze the needs of an organization and demonstrate their skills of persuasion to convince key stakeholders to adopt a technological innovation in their workplace.
  
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    EDUC 7345 - eLearning


    (5 cr.) Learning continues to change globally through the availability of a wide variety of electronic devises. Principles of distance education, mobile learning, MOOCs, virtual schooling, global collaboration, and online teaching and learning are the foci of this course. Learners create a digital video on a topic related to eLearning, by applying problem-solving and critical-thinking skills to determine the most appropriate tools and learning environments for their workplaces.
  
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    EDUC 7346 - Leading Change


    (5 cr.) Effective leaders direct the vision and goals for sustainable change initiatives in organizations. Based on the Human Performance and Training Model, learners explore strategies and tactics needed to bring about positive social change through an analysis of leadership, strategic planning, motivation, communication, and learning technologies. Problem-solving skills are developed as learners effect change in the workplace focusing on a human performance issue. Components for successful grant writing are developed.
  
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    EDUC 7347 - Designing Instruction for eLearning


    (5 cr.) Opportunities for learning have expanded as a result of eLearning technologies. Learners evaluate MOOCs, blended environments, mobile devices, and online learning as means for delivering content and providing collaboration and global connectivity. Instructional design principles are applied to effectively design and create an online eLearning module that engages students in learning beyond the walls of the classroom.
  
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    EDUC 7352 - Assessing for Individual Growth


    (4 cr.) The value of performance assessment coupled with accountability systems can vary widely, depending on how resulting data are used to enhance learning. Students in this course examine the nature of individual evaluation in multiple educational contexts. Students will examine the use of data for measuring learner progress, data-based decision making, and personnel evaluation. Supporting technical skills are integrated into the course, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods of data gathering and analysis. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 7350, RSCH 7100D, RSCH 7200D.)
  
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    EDUC 7353 - Evaluating and Improving Programs, Organizations, and Systems


    (4 cr.) Determining comprehensive value and worth of a curriculum, project, instructional method, institution, or policy is a complex endeavor. In this course, educators examine the process of determining the value, purpose, efficacy, and social implications for programs, organizations, and systems within a framework for continuous improvement. Supporting technical skills are integrated into the course, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods of data gathering and analysis. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 7350 and EDUC 7250.)
  
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    EDUC 7354 - Dynamics of Communication for Impact and Results


    (4 cr.) Finesse and skill are needed to communicate complex information and findings from data analysis to particular stakeholders in ways that convey understanding, impart meaning, and stimulate a call to action. The focus of this course is on how to report results, consequences, options, and recommendations in compelling ways for multiple audiences. A wide variety of communication methods will be explored that include presentation technology, Internet communications, technical writing, writing for publication, press releases, grant writing, and collaborative communication. Data compression is practiced as part of the communication and recommendation process. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 7353.)
  
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    EDUC 7355 - Capstone: Building a Culture of Continuous Improvement


    (5 cr.) Continuous improvement is a phrase that is applied in both business and educational settings. Operationalized, the term crosses fields that include leadership, organizational development, change theory, and evaluation and assessment. In this course education professionals connect continuous improvement as referenced in these fields and move beyond to include organizational culture, professionalism, social justice, and codes of ethics that support the formation and sustainability of this type of culture. The culminating project provides a platform for individualizing a plan with a self-chosen organization that incorporates evaluation, assessment, and a vision for social responsibility as part of creating a culture of continuous improvement. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 7354; EDUC 7355 must be the last course taken in the program.)
  
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    EDUC 7411 - Foundations for Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment


    (6 sem. cr.) Providing systemic leadership at the district, regional, state, or federal level in curriculum, instruction, and assessment is a complex, challenging process. This course is a foundation for education professionals to navigate this process and lead so that they can promote the success of all K–12  students within their organizations by developing quality educational programs. Education professionals examine the critical elements of a framework for leading for excellence, including curriculum, instruction, and assessment; data-driven instructional improvement; professional learning time for improvement; and leadership skills that produce results. They also learn the process for completing their doctoral degree successfully by examining how Walden University supports them in developing facility with Walden’s online learning environment; understanding of the university’s and the program’s support systems, expectations, and outcomes and doctoral-level critical-thinking, research, and writing skills.
  
