2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) 
    
    Dec 04, 2020  
2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    MGMT 6611 - Business Operations: Systems Perspectives in Global Organizations♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course immerse themselves in the ways in which business operates in a global environment. Topics include supply chain management, process management, quality, innovation, forecasting, and decision making in a global operations environment. Through course assignments, students focus on the practical application of writing, creative, and critical-thinking skills and the integration of professional practice at the doctoral level.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6612 - Talent Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) One of the most important assets of an organization is its talent, in other words, its human capital. However, too often there is little planning or strategy applied to the creation and management of this huge asset. In this course, students have the opportunity to develop the skills and knowledge to create and work effectively within a talent management and planning process. They explore recruiting strategies within a human capital development context and focus on building specific skills in managing an organization’s talent through position planning, talent selection and placement, and retention. Using industry best practices, students also engage in applications and group projects to practice developing initiatives that align with organizational strategies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6613 - Human Resource Metrics♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Understanding the specific value of the human resource (HR) capital of an organization is crucial. Metrics for HR management provide the tools for both measuring human capital value and for overseeing and managing an organization’s human resources. Students in this course explore HR metrics as tools for organizational and individual performance improvement. They work toward establishing a foundation for the effective deployment of performance metrics as part of the recruitment, training and development, and retention of human resources. Students learn which metrics to employ and how to manage the results—a pivotal responsibility of HR managers. Students in this course are provided with the tools to make informed decisions required to create, apply, interpret, and manage results of appropriate metrics as HR professionals.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6615 - Building Organizational Culture: Leaders as Architects


    (3 sem. cr.) Organizational leaders act as partners in shaping, and are shaped by, the organizational cultures they seek to influence. Students in this course learn to recognize the elements that make up an organization’s culture as well as ways to harness these for positive change and organizational success. They explore perspectives on how to make conceptual sense of the cultural landscape of organizations and examine the implications for leading and building effective communities at various levels of application. Students assess and discuss a variety of topics, such as tools of self-development, the reciprocal nature of leadership, and cultural components.
  
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    MGMT 6617 - Performance Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Performance management is a set of practices and processes that creates career opportunities to attract appropriate resources, establishes an environment that nurtures individual productivity and development, and smoothly transitions individuals to their next position or organization. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to address these three key sets of processes. They practice writing job descriptions, selecting the right employees, developing skill-based performance standards, effecting relevant onboarding programs, and implementing educational and training programs intended to drive the success of employees and the organization as a whole. They explore how to maximize employee productivity through structured feedback, coaching, reflective performance development conversations, effective compensation models, employee recognition programs, and career development paths. Students also examine ways to improve performance management systems by integrating feedback from the exit interviews of valued employees.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6621 - Personal Leadership: Mentoring and Coaching♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course will understand and apply skills of effective mentoring such as active listening, learning, empowering, enabling change, and using feedback to create interactive dialogue and deeper understanding. Mentoring requires an understanding and integration of many leadership, interaction, and communication theories that support the development of effective leaders.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6622 - Practices in Project Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques needed to successfully manage projects throughout the life of a project, known as the project life cycle. By learning about the project management Knowledge Areas and Process Groups as well as the distinguishing characteristics of each, students gain an appreciation for how these two dimensions of project management interact in initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project.
  
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    MGMT 6623 - Enterprise and Project Risk Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Project management involves an ongoing, and nearly inevitable, variation of risks to which managers must be attuned and ready to mitigate. In this course, students learn how to plan, analyze, respond to, and control qualitative and quantitative risk in projects. They examine the internal risks associated with managing projects and the external risks associated with customer behavior, the supply chain, transportation and distribution channels, and acts of nature within the framework of the organization’s overall risk strategy. Assessing real-world examples of project risks, students learn about strategies for working with project stakeholders to identify and respond to risk within defined ethical and legal standards.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information
  
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    MGMT 6627 - Stakeholder Management and Organizational Behavior♦


    (3 sem. cr.) One role of the project manager is to lead teams in complex and diverse organizational settings while concurrently communicating with all stakeholders. In this course, students analyze this dual role and examine how individual and group behavior impacts organizational effectiveness. They discover how using influence, rather than organizational power, leads to more successful project management. Students learn ways to design projects to support organizational goals and how to build and engage organizational capital (intellectual, human, physical, financial, and structural). They also apply stakeholder management practices to engage in and manage relationships with the community of project stakeholders.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6630 - Strategies for Advancing Innovation and Technology♦


    (4 sem. cr.) Students in this course address important management challenges that are typical in today’s technology-based businesses. Students emphasize topics such as how to align business needs with technology solutions, how to identify new opportunities or applications for technology, and how to manage the related processes to ensure that technology solutions enhance an organization’s competitive position.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6631 - Strategies for Implementing Innovation and Technology


    (4 sem. cr.) Students in this course focus on innovation and technology management and supporting processes. In addition, students examine how technology solutions are affected when the context is global in scope.
  
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    MGMT 6635 - Fostering a Culture of Innovation


    (3 sem. cr.) In today’s complex and uncertain environment, innovation is important to achieving business success. In this course, students will examine how to be effective, creative leaders who can readily apply imagination to resolve complex problems. Additionally, students explore methods to establish a work environment conducive to creative thinking. Students will gain a set of proven methods, skills, and strategies that enable innovative breakthroughs to occur in a much more deliberate and predictable manner. Topics include: an overview of the concepts of creativity, foresight, and innovation; the diversity of different creative thinking styles; the “design thinking” process for business problem solving; work environments that stimulate creativity; characteristics of leaders who exemplify creativity that often leads to innovation; and the application of creativity and innovation concepts in organization settings.
  
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    MGMT 6637 - Leadership in Action: Change Management and Conflict Resolution♦


    (3 sem. cr.) One of the more difficult and large-scale challenges of leadership is effecting successful change in the face of resistance and conflict. Students in this course explore this challenge as well as the various facets of leading organizational change. They engage in writing assignments designed to help them focus their ideas and critically assess major topics, such as conflict resolution strategies aimed at the personal and organizational level. Students also consider the implications of emotion and the multifaceted array of conflict-management styles—factors for which professionals must account when making decisions regarding leadership and conflict resolution.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6640 - Leadership in a Global Landscape♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Leaders encounter many challenges as people from different cultures, social structures, religions, and languages participate in a globalized landscape and workforce. Students in this course examine these challenges and develop an understanding of the interrelatedness of nations in the global economy. They also explore the changing nature of international business and leadership. Students evaluate and discuss the concepts of sustainable business strategies, international trade, foreign direct investment, and regional economic integration in relation to leadership in a global environment.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6641 - Applications in International Business♦


    (4 sem. cr.) Students in this course are introduced to how institutions, organizations, and culture shape uniqueness in regional market and business practices. Students are exposed to the functioning of global organizations that shape the global business climate. Students explore the drivers of internationalization, barriers and pitfalls, and best practices in international business.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6645 - Improving Business Performance


    (3 sem. cr.) One of the most critical challenges in maintaining and improving organizational performance is identifying core strengths and weaknesses within the organization and across the more general value creation landscape. The focus of this course is on the challenges and opportunities for managers to create value and to increase organizational performance through the effective deployment of systems thinking and change management skills. Students in the course explore systems thinking as a process whereby problems are viewed as individual components within a larger system and explore how various operational and systems thinking frameworks such as the Theory of Constraints and Lean Six Sigma can be utilized to optimize organizational performance in both industrial and service settings.
  
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    MGMT 6650 - Foundations in Project Management♦


    (4 sem. cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the art and science of project management as applied to different types of project situations. Topics such as project life-cycle management; project organizations and leadership; project team building; requests for proposal (RFPs), proposals, and contracts; techniques for project scope definition, work definition, estimating, scheduling, risk management, control, and closeout; the Project Management Organization; project management methodology; and project selection/portfolio management are covered. Students explore these concepts in the context of real-world problems. Note: There is a special technology requirement for this course requiring the use of Microsoft Project. The software will be provided in trial form, but there is not a Mac version of this software available. Students in this course are required to use Microsoft Windows, XP, or Server 2003 or later. Because Mac users may experience difficulty using the software, we recommend the following: (a) Mac users should be prepared to use a PC during this course or (b) Mac users should purchase the appropriate software or hardware to be able to replicate the Windows environment on their Mac.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6651 - Project Management Skills for Managers


    (4 sem. cr.) The “soft” skills of project management are increasingly recognized as key to improving its practice. Students in this course explore best practices and research results on the best methods to practice project management in today’s organizations in the context of real-world problems. Students also examine how project management applies in a global context. (Prerequisite(s): MGMT 5540.) Note: There is a special technology requirement for this course requiring the use of Microsoft Project. The software will be provided in trial form, but there is not a Mac version of this software available. Students in this course are required to use Microsoft Windows, XP, or Server 2003 or later. Because Mac users may experience difficulty using the software, we recommend the following: (a) Mac users should be prepared to use a PC during this course or (b) Mac users should purchase the appropriate software or hardware to be able to replicate the Windows environment on their Mac.
  
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    MGMT 6655 - Marketing Communications, Storytelling, and Persuasion


    (3 sem. cr.) Whether one is addressing a customer, an audience, or a jury, the aim is to use the tools of persuasion to influence individuals to take action.  Especially in social media, it is critically important to establish an appropriate tone, voice, and personality. Tying these strategies to the overall brand positioning is even more important. It has been found that storytelling is one of the most effective tools of persuasion. Rather than simply stating the facts, the story puts facts into a meaningful context, so that the consumer can understand and empathize with the characters in the story and, therefore, identify with the brand’s social media personality. In this course, students explore the elements of the story and the approaches used to develop content. Understanding the impact of individual channels on a strategy for integrated marketing communications and positioning allows the marketer to allocate budgets more effectively and efficiently.
  
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    MGMT 6659 - Marketing for Competitiveness♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective managers know that a clear understanding of the role of marketing, as well as a grasp of effective marketing practices, is essential for organizations to succeed in today’s fast-paced, competitive environment. In this course, students gain a working knowledge of both marketing theory and the practical application of innovative marketing tools and strategies. Students also explore how product, price, place, promotion, and people contribute to the marketing mix as they explore research-based insights into consumer behavior. Topics include product and service differentiation, competitive analysis, relationship marketing, coordination of marketing functions, and distribution strategies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6660 - Framing and Analyzing Problems: Research Strategies for Leaders♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This course is designed to promote the learner’s ability to think critically, with a long-term view, about identifying and analyzing problems, data interpretation, and decision-making, while avoiding common decision errors that occur because of faulty, deep-seated mental models. Students will also review fundamentals of scientific research, including the application of qualitative and quantitative research methods in understanding leadership phenomena.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6661 - Applied Research Methods—Qualitative and Quantitative


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course focus on acquisition of substantive, foundational knowledge of the philosophy of science, including the construction, use, and critique of concepts and theories. Qualitative and quantitative frameworks for inquiry are introduced. Ethical, social, and political aspects of conducting research and producing knowledge for practice are examined. Quantitative designs covered include experimental and quasi-experimental, survey, causal-comparative, evaluation, and existing action research. Qualitative designs include case study, phenomenology, grounded theory, and ethnography. Assignments consist of knowledge demonstration and problem solving for professional practice. Through course assignments, students focus on the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the integration of professional practice at the doctoral level.
  
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    MGMT 6662 - Communicating Using Social and Digital Media♦


    (3 sem. cr.) While some companies may still be asking, “Why should we care about social media?” most are now asking, “How can we leverage the power of social media?” In this course, students examine how social media has changed the way consumers interact with brands and apply elements of storytelling to develop a social media strategy for an organizational scenario. In addition, students explore issues of ethics, privacy, and media law that are heightened by social media and digital communication distribution. Topics include types of social media, audience appropriateness, reputation management, social media strategy, evaluation methods, and the communications regulatory environment, including media law and privacy.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6663 - Market Research and Customer Insights♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Understanding consumer behavior is essential for developing and effectively marketing products and services. In this course, students can learn how to use customer data and insights to improve strategic marketing decisions and improve performance. Students have the opportunity to analyze factors that influence buyer behavior during all stages of the purchasing process and to consider how learnings can be translated into product strategy and related marketing decisions. Additionally, students will study market segmentation and targeting practices as a key means of differentiation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6670 - Applications in Global Business♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This course is an introduction for students to learn how institutions, organizations, and culture shape uniqueness in regional market and business practices. Students are exposed to the functioning of global organizations that shape the global business climate. Students explore drivers for internationalization, barriers and pitfalls, and best practices in international business.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6673 - Case Studies in Global Business♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, international business topics are explored in depth and in context through real-world case studies. Students analyze the success and failure of international business ventures across a wide range of industries, developing their analytical skills in the process.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6677 - Competing in the Global Economy♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Over the last few decades, a fundamental shift in the world economy has been underway. No longer are national economic interests and business operations largely confined within well-defined geographic borders. Phenomena such as the explosion of the Internet, outsourcing, and the reduction in barriers to cross-border trade have all contributed to the creation of a truly global economy. Students in this course focus on the global environment of business and explore how the international sociocultural, political, legal, economic, physical, and historical environments affect business practices and policies. Students acquire the skills and methodologies required for market analysis and business strategizing on a global scale. In particular, students identify the internal and external forces affecting an organization’s ability to compete both domestically and globally.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6681 - Social/Environmental Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Development♦


    (4 sem. cr.) In this course, students explore and evaluate opportunities to create value through the development of new organizations that respond in sustainable ways to the needs of both the micro-level community and the world at large. Students prepare to build new organizations that solve problems within a systems context and to build into their approach to planning, operations, and decision making a global awareness that begins within their local community and extends far beyond. New venture plan outlines are drafted, focusing on social and environmental entrepreneurship issues.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6689 - Message Design, Audience, and Evaluation♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Using reputable sources lends credibility to a message. But how does a communication professional determine which supporting information is appropriate to help craft a message, gain audience insight, choose a communication channel, or evaluate the impact of a message? In this course, students examine research approaches that are common to the field of communication and appropriate for answering questions about audiences and evaluating messages. Topics include simple quantitative analysis and qualitative research approaches such as focus groups, interviewing, and surveys, as well as basic metrics such as cost of media, cost per sale, return on investment, and web analytics.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6690 - U.S. Healthcare Delivery System♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Healthcare delivery is one of the largest industries in the United States. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to gain thorough insight into the current structure and components of health services and delivery; they are also presented with an abbreviated history addressing the nature of population illness and disease. Students identify and describe components of the system, including patients, healthcare professionals, public and private third-party payers, regulators, reimbursement methods, and technology. They engage in activities and discussions focused on the continuum of services related to healthcare, such as hospitals and hospital systems, ambulatory care, and long-term care. Students also explore issues related to these services, such as wellness, prevention, and community and public health, for a comprehensive understanding of the system. Students contextualize their study through the examination of current factors and challenges as well as the impact these challenges have on delivery and management.
     
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6692 - Financial Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the terminology, theory, concepts, and techniques used in the accounting and finance functions in healthcare organizations. They explore the important role of finance in healthcare organizations, in addition to the various techniques to develop, manage, and control finances. Using an applied approach to healthcare finance, students learn how to develop, apply, and interpret various financial tools, including budgets, sources of revenue/reimbursement by payer, income statements, balance sheets, dashboards, statements of cash flow, pro formas, return on investment analysis, financial ratios, capital budgeting, debt service and borrowing, depreciation, and cost allocation and cost accounting techniques. Students develop portions of a business/financial plan using these techniques and analyze the viability of their plan using accepted financial management tools.
     
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6693 - Interpersonal Communication♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The ability to communicate with others influences success in both professional and personal settings. As communities and places of work become increasingly diverse, the intersections of interpersonal and intercultural communication also increase, and communicators need to be aware that the cultural diversity of their audiences should affect the way they convey information. Students in this course examine interpersonal and intercultural intersections and study the influence of cultural diversity on interpersonal communication. By examining theory, students develop an approach to practice and hone individual strategies for communicating successfully in diverse interpersonal situations. Topics include interpersonal communication theory, intercultural communication theory, individual communication competence, nonverbal channels, person perception, conflict resolution, and listening and communication barriers.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6695 - Health Policy and Economics


    (3 sem. cr.) Managers in healthcare must possess the skills needed to assess economic principles and policies to make important decisions regarding healthcare and services. In this course, students examine the application of health policy and economic principles in regard to managerial decision making. They learn about the process for policy development and implementation, key stakeholders and interest groups involved in the health policy process, and how health policy changes over time within the United States. Students assess and discuss key policy initiatives related to cost, quality, and access. They also engage in assignments designed to advance their understanding of and ability to apply economic principles, such as supply, demand, and the determination of market price.
     
  
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    MGMT 6697 - Creative Strategy and Execution: From Brief to Presentation♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course leverage a wide range of knowledge and skills to conceive and execute a global communication campaign that uses traditional and digital media. Students have the opportunity to develop and review a creative or innovative brief grounded in concepts of integrated marketing communication. Students generate solutions for that brief across the phases of the creative process, present and defend solutions, and evaluate solutions using metrics. Topics include the creative process, integrated marketing communication, selecting appropriate channels, pitching and selling ideas, and evaluation metrics.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6698 - Public Relations Concepts and Strategy


    (3 sem. cr.) To successfully build and manage the relationship between an organization and the public in today’s increasingly global community, a strategic communications plan requires the use of both traditional and new technology. Students in this course explore, from a global perspective, the needs of various public relations stakeholders, including the customer, the press, and the investor. Topics include how to change behaviors, advocate for causes, design messages for specific audiences, select appropriate communication channels, and evaluate results of public relations campaigns. Students also consider the potential legal and ethical aspects of the practice of public relations.
  
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    MGMT 6900 - Capstone: Practicing Managerial Decision Making


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to synthesize management content, theory, and practice to create their personal visions and goals. Students assess existing research and methods, reflect on their current approach to management, and purposefully plan for a future as a management professional who affects positive change. Students produce individual treatises that include essays on their values, beliefs, strengths, and weaknesses, which serve as a foundation for continued professional growth and development; thus, students become better equipped to meet the management challenges of an uncertain tomorrow.
  
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    MGMT 6905 - Capstone: Integrating Management Theory and Practice for Individual Action


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to synthesize management content, theory, and practice to create their personal visions and goals. Students assess existing research and methods, reflect on their current approach to management, and purposefully plan for a future as a management professional who affects positive change. Students produce individual treatises that include essays on their values, beliefs, strengths, and weaknesses, which serve as a foundation for continued professional growth and development; thus, students become better equipped to meet the management challenges of an uncertain tomorrow.
  
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    MGMT 6990 - Capstone: Sustainable Business Practices and Strategies


    (3 sem. cr.) The purpose of this course is to integrate knowledge and concepts related to strategy and sustainable business practices to produce actionable recommendations intended to produce improved performance and growth. Students will practice their skills and employ their knowledge by evaluating business strategies capable of achieving sustainable competitive advantage. Students in this course will be required to identify and address challenges and opportunities found in today’s complex and often uncertain business environment. Students complete their transformational journey through the program by reflecting on their learning and will consider the next phase of their career development. The aim of the course is to improve the students’ ability to manage in an environment requiring both strategic and operational knowledge. Topics include corporate social responsibility and stakeholder management, resource-based capabilities analysis, external competitive analysis, business-level strategy evaluation and development, and change management.
  
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    MGMT 8015 - Gateway to Doctoral Studies♦


    (5 cr.) The journey for a doctoral student to the domains of the scholar-practitioner begins with this course. No organization can succeed without being managed, and students will be exposed to a unique perspective on organizational success. Students have the opportunity to develop a personal navigational tool—the Skills Development and Assessment Plan (SDAP)—to identify goals and how the program will unfold to help students meet those goals. In this course, students are prepared for the journey that will take them from absorbing knowledge to becoming creators of knowledge. During this orientation, students grapple with some of the biggest questions facing the management profession: How have the demands on management and leadership shifted with the digital age? What are the implications of a global 24/7 world? How will the student, as a scholar-practitioner, contribute to positive social change after graduation? While engaging them in these and other questions regarding the future of management, students will be guided through the full spectrum of Walden resources and become familiar with those academic support systems designed to help students become better critical thinkers and scholarly writers: the Writing Center, the Library, the Academic Skills Center, and the Center for Research Quality.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8020 - Managing Organizational Systems and Complexity♦


    (8 cr.) Effective managers in complex organizations often use core concepts of systems theory to analyze and execute change within their organizations. Students in this course examine these concepts, including both seminal and current approaches to systems thinking, self-organizing systems, and complexity. Using processes of systems thinking, mental models, mind mapping, analysis of assumptions and limitations, and relationship mapping, students engage in hands-on application assignments through which they analyze existing organizations and develop plans for change. Students also have the opportunity to reflect on the concepts presented in the course and to contemplate how they can apply this information to effect complex adaptive change in their field. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8100Z or RSCH 8101Z.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8025 - Perspectives on Organizations and Their Implications for Leaders♦


    (5 cr.) There are many ways of seeing an organization and one’s place in it. The assumptions one makes about people, purpose, and profit will influence the way a person manages. It is important to develop the skill required to “read” various situations and to understand what is “between the lines” in order to act with insight. Developing and utilizing various divergent perspectives on organizational dynamics enables a manager to devise appropriate actions by critically thinking about the way things can be (based on the way things are). In this way, leaders free themselves from conventions and are able to invent unique tools, structures, and policies to succeed. Specifically in this course, students have the opportunity to explore several metaphors of organizations from “mechanistic” to “organic” to “network,” among others. Further, they can look at organizations through several all-encompassing “frames” to understand how a leader can leverage these new perspectives to better manage processes and change. (Prerequisite(s): MGMT 8015 [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8030 - Management of Decision Making♦


    (8 cr.) Often times, the tools used to make complex managerial decisions are the same resources employed in everyday decision making. Understanding these tools and practicing the skills needed to make effective, timely decisions with sustainable results is a valuable outcome of this course. Students examine and discuss competing paradigms of individual and group decision making, which include both seminal and current research related to rational and behavioral decision-making theories, among others. Students also explore how these approaches differ in their impact on ethics, group dynamics, risk assessment, and leadership responsibilities. (Prerequisite(s): MGMT 8020.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8035 - Complexity and Applied Systems Thinking♦


    (5 cr.) Organizations are increasingly a reflection of the confluence of dynamic influences and pressures to compete in an uncertain environment. Leaders need to stimulate creative and innovative approaches to products, services, and operations. Yet, organizations also need to have predictable control systems to enable the efficient utilization of resources. This tension between chaos and order demands new approaches to structuring organizations and decision making. Using processes of systems thinking, mental modeling, and relational dynamics, students have the opportunity to analyze organizations and develop tools to better understand complex systems dynamics. (Prerequisite(s): MGMT 8025 [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8045 - Mechanics of Individual and Group Decision Making♦


    (5 cr.) In today’s highly complex organizations, rational and behavioral decision-making processes and models impact leadership, ethics, group dynamics, and risk assessment. Students can examine these factors and the underlying competing paradigms of individual and group decision making and how these approaches differ in their impact on the personal, leadership, and organizational levels of analysis; and, in some cases, how decisions impact society. (Prerequisite(s): MGMT 8035 [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8100 - Dissertation Mentoring


    (0 cr.) The purpose of this course is to assist doctoral students in making steady progress toward their degree. Students use this course as a forum for ongoing exchange of ideas, input, and feedback with peers and their faculty mentor. Gaining tools needed for success in completion of their dissertation, students practice with various research methods and data-gathering techniques; determine best practices; and explore the various resources, including the Walden University Library, Writing Center, and Research Center. On a quarterly basis, students also prepare a progress plan and submit a progress report to help stay on track for successful completion of their degree. (Prerequisite(s): [RSCH 8201M or RSCH 8301M (may be taken concurrently)] and MGMT 8990.)
  
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    MGMT 8410 - Leadership, Influence, and Power♦


    (4 cr.) Power is often thought of as the lifeblood of leadership. Students in this course review the varieties of power and their functions. They analyze and synthesize research, focusing on how leaders influence others through the tools they have at their disposal, including aspects of personality and character that serve to help effectively influence others. Students also explore the full spectrum of leadership behavior from autocracy to emergent consensus and how rights and powers are distributed to people in order to achieve their responsibilities in an organization. Practicing doctoral-level skills, students also engage in scholarly writing assignments, such as the preparation of a literature review, lending to a significant research topic, problem, and research question. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8420 - Challenging Conventional Leadership♦


    (4 cr.) A desirable trait of modern managers and leaders is the ability to assess multiple perspectives and the confidence to assert change if needed. Conventional organizational structures and leadership behavior represent one, albeit the dominant, set of expectations based on widely understood assumptions and practices. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to diverge from conventional leadership ideology and behavior through exploration of alternative models and lessons from a full spectrum of human organizations, such as utopians and reformers as well as intentional organizations and social experiments. Students analyze these organizations on a global level for new and promising methods, principles, and systems that may be applied and add value to local organizations. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8430 - The Changing Face of Leadership—Diverse Perspectives♦


    (4 cr.) Leadership in a global context with transnational organizations requires an understanding of the differences that exist among people as employees, colleagues, and customers. Students in this seminar course are introduced to advanced research topics in leadership and organizational behavior as they relate to the challenges of leading in internationalized, cross-cultural, and diverse contexts. Students analyze theories of cross-cultural practice, diversity in thinking, culture and belief systems, and stakeholder management. They actively engage in identifying potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the ethical and social change dimensions of the topics under study. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8440 - The Socially Conscious Leader♦


    (4 cr.) Socially conscious leadership involves the use of widely diverse psycho- and socio-graphic sensibilities regarding stakeholder interests and those of the larger society. In this course, students learn how to harness such awareness and examine the pursuit and distribution of profit, the mission of the organization, the methods of management, and organizational growth and restructuring to achieve new strategic objectives. They explore the nature of leadership in the context of a stakeholder environment with “triple bottom line” responsibilities—profit, sustainability, and social justice. They also study the nature of formal and informal relationships among people and between an organization and the community(s) in which the organization does business. Students have an opportunity to gain skills necessary to understand the motives as well as the impact of organization and leadership failure. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8450 - Crafting and Responding to Change♦


    (4 cr.) What are some of the advantages of various change models, how do organizations employ these to respond to change, and why is change important to an organization? Students in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions as well as to develop original ideas for change management and response. Students use traditional leadership methods and strategies to explore how the need for change is perceived, understood, and managed, and how change manifests itself from external and internal sources. They also learn ways that that they can use change techniques to mobilize an organization to make effective transitions. Engaging in scholarly inquiry, students use a whole systems and network perspective in relating change to internal and external contingencies. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8510 - Managing E-Commerce Management Information Systems♦


    (4 cr.) Students in this course are provided with broad coverage of information systems management concepts and trends underlying current and future developments as well as principles for providing effective implementation of information technology. Students assess strategies associated with both sides of the electronic commerce world: e-commerce solutions for existing companies and e-business concept development for venture startups. Assessing a variety of case studies, students contextualize their study through the evaluation of emerging theories and practices of e-commerce strategies. As the course progresses, students develop and define their position on a variety of current issues in e-commerce information systems and then engage in online discussions to share and defend their analysis. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8520 - Organizational Performance Improvement♦


    (4 cr.) What is business process redesign, and how can it be used to achieve improvements in performance measures? Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to investigate such questions and survey a wide array of current literature from experts in the field. Students learn about the concepts of performance improvement and process re-engineering. They work toward achieving high-level improvements in organizational performance through redesigned business processes and the use of information technology to re-engineer an organization. Students analyze the data required for organizational performance improvement and then develop and present a report or case study of an organizational setting in the context of performance analysis and improvement. Students also engage in discussion assignments to share ideas and perspectives with peers and to reflect on weekly topics. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8530 - Managing Projects in Complex Environments♦


    (4 cr.) In consideration of the growing complexities of the global business environment, there is a pressing need for leaders with diverse skill sets who know how to see a project through a multitude of challenges in a rapidly changing business environment. Students in this course explore the theory and practice of how to manage projects in such environments. Through extensive reading and literature review, students assess effective project management styles, critical factors for project success, organizational support systems that enhance projects, earned value analysis, the maturity of modern project management, and ethics in project execution. They also examine critical issues of budgeting, schedules, technical planning, and control methods, and they investigate the function of project management software in anticipating and managing the challenges of complex environments. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8540 - Systems Analysis, Design, and Implementation♦


    (4 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to examine the analysis, design, and development of computer-based information systems to enhance their knowledge base in software engineering. They compare the key characteristics of object-oriented methodologies with traditional methods for an understanding of how various types of systems require different software engineering techniques. Students learn about the lifecycle concept and related activities, including information requirements determination, prototyping, detailed systems design, development, testing, and implementation strategies. Collaborating with peers, students sharpen analytical and communication skills as they engage in weekly discussions on a variety of topics, such as software processes, design and implementation, dependability and security, and general issues related to software engineering. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8550 - Security Management and Risk Assessment♦


    (4 cr.) Reliable, secure transfer of information is vital to the operation and management of all businesses. The information transfer process, however, has presented a series of challenges as modern technology and the Internet have transformed the way business is conducted. Students in this course examine the need for security measures, policies, and careful assessment to ensure data integrity in electronic commerce. They explore management aspects of information security from a business perspective as well as the implications of information security risks faced by organizations. Students learn ways to identify threats and implement safeguards on corporate networks and the Internet. They also explore topics on return on security investment, business continuity planning, development of security policies, and information security auditing. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8551 - Preparing for Dissertation


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on the preparation for the dissertation phase of training. In this course, students identify a dissertation topic and potential dissertation committee members; begin to conduct a literature review; develop a problem statement and research questions; and evaluate research designs, methods, and types of analyses to use for their dissertation. Students also complete their initial premise in this course and an annotated outline of their prospectus.
  
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    MGMT 8610 - Financial Decision Making for Individuals and Firms♦


    (4 cr.) All responsible leaders consider the fiscal implications of the decisions they make on a daily basis, such as those involving growth, sustainability, and employee issues. In this course, students are provided with a survey of fundamental concepts in financial decision making, primarily at the individual and firm level. Students examine core principles, such as the time value of money, decision making under conditions of uncertainty, valuation, and capital budgeting. They also explore the legal, ethical, and global dimensions of individual- and firm-level financial economic decision-making theories and practices. Students gain hands-on practice using modern financial tools to evaluate case study scenarios and collaborate with peers to practice conducting and presenting research on a specific topic. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8620 - Financial Markets: Risk and Return, Capital Structure, and International Dimensions of Finance♦


    (4 cr.) Students are provided with the opportunity to augment their core financial knowledge base through a survey of fundamental concepts in financial decision making in which markets affect firm decisions and societal outcomes. Through a variety of practical application assignments, students learn about the role, impact, and limitations of financial markets in society and how risk and return for firms are mediated and moderated by agency effects, information asymmetries, and both rational and irrational aspects of market behavior. Students examine the structure of international capital markets. They also explore and discuss the legal, ethical, and global dimensions of firm- and market-level financial economic decision-making theories and practices. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8630 - Corporate Financial Management♦


    (4 cr.) How do corporate managers decide which investments add the most value to their company? Using previously acquired knowledge of financial analysis and decision making, in addition to new concepts presented in this course, students have the opportunity to answer this question, as well as to understand the reasoning behind such valuation. Students engage in a variety of group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on advanced research topics related to corporate finance, including the sourcing and deployment of capital, corporate risk management, short- and long-term financing, and product-market interactions. Through extensive reading and literature review, students identify potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the legal, ethical, and global dimensions of corporate finance theories and practices. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8640 - Valuation of Assets, Entities, and Opportunities♦


    (4 cr.) Experienced investