2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) 
    
    Dec 04, 2020  
2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    EDSD 7014 - Recruiting and Retaining Effective School Personnel


    (5 cr.) Education leaders study human resources policies and practices for recruiting, selecting, hiring, inducting, developing, evaluating, and retaining or dismissing school personnel. Identifying teachers’ needs for professional growth is important, but leaders must also ensure that teachers have the opportunity and motivation to use their professional expertise and to participate in ongoing substantial professional development focused on enhancing the learning of every student. Education leaders have the opportunity to evaluate school personnel and ensure teachers are utilized in their areas of strength within the school, and that teachers also receive support and training in any needed areas to promote student learning. They can become knowledgeable about how to hire and retain their novice teachers in order to reduce teacher turnover. As well, school leaders must be able to identify characteristics of productive teacher evaluation processes and programs; distinguish between supervising teaching and supervising learning; and utilize a process and structure for evaluating school personnel that is productive and supportive, motivates improvement, results in retention of highly competent staff members, embodies standards of due process, and takes into account the provisions of the contractual agreements for staff.
  
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    EDSD 7040 - The Community College—Historical Context and Critical Issues


    (5 cr.) The rise of community colleges following World War II added a new egalitarian dimension to higher education. In this course, educators explore how the various components of the community college history and mission changed the face of postsecondary education, giving rise to workforce development, developmental education, and continuing education, in addition to academic transfer programs. Best practices for governance of community colleges as well as contemporary issues such as the completion agenda, dual-credit courses for high school students, and articulations with 4-year institutions are explored. 
  
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    EDSD 7044 - Leadership and Management for Change in Education


    (5 cr.) Building on the core knowledge from earlier courses, students will engage the emerging theories of leadership that reflect the current challenges in culturally responsive education, and the research on motivation and performance. The focus is on entrepreneurial and creative solutions, which reach across P–20 learning organizations to effect positive social change in education.
  
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    EDSD 7050 - Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: A Systems Perspective♦


    (5 cr.) Today’s schools are dynamic organizations that require educators to take an iterative approach to designing curriculum, instruction, and assessment—one that responds to changing and diverse student needs, stakeholder perspectives, policies, accountability requirements, emerging technologies, family and community resources, and other internal and external forces. In this course, education professionals engage in active inquiry at the systems level and address real-world scenarios and problems. Learners can gain experience and expertise in promoting best practices in education, overcoming barriers to student learning and involving family and community partners, all while meeting and complying with relevant policies, laws, ethical practices, and standards. Education professionals explore key components of a successful learning community, the role of a leader within a dynamic system, professional dispositions, current educational trends and issues, and how technologies are creating new opportunities for organizational change and improved student performance.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDSD 7051 - Data-Driven Instruction and Assessment


    (5 cr.) Using data to inform instruction, assessment, and evaluation promotes continuous improvement and student achievement. Instructional leaders must have the ability to ground current practice in data—a process that includes reviewing and discerning data, evaluating current practices, setting an appropriate vision for the future, prioritizing the work, identifying measurable goals, developing an action plan, and then monitoring the results. Education professionals in this course examine the inextricable link between instruction and assessment. They engage in a diagnostic process designed to meet diverse student and systemic needs. They also examine the role of formative and summative assessments in making instructional decisions, the various forms and purposes of assessment, and how the ongoing use of assessment data can move curriculum and instruction beyond mediocrity to support rigorous learning for all students. The effective use of instructional practices such as blended learning, the “flipped” classroom, and the appropriate use of technology to support learning is also examined. 
  
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    EDSD 7052 - Curriculum Design to Promote Social Change


    (5 cr.) Meaningful and engaging learning occurs when curriculum extends beyond the classroom to promote a climate for social change. In this course, education professionals will use a documentary case scenario to evaluate the use of service learning as a tool for connecting the curriculum to real-world experiences, while also supporting the community and its citizens. Educators will select an appropriate learner-centered curriculum model, design an interdisciplinary service project, and prepare a presentation for stakeholders’ consideration, illustrating the potential of service learning as a catalyst for bringing a learner-centered curriculum, citizenship, and standards to life. 
  
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    EDSD 7060 - Issues and Trends in Reading and Literacy


    (5 cr.) Literacy may be understood in multiple ways across various settings and populations. In this course, a foundation will be laid for educators to define literacy based on historical and contemporary perspectives, the sociopolitical landscape, the influence of social media and technological innovation, and influences coming from national, state, local, and Common Core standards. Educators will examine ways to overcome barriers to student literacy learning and develop techniques to improve communication and increase community and family involvement. Based on what they learn in this course and drawing on professional reading and curriculum standards, education professionals will develop a plan to gain stakeholder support for the improvement of curriculum and literacy programming at the systems level.
  
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    EDSD 7061 - Assessment and Data Analysis to Support Effective Literacy Programs


    (5 cr.) Designing literacy programs that effectively promote and support high levels of literacy proficiency requires the use of data that accurately describe the status of student, teacher, and school performance. Education professionals in this course can examine a variety of assessment tools for addressing individual and classroom needs while meeting district and state mandates. Topics include data analysis for tiered intervention decision making and the interpretation of data to drive recommendations at a systemic level. Educators will develop skills to facilitate collaboration and stakeholder inclusion.
  
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    EDSD 7062 - A Collaborative Approach to Literacy Across the Content Areas


    (5 cr.) Making academic content accessible and comprehensible for all learners requires specific strategies PreK–12 teachers need to know and be able to demonstrate. By focusing on academic language, content acquisition, and the appropriate use of technology, education professionals add to their repertoire of strategies to meet content standards for all students, including those with diverse needs, learning styles, and abilities. Education professionals can plan ways to collaborate and share knowledge with other educators within their professional setting and review and evaluate research to inform effective practices. Through this course, educators also address ways to develop programs that integrate both content and literacy objectives to better enhance the development of all learners throughout the content areas. 
  
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    EDSD 7070 - Special Education: Exploring Theory and Practice♦


    (5 cr.) Special education is a dynamic field with a growing research base of best practices and changing implementation efforts for students who demonstrate a broad spectrum of adaptive and learning challenges. Special education professionals in this course explore how theoretical research in the field evolved and influenced emerging and prevalent practices in the field. Through the realistic lens of a case study, candidates will explore a range of research topics as well as investigate how research has influenced practice. Through their coursework, educators are supported in the development of skills and dispositions that will assist candidates as they envision and influence the future of special education.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDSD 7071 - Leading Change in Special Education: Advocacy, Policy, and Law♦


    (5 cr.) Leadership and advocacy go hand-in-hand when seeking to promote policies that support effective practices in education for ALL students. Through analysis and reflection, candidates can examine the evolution of special education legislation and pivotal case law and can analyze the connections among advocacy, leadership, policy, and law as it plays out in realistic scenarios. Special education professionals will also investigate change theory and leadership styles, allowing them to reflect on their own and others’ paradigms in order to determine best practices to promote positive educational and social changes. They must apply leadership, advocacy, self-evaluation, and social change skill sets to current practice as they will be called upon to do in future careers. Candidates can also engage in a culminating project through which they construct a professional plan for advocacy and leadership in an area of interest that includes issues of diversity and special needs.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDSD 7072 - Research Methodology for Special Education


    (5 cr.) In this course, special educators examine research methodologies important and unique to the field of special education. Particular attention is given to single-subject research designs that are used to study behavioral change in individuals or small groups as a result of an intervention. Topics include reliable measurement, repeated measurement, description of conditions, baseline and treatment conditions, and single-variable rules. Candidates will apply the concepts studied in the course to the special education case study. By the end of this course, candidates will begin to delineate various special education research-based methodologies that may apply to an area of interest for their capstone projects.
  