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    EDUC 7412 - Leadership for Today’s Schools


    (6 sem. cr.) Today’s schools are dynamic places and require leaders who understand how learning communities operate and thrive and are prepared to deal with the demands of internal and external forces. In this course, education professionals make connections between change theory and the continual appraisal of evolving needs of the learning community and application of a grounded knowledge base of theory and practical strategies supported by research. Education professionals are empowered to explore current and future technology as they assess educational trends and issues. Education professionals also analyze their own and others’ paradigms and leadership styles, and they determine best practices to promote positive social change.
  
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    EDUC 7450 - Systemic Curriculum Design: Rigor, Relevance, and Results


    (6 sem. cr.) Designing curriculum with rigor, relevance, and results requires broad understanding of the key concepts behind each of these attributes. In this course, education professionals examine the contribution of learning theory to what defines rigor as they explore alignment of standards and design models as well as the role of collaboration between educators and the needs of an ever-increasing diverse student population, including English-language learners, special education educators, gifted students, and students of poverty. As leaders of learning, education professionals examine the connection between relevant curriculum and global trends, social-emotional, and character development, and the integration of technology for student engagement. In addition, they gain an understanding of what constitutes results that acknowledge the demands of accountability from multiple constituents, such as parents, community members, school administrators, and government oversight. They also gain practice analyzing, evaluating, and applying quantitative research methods appropriate to data-driven planning and decision making.
  
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    EDUC 7451 - Data-Driven Instruction and Assessment


    (6 sem. cr.) Instructional leaders must have the ability to diagnose by reviewing data and practices, set a vision for where they want to go, prioritize the work by utilizing relevant data, identify measurable goals, develop an action plan, and then monitor their results. Education professionals in this course examine this inextricable link between instruction and assessment. They engage in a diagnostic process designed to meet diverse student and systemic needs. They also examine the role of formative and summative assessments in making decisions, the various forms and purposes of assessment, and how the ongoing use of assessment data can move curriculum and instruction beyond mediocrity to support rigorous learning for all students. Additionally, they explore qualitative research methods appropriate to understanding institutions, programs, and stakeholder interests.
  
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    EDUC 7452 - Capstone: Effective Professional Development


    (6 sem. cr.) Effective professional development is foundational to improving a school system’s ability to raise student achievement. Using adult learning theory as a foundation, education professionals in this course explore models that look at adult learning strategies and skills that build strong professional development opportunities promoting new knowledge and skills that affect teacher practice and student learning. Educators will learn how to use collaboration, facilitation, coaching, and mentoring that support a culture of learning that involves students, educators, parents, and community. As evaluating the impact of professional development efforts is crucial to ongoing success, leaders learn to collect and analyze data from student work and teacher practice to make informed decisions that lead to continuous improvement. Communicating and disseminating results to multiple constituents within the school system will be emphasized. Educators will also investigate mixed-methodology research approaches appropriate to planning and resource management.
  
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    EDUC 7541 - Foundations in Reading and Literacy Leadership


    (6 sem. cr.) Literacy may be understood in multiple ways across various settings and populations. This course will lay a foundation for leaders to define literacy based on sociopolitical landscape, the influence of social media and technological innovation, and influences coming from Common Core standards that influence literacy programs in P-20 and beyond. As part of this foundational course, candidates will also learn the process for how to succeed as a graduate student at Walden University, understanding how Walden supports students in developing (a) facility with Walden University’s online learning environment; (b) understanding of the university and the program support systems, expectations, and outcomes;  and (c) graduate-level critical thinking, research, and writing skills.
  
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    EDUC 7542 - Literacy Leadership for Today’s Schools


    (6 sem. cr.) The field of literacy education demands leaders who are not only knowledgeable in this subject area but who can articulate a dynamic vision that motivates collaboration, creativity, and positive social change. This course, grounded in knowledge about literacy professional standards of practice, examines the high-stakes nature of literacy acquisition in the context of limited financial and human resources. Leadership skills explored include decision making to solve complex problems, facilitation for reaching goals, mentoring, and the building of staff capacity for literacy infusion across content areas. Candidates study leadership and change theory at both the research and application levels.
  
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    EDUC 7543 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and of the appropriate use of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
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    EDUC 7544 - Learners and the Changing Literacy Landscape


    (6 sem. cr.) Literacy is essential for individual learning and is also a means by which an individual participates in the intellectual, social, and commercial life of the community. Students in this course examine language development within the context of culture, the value placed on literacy within the community, and diversity of learner ability. Topics include the developmental nature of literacy competencies from early childhood to the adult learner, potential barriers to literacy that learners of all ages must overcome, theoretical research, and approaches to curriculum and instruction that facilitate literacy across settings. Specific attention is given to the challenges second language learners face in school. Candidates will practice analyzing, evaluating, and applying research methods appropriate to data-driven planning and decision making.
  
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    EDUC 7545 - Assessment and Data Analysis to Support Systemic Literacy Programs


    (6 sem. cr.) Designing systems that effectively promote and support high levels of literacy proficiency requires the use of data that accurately describe the status of student, teacher, and school performance. This course will examine a variety of assessment tools and validity issues for addressing individual and classroom needs as well as district and state mandates. Topics include a focus on data analysis for tiered intervention decision making and the interpretation of data to drive recommendations at a systemic level. Skills of collaboration and stakeholder inclusion are examined. Quantitative and qualitative methods appropriate to understanding institutions, programs, and stakeholder interests are also explored.
  
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    EDUC 7547 - Capstone: Program Development and Professional Development


    (6 sem. cr.) As research and technology continue to provide new perspectives on literacy, educational leaders are charged with the responsibility for leading the selection or development and implementation of innovative programs that support high levels of literacy achievement for all learners. This course emphasizes program development, monitoring, and evaluation for continuous improvement of literacy teaching and learning. It integrates the important role the literacy leader plays in supporting effective professional development. Topics also include the creation of a literacy environment and the use of technology to promote both student learning and the professional development of teachers. Research highlights current issues in the field of literacy as they relate to program development, evaluation, and professional development. This course culminates with the Ed.S. Capstone Project.
  
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    EDUC 7740 - Qualities of Effective Professional Development


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective professional development is foundational in improving a school system’s ability to raise student achievement. Education professionals in this course examine the history and research that supports the need for ongoing professional learning for teachers, principals, and all adults who interact with students in P–12 schools. They use case studies of schools and districts that have achieved results to learn the standards of exemplary professional development programs and analyze the attributes necessary for success. Education professionals are also provided with the opportunity to explore the roles and responsibilities of professional developers inside and outside the classroom as well as career paths for developing leadership skills in the area of adult and student learning.
  
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    EDUC 7741 - Designing Professional Development♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Professional development that ensures quality teaching for all students is based on a model of continuous improvement that is data-driven and grounded in research-based practices. In this course, education professionals examine a variety of professional-development models and select and plan the most appropriate approach to support their goal. Using adult-learning theory as a foundation, they explore models of adult learning and change as well as cycles of improvement. They also design strategies to build strong professional-development programs that include planning, delivering, following-up, and evaluating impact on teacher practices and student learning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 7742 - Implementing Professional Development


    (3 sem. cr.) Delivering and sustaining professional development requires an understanding of culture and change. In this course, education professionals develop skills to set expectations, facilitate professional learning, support individual growth, and build collaborative teams. Using change theory, education professionals learn to monitor and support adult learning by organizing professional learning communities that focus on student needs and school goals. They explore strategies for delivering and providing continuous follow-up and support of professional learning. They also learn how to use collaboration, facilitation, coaching, and mentoring skills to involve colleagues, staff, families, and other key stakeholders in making decisions grounded in research-based practices and support a culture of learning that involves educators, students, parents, and community.
  
