2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) 
    
    Nov 29, 2020  
2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    DDBA 8524 - Seminar in Multicultural Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Growing cultural diversity within countries and expansion of organizations’ international initiatives has brought about the need to recognize, lead, and manage a broader cultural spectrum of workers, managers, and performance improvement teams. In this seminar course, students define the key organizational techniques and the potential benefits stemming from managing multicultural workforces. Students contextualize their study through the examination and development of case studies of successful and unsuccessful attempts to realize the potential that can be derived from multicultural workforces and teams. Students accomplish course objectives by examining current information through extensive use of recent journal articles and papers as well as classic articles and papers related to the field of study. They also disseminate their findings to their peers through group discussions.
  
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    DDBA 8525 - Energy Delivery Analysis


    (3 sem. cr.) Energy is needed throughout the world for business operations. The end user of energy and the production source can be miles, countries, or oceans apart. Independent scholars will analyze regional, national, and international energy distribution issues from a business leader perspective. Issues include environmental regulations, legal requirements, and social conditions (a pipeline, power lines, or a local substation, for instance). The conceptual analysis of managing new means of energy delivery is explored.
  
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    DDBA 8531 - Seminar in B2B Marketing


    (3 sem. cr.) Business-to-business (B2B) marketing has emerged as its own discipline to meet the needs of other businesses. The challenge is to find new methods of enhancing marketability and value while maintaining important relationships with consumers. Students in this seminar course focus on B2B marketing techniques, strategies, customer acquisition, and relationship building. They explore the theory and conceptual challenges facing today’s B2B marketing manager. Primarily, students learn aspects of online promotion and advertising, communications strategies to promote online initiatives, and creative ways of developing the B2B channel. They fine-tune critical-thinking skills by formulating an original research topic and debating with peers. Students accomplish course objectives by examining foundational literature and theories, seminal works, and established models in the field of B2B marketing.
  
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    DDBA 8532 - Seminar in Consumer Behavior


    (3 sem. cr.) The buyer decision-making process is one of the driving forces behind how, where, and when to market a product, which is why understanding consumer behavior is integral to successful businesses. In this seminar course, students focus on the characteristics of consumers from the perspective of why they purchase products and services as well as their expectations when doing business. More importantly, students study individual behavior and the psychology of choice, the motivation to buy, and how to maintain satisfaction after purchase. Because forces beyond individual control sometimes influence markets, niches, and segments, students also examine consumer behavior from a cultural (and subcultural) perspective. Students engage in course activities and discussions that focus on how to manage the customer experience from attraction to a mutually rewarding relationship. Students accomplish course objectives by examining foundational literature and theories, seminal works, and established models in the field of consumer behavior.

     

  
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    DDBA 8533 - Seminar in Marketing Research


    (3 sem. cr.) Business leaders and decision makers need accurate information to introduce projects and services that create appeal and value in the mind of the consumer. In this seminar course, students explore the processes and methods of studying markets and focus on understanding the empirical research process. Students survey marketing research methods in the context of understanding competitive opportunities, new product development, and positioning a product or service in the marketplace. They examine the practices of utilizing public databases, spotting trends, and identifying opportunities for new research in the field. Students hone critical-thinking and analytical skills by formulating an original research topic related to the course literature, which they present and debate in a peer work group. Students accomplish course objectives by examining foundational literature and theories, seminal works, and established models in the field of marketing research.

     

  
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    DDBA 8540 - Seminar in International Finance


    (3 sem. cr.) International finance is a branch of economics that considers how capital investment is undertaken globally and how financial markets and global trade influence investment opportunities. Independent sholars taking this seminar course are provided with an overview of the historical context of globalization. Included in the discussions is an in-depth analysis of how organizations, emerging markets, and society benefit from globalization. Independent scholars examine how organizations manage risk in a global environment. Scholars also explore barriers to globalization. Independent scholars accomplish course objectives by examining foundational literature and theories, seminal works, and established models in the field of international finance. They also formulate an original research topic and synthesize findings and conclusions based on their literature review for a comprehensive and critical understanding of the discipline.
  
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    DDBA 8541 - Seminar in Entrepreneurial Finance


    (3 sem. cr.) Entrepreneurial finance is designed to help managers make accurate investments and business decisions in entrepreneurial settings. In this seminar course, students explore the development of a small business from startup to financial security. They examine the process and various sources of funding, including partnerships with venture capitalists, conventional sources, and initial public offerings. Most importantly, students explore how to construct funding as well as the trade-offs and benefits for each model. They analyze entrepreneurial equity and how to negotiate any agreement with funding sources. Students accomplish course objectives by examining foundational literature and theories, seminal works, and established models in the field of entrepreneurial finance. They also identify additional resources and disseminate research conclusions to their peers.
  
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    DDBA 8550 - Seminar in Managerial Accounting


    (3 sem. cr.) Using a theoretical approach, students in this seminar examine common concepts, principles, and methods used in managerial decision making, including revenue forecasting and cost prediction methods, break-even and cost-volume-profit analyses, performance variance analysis, relevant cost analysis, project valuation, expected rates of return, and discounted cash flow methods. They also explore opportunities for optimizing methods. Additionally, students examine applied research methods in the context of design and development of rational managerial decision-making systems.
  
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    DDBA 8551 - Seminar in Accounting-Based Performance Evaluation Systems


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this seminar examine theories of corporate governance and employee performance evaluation, including the control and performance evaluation aspects of pricing/contribution margin analysis, cost allocation, activity-based costing, throughput accounting, key performance indicators, and balanced scorecard methods. They also explore opportunities for optimizing methods. Additionally, students examine applied research methods in the context of design and development of rational corporate governance and employee performance evaluation systems.
  
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    DDBA 8552 - Seminar in International Aspects of Managerial Accounting


    (3 cr.) Through this seminar course, independent scholars have the opportunity to examine international aspects of theories of managerial decision making, risk management, and budgeting in the context of global, cross-cultural management. They also explore applied research methods on the effects of import/export issues, foreign exchange rates, controlled economies, social responsibility reporting, inflation accounting, and international taxation.
  
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    DDBA 8560 - Seminar in Healthcare Managerial Decision Making


    (3 sem. cr.) In this seminar, independent scholars examine the application of healthcare policy and economic principles to managerial decision making, including policy development and implementation processes as well as how health policy changes over time. They also explore key policy initiatives related to cost, quality, ethics, and access, and they investigate stakeholders and interest groups involved in the health policy process. Independent scholars devote special attention to how economic principles, such as supply, demand, and market price determination, relate to the structure of the healthcare industry and the distribution of resources and services.
  
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    DDBA 8561 - Seminar in Managing Healthcare Delivery Systems


    (3 sem. cr.) Healthcare delivery is one of the largest industries in the United States. Students in this seminar focus on the components of the health services delivery system, including patients, organizations, professionals, public and private third-party payers, regulators, reimbursement and reimbursement methods, and technology. Students explore the nature of population illness and disease, and they examine the continuum of health services, such as hospitals and hospital systems, ambulatory care services, long-term care services, wellness/prevention services, and community/public health services. In addition, students analyze contextual factors and challenges that are linked to the healthcare delivery system management; they also explore the impact of these challenges on the delivery of services and healthcare management.
  