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    EDSD 7073 - Designing Specialized Instruction for Diverse Learners


    (5 cr.) Whether practicing in a school, university, or other professional settings, special educators are called upon to implement data-driven assessments in order to plan and implement individualized instructional plans for students with diverse learning and social challenges. In this course, educators review research and practice specific to specialized instruction for students with disabilities in language, reading, writing, math, and content areas. Topics also include effective practices for instruction and evaluation for students with social-emotional and behavioral needs, including applied behavior analysis, positive behavioral interventions, and skill building. Related brain-based research will be examined, as well as assistive technologies and methods of delivery, whether in individual, small group, or inclusive settings. 
  
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    EDSD 7074 - Implementing Effective School-Wide Intervention Models


    (5 cr.) Special educators must be prepared with valid and reliable assessment data in order to recommend and implement sound, research-based intervention models. In this course, educators examine problem-solving best practices for using data to identify students at risk of academic, social, or emotional difficulties. Candidates can also study methods of disability identification and monitoring student progress, and data-based decision making for instruction, universal instruction, and interventions useful for all students. Professional development for general and special education teachers and the role of caregivers (e.g., parents, families, guardians) will be explored. Functional behavioral assessment is examined as an evaluation tool for understanding behavior, and effective practices for school-wide positive behavioral support (SWPBS) are also explored. 
  
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    EDSD 7075 - Sustaining and Supporting Effective Practices in Special Education


    (5 cr.) Effective special education leaders promote meaningful change for students with diverse learning and social needs, foster the use of effective practices, and sustain long-term program viability throughout diverse settings. Once effective practices are in place, they establish a clear plan for addressing program integrity and sustaining commitment to continuous improvement. Throughout this course, candidates can examine critical components to sustain change, including program evaluation, professionalism, culturally responsive practices, and policy to support continuous improvement. 
  
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    EDSD 7080 - Child Development in the Critical Early Years♦


    (5 cr.) Effective early childhood professionals know that respectful relationships with families provide the foundation for supporting young children’s healthy development. Candidates examine key developmental stages, from prenatal experiences to the early school years. Education professionals explore child development theory, current research in neuroscience, and social-emotional development across the early childhood years, with a special emphasis on the significant role families play in fostering healthy development. Current thinking from the fields of psychology, science, and education are integrated with global perspectives on child development. Educators apply their knowledge to promote positive developmental outcomes for young children and their families. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDSD 7081 - The Language/Literacy Continuum From Birth Through Age 8♦


    (5 cr.) How does language affect the young child’s ability to think, communicate, and learn? In this course, educators explore the language and linguistic development of young children. Education professionals focus on theories of language acquisition; the nature and function of language; the relationship between language and cognition; the developmental stages of language and literacy; and the critical role of families, communities, and educators in fostering language and literacy development from birth through age 8. Education professionals examine current research and ways early childhood professionals can support language and literacy learning for all children across the early childhood spectrum. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDSD 7082 - Meaningful Learning Experiences in Supportive Environments


    (5 cr.) What does excellence look like in early childhood settings? What are varying perspectives on excellence in early childhood education throughout the world? What are the common elements of learning experiences and environments that provide meaning, inspire curiosity, offer safety, and encourage children to thrive? By examining the research, candidates explore current issues and trends in early childhood education such as the inclusion of national standards, project-based learning, looping, technology, and the role of play in fostering healthy development and learning. Education professionals also explore the role of families in supporting children’s learning at home and in early childhood settings as well as how to build effective partnerships with families. 
  
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    EDSD 7083 - Assessment Practices to Promote Healthy Development and Learning


    (5 cr.) How can early childhood professionals ensure that assessment not only evaluates development and learning but also promotes children’s growth? What kinds of assessments are appropriate and effective for very young children as well as those throughout the primary grades? Educators explore formative, summative, formal, and informal assessment as well as the use of these assessments to promote development and guide teaching and learning. Education professionals reflect on the many ways they use assessment on a daily basis, and discuss strategies for communicating assessment processes and results. Educators review current research regarding culturally responsive assessments, assistive technology, and international perspectives. 
  
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    EDSD 7084 - Evaluating and Supporting Early Childhood Programs


    (5 cr.) Researchers indicate that high-quality early childhood programs result in long-term positive outcomes for children. Early childhood professionals have a deep understanding of the developmental domains and content areas of early childhood. Based on this understanding, educators use professional accreditation standards to evaluate the effectiveness of early childhood programs. Professionals learn how to evaluate programs for research-based, effective practices that promote healthy development and learning from birth through age 8. Specific focus is placed on effective practice related to management policies and procedures, teacher qualifications, family engagement, and community involvement.
  
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    EDSD 7085 - Inspired Leadership, Informed Advocacy, and Improved Policy


    (5 cr.) What are the dispositions and responsibilities needed to be an effective professional in the early childhood field? Early childhood leaders exemplify the values and ethics of the field, act as advocates for children and families, and lead initiatives to improve policy and effect positive social change. In this course, education professionals study leadership theory, advocacy strategies, and early childhood policy systems. Educators explore multiple leadership roles in the early childhood field, analyze leadership qualities and traits, reflect on professional growth, and continue to refine research interests. Educators are challenged to be innovative and transformative future thinkers who are deeply committed to the well-being of young children and families.
  
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    EDSD 7090 - Trends and Issues in Educational Technology♦


    (5 cr.) Using new technologies in new ways sparks learning, creativity, and innovation. Trends and issues in educational technology are examined to discover how they influence learning and creativity in the workplace. Learners collaborate to demonstrate the evolution of a current technological trend, analyze its impact on learning and society, and evaluate the societal issues and problems caused by that trend.  
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDSD 7091 - Creating Digital Media♦


    (5 cr.) The effective use of digital media in learning environments requires leaders in the field to be both consumers and creators of multimedia. Learners become knowledgeable developers of digital media by applying principles of instructional design and pedagogy to multimedia. Learners collaborate in the design and creation of digital and interactive media based on visual design principles.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDSD 7092 - Innovations and the Diffusion of Learning Technologies♦


    (5 cr.) Social change resulting from the integration and adoption of technological innovations is the focus of this course. Learners explore Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovations Theory through first-hand experience in a simulation. Learners explore research regarding the integration of technology in the workplace or education setting to determine strategies for becoming catalysts for change. Strategies for overcoming resistance and barriers to change are analyzed.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDSD 7093 - Leading Change


    (5 cr.) Education professionals explore topics related to leading technological change in an organizational setting. Human performance concerns are examined utilizing a variety of leadership approaches. Learners identify a performance gap, develop technological interventions, consider social change issues, and design assessments in order to develop a plan for improving performance.
  