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    EDUC 7743 - Evaluating Professional Development


    (3 sem. cr.) Evaluating the influence of professional-development efforts is crucial to ongoing success. Education professionals in this course explore systemic and comprehensive approaches for linking professional learning to student learning and using data to make informed decisions on how to improve the practices of educators and assess the impact on student learning. Using logic theories, education professionals learn how to collect and analyze data from student work and teacher practice to make informed decisions that lead to continuous improvement. They engage in coursework that emphasizes communicating and disseminating results to multiple constituents within the school system. They also focus on system approaches that promote shared leadership in continuing, improving, and sustaining effective professional development at the district, school, and classroom levels.
  
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    EDUC 7745 - Applied Research in Education, Part I


    (3 sem. cr.) Being a knowledgeable consumer of research requires the ability to understand and process the philosophies, core components, and designs and methodologies in educational research and scholarship. In this course, education professionals develop the skills to analyze and interpret research studies with a critical eye as well as to communicate or implement the findings. They work toward becoming consumers of research who confidently assess the reliability and validity of a study, interpret the study, and articulate and/or implement the findings of the study into practice. In addition, they engage in practical assignments focused on quantitative methods of design and analysis.
  
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    EDUC 7746 - Applied Research in Education, Part II


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course build upon the concepts learned in EDUC 7745 - Applied Research in Education, Part I, synthesizing acquired knowledge with a quantitative methodology application project. Through this project, education professionals develop an understanding of research design and methodology, focusing beyond quantitative approaches to include qualitative design and analysis, including mixed methodology. They learn to function as consumers of research, gaining skills for reporting and contextualizing research.

      (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 7745.)

  
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    EDUC 7760 - Foundations: Special Education


    (6 sem. cr.) Special education as a field is dynamic, with a growing research base of best practices and changing implementation efforts that seek to balance effective and efficient education for students with disabilities. Education professionals in this course explore evolving trends that reflect this balance and a range of related topics, such as issues of equity, assistive technology, collaborative instruction between regular and special educators, delivery approaches with and without student categorization, and ethical practice. As part of this foundational course, education professionals learn the process of how to complete their doctoral or education specialist degree successfully. They gain facility with Walden University’s online learning environment; knowledge of the university’s and the program’s support systems, expectations, and outcomes; and advanced, graduate-level critical-thinking, research, and writing skills.
  
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    EDUC 7761 - Leadership, Advocacy, Policy, and Law


    (6 sem. cr.) Leadership and advocacy go hand-in-hand when seeking to promote policies that support effective practices in education for early childhood and school-age students. In this course, education professionals analyze the connections among advocacy, leadership, and policy by examining the evolution of education legislation and pivotal case law in the United States. They examine change theory and leadership styles, allowing them to reflect on their own and others’ paradigms and to determine best practices to promote positive social change. They also engage in a culminating project through which they construct a professional plan for advocacy and leadership in an area of interest that includes issues of diversity and special needs.
  
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    EDUC 7762 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and of the appropriate use of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
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    EDUC 7763 - Specialized Instruction


    (6 sem. cr.) A growing body of research exists around evidenced-based instructional practices in special education. This course reviews the literature specific to specialized instruction for students with disabilities in language, reading, writing, math, and content areas. Topics also include effective practices for instruction and evaluation for students with social-emotional and behavioral needs, including applied behavior analysis and positive behavioral interventions and skill building. Related brain research will be examined, as well as assistive technology and methods of delivery, whether in isolation, small group, or inclusive settings.
  
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    EDUC 7764 - Research Methodology and Special Education


    (6 sem. cr.) To document the effectiveness of practices in special education, different research questions are needed that call for different types of methodologies. This course examines four types of research methodologies important to special education: experimental group, correlation, single-subject, and qualitative designs. Particular attention is given to single-subject research designs that are used to study behavioral change in an individual or group as a result of an intervention. Topics include reliable measurement, repeated measurement, description of conditions, baseline and treatment conditions, and single-variable rules.
  