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    DDBA 8562 - Seminar in Law and Ethics in Healthcare Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this seminar engage in an examination of the key laws, regulations, and court decisions related to healthcare operations, oversight of organizations and practitioners, and the rights and responsibilities of healthcare providers and patients. They study laws and regulations governing healthcare providers, the identification of organizational governance issues, fraud and enforcement, and the development of risk management processes and controls. Students also explore key ethical issues underpinning healthcare delivery and management, including patient rights and advocacy.
  
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    DDBA 8570 - Seminar in Program and Portfolio Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Independent scholars in this seminar course examine developments in the discipline of project-based program and portfolio management and the business competencies required to manage complex projects in dynamic, distributed, and global environments. Among the topics included are aligning project portfolios to organizational strategy and value, assessing project protfolio management successes and failures, measuring project portfolio performance, and stimulating organizational creativity and innovation.
  
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    DDBA 8571 - Seminar in Project Portfolio Performance and Organizational Effectiveness


    (3 sem. cr.) Managing an organization’s portfolio of projects requires an understanding of project management process groups and the alternative approaches for selecting and managing a portfolio of projects. Independent scholars also examine how an effective project portfolio management infrastructure is built so that a formal approach to project management can be applied by balancing the need for structure with the need for flexibility. Issues of cultural and ethical diversity that affect management in a global environment are also explored.
  
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    DDBA 8572 - Seminar in Project-Based Strategic Leadership


    (3 sem. cr.) Independent scholars in this seminar course examine the forces of complexity and uncertainty and their impact (past, present, and future) on the project management profession. Topics include a retrospective analysis of research and practice over the past several decades and the examination of the increasing focus on the strategic value of projects and project leadership. Because the global business environment is characterized as increasingly complex and uncertain, and projects are directly linked to the organization’s strategic goals and competitive position, project management practitioners and researchers also learn about leading the continued development and maturity of the project management profession.
  
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    DDBA 8580 - The New HR: The Savvy Strategic Partner


    (3 sem. cr.) The role of the human resources (HR) department as a strategic partner entails new and different functions that enable organizations to function as high-performing and cost-cognizant entities. To recognize the best way for organizations to grow in capability and capacity, students in this course detail the potential for involvement of HR in evaluating buy-build alternatives and B2B partnerships. They explore a range of alternatives, including service agreements, contract negotiations, and management of fully outsourced services. Graduates of this course will be able to analyze the impact of such decisions on the quality of the deliverables and the risk impact on both the HR department and the organization.
  
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    DDBA 8581 - Succession Planning: A Survival Tool of the Fittest


    (3 sem. cr.) In order to succeed in competitive environments, organizations must begin succession planning at the beginning of every initial interface—when an employee is added to the talent pool, when a leader is added to the knowledge capital, when the organization reviews its successes and its challenges, and when corporations plan “to plan.” The only sure way to do this well is to know where the gaps are in present-day resources and cast them repeatedly against future and emerging needs and trends facing the organization, then craft the strategies that will map the path for getting there. In this course, students are drawn into defining organizational capability using career mapping, opportunistic development, and technology to fulfill future strategic human and knowledge capital essential in optimizing organizational success.
  
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    DDBA 8582 - An HR Plan for Organizational Agility


    (3 sem. cr.) Graduates of this new human resources (HR) strategic partner course will be able to integrate several key HR concepts with organization-wide strategic planning to develop an evidence-based annual HR department/division operating plan critical to the for-profit or not-for-profit organizations. New HR professionals must be able to direct individual and organizational performance to deliver on value proposition, build sustainability, and impact positive social change.
  
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    DDBA 8590 - Impact of Homeland Security Policies on Business Continuity


    (3 sem. cr.) The term business continuity management is a unifying process and the umbrella under which multiple supporting functions, including crisis management and business continuity, operate and integrate. Terrorism represents a significant threat to global business leaders, since globalization and terrorism are inextricably linked. Events such as the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and the 2004 Madrid bombings had significant impact on business continuity management. From a business continuity perspective, learners in this course examine key questions and issues facing the U.S. intelligence community from a global viewpoint. What is its role in homeland security and how may these topics affect business continuity management? The emphasis of the course will be on issues affecting business continuity management policy, oversight, and intelligence support to homeland defense/security and global business decision making. The Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 is addressed, and the course is shaped to focus on homeland intelligence support business issues at the state, local, and tribal levels.
  
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    DDBA 8591 - Homeland Security—Business Planning


    (3 sem. cr.) A foundational tenet of terrorist activity is the destruction of business structures. Business leaders can do much to prepare for the impact of hazards faced with regard to technology-related hazards, terrorism, natural hazards, and human-caused hazards. From a business planning standpoint, the business leader will examine an all hazards approach. Learners, as part of an economical system, will get an overview of terrorism that includes the definition, root causes, ideologies, historical and current perspectives, modus operandi and targets, radicalization and recruitment, terrorist group structures, domestic and international terrorist groups, state-sponsored terrorism, and counterterrorism inasmuch as all impact the business leader. Terrorism affects both the long-term and short-term segments of businesses around the world; therefore, the need for business continuity planning is investigated.
  
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    DDBA 8592 - Business Infrastructure Vulnerability Analysis


    (3 sem. cr.) Given the uncertainty of emerging terrorist and criminal threats, business leaders require a quick qualitative assessment of the vulnerability to existing business operations, personnel, facilities, and assets. From a business perspective, critical infrastructure protection is one of the cornerstones of homeland security. The National Strategy for Protection of Critical Infrastructure and Key Assets lists 11 critical sectors. Students in this course are introduced students to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) risk-based resource allocation process. In the course, the fundamentals of business-related risk assessment are discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of various risk assessment tools are examined. At the completion of the course, learners will be able to assess the value of various risk tools, apply those tools to any critical infrastructure within their multijurisdictional region, and derive optimal business strategies and draft policies to reduce the risk associated with future terrorist attacks and other hazards on their business interests.
  
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    DDBA 8850 - The New HR: The Savvy Strategic Partner


    (3 sem. cr.) The role of the human resources (HR) department as a strategic partner entails new and different functions that enable organizations to function as high-performing and cost-cognizant entities. To recognize the best way for organizations to grow in capability and capacity, students in this course detail the potential for involvement of HR in evaluating buy-build alternatives and B2B partnerships. They explore a range of alternatives, including service agreements, contract negotiations, and management of fully outsourced services. Graduates of this course will be able to analyze the impact of such decisions on the quality of the deliverables and the risk impact on both the HR department and the organization.
  
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    DDBA 8852 - An HR Plan for Organizational Agility


    (3 sem. cr.) Graduates of this new human resources (HR) strategic partner course will be able to integrate several key HR concepts with organization-wide strategic planning to develop an evidence-based annual HR department/division operating plan critical to the for-profit or not-for-profit organizations. New HR professionals must be able to direct individual and organizational performance to deliver on value proposition, build sustainability, and impact positive social change.
  
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    DDBA 9000 - Doctoral Study Completion


    (3 sem. cr. per term for a minimum of five terms until completion) In the final doctoral study, independent scholars demonstrate their ability to examine, critique, and synthesize knowledge, theory, and experience so that new ideas can be tested; best practices identified, established, and verified; and theoretical, practice, or policy constructs evaluated and advanced. In all cases, independent scholars engage in rigorous inquiry that results in new knowledge, insight, or practice, demonstrating efficacy in the world of business and management. Through this course, independent scholars gain assistance in working through the process of the doctoral study. They design personal best practices for completing their study within a designated context. They also select their committee members, with whom they establish and maintain strong working relationships and on whom they rely to mentor and approve their proposal and final study. Ultimately, independent scholars completing the doctoral study make a fresh contribution to the field of practice in the professional business environment.

    Students take this course for a minimum of five terms and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Doctoral Study with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a doctoral study, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred.

  
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    DDBA 9000P - Doctoral Portfolio Capstone Completion


    (3 sem. cr. per term for a minimum of 5 terms = 15 sem. cr.) In the final doctoral portfolio capstone, independent scholars demonstrate their ability to examine, critique, and synthesize knowledge, theory, and experience. Through the capstone they provide evidence of new ideas tested; best practices identified, established, and verified; and theoretical, practice, or policy constructs evaluated and advanced. In all cases, independent scholars engage in rigorous inquiry that results in new knowledge, insight, or practice, demonstrating efficacy in the world of business and management. Through this course, independent scholars gain assistance in working through the process of the doctoral portfolio capstone. They design personal best practices for completing their portfolio capstone within a designated context. They also select their committee members, with whom they establish and maintain strong working relationships and on whom they rely to mentor and approve their proposal and final study. Ultimately, independent scholars completing the portfolio make a fresh contribution to the field of practice in the professional business environment.

     

  
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    DDBA 9001 - Doctoral Study Completion


    (3 sem. cr. per term for a minimum of five terms until completion) In the final doctoral study, independent scholars demonstrate their ability to examine, critique, and synthesize knowledge, theory, and experience so that new ideas can be tested; best practices identified, established, and verified; and theoretical, practice, or policy constructs evaluated and advanced. In all cases, independent scholars engage in rigorous inquiry that results in new knowledge, insight, or practice, demonstrating efficacy in the world of business and management. Through this course, independent scholars gain assistance in working through the process of the doctoral study. They design personal best practices for completing their study within a designated context. They also select their committee members, with whom they establish and maintain strong working relationships and on whom they rely to mentor and approve their proposal and final study. Ultimately, independent scholars completing the doctoral study make a fresh contribution to the field of practice in the professional business environment.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 5 terms (two 8-week terms per semester) and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Doctoral Study with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a doctoral study, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred.

  
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    DDBA 9001P - Doctoral Portfolio Capstone Completion


    (3 sem. cr. per term for a minimum of five terms until completion) In the final doctoral portfolio capstone, independent scholars demonstrate their ability to examine, critique, and synthesize knowledge, theory, and experience. Through the capstone, they provide evidence of new ideas tested; best practices identified, established, and verified; and theoretical, practice, or policy constructs evaluated and advanced. In all cases, independent scholars engage in rigorous inquiry that results in new knowledge, insight, or practice, demonstrating efficacy in the world of business and management. Through this course, independent scholars gain assistance in working through the process of the doctoral portfolio capstone. They design personal best practices for completing their portfolio capstone within a designated context. They also select their committee members, with whom they establish and maintain strong working relationships and on whom they rely to mentor and approve their proposal and final study. Ultimately, independent scholars completing the portfolio make a fresh contribution to the field of practice in the professional business environment.

    In the final doctoral study, independent scholars demonstrate their ability to examine, critique, and synthesize knowledge, theory, and experience so that new ideas can be tested; best practices identified, established, and verified; and theoretical, practice, or policy constructs evaluated and advanced. In all cases, independent scholars engage in rigorous inquiry that results in new knowledge, insight, or practice, demonstrating efficacy in the world of business and management. Through this course, independent scholars gain assistance in working through the process of the doctoral study. They design personal best practices for completing their study within a designated context. They also select their committee members, with whom they establish and maintain strong working relationships and on whom they rely to mentor and approve their proposal and final study. Ultimately, independent scholars completing the doctoral study make a fresh contribution to the field of practice in the professional business environment.

    Students take this course for a minimum of five terms (two 8-week terms per semester) and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Doctoral Study with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a doctoral study, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred.

  
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    DDHA 8003 - Building a Multidisciplinary Approach to Health


    (3 cr.) In this course, students explore the multidisciplinary nature and integration of professional practice in the health field. Students have the opportunity to utilize their scholarly voice with diverse audiences and with academic integrity to ensure academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. As leaders in their profession, students discuss critical public health and health services in the health field utilizing a response to a natural disaster, review of emerging issues in the health field, and what it means to be part of a multidisciplinary team to develop community partnerships with key stakeholders to address health issues impacting their communities, agencies, and/or organizations.
  
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    DDHA 8050 - Global Health and Issues in Disease Prevention


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with an in-depth review of how global health-based strategies are used in the prevention of disease and disability in diverse populations. They explore global health topics and disease prevention activities from the perspective of understanding the determinants of health. Using a cross-disciplinary approach, students examine how economics, social factors, cultural competency, health literacy, health policy, urbanization, globalization, the environment, and other factors influence disease. They consider how research in disease prevention, health determinants, cultural ecology, and global health applies to public and community health efforts.
  
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    DDHA 8051 - The United States Healthcare Delivery System


    (5 cr.) Healthcare delivery is one of the largest industries in the United States. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to gain thorough insight into the current structure and components of health services and delivery; they are also presented with an abbreviated history addressing the nature of population illness and disease. Students identify and describe components of the system, including patients, healthcare professionals, public and private third-party payers, regulators, reimbursement methods, and technology. They engage in activities and discussions focused on the continuum of services related to healthcare, such as hospitals and hospital systems, ambulatory care, and long-term care. Students also explore issues related to these services, such as wellness, prevention, and community and public health, for a comprehensive understanding of the system. Students contextualize their study through the examination of current factors and challenges as well as the impact these challenges have on delivery and management.
  
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    DDHA 8130 - Communications, Marketing, and Public Relations for Healthcare Administration Leaders


    (5 cr.) An overview of marketing and public relations principles as they relate to healthcare administration, highlighting theoretical concepts that are commonly used in healthcare administration research and practice, is provided to students in this course. Topics include principles of communication, social marketing techniques, public relations techniques, promoting health literacy, identifying key stakeholders and community partnerships, principles of culturally appropriate health services delivery, marketing healthcare services, and ethical practice in healthcare administration.
  
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    DDHA 8246 - Advanced Application of Practice-based Research in Health


    (5 cr.) The goal of this course is to provide participants with an understanding of the methods and principles of applied research (quantitative, qualitative, and/or mixed-method designs) in health, focusing on cultural sensitivity, appropriate literacy levels, and Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR). Students gain an appreciation of advantages and limitations of this approach, and skills necessary for participating effectively in CBPR projects. Additional topics include the role of funding in health research and principles of community health assessment. Students learn to identify and prioritize problems, then assess and utilize community resources to address these problems. Students also develop their Doctoral Study Premise.
  
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    DDHA 8300 - Healthcare Financial Management and Economics


    (5 cr.) In this course, students gain knowledge of economics principles such as cost, quality, and access as they relate to the healthcare world. The principles of healthcare financial management, including accounting and finance, are vitally important to the viability and ongoing operations of a healthcare business. Students have the opportunity to interpret and analyze the financial statements of a business, use and analyze financial ratios, utilize variance analysis, understand and implement operating and capital budgeting, and develop knowledge of the business planning process. Students create portions of a business/financial plan using these techniques and analyze the viability of their plan using accepted financial management tools.
  
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    DDHA 8400 - Human Resource Management for Healthcare Administrators


    (5 cr.) In this course, students address the role of human resources in healthcare organizations as well as the recruitment, retention, management, and development of these resources. Students gain an understanding of the key roles of human resource personnel in establishing goals and expectations regarding organizational performance as well as how individuals contribute to effective performance in terms of controlling costs, improving quality, and providing excellent customer service. They explore major federal and state legislation that influences human resources, key management functions within workforce planning and recruitment, and functions within workforce retention. Students devote specific attention to the administrative, operational, and strategic aspects of managing human resources, focusing on managing clinical and direct-care practitioners whose perspectives and expectations differ from those of management. Other topics that students explore and discuss include employment and contract labor law; compensation strategies, including benefits and pay for performance; staffing models; labor relations; performance management; workforce retention; and strategies for ensuring employee engagement, motivation, and satisfaction.
  
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    DDHA 8426 - Advanced Application of Practice-based Research in Health


    (5 cr.) The goal of this course is to provide participants with an understanding of the methods and principles of applied research (quantitative, qualitative, and/or mixed-method designs) in health, focusing on cultural sensitivity, appropriate literacy levels, and Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR). Students gain an appreciation of advantages and limitations of this approach, as well as the skills necessary for participating effectively in CBPR projects. Additional topics include the role of funding in health research and principles of community health assessment. Students learn to identify and prioritize problems, and then assess and utilize community resources to address these problems. Students also develop their doctoral study premise.
  
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    DDHA 8450 - Project and Resource Management in Integrated Systems


    (5 cr.) In this course, students focus on the strategic resource management process in an organizational setting. As leaders in the healthcare field, students explore resource management within the context of the healthcare mission, planning resource allocation, program implementation, and program evaluation. Students have the opportunity to assess their organization’s current strategic position and apply relevant theoretical models in healthcare settings to adjust management practices in a changing healthcare environment. Students can also address the organizational dynamics and change management processes of integrated health systems and their networks of hospitals, nursing homes, group practices, and medical offices. 
  
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    DDHA 8500 - Health Leadership and Systems Thinking


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore leadership models and theories, the core principles of public health leadership, and the application of systems thinking to public health. They examine how to create strategies and solutions that efficiently utilize public health and healthcare resources. Students also discuss descriptive and prescriptive systems, focusing on the application of these processes to current public health issues and challenges at the organizational and community levels.
  
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    DDHA 8600 - Governance, Law, and Policy for Healthcare Leaders


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine healthcare organization governance principles, health laws and mandates, and health policy issues and practice, which directly impact healthcare leaders. Using case studies and hypothetical situations, students assess leadership roles and key ethical principles and challenges underpinning healthcare organizations. Students apply an interdisciplinary approach that employs sociological, political, economic, and ethical perspectives to increase performance and assure quality in healthcare delivery. Topics include healthcare policy, advocacy, laws, mandates, contracts, and ethical obligations to provide quality healthcare by being stewards of their organization.
  
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    DDHA 8700 - Healthcare Operations Management


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the factors that affect performance outcomes within healthcare organizations; methods to monitor, adjust, and improve performance; and techniques and tools of quantitative analysis of operations and decision support that assist in management of capacity issues, reengineering, staffing, scheduling, productivity, and supply chain. Other important concepts that students examine include understanding operational assessment; understanding patient care and related support-care processes through flowcharting of steps in the process; taking a systems perspective on the organization and delivery of services; identifying problems and improvement opportunities using analytical techniques; and monitoring performance data to identify trends and variation based on current operations and those resulting from changes and improvements.
  
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    DDHA 8750 - Trends and Issues in Executive Level Management for Healthcare Administrators


    (5 cr.) Healthcare administrators, more than ever before, are facing challenges and opportunities, given the dynamic nature of the healthcare industry. In this seminar-style course, students address how executive-level managers leading complex health systems can use strategic planning, risk management, and innovative business practices to take advantage of healthcare trends, as well as the current social and economic forces that guide strategic planning of healthcare systems. Students explore ways to improve Board of Director relationships, address financial challenges, and implement healthcare reform measures. As a result of this course, healthcare leaders are better able to visualize and address the quickly changing landscape of healthcare delivery per the guidelines outlined in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. Students also have the opportunity to address the cultural issues that are present in the healthcare environment.
  
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    DDHA 8800 - Data-Driven Decision Making


    (5 cr.) To make informed decisions, healthcare administrators need to synthesize an abundant and wide variety of data. Students in this course are provided with techniques to transform data into the information needed to make critical decisions. Data mining, using operational data, methods for interpreting data, and the use of technology in the collection and application of data are explored. Students apply data-driven decision-making skills to practical application through the use of contemporary and practical case studies. They also apply techniques for presenting data to stakeholders. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8201 , and RSCH 8210 .)
  
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    DDHA 8900 - Healthcare Quality Management


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on the development of leadership strategies and competencies to support healthcare and organizational quality delivery of care. Emphasis is placed on a systems approach exploring the organizational structures that impact healthcare quality performance and, ultimately, patient outcomes. Using macro (enterprise-wide) and micro (individual and team performance) perspectives, students examine the leadership roles, which define, develop, and support decisions affecting quality strategies. Students in this course address how key organizational theories, principles, and concepts relate to achieving the effective and efficient delivery of safe healthcare services. Through the development of a quality program initiative, students demonstrate an understanding of the impact an initiative has on organizational structure, its environment, and the system’s leadership. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8201  and RSCH 8210 .)
  
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    DDHA 8901 - Research Forum Companion


    (5 cr. per term for a minimum of four terms = 20 cr.) The purpose of this forum is to assist students with making initial progress toward earning a Doctor of Health Administration (DHA) degree. Students begin working on the prospectus with their chair and become familiar with the resources available for doctoral students. The course offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their program of study and demonstrate knowledge of an in-depth exploration of a healthcare administration issue or problem. Students will engage in regular scholarly discussions with a faculty chair and fellow doctoral students, submit Quarterly Plans, and progress toward completion of the DHA degree. Information and resources related to the doctoral study, residencies, research and writing, and doctoral program expectations are provided for guidance.
  
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    DDHA 9100 - DHA Research Capstone


    (5 cr. per term for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion) In this capstone course, doctoral students have the opportunity to integrate their program of study and demonstrate their knowledge into an in-depth exploration of a healthcare administration issue or problem. Students complete an applied practice-based project independently, with the guidance of a capstone supervisory committee chair and committee members, in a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and carry out and analyze a research protocol and project.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 4 quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Dissertation with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook.

  
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    DDPA 8003 - Foundations for Doctoral Studies


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in public policy and administration.
  
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    DDPA 8003I - Foundations for Doctoral Studies for International Students


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in public policy and administration.
  
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    DDPA 8101 - Critical Issues in Emergency Management


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the theories and concepts underpinning contemporary emergency management and how to understand the phenomena of natural and human-caused disasters. Students examine the historical context of emergency management, the general process of risk assessment, the emergency management cycle, communications within emergency management and crisis planning, and the general policy and legal framework surrounding the process of emergency management in the United States with a focus on the National Incident Management System. Case studies of major catastrophes are used to explore contemporary and practical hazard management. Students can complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute courses IS-100.b - Introduction to Incident Command System and either IS-800.b - National Response Framework: An Introduction or IS700.a - National Incident Management System as part of this course. Nationally recognized certificates are awarded for successful completion of FEMA courses.
  
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    DDPA 8111 - Leadership and Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Successful organizations in a rapidly changing and complex world require leaders who embrace change and are able to engage others in change. In this course, students use traditional literature, current articles, and interactive media to explore the qualities, characteristics, and skills of effective leaders as well as the theories, models, and relationships between leadership and organizational change. They assess the ethical issues and standards as well as the opportunities and challenges related to leading diverse organizations through change. Students also examine how current leaders employ leadership and organizational change to contribute to social change, and they consider how to use these lessons to make further positive changes within an organization or their own community. 
  
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    DDPA 8112 - Governance and Public Policy


    (5 cr.) Democratic principles are the foundation of modern life. Students in this course are provided with an overview of democratic governance in public administration, public policy, or nonprofit or nongovernmental organizations in modern society. Students examine the theoretical underpinnings of democratic governance and public policy in their chosen area of specialization necessary for doctoral-level research. Students examine the context in which public and nonprofit leaders function and the social institutions that influence public policy and guide administrative decision making. Students also review fundamental theories of governance, research current literature on a specialized topic, and apply best practices as they relate concepts to complete practical application assignments and a final case scenario project. 
  
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    DDPA 8137 - The Nature of Crime and Criminology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to contemporary views and theories of maladaptive and criminal behavior. They examine a broad conceptualization of criminal behavior from an interdisciplinary perspective as well as theories and application of criminal profiling. Students also explore specific views of criminal behavior germane to groups, such as psychopaths, serial offenders, and sexually violent predators. At the end of this course, students will have an understanding of the theories and practices that are the foundations of the field of criminology. Students may take this as a nondegree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. 
  
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    DDPA 8200 - Management Techniques for the Public Sector


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to evidence-based practices and analytic techniques for decision making in the public sector.  Learning focuses on building a tool kit of analytic methods related to budgeting, problem solving, and utilization of data to inform leaders of areas for improvement in the delivery of public goods and services.  
  
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    DDPA 8201 - Risk Assessment, Preparedness, and Disaster Mitigation


    (5 cr.) Risk assessment and mitigation are key components to effective emergency management and all-hazard planning and response. Students in this course focus on the methods and techniques required to assess an organization or government’s risk associated with the protection of human life and capital assets. They study ways to evaluate the social vulnerabilities to disaster and the special needs of at-risk populations, and they explore methods to reduce vulnerabilities and build capacity through structural and nonstructural mitigation. Additionally, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS-393.a: Introduction to Hazard Mitigation as part of this course. 
  
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    DDPA 8204 - Fundamentals of Mapping and Geographic Information Systems


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the fundamentals of mapping with geographic information systems. Through course readings and activities, students build an understanding of geospatial data assembly and manipulation and use the principles of cartographic design.
  
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    DDPA 8205 - Spatial Analysis and Modeling


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are introduced to advanced geospatial data processing and analysis through a combination of readings and computer exercises.  Topics include advanced feature and attribute editing, spatial database queries, basic geoprocessing of both raster and vector data, and geospatial model building.
  
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    DDPA 8206 - GIS Research Methodology


    (5 cr.) Students gain familiarity with the tools and methods of research in geographic information systems (GIS) by developing an intensive GIS project to solve a practical problem of student interest under guidance from the instructor.
  
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    DDPA 8210 - Analytics for Evidence-Based Decision Making


    (5 cr.) Analytics is the practice of using statistics and computer programming together to manipulate and gain insight from very large datasets. Analytic processes discussed in this course include data mining, the use of neural networks as a decision-making tool, and exploration into computer-simulated and generated models for public decision making such as agent-based modeling. Analytics are used to understand past events and predict future events.
  
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    DDPA 8215 - Controversies in Criminal Justice


    (5 cr.) Justice is at the heart of the U.S. democratic system, yet opposing viewpoints surrounding and within the system often muddle interpretations of the law and the development of policies to promote and enforce justice. In this course, students examine events that have significantly changed how the legal system interprets the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Code, and the U.S. Patriot Act, for example, the terrorist acts of September 11, 2001. They learn how social and historical changes have shifted perspectives and sparked debates on expanding the rights of government versus safeguarding personal civil rights and civil liberties. Through discussion with peers, assessment of contemporary articles, and examination of Supreme Course cases, students have the opportunity to reflect on and potentially broaden their own opinions and perspectives on current criminal justice affairs in regard to issues of law enforcement, public perception, policy development, and ethics. 
  
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    DDPA 8217 - Technological Solutions and 21st-Century Crime


    (5 cr.) In consideration of modern technological innovation and the spread of knowledge through digital means, the relationship between technology and criminal activity is increasing. In this course, students explore this relationship and gain a comprehensive view of cyber crime, including current trends. They learn how law enforcement agencies use technology to track and apprehend criminals. Through real-world scenarios, students examine legal responses to cyber crime and learn different approaches and techniques for solving cyber crimes and handling related challenges. Students also have the opportunity to gain a comprehensive understanding of building cases and prosecuting crimes through practical exercises in identification, data mining, and the protection and gathering of evidence.
  
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    DDPA 8300 - Writing Applied Research and Funding Proposals


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will learn to develop funding proposals and propose applied research projects. Learning is focused on two objectives: first, to prepare the student for the doctoral professional administrative study; and second, to prepare the student to write professional documents designed to explore problems in the practice of public administration, propose solutions to those problems, and gain grant-writing skills to fund public and nonprofit organizations.  
  
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    DDPA 8301 - Disaster Response and Recovery


    (5 cr.) A major concern of disaster response professionals is meeting basic and humanitarian needs of disaster-affected populations. In this course, students explore a range of issues, including evacuation, relocation, and tactical and strategic decisions in the immediate aftermath of an emergency episode. Students study important federal policies related to disaster response and recovery, including the National Response Framework, and they can gain an understanding of how local, state, and federal policies mesh in response and recovery efforts. Through their exploration, they study how recovery begins once the immediate threat of the emergency wanes and the focus shifts to restoring disaster-affected areas. As part of this course, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS208.a: State Disaster Management. 
  