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    EDSD 7101 - Learner-Centered Curriculum♦


    (5 cr.) Designing curricula with rigor, relevance, and results requires broad understanding of the key concepts behind each of these attributes and a clear focus on how best to maximize the learning and potential of PreK–12 learners. In this course, education professionals examine what it means to design a learner-centered curriculum that enhances student engagement and involvement, provides a transformative experience for students, and creates conditions that facilitate deep learning. Education professionals examine the alignment of content standards and design models as well as the role of collaboration and community building, power sharing to foster learner autonomy, problem solving, material that is socially relevant, and ongoing assessment to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse student population. Authentic case-study scenarios provide opportunities for educators to see curriculum design in practice, use existing data to redesign and adapt curriculum, and create learning spaces that accommodate multiple learning needs.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDSD 7102 - Promoting the Success of Diverse Learners♦


    (5 cr.) Student diversity comes in many different forms (e.g., linguistic, cultural, socioeconomic, academic, emotional, aesthetic), and effective educators have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to value the richness this diversity brings and enhance learning in their education setting. By applying strategies and evaluating programs and initiatives to meet the diverse needs of all learners, educators can demonstrate an awareness of students’ prior learning, language, culture, family, and community values to improve teaching and learning. Through real-world scenarios and applications, educators will assess strategies for promoting equitable access to high-quality learning experiences while recognizing their own personal beliefs and biases. Education professionals will also explore current and effective practices for working with diverse learners and providing productive learning environments for all students. Through the use of appropriate materials and technologies, educators will evaluate curriculum, instruction, and assessment, promoting learning for all students. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDSD 7103 - eLearning


    (5 cr.) Educators explore the theories, paradigms, trends, and issues in the field of eLearning. Research on eLearning is critiqued and analyzed as an ecosystem, including an examination of K–12, higher education, corporate, and personal learning communities. Current social and geopolitical trends and their impact on eLearning are analyzed. Delivery methods, human presence, and sustainability of eLearning design are investigated. Through this course, educators are provided with design and development experience through the creation of multimedia presentations in an eLearning environment.
  
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    EDSD 7106 - Program Evaluation for Continuous Improvement


    (5 cr.) Effective educational leaders must have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to evaluate programs and make data-driven decisions to promote continuous improvement for all learners. In this course, education professionals use available data points and tools to evaluate the design, implementation, and program outcomes to determine a program’s impact on the learner, family, and community. The results of the program evaluation may lead educational professionals to develop action plans that include the development of community outreach programs, grants, legislation/policy reform, professional development plans, or technology solutions. Through this course, education professionals are helped to determine whether to recommend an improvement plan on an existing program or propose a new program or initiative.
  
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    EDSD 7107 - Designing Instruction for eLearning


    (5 cr.) Instructional design for eLearning involves understanding effective learning experiences in digital spaces. Educators apply the principles of the community of inquiry and the engagement of the digital learner as they design an eLearning course. Mobile technologies, collaborative learning, assessment, academic integrity, and meeting the needs of diverse and global students are addressed. Educators collaborate in the design and development of eLearning products and explore social change through eLearning.
  
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    EDSD 7410 - Creativity and Innovation


    (5 cr.) Creativity and critical thinking are driving forces behind human innovation and progress. In this course, educators explore theories, models, and roles of creativity and innovation in society and learning environments. They reflect on the risks and rewards associated with creativity and critical thinking, while employing approaches for idea creation focusing on originality and inventiveness.
  
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    EDSD 7411 - Authentic Assessment


    (5 cr.) Innovative learning requires creative assessment strategies to evaluate student learning within real-world and simulated environments. Through the use of reverse design, educators will create authentic assessments for a learning culture that emphasizes creativity, innovation, and critical thinking. In addition, approaches for using assessment data to effect change will be explored. Methods of inquiry designed to inform and improve learning and instruction to address new trends, including the latest tools and technologies, will be examined.
  
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    EDSD 7412 - Innovative Curriculum


    (5 cr.) Innovative curriculum evolves and changes in anticipation of learner needs. The focus of this course is on research-based processes and a variety of models used to design innovative curriculum to support learning across the lifespan and within diverse contexts. Strategies for aligning strong content with formalized standards and goals within the learning environment will be explored. The contributing roles of instruction, technology, and globalization will set the context for this course of study.
  
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    EDSD 7900 - EdS Capstone Project: Creating and Supporting Effective Educational Practices


    (5 cr.) Effective education leaders promote meaningful change for all students, foster the use of effective practices, and sustain long-term program viability in diverse educational settings. Throughout the program course sequence, educators examine critical components to create and support continuous improvement. These skill sets are applied in this capstone course as educators create a project that promotes meaningful education and social change. Working in a consultative role as a school or district professional, the educator engages in a project to identify a problem within his or her academic and/or work environment and propose a solution in the form of draft recommendations for the school, district, or educational setting. Additionally, the educator projects how the proposed recommendations, if implemented, would be evaluated and sustained. A Capstone Project Rubric is used to guide in project development and evaluation.
  
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    EDUC 1001 - Introduction to Education♦


    (5 cr.) This course is an overview of the field of early care and education. Education professionals engage in assignments that emphasize the elements of high-quality programs, governing standards and regulations, and historical perspectives. They engage in peer discussions on a range of topics, such as the nature of infant care and education, learning through play, quality education and teaching, the definition of education, and current issues affecting education. Education professionals gain further insight into the profession of teaching and working with children through interviews with teachers of various age groups. Additionally, education professionals explore career options and consider what it means to be a professional in the field of early care and education.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 1002 - Pioneers and Philosophies of Education♦


    (5 cr.) Current perspectives on education and methods of teaching are rooted in history and philosophy as far back as the ancient Greeks. In this course, education professionals explore thinkers, philosophies, and educational programs that have influenced current ideas about effective practices in teaching, including tapping into different forms of intelligence and applying new methods for assessment. Education professionals critically examine educational philosophies and methods in light of current social, political, and economic forces impacting children, families, and the field. Through coursework and discussions, education professionals begin to develop a reasoned, coherent personal philosophy of education as a basis for ethical and professional practice and decision making.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 1003 - Educational Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) How might social class, ethnicity, and gender impact children’s learning? Education professionals in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions through the exploration of psychological concepts and theories as they relate to the field of early care and education. Education professionals examine behavioral, cognitive, social, and constructivist views of learning. They engage in conceptual and applied assignments that emphasize research-based principles as well as implications of these principles on child development, learning, teaching, and assessment. Moreover, they share perspectives and delve deeper into content through weekly discussions on a variety of topics, such as helping children develop and learn, defining intelligence, fostering resilience, analyzing learning experiences, and using motivation theories and principles.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 1004 - Child Development♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, education professionals have an overview of physical, cognitive/language, and social and emotional development in children from birth through adolescence. Education professionals examine prevailing philosophies and theories of child development and form their own child development philosophy. Through an exploration across various developmental domains and stages, education professionals investigate the latest research and thinking in regard to conditions that affect children’s learning and development, such as risk factors, developmental variations, temperament, rate of maturation, innate abilities, culture, family, community, and societal influences.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 1005 - Child Health, Safety, and Nutrition♦


    (5 cr.) Growth and development in young children are influenced by many factors, including nutrition, safety, and health. Education professionals in this course learn about these factors and examine the professional’s role in supporting children’s healthy development within the context of early childhood care and education as well as in family and community settings. They also assess and discuss the prevention of health problems common to young children, methods of promoting wellness and fitness, child safety, emergency preparedness and procedures, and child mental health.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 1006 - Child, Family, and Community Relationships♦


    (5 cr.) Complex events, such as divorce, child abuse and neglect, and illness and death of family members, are common occurrences in today’s society. This course is a survey of the ways in which professionals and families work together in supporting child and family resiliency within the context of these complex issues. Education professionals explore formal and informal communication strategies; family participation in group settings; family education; advocacy for families; and the impact of family, culture, and community on children’s development and learning within early childhood programs. Through this course, education professionals have the opportunity to gain the communication and conflict-management skills needed to prepare for future professional challenges in the field of education.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 1011 - Making Connections: The Early Childhood Field


    (2 cr.) In this course, education professionals explore the early childhood field and related themes, issues, and controversies. Education professionals make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, challenges, and possibilities within the field of early care and education. They investigate professional organizations and research information on early childhood career opportunities. They also reflect on prior knowledge as well as knowledge gained throughout the course in regard to what it means to be a professional in the field of early education.
     
  
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    EDUC 1012 - Making Connections: The Developing Child


    (2 cr.) Education professionals in this course focus on the themes, issues, and controversies related to child development. They make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, challenges, and possibilities related to the developing child. Education professionals research and analyze information on brain development, which they use to develop a presentation that could be used to inform stakeholders, such as parents and colleagues. Through this and other assignments designed to provide practical application of content, they summarize their understanding of the developing child, including areas in which they hope to learn more.
     
  
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    EDUC 1013 - Making Connections: The Well-Being of Children


    (2 cr.) Children’s overall well-being is related not only to their health and safety but also to quality relationships among early childhood professionals, family, and community members. In this course, education professionals examine themes, issues, and challenges related to the fostering of children’s overall well-being. They make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, developments, and possibilities related to healthy growth and development within early childhood, family, and community settings. Additionally, education professionals assess and discuss resources in the area of early childhood education to further their professional development.
     
  
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    EDUC 1014 - Understanding Today’s Instructional Environments♦


    (5 cr.) Learning in the 21st century can take place anytime and anywhere. This course is an overview of the various settings in which teaching and learning occur. Education professionals explore the dynamics of traditional face-to-face, hybrid, and online instructional environments found in such areas as corporate training, higher education, K–12 education, government, healthcare, and nonprofit organizations. Applying course concepts and theories, education professionals construct a concept map of important categories and characteristics of learners. They also compare components of various learning environments and structure them for effective learning and engagement.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 1015 - How People Learn♦


    (5 cr.) Humans are complex, and many factors influence the ways in which they learn. In this course, education professionals examine the major theories of how humans learn, including behaviorism, constructivism, and emerging theories based on brain research. They also explore the concepts of multiple intelligences and learning styles, as well as the influences of emotion, culture, and motivation on the learning process. Employing course concepts and principles, education professionals apply learning theories to learning experiences and analyze themselves as adult learners. They also discuss a variety of topics, such as the learning process, social learning theories and online learning, factors that affect online learning, and adult learners and online learning.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 1016 - Foundations of Educational Studies♦


    (5 cr.) Education is a core value in our society. The types of educational opportunities available, the manner in which they are made available, and the ways in which people participate have changed drastically over time. In this course, education professionals explore the structure and history of educational systems in the United States, the wide variety of settings in which learning occurs, and how the role of education in society has changed over time. They also explore the multiple career paths available to them in the field of education.



    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    EDUC 2001 - Language Development♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, education professionals focus on the theories of language acquisition and language development of young children from infancy through preschool. Education professionals explore how children acquire and develop language, and they gain an understanding of emergent reading and writing. They engage in coursework that emphasizes bilingualism, atypical speech and language development, and the impact of culture and environment on language. Additionally, education professionals make connections between course concepts and share ideas and perspectives though weekly discussions on a range of topics, such as language and the brain, adult roles in language development, early literacy, and challenges for second-language learners, among others.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 2002 - Children’s Literature♦


    (5 cr.) Children’s literature can delight and inspire young readers as well as promote respect for diversity. In this survey course, education professionals focus on the power and quality of children’s literature from birth through adolescence. Education professionals explore a wide variety of genres and learn the characteristics of high-quality literature. They gain practical experience critically evaluating and selecting books from various genres for specific age groups. They also learn about prominent authors, illustrators, and book awards.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 2003 - Human Development♦


    (5 cr.) To fully appreciate and understand ourselves and others, we must have a basic understanding of human cognitive, emotional, and social development. In this course, education professionals examine the basic developmental stages that all humans undergo throughout their lifespan, from infancy to adulthood. They explore these topics with consideration to issues of gender, ethnicity, social class, and culture. Applying course concepts and theories, education professionals engage in an integrative project through which they create a character for whom they map human development and progress benchmarks from infancy through early adulthood. Through this project, they gain a deeper understanding of life-span development and major theories used to view human development.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 2004 - Literacy in the 21st Century♦


    (5 cr.) The technology-centered and information-rich world in which we live and work requires an expanded definition of what it means to be literate. Education professionals in this course examine the skills and strategies necessary for success in a digital information society. They explore multimedia and Internet technologies that enhance learning by facilitating collaboration, communication, and problem solving. Education professionals apply 21st-century literacy skills through a collaborative project in which they research a topic within the current field of literacy; they communicate their findings in a multimedia presentation.
      (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 1014.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 2011 - Making Connections: The Foundations of Literacy


    (2 cr.) Education professionals in this course explore the themes, issues, and developments in the foundations of literacy. They make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, challenges, and possibilities within the fields of language development and children’s literature. Demonstrating knowledge of key concepts and theories, education professionals engage in written assignments designed to provide practical application of course content on a variety of topics, such as the benefits and impact of literacy, how literacy serves as a tool of social equity, and strategies to support family literacy and literacy programs.
     
  
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    EDUC 2012 - Understanding and Valuing Creativity♦


    (5 cr.) Innovating and risk taking, critical thinking and problem-solving, and communicating and collaborating—all of these are essential skills for the 21st century, and all are intrinsically linked to creativity. Education professionals in this course explore the abundant meanings, value, and applications of creativity as they pertain to learning and life. They consider how encouraging and celebrating creativity in themselves, their colleagues, and today’s learners can benefit society. They achieve understanding through an integrative, collaborative wiki project through which they develop a definition of creativity based on theories and philosophical viewpoints, determine how creativity develops throughout the lifespan, describe how to foster creativity in others, and develop creative techniques to solve problems and promote critical thinking.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 2400 - The Professional Educator


    (5 cr.) Lifelong learning and professionalism are key components of effective teaching. As teacher candidates begin their professional program of study, they review the program requirements including field experience responsibilities and major assessments. Teacher candidates study the dimensions of teacher professionalism through the eyes of social change. After reviewing the code of ethics from a practitioner viewpoint, historical theorists, court cases, and trends in education, candidates focus on what is required to be successful in 21st century schools. This includes an analysis of multiple technological frameworks, and candidates use these frameworks in multiple ways throughout the course. Through readings, voices from the field, virtual field experiences, and reflective experiences, each candidate begins to consider his/her personal philosophy.  (Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1010, Math-Algebra.) 


  
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    EDUC 2401 - Diverse and Exceptional Learners in the Elementary Classroom


    (5 cr.) The dynamics of today’s classroom are unique and challenging for teachers and learners. Education professionals in this course explore and analyze issues, complexities, and responsibilities associated with the field of education in the 21st century, including providing equal educational opportunities for all learners, regardless of their abilities and differences. They examine many factors influence learning, including individual experiences, abilities, talents, prior learning, language, culture, and family and community values. Education professionals study special education laws and policies; language diversity; and multiple intelligences. They also address learning theory, diverse learning styles, and practical instructional strategies, and they acquire theoretical and practical knowledge about today’s classroom as well as the family and community contexts that influence children’s learning and development. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 2400.) 
  
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    EDUC 2402 - Exploring Dimensions of Literacy K-6


    (5 cr.) In this course, education professionals learn theories, principles, practices, and strategies to support literacy development in the elementary grades. Candidates learn about early literacy development including phonological awareness, concepts of print, and phonics. Strategies for developing vocabulary, comprehension, fluency, writing, content-area literacy, and media literacy are also explored. Through course readings and virtual field experiences, candidates analyze literacy instruction and identify research-based principles that support the literacy and learning of all students, including English language learners. Candidates examine the role of formal and informal assessments in planning and modifying literacy instruction to meet the needs of a diverse student population. Topics include organizing the literacy classroom, differentiating literacy instruction, and involving families to support the literacy development of students. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 2400.) 
  
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    EDUC 3003 - Observation and Assessment of the Young Child♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, education professionals explore developmentally appropriate formal and informal assessments, including observational techniques for assessing young children’s development and learning. Education professionals learn how to use specific tools and the data generated from them to inform effective decision making and instructional planning. They also consider and discuss ethical and legal considerations as well as other related issues and controversies. Applying course concepts, education professionals participate in an integrative child observation project through which they gain a deeper understanding of the process of assessment, the role of observation, and the importance of considering children as individuals.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3004 - Curriculum Design♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, education professionals have the opportunity to gain the fundamental skills needed for planning, designing, and delivering engaging learning experiences. They examine the elements of effective curriculum design, learn how to write measurable learning objectives, and explore tools, technologies, and resources for developing curriculum. They share perspectives and gain practical insight on course concepts through discussions on various topics, such as instructional designer responsibilities in creating effective curriculum, learning objective analysis, assessment formats, and curriculum design proposals. Additionally, education professionals reflect on learning and consider how they can use knowledge gained throughout the course in future personal, academic, and professional future endeavors.
      (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 1014.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3005 - Evaluation and Assessment♦


    (5 cr.) Program evaluation and learner assessment are fundamental components to the process of designing effective learning experiences. In this course, education professionals investigate major concepts, principles, and methodologies related to evaluation and assessment. They explore the selection of assessment tools, measurement of learning outcomes, and performance evaluation. Education professionals learn how to use information gained from assessments as a tool for improving learning.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3006 - Designing Curriculum♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, education professionals have the opportunity to gain the fundamental skills needed for planning, designing, and delivering effective learning experiences. They examine the elements of effective curriculum design, and they explore tools, technologies, and resources for developing curriculum. They also discuss the role of instructional designers, course goals and objectives, assessment techniques, and emerging issues in the field. Moreover, education professionals gain practical experience in applying Bloom and Fink taxonomies as well as writing goals and objectives, congruent assessments, learning plans, and instructional steps.
      (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 1014.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3007 - Assessment and Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) Assessment and evaluation are fundamental to the process of designing effective learning experiences. In this course, education professionals investigate major concepts, principles, and methodologies related to evaluation and assessment. They explore the selection of assessment tools, measurement of learning outcomes, and evaluation of performance. Additionally, education professionals learn how to use information gained from assessments as a tool for improving practice.
      (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 1015.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3008 - Diversity in Education♦


    (5 cr.) People have different backgrounds, perspectives, and values; similarly, they have different approaches to learning. Individuals who work in educational environments and serve as agents of social change must recognize and honor these differences. Education professionals in this course examine how the need to serve people of differing social groups, cultures, and abilities offers challenges and opportunities in today’s learning environments. They reflect on their attitudes, beliefs, and biases regarding diversity and learn approaches to help ensure equitable access and meaningful learning in a variety of educational settings.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3009 - Technology and Education♦


    (5 cr.) Technology is becoming a central aspect of our everyday lives and has a profound impact on the way we work, play, and learn. In this course, education professionals explore and discuss how our technology-rich world influences different generations of learners and their learning preferences. Through conceptual and application-based assignments, they also learn how to integrate technology into teaching and learning processes to meet the needs of diverse learners as well as how to harness Internet technologies to enhance the work of students by facilitating collaboration, communication, and problem solving.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3010 - 21st-Century Learning♦


    (5 cr.) Professionals in all areas of education, such as teaching, workforce training, and policy making, must be cognizant of the knowledge and skills required to adapt to 21st-century-specific change. In this course, education professionals explore the proficiencies essential to navigating the 21st-century learning landscape to position themselves for professional flexibility and success. They examine how the nature of knowledge, literacy, and learning is changing as a result of new technology. Education professionals gain a practical understanding of ways to learn and function effectively in this new, evolving environment through investigations and discussions on emerging research on learning.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3011 - Making Connections: Managing and Leading Early Childhood Programs♦


    (2 cr.) Managing child development centers in the 21st century requires a complex array of leadership skills and dispositions. In this course, education professionals explore the various types, purposes, and theoretical foundations of child development programs, and they examine the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) core competencies for directors. They engage in discussions and assignments that emphasize the leader’s role in managing the organization as a whole, including overseeing regulatory and business concerns, establishing policies and procedures, and implementing the organization’s mission and vision.


    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3012 - Making Connections: Fiscal and Personnel Management of Child Development Centers and Programs


    (2 cr.) A child development center is a business like any other; it must be operated and staffed with precision. In this course, child development center directors and managers prepare for the financial and human relations aspects of the job. Topics covered include constructing and managing a budget, maintaining accurate financial reports, fund-raising, staffing, personnel management, and professional development.
  
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    EDUC 3050 - Child Development, Motivation, and Learning


    (5 cr.) In this course, teacher candidates prepare to understand the social, physical, emotional, and intellectual growth and development of children as related to learning and motivation in the elementary classroom. Teacher candidates explore philosophies and theories of child development and make connections between and among the key topics of development, learning and motivation, and social and cultural diversity. Learning environments and resources (including technology) that support the developmental needs of elementary children are identified and analyzed. In addition, teacher candidates explore the importance of family and community connections to support children’s learning; develop strategies for engaging families in the learning process of their children; and consider the role of children’s interests and personal experiences when planning instruction. Teacher candidates identify typical and atypical developmental patterns; analyze effectiveness of instructional strategies; and consider the role of specialists in supporting children’s growth and development. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 2401.) 
  
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    EDUC 3051 - Collaboration to Support All Learners


    (5 cr.) In this course, candidates explore strategies for effective communication and collaboration with colleagues, specialists, families, and community agencies to provide support for all children. Candidates examine collaboration strategies that promote the growth and learning of all children in the elementary classroom, including those with exceptionalities, gifted and talented students, and English language learners. Candidates learn about the roles of all participants in collaborative teams, including coteaching and participating in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) process. Candidates examine the role of the school in supporting all learners within the larger community context. They identify factors in the students’ environments that may affect their growth and learning and explore strategies for effective collaboration with diverse families. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 2402, EDUC 3052)
     
  
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    EDUC 3052 - Effective Practices: Planning, Instruction, and Assessment


    (5 cr.) To help ensure high levels of learning and achievement for all students, today’s educators must be knowledgeable about learners and learning and well-versed in effective teaching and assessment practices. In this course, education professionals examine the interrelationships between assessment, teaching, and learning as well as effective practices for applying and integrating these critical components in the K–6 classroom. They gain a historical perspective on the standards and accountability movement and examine standards in their state or local setting. They also explore learning theory in the context of today’s challenging educational goals and standards. In this course, education professionals learn and apply research-based practices in effective assessment, curriculum design, and instruction. Through on-site experiences and Virtual Field Experiences, they critically analyze and implement teaching and learning principles and practices that help ensure awareness of the individual and collective needs of students. This course requires a 15 hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 2401.) 
  
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    EDUC 3053 - Community Building for Effective Classroom Management


    (5 cr.) In this course, education professionals learn to create safe, supportive, and respectful learning environments that promote social-emotional development, self-responsibility, and character to optimize learning for all students. Teachers will learn how to foster a sense of community in the classroom and develop positive relationships with and among students. Age-appropriate skills and strategies for managing dynamic and flexible grouping structures and for teaching conflict resolution will be presented. The course also provides strategies for building positive relationships, fostering motivation, and engaging in effective communication and problem solving with parents and families. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 2401.) 
  
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    EDUC 3054 - Literacy K-6: Instruction and Assessment


    (5 cr.) Reading, listening, speaking, and writing are skills essential to success in school and in life. In this course, teacher candidates can examine a wide range of effective instructional and assessment practices that support the development of reading, oral language, and written communication for K-6 students. Teacher candidates use research-based approaches to literacy instruction while implementing a variety of assessment tools to identify students’ difficulties. Teacher candidates use assessment data to create engaging literacy learning experiences at diverse developmental levels. Topics include the incorporation of technology to support and enrich literacy learning, family involvement, and integrating literacy and learning into the content areas This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 2402, EDUC 3052.) 
  
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    EDUC 3055 - Social Studies and the Arts K-6: Instruction and Assessment


    (5 cr.) In this course, candidates prepare to become effective educators of social studies and the arts. As they plan and implement instruction, candidates integrate the major concepts, themes, and modes of inquiry from social studies and the arts. Emphasis is on developing strategies to help students become effective citizens of a democratic and culturally diverse society. Candidates focus on building connections across disciplines and using the arts to foster student engagement and communication and promote their abilities to construct and apply knowledge. Candidates use multiple assessments to measure student progress and modify instruction to address the needs of all learners in diverse classrooms. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 3053, EDUC 3054, EDUC 3056, EDUC 4010, EDUC 4020, American or World History.) 
     
  
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    EDUC 3056 - Integrating Content and Technology to Enhance Learning


    (5 cr.) In this course, teacher candidates explore strategies for integrating technology across content areas in order to plan units and lessons that support developmental and curricular goals for elementary students. Candidates create learning experiences that promote student motivation and engagement; support exploration, problem solving, and critical thinking; provide opportunities for collaborative and self-directed learning; and foster content area literacy. Candidates explore a wide variety of technology resources, infusing them in instructional planning to help students learn content and become proficient in the use of technology. Candidates examine effective teaching practices, including formative/authentic assessments and scaffolding techniques to support diverse learners. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 3054)
  
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    EDUC 3101 - Professionalism and Advocacy in the Early Childhood Field♦


    (5 cr.) The landscape of early care and education is constantly changing. Education professionals in this course examine these changes, focusing on the roles and responsibilities of the early childhood teaching professional in infant/toddler and preschool settings. Education professionals explore the complexities of developmentally appropriate practice and learn what it means to be an advocate for children, their families, and the profession itself. They engage in discussions and assignments that emphasize the importance of keeping up with current research in the field and engaging in professional activities and organizations to ensure continual professional growth and learning.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3103 - Guiding Young Children’s Behavior♦


    (5 cr.) Proactive guidance and positive, safe learning environments promote healthy child development and learning. Education professionals in this course focus on understanding and fostering social and emotional development in preschool-age children, and they learn strategies for establishing classroom communities in which all children feel safe, valued, and respected. They explore a range of topics, including teaching social skills, routines, and procedures; collaborating with families; preventing and working with challenging behaviors; developing problem-solving abilities; and organizing the classroom setting to support learning, cooperation, and social and emotional growth.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3111 - Making Connections: Foundations of Preschool Teaching


    (2 cr.) Professionalism, advocacy, and preschool education provide the focus of the themes, issues, and challenges that education professionals examine in this course. Education professionals make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, controversies, and possibilities related to working in the early childhood field with preschool-age children and their families. Applying course concepts, education professionals consider and explain the role and benefits of play for children and adults, and they summarize their thinking in regard to cultivating healthy development and learning in children through connections with nature.
     
  
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    EDUC 3112 - Making Connections: Effective Learning Environments


    (2 cr.) The development of optimal preschool learning environments and related themes, issues, and challenges provide the framework for this course. Education professionals make connections between the topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, controversies, and possibilities associated with establishing effective preschool learning environments. Through a case study scenario, they apply their knowledge of preschool children as well as concepts learned in the course to describe components that they believe are essential to optimal preschool environments. They also consider and summarize the importance of creativity, how creativity has affected their own lives, and how they would go about fostering creativity in the learning environment.
     
  
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    EDUC 3202 - Quality Programs for Infants and Toddlers♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, education professionals have the opportunity to focus on the breadth and depth of the field of infant/toddler care and education, emphasizing characteristics of quality infant/toddler programs. Education professionals learn the foundations of infant/toddler development, the integral role of the infant/toddler professional in fostering children’s growth and ensuring family involvement, and theoretical frameworks key to quality programs. They also explore the components of high-quality environments and what it means to be an advocate for young children, their families, and the profession.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3203 - Infant/Toddler Mental Health♦


    (5 cr.) Positive developmental progress in infants/toddlers depends on many factors, including the overall promotion of mental health, prevention of occurrence or escalation of mental health problems, and the effective treatment of mental health needs. Education professionals in this course explore current research in the field of infant/toddler mental health, through which they gain practical insight on protective and risk factors in family environments; social and emotional developmental challenges; developmentally appropriate infant/toddler screening and assessment; diagnostic classification systems for infant/toddler mental health; effective intervention strategies; and collaborative services approaches. Moreover, education professionals apply course concepts through practical assignments, such as the development of a fact sheet designed to educate child development professionals about the importance of the field of infant/toddler mental health.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3204 - Family Cultures of Infants and Toddlers♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, education professional experience an overview of the way culture impacts typical conceptions of infant/toddler development and interactions. Education professionals focus on the ability to form healthy working relationships and respectful partnerships with the families of infants and toddlers across a range of cultures. They investigate the meaning of various child-rearing behaviors and how they relate to family expectations and cultural traditions, with the goal of developing culturally appropriate practices. Education professionals also make connections and share perspectives through discussions on related topics, such as cultural differences in caregiving practices, attachment and separation, perspectives on play, and effective communication, among others.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3211 - Making Connections: Foundations of Infant/Toddler Care and Education


    (2 cr.) An important role of the child development professional is to understand how to use support services and programs to aid the healthy development and learning of young children and their families. In this course, education professionals examine themes, issues, and controversies central to the field of infant/toddler care and education, and they critically analyze ways to support the healthy development and learning of infants and toddlers through food and nutrition programs, vaccinations, and early intervention services. Education professionals make connections between the topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, challenges, and possibilities that infant/toddler professionals must understand.
     
  
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    EDUC 3212 - Making Connections: Healthy Infant/Toddler Growth and Development


    (2 cr.) Education professionals in this course focus on healthy infant/toddler growth and development as well as related themes, issues, and challenges. They make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, controversies, and possibilities associated with the overall well-being of very young children. Applying course concepts and gaining deeper insight on topics, education professionals also engage in practical writing activities, such as the development of a resource sheet for child development professionals that includes information on factors promoting healthy growth and development.
     
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 3203 - Infant/Toddler Mental Health and EDUC 3204 - Family Cultures of Infants and Toddlers.)
  
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    EDUC 3301 - School-Age and Adolescent Development♦


    (5 cr.) Education professionals in this course gain a fundamental understanding of how school-age children and adolescents develop and learn. They examine typical and atypical cognitive, physical, and social-emotional development as well as the relationship among these developmental domains. They also compare theories of development; develop a presentation that identifies and explains specific strategies, methods, or activities for the promotion of health and well-being in middle childhood; engage in a field study to gain real-world insight on the affective and social development of children between the ages of 6 and 12; and complete an integrative research paper on critical, topical issues related to school-age and adolescent development.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3302 - Making Connections: Professions in the Field of School-Age and Adolescent Development


    (2 cr.) In this course, education professionals have an overview of the practices and professions in the field of school-age and adolescent development, including topics such as careers; interpersonal and professional skills; and ethical/legal guidelines needed for working with school-age children and adolescents, families, and other professionals. Education professionals explore a variety of organizations that are devoted to fostering the healthy development of school-age children and adolescents. They also have the opportunity to investigate a profession of their choice to learn the responsibilities and tasks it entails. Additionally, education professionals describe what they perceive to be the professional relationship between ethical and legal obligations as well as the significance of law and ethics in the field of school-age and adolescent development.
     
  
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    EDUC 3303 - Motivating and Guiding School-Age Children and Adolescents♦


    (5 cr.) Educators have a responsibility to guide and motivate as well as to foster self-esteem and resilience in school-age children and adolescents. Education professionals in this course address a continuum of effective strategies needed for working with school-age children and adolescents in group and classroom settings. Such strategies include effective communication, positive guidance, modeling/mentoring, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, fostering self-esteem, promoting resilience, and problem-solving and conflict-resolution skills. They learn to apply theory to practice as they critically analyze several theoretical constructs and consider their implications for working with school-age children and adolescents in group and/or classroom settings.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 3304 - Making Connections: Effective Learning Environments for School-Age Children and Adolescents


    (2 cr.) Often times, the setting in which learning occurs is equally important as the material taught and method of teaching. In this course, education professionals examine effective learning environments for school-age children and adolescents. They make connections between key topics and their personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world settings; and future trends, challenges, and possibilities related to the healthy development and learning of school-age children and adolescents. Demonstrating knowledge and applying concepts, education professionals consider and describe how their definition of an effective learning environment has changed as a result of their learning. They also gain real-world insight into how to design effective learning environments by interviewing a professional in the field.
     
  
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    EDUC 4001 - Capstone


    (7 cr.) In this course, education professionals have the opportunity to integrate theories of child development, principles of effective early childhood practice, and methods of working with young children and their families. Education professionals engage in projects that demonstrate synthesis and application of this knowledge. Through these projects, they consider the knowledge and skills gained throughout the program and how they can apply them to future work in the early childhood/child development field. They also have the opportunity to research a position in early education, interview a professional in the field, develop a resume and cover letter, and reflect on professional competencies and areas for professional growth.
      (Prerequisite(s): Completion of all other required coursework.)
  
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    EDUC 4004 - Children With Special Needs♦


    (5 cr.) Educators understand that all individuals are unique with varying abilities and needs. In this course, education professionals have an overview of exceptionalities in children from birth through adolescence. They engage in coursework that highlights early identification, referral, intervention, inclusion, and the related psychosocial needs of children and their families. They discuss complexities related to labeling children, inclusion, and challenging myths and stereotypes. In addition, education professionals explore federal and state legislation that guides educational requirements.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4005 - Cultural and Linguistic Diversity♦


    (5 cr.) An emphasis in this course is the importance of being responsive to the languages and cultures of individual children and their families and communities to support learning and development effectively. Education professionals broaden their understanding of culture as a framework that includes not only language and ethnicity but also gender, socioeconomic status, exceptionalities, family configuration, sexual orientation, personal interests, and many other aspects of one’s individuality. In addition, education professionals reflect on their own cultural frameworks and examine personal attitudes and beliefs.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4006 - Making Connections: Operating Child Development Centers and Programs


    (2 cr.) Operating a child development center requires the wearing of multiple hats. The focus in this course is on the day-to-day operational duties that managers and directors must perform to keep the facility running safely and smoothly. Topics include marketing and public relations; facilities management to ensure proper health, nutrition, and safety conditions; and family communication and support. Legal and ethical issues in working with children and families are also explored.
  
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    EDUC 4010 - Mathematics K-6: Instruction and Assessment


    (5 cr.) This coherent and rigorous approach to teaching and learning K–6 mathematics focuses on conceptual understanding, procedural skills, and application of mathematical knowledge. Coursework also focuses on helping teacher candidates promote problem-solving and communication skills as the core for teaching numbers and operations, algebra, data analysis, probability, measurement, geometry, and the use of manipulatives across math strands. Themes threaded throughout the course include technology, real-world applications, integrating math with other content areas, and building on the strengths and overcoming the challenges of diverse learners. This course includes 15 hours of field experience. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 3054.)
  
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    EDUC 4011 - Making Connections: The Individuality of Children


    (2 cr.) In this course, education professionals address themes, issues, and controversies related to the special needs and individuality of children. They make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends, challenges, and possibilities associated with understanding and meeting the needs of individual children and their families. Through written assignments designed to provide practical application of content, education professionals analyze topical sources focused on disability culture and autism and then make connections, describe how their thinking has changed as a result of their analysis, and summarize new perspectives.
     
  
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    EDUC 4012 - Making Connections: Living in a Diverse World


    (2 cr.) Education professionals in this course examine themes, issues, and challenges specific to living in a diverse society. They make connections between key topics and their own personal experiences, interests, and aspirations; other coursework; current research and controversies; real-world early childhood settings; and future trends and possibilities related to the areas of social responsibility and cultural and linguistic diversity. They delve deeper into content and share ideas and perspectives through discussions on a range of topics, such as methods to strengthen communities and strategies and challenges of international adoption.
     
  
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    EDUC 4013 - Motivation and Learning♦


    (5 cr.) Motivation is an important precursor to learning; yet, what motivates people of different ages and different backgrounds to participate and persist in learning opportunities varies widely. In this course, education professionals explore foundational theories of motivation and how these impact learning. They investigate applications of theories of motivation to understand what occurs in different learning environments. They also explore how to use these theories to help those who work in educational environments make effective decisions about their practice.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4014 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Education♦


    (5 cr.) An understanding of legal and ethical issues that impact the lives and interests of learners is critical to those who work in all types of educational settings. In this course, education professionals examine issues surrounding state and national educational policy; constitutional issues concerning equal opportunity, privacy, and access; and the legal requirements of working with children and adults from different backgrounds. Through activities and discussions, education professionals practice ethical decision making and consider their own beliefs and biases about ethical issues in education.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4015 - Educational Studies Capstone


    (5 cr.) Through the capstone experience, education professionals have the opportunity to integrate their understanding of educational concepts and processes learned throughout the program. They complete an integrative project that demonstrates their ability to apply this knowledge to the real world. Education professionals identify professional opportunities in the field of education and make connections between program learning outcomes and their job of interest, thus demonstrating how fulfilling learning outcomes provided them the skills, knowledge, and qualifications required for the position.
      (Prerequisite(s): Completion of all other program coursework.)
  
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    EDUC 4020 - Science K-6: Instruction and Assessment


    (5 cr.) In this course, education professionals explore teaching and learning in science, based on the latest research on the most effective methods for teaching appropriate science curriculum from Kindergarten through grade 6. Candidates focus on ways to use developmentally appropriate strategies to promote modes of inquiry and analytical skills in science education. They also explore instructional and assessment strategies to develop children’s conceptual understanding of science, particularly relating to the standards for physical, life, and earth and space sciences. Candidates examine and apply integration of science with reading, math, social studies, and technology. Candidates consider their own science content knowledge and explore local professional development opportunities. This course requires a 15-hour field experience at a school approved by Walden University. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 3054 and Lab Science requirement.)
  
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    EDUC 4030 - Demonstration Teaching/Seminar: Professional Ethics, Communication, and Collaboration in Elementary Education


    (10 cr.) Demonstration teaching is the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program and is an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills. Education professionals participate in orientation activities and then gradually assume complete teaching responsibility of an elementary classroom. Education professionals take full control for 4 consecutive weeks over a 12-week placement, gaining real-world experience and the opportunity to translate theory into practice.

    Candidates demonstrate the various roles of an elementary educator. Education professionals work closely with, and are evaluated by, their Walden University supervisor, classroom cooperating teacher, and Walden faculty member. During demonstration teaching, all professionals complete the Education Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA), participate in weekly discussions, and complete a collaboration based major assessment. This course requires a 12-week full-time classroom experience at a school approved by Walden University. (Prerequisite(s): Completion of all other required coursework.) 

  
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    EDUC 4102 - Play and Learning for the Preschool Child♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, education professionals address an essential question in early childhood education: Why is play integral to children’s development and learning? They learn the theory, methods, and materials needed to support and enhance children’s play and learning in preschool settings, and they gain an understanding of the vital role of play in fostering growth in each of the developmental domains. They also explore how to arrange developmentally appropriate environments; provide opportunities for high-quality, productive play, and learning experiences; and assess development and learning through observation of play-based activities and learning experiences.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4104 - Inclusive Practices in Classroom Communities♦


    (5 cr.) All children have the right to develop and learn in classroom communities that support diverse, individual needs. In this course, education professionals explore the ways in which preschool teachers can build inclusive environments that exemplify developmentally appropriate practice. Education professionals learn strategies that support inclusion, meet identified needs, and foster a sense of classroom community. They also engage in coursework focused on observation and assessment, partnership development with families, collaboration with support resources, legal regulations and issues, and the roles of reflection and evidence-based decision making.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 4105 - Early Literacy♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, education professionals explore current research on the most effective methods of promoting literacy development in preschool children. Using the “five pillars” of reading—phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension—as an organizational framework, education professionals explore the characteristics of emergent readers and writers. They also learn about developmentally appropriate assessments, materials, and strategies for instruction, including developing literacy through play and effectively using current technologies. They also engage in coursework that highlights the integral role of literacy across the curriculum.
     

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

 

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