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    EDUC 7765 - School-Wide Intervention Models


    (6 sem. cr.) Response to intervention (RTI) is a school-wide approach that integrates assessment and intervention within a multitiered prevention system to maximize student achievement and to reduce behavioral problems. This course examines RTI research and other problem-solving processes for best practices for using data to identify students at risk of academic, social, or emotional failure; methods of disability identification and monitoring student progress; and data-based decision making for instruction, universal instruction, and interventions useful for all students. Professional development of regular and special education teachers and the role of parents will be explored. Functional behavioral assessment is examined as an evaluation tool for understanding behavior and effective practices for school-wide positive behavioral support is also explored.
  
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    EDUC 7766 - Sustaining and Supporting Effective Practices in Special Education (Capstone)


    (6 sem. cr.)  Once effective practices for special education are in place, a clear plan is needed for implementation fidelity that addresses program integrity and sustains commitment within the professional learning community. Candidates will examine critical contributing components such as program evaluation, professionalism, cultural resonance, and policy to support continuous improvement.  
    (Prerequisite(s): All other courses.)
  
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    EDUC 7801 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Field experiences provide education professionals with authentic opportunities to apply learning as well as to expand understanding and ability. Building knowledge, skills, and dispositions for field experiences, education professionals also participate in two residencies in which they have the opportunity to meet face-to-face with faculty members to learn and hone skills, develop dispositions, and discuss ways to ensure productive and successful field experiences and meet the demands of the profession they are studying. The program requires a minimum of 320 hours or 40 eight-hour days (across 12 consecutive months) in elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school settings as an administrative aide to a licensed and practicing school principal. Field experience must include at least 40 hours or 1 week at each level that is not a part of education professionals’ primary teaching experience.
  
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    EDUC 7802 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Field experiences provide education professionals with authentic opportunities to apply learning as well as to expand understanding and ability. Building knowledge, skills, and dispositions for field experiences, education professionals also participate in two residencies in which they have the opportunity to meet face-to-face with faculty members to learn and hone skills, develop dispositions, and discuss ways to ensure productive and successful field experiences and meet the demands of the profession they are studying. The program requires a minimum of 320 hours or 40 eight-hour days (across 12 consecutive months) in elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school settings as an administrative aide to a licensed and practicing school principal. Field experience must include at least 40 hours or 1 week at each level that is not a part of education professionals’ primary teaching experience.
  
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    EDUC 7803 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Field experiences provide education professionals with authentic opportunities to apply learning as well as to expand understanding and ability. Building knowledge, skills, and dispositions for field experiences, education professionals also participate in two residencies in which they have the opportunity to meet face-to-face with faculty members to learn and hone skills, develop dispositions, and discuss ways to ensure productive and successful field experiences and meet the demands of the profession they are studying. The program requires a minimum of 320 hours or 40 eight-hour days (across 12 consecutive months) in elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school settings as an administrative aide to a licensed and practicing school principal. Field experience must include at least 40 hours or 1 week at each level that is not a part of education professionals’ primary teaching experience.
  
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    EDUC 7804 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Field experiences provide education professionals with authentic opportunities to apply learning as well as to expand understanding and ability. Building knowledge, skills, and dispositions for field experiences, education professionals also participate in two residencies in which they have the opportunity to meet face-to-face with faculty members to learn and hone skills, develop dispositions, and discuss ways to ensure productive and successful field experiences and meet the demands of the profession they are studying. The program requires a minimum of 320 hours or 40 eight-hour days (across 12 consecutive months) in elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school settings as an administrative aide to a licensed and practicing school principal. Field experience must include at least 40 hours or 1 week at each level that is not a part of education professionals’ primary teaching experience.
  
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    EDUC 7805 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Field experiences provide education professionals with authentic opportunities to apply learning as well as to expand understanding and ability. Building knowledge, skills, and dispositions for field experiences, education professionals also participate in two residencies in which they have the opportunity to meet face-to-face with faculty members to learn and hone skills, develop dispositions, and discuss ways to ensure productive and successful field experiences and meet the demands of the profession they are studying. The program requires a minimum of 320 hours or 40 eight-hour days (across 12 consecutive months) in elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school settings as an administrative aide to a licensed and practicing school principal. Field experience must include at least 40 hours or 1 week at each level that is not a part of education professionals’ primary teaching experience.
 

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