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    DDPA 8310 - Fundamentals of Mapping and Geographic Information Systems


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are exposed to a variety of instructional techniques to learn information regarding mapping fundamentals and the use of computers to produce maps and other graphic displays of data.
  
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    DDPA 8315 - Spatial Analysis and Modeling


    (5 cr.) Students in this course focus on the fundamental statistical methods and procedures relevant to geographic data and spatial analysis.
  
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    DDPA 8320 - Public Policy Implications of Terrorism Legislation and Policies


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to develop a broad perspective on the history of the U.S. Patriot Act, terroristic legislation and immigration laws, and their policy implications on law enforcement, governmental entities, organizations, and individuals. Students gain a foundation to build the skills that public administrators and public policy analysts use to draft and implement public policy and enforce and/or respond to potential terroristic threats while simultaneously upholding and protecting constitutional freedoms. Students examine topics through a wide variety of resources, including contemporary texts, websites, case studies, and material representing international, national, and local governments and organizations. They critically review and analyze the U.S. Patriot Act and similar terroristic 297 legislation and policies, and they participate in discussions about these laws and their implications on U.S. constitutional freedoms.
  
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    DDPA 8321 - Terrorism: A Systemic Approach for Emergency Preparedness


    (5 cr.) Terrorism continues to be a constant threat to the American public, facilitating the need for accurate information, organized resources, and established approaches to respond to emergencies and keep the public informed. Students in this course examine terrorism and related public policy on a local, national, and international level. They also assess the need and function of systemic approaches for emergency preparedness. Students explore and discuss topical issues, such as terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyber terrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Using analytic skills and tools, students assess recommendations that policy makers use in decisions to prevent or respond to terrorism. They also gain hands-on experience initiating the development and/or analysis of a terrorism-preparedness infrastructure.
  
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    DDPA 8322 - Critical Incident Planning and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Who is responsible for emergency management, and what elements should be included in an emergency management plan? Students in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions as they examine the principles of emergency planning, selection of leaders, specialized planning (e.g., schools, tourism), mutual aid, and leadership theories. Students analyze case studies, identifying weaknesses in current methods as well as potential solutions. Through this analysis, students develop new strategies and perspectives in regard to responding to and planning for critical incidents. Public administrators or students planning to enter the field of public administration build a basic foundation to develop a critical incident plan and gain a thorough understanding of leadership models and methods.
  
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    DDPA 8325 - GIS Research Methodology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course familiarize themselves and practice with the tools and methods of research in geographic information systems in students’ areas of interest in practice and research.
  
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    DDPA 8330 - Holding Up the Mirror: Understanding Different Cultures and Increasing Global Consciousness


    (5 cr.) Professionals in all areas of public policy and administration work with individuals and organizations of different cultures on a daily basis; therefore, global consciousness is vital to effective communication and interaction in the field. In this course, students explore and analyze the cultural values and styles of communication, reasoning, and leadership unique to their home culture. Students apply these concepts to better understand the people, values, and policies of other cultures. They also identify and become familiar with challenges that American nonprofit organizations face as they work internationally or cross-culturally within the United States. Sharpening critical-thinking skills, students research and assess an organization within their own community that has international links; through this assessment, students gain further awareness of different cultures and the importance of cross-cultural ties. 
  
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    DDPA 8331 - Crossing Borders: U.S. and International NGO Organizational Cultures and Environments


    (5 cr.) In this course, students study in depth the cultures, structures, and activities of nongovernmental organizations in select countries and compare their activities, organizational cultures, structures, and working environments with nonprofits in the United States.
  
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    DDPA 8332 - Placing NGOs in the Global Context


    (5 cr.) Modern public policy and administration professionals use knowledge of international culture to understand the operations and structure of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in different countries, thus leading to well-informed, globally responsible decisions. In this course, students engage in a comprehensive study of the cultures, structures, and activities of NGOs in select countries. Students compare the activities, organizational cultures, structures, and working environments of these countries with nonprofit organizations in the United States. Through discussions, research, and topical writing assignments, students identify and assess the values, actions, and beliefs of a selected culture to gain an in-depth understanding of that culture’s voluntary or NGO environment. 
  
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    DDPA 8380 - Policy and Politics in American Political Institutions


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the crafts of policymaking and policy analysis in the U.S. democratic system. Students examine the tasks involved in the policy process, including setting agendas, using policy analysis tools, managing the political process, implementing policy, and providing evaluations and feedback. Through this analysis, students work toward developing skills to conduct policy and economic analyses as well as to determine the political feasibility of proposed policies. They learn about regulation as a policy choice. They also work toward enhancing their ability to develop alternatives and to assess strategies proposed to achieve certain policy objectives. Students engage in scholarly writing assignments and discussions on policy areas of interest, such as communications, immigration, transportation, housing, labor, arts, and environmental policies.
  
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    DDPA 8381 - Public Policy and Evaluation


    (5 cr.) There are a variety of tools available to policymakers and policy analysts to evaluate the impact of social programs. In this course, students examine these tools and work toward gaining the skills needed to develop plans for evaluation and to assess social programs effectively. Students engage in discussions and assignments designed to provide practical application of content on a variety of topics, such as selecting programs to evaluate, crafting program descriptions, identifying stakeholders and their interests, developing logic models, framing evaluation questions, applying utilization-focused evaluation techniques, using quantitative and qualitative tools to complete formative and summative evaluations, and providing evaluation reports and feedback to decision makers. Using concepts presented in the course, students gain hands-on experience developing an evaluation design for a social program.
  
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    DDPA 8382 - Public Policy and Finance


    (5 cr.) Public policymakers often rely on microeconomic and macroeconomic models to formulate new policies and reevaluate existing polices. In this course, students examine the use of such models in the public policy setting and assess how public finance influences policy choices as well as implementation alternatives. Through weekly analytical writing assignments and peer discussions, students explore tax policies and tax incentive models; budgeting; public/private models; market influences on policy; the impact of government expenditures on income redistribution; and economic considerations of welfare, food stamps, workers’ compensation, Social Security, and outsourcing of public programs. Synthesizing course content and applying critical-thinking skills, students assess a local government jurisdiction, examine the decisions of policymakers, and recommend improvements based on economic models.
  
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    DDPA 8390 - Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Students in this course engage in a collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration. Students apply a systems perspective to construct a public enterprise “mental” model of a public organization to understand the strategic context for practical action and the stakeholder relations involved. Students demonstrate their knowledge of the interrelated flows of money, knowledge, and influence as they weave these elements in their model. They engage in readings and practical assignments that emphasize management and leadership in a time of unprecedented and unpredictable change. Students also work toward developing professional-action habits for pragmatic action-learning in the practice of public administration.
  
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    DDPA 8400 - Professional Administrative Study


    (5 cr. per term for a minimum of four terms until completion) The professional administrative study results in a formal manuscript designed and written to address a problem in public administration practice. Each DPA student is required to complete a professional administrative study paper and four quarters of DDPA 8400 with a satisfactory grade. The professional administrative study paper involves students’ completing an applied research project that addressed an actual problem or planning situation. Students work under the direction of a faculty chair and a second faculty mentor. The professional administrative study paper takes the format of a consulting report and, at a minimum, includes the following sections:

    • Executive Summary
    • Situation or Problem Description
    • Conceptual Approach
    • Detailed Process
    • Evaluation
    • Recommendations or Plan

    Students take this course for a minimum of 4 quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Doctoral Study with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a doctoral study, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their doctoral study on ProQuest before their degree is conferred.

  
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    DDPA 8401 - Public Health Leadership and Systems Thinking


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore leadership models and theories, the core principles of public health leadership, and the application of systems thinking to public health. They examine how to create strategies and solutions that efficiently utilize public health and healthcare resources. Students also discuss descriptive and prescriptive systems, focusing on the application of these processes to current public health issues and challenges at the organizational and community levels.
  
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    DDPA 8405 - Ethics and Social Justice


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. In this course, students examine the philosophy of ethics as well as responsibility and social justice—basic tenets of public service. Students explore the complex social, political, and related ethical challenges leaders face as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. They examine ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students also assess demographic data and current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community. Applying concepts presented in the course, students engage in an in-depth assessment of an emerging or persistent ethical or social justice issue, through which they demonstrate their ability to make recommendations for improvement or change.
  
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    DDPA 8410A - Research Forum Companion


    (1 cr.) The purpose of this forum is to assist students with making initial progress toward earning the Doctor of Public Administration (DPA) degree. Students begin working on the prospectus with their chair and become familiar with the resources available for doctoral students. Doctoral students are offered the opportunity to integrate their program of study and demonstrate knowledge of an in-depth exploration of a public administration issue or problem. Students will engage in regular scholarly discussions with a faculty chair and fellow doctoral students, submit Quarterly Plans, and progress toward completion of the DPA degree. Information and resources related to the doctoral study, residencies, research and writing, and doctoral program expectations are provided for guidance.
  
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    DDPA 8420 - Health Economics


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the application of economic principles to healthcare managerial decision making regarding the amount, structure, and distribution of healthcare resources and services. Because of the complexity and uncertainty of the healthcare system, as well as the scope of resources consumed by health and health-related organizations, managers must appreciate the economic implications of decisions regarding allocation of resources. Students advance their knowledge of economic principles as reflected in the population demand for health; the demand for healthcare and medical care; the supply of health organizations and practitioners; the role of insurance, moral hazard, and adverse selection; the practice of cost-shifting; the structure, competitive nature, and dynamics of markets; differing objectives of for-profit and nonprofit organizations; variation in consumer access to and utilization of services; roles of uncertainty and information asymmetry; strategies for consumer cost-sharing; and the challenges healthcare organizations face in the pricing, production, allocation, and distribution of health and medical services. Special attention is devoted to understanding how health services differ in a variety of competitive markets. 
  
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    DDPA 8540 - Strategic Planning, Management, and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in various types of organizations. In this course, learners engage in a collaborative study of strategic planning, management, and leadership in the context of public and nonprofit organizations. Students in this course identify, analyze, and evaluate the intricate relationships between strategic planning, management, and leadership from an international perspective. Students connect three key institutional elements: thinking, acting, and leading strategically. Students apply a management systems approach as they develop, adopt, manage, and lead a strategic plan for an international public or nonprofit organization or with an international focus. Students will understand the strategic context for practical decision making for international public and nonprofit organizations, emphasizing the central role of the environment in the strategic planning process. Students are offered a hands-on approach in this course that tests their ability to make effective and timely management and leadership decisions in complex and uncertain conditions.
  
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    DDPA 8541 - Sustainable Development for Global Communities


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change, assess community needs and resources, create community visions, promote stakeholder interest and participation, analyze community problems, and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models, and they apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning.
  
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    DDPA 8542 - Transformative Change in a Global Environment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the nature and methods of transformative change in the complex human systems of contemporary public organizations. Students explore and employ a pragmatic-action-learning process for studying the experience of transformative change in complex systems. They examine the dynamics of complex adaptive systems to gain an understanding of how large-scale and highly interrelated human systems change through self-organization. Students explore and apply appreciative inquiry and other selected methods of transformative change to a positive organizational-change situation of personal interest. They also have the opportunity to develop professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
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    DDPA 8740 - Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma


    (5 cr.) There is no shortage of natural and human-made disasters, such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities. Individuals and communities impacted by such disasters often need assistance from professionals who understand the social, cultural, and psychological complexities of crisis and trauma. Students in this course investigate how these incidents impact the psychology of individuals and groups. They assess traditional and current literature and complete practical exercises to learn about theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with trauma. Considering the various ways crisis professionals can promote positive social change, students devote special attention to the importance and development of culturally appropriate service-delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disasters. 
  
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    DDPA 8741 - Psychology of Terrorism


    (5 cr.) Many sources define terrorism as a type of psychological warfare, as it induces fear and feelings of vulnerability. Therefore, professionals need to understand all aspects of terrorism to help prevent further terroristic acts and respond to victims who have been affected psychologically. Students in this course explore terrorism from a psychological perspective. They examine types of terrorism; contributing factors related to the development of terrorists and terrorist organizations; counterterrorism agencies and laws; the impact of terrorist events on individuals, families, and communities; prevention, intervention, and postvention with survivors; media coverage of terrorist events; human rights and ethical issues; and future trends related to the psychology of terrorism. Students also examine the threat of terrorism in their own community and evaluate the potential impact. Using concepts presented in the course, they consider applications for preventative measures as well as strategies to promote resiliency among individual and families who may become victims of terrorism. 
  
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    DDPA 8810 - Fundamentals of Law and Public Policy


    (5 cr.) Legal decisions and the law often have a major impact on the creation of public policy. In this course, students explore and discuss the relationship between laws and public policy and the impact that court decisions have on policy and policy leaders. They examine the role of administrative agencies in the creation and execution of law and public policy and the role of the courts in resolving challenges to agency rule making; conflicts between executive and legislative branches of government; and conflicts between and among federal, state, and local laws. Students have the opportunity to sharpen their critical-thinking and research-database skills as they search for real-world examples of how fundamental legal concepts and processes affect the creation and execution of law and public policy. 
  
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    DDPA 8811 - Legal Research for Policy Practitioners


    (5 cr.) There is a wealth of vital legal knowledge available to public policy practitioners. In this course, students explore the many print and electronic resources available for legal research. Students examine how practitioners use the law to inform the creation of public policy. They engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of content to learn how to navigate legal libraries, cite cases, and employ research to support public policy. Students also gain experience in applying legal research to case studies and contemporary issues. 
  
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    DDPA 8812 - Contemporary Cases and Issues in the Courts


    (5 cr.) Major issues in the Supreme Court continue to have an impact on public policy at the state and local levels. In this course, students examine major past and current U.S. Supreme Court cases related to abortion, privacy, due process, personal property, and freedom of religion and speech. They also examine major cases related to state powers, government entitlement, and powers of the judicial and federal branches of government. From this assessment, students determine how outcomes of such cases affect public policy. Students also explore and discuss individual rights, property rights, administrative law, immigration law, and foreign policy as well as contemporary issues and case studies, to which they apply legal research and verdicts.
  
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    DDPA 8820 - Elements of Sustainable and Livable Communities


    (5 cr.) Creating and maintaining sustainable and livable communities require leaders who understand the connections among the natural, built, and social environments and who can address these connections in a holistic and integrated fashion. Students in this course examine concepts of sustainability and livability and explore popular approaches to creating and maintaining communities that are more environmentally sound, economically prosperous, and socially equitable. They also focus on strategies to halt urban sprawl and to promote alternative modes of transportation. Students define and explore these concepts through case studies and examples drawn from local communities.
  
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    DDPA 8821 - Tools for Sustainable Community Development


    (5 cr.) Effective community leaders must be familiar with a wide range of tools, strategies, and skills to create sustainable communities. In this course, students examine these elements to learn how leaders build capacity for community change, assess community needs and resources, create community visions, promote stakeholder interest and participation, analyze community problems, and carry out practices and interventions to improve sustainability in communities. They also explore sustainability frameworks and models, and they apply these and other concepts presented in the course to develop a proposal for sustainable community development, focusing on community assessment, stakeholder involvement, and development planning. 
  
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    DDPA 8822 - Current Issues in Regional and Local Public Policy


    (5 cr.) Public decision makers must understand and address a variety of complex and interrelated issues, such as land use and transportation, energy and environment, housing and schools, and regional economic development. In this course, students learn how leaders attend to these issues in light of existing policies and contemporary social, economic, political, demographic, and technological trends. Students explore and discuss planning processes, tools, approaches, strategies, and policies used to create sustainable and livable communities through collaborative processes involving multiple stakeholders. Through the development of a policy-option written assignment, students assess critical issues and identify problem-solving strategies. 
  
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    DDPA 8841 - Health Policy and Management


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the factors that influence and improve health outcomes of individuals and populations, with attention to the goals of Healthy People 2010 and the main components and issues of organization, financing, and delivery of health services and public health systems in the United States. Topics include management theories and processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. The policy process is addressed, as well as the advocacy role of the public health professional in influencing local, state, and federal policy. The impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems is also considered.
  
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    DDPA 8850 - Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector


    (5 cr.) Nonprofit organizations (NPOs) can serve to positively affect people’s lives through social change, but they require leaders who have a fundamental understanding of the nonprofit sector, including related ethical, legal, and global perspectives. Students in this course explore these viewpoints as well as the history, foundations, and types of NPOs. They also examine the diverse political, social, and economic contexts within which NPOs exist. Students explore and apply marketing, public relations, and communication concepts and strategies to case studies and contemporary situations. Gaining practical insight, students also apply theories presented in the course to the development of a concept paper guiding the development of a nonprofit organization.
  
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    DDPA 8851 - Board Governance and Volunteer Management


    (5 cr.) The success of nonprofit organizations (NPOs) is largely dependent on the effective management of program volunteers and board members—individuals who often serve as the lifeblood of NPOs. Students in this course explore the volunteer management process, including volunteer recruitment, orientation, training, supervision, and evaluation. They focus on methods that organizations use to create and maintain an effective board of directors to ensure that the board governs and guides the organization toward its mission. Students design a board development or volunteer management plan based on processes presented in the course and fundamental concepts acquired earlier in the program. 
  
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    DDPA 8852 - Resource Development


    (5 cr.) All nonprofit organizations require financial resources. Obtaining philanthropic financial support is essential to program delivery and stability. Students in this course explore the concepts of philanthropy and development, identification of funding sources, donor/prospect cultivation and education, and solicitation and appreciation strategies. They focus on processes and strategies for creating an organizational philanthropic culture based on ethics and donor relationships. Using these strategies and other concepts presented in the course, students create a resource development plan for a nonprofit organization.
  
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    DPSY 6002 - Foundations for Graduate Study in Psychology


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals, and they develop a program of study, a professional development plan, and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. They engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.
  
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    DPSY 6111 - Themes and Theories of Developmental Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to concepts, theories, and research methods relevant to understanding developmental psychology. Developmental theories will be reviewed, including psychoanalytic, behaviorist, cognitive, social, and ecological theory. Students will critically examine the strengths and limitations of each theory and the research that contributed to each theory. Contemporary applications of developmental theories will be explored, with an emphasis on applications designed to effect positive social change.
  
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    DPSY 6114 - Language and Cognitive Development


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to theories and research related to the development of cognition and language acquisition. Both normative and individual differences will be explored. In the course, students will examine basic concepts in cognitive development in addition to problem solving, decision making, and creativity. Piagetian cognitive theory will be examined, as well as sociocultural and neurobiological perspectives. Contemporary research and theory will be reviewed, including information processing and theory of mind. Students will also learn about psycholinguistics, including the structure of language, stages of language acquisition, and multilingualism. Theories of language acquisition will be explored, including behaviorist and conditioning perspectives, Chomsky’s perspective, neural networks, and linguistic relativity. Through the course, students will examine atypical development, such as cognitive delay, language disorders, and autism.
  
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    DPSY 6121 - Development in the Digital Age


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the impact of social media and other digital technology on children, teens, and adults and at different stages of cognitive, social, and emotional development. They also examine how identity development, relationships, and socialization can be affected by the use of digital and social media. Students receive a historic review of electronic media research, including the effect of violent television on viewer behavior, which provides a foundation to examine the current impact of digital media. Current issues such as sexting, online harassment, cyberbullying, and cyberstalking are explored, along with strategies for mitigating these issues. Similarly, positive impacts of social media, such as building social groups, finding communities, overriding generational gaps, seeking health and mental health support and resources, are also explored. Students also examine generational, socioeconomic, and cultural differences in access to and use of digital media. Digital media literacy and public policy are explored, with an emphasis on positive social change.
  
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    DPSY 6214 - Consulting for Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Organizational and professional development (OPD) professionals promote and implement organizational change by using fundamental techniques of change management. Students in this course examine and apply these tools, including consulting competencies, approaches, and organizational change models to learn the skills of an OPD consultant. Students explore methods for accelerating individual, group, and organizational performance through consulting, coaching, and change management. They also explore related topics, such as organizational assessment; team development; strategic planning; group dynamics; power, politics, and influence; leadership; and conflict management. Students apply course concepts to the assessment of an organization and the development of strategies to address identified needs for change.
  
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    DPSY 6215 - Lifespan Development


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an advanced overview of human development through the lifespan, including prenatal, childhood, adolescent, adult, and late-adult phases. Students examine and apply basic processes and theories to developmental milestones that occur within these phases of development. They explore factors of heredity and environmental elements on human development, and they consider ethical issues, research considerations, and global perspectives as they assess strategies to promote optimal development. Students also engage in coursework and discussions that highlight themes of diversity and social change.
 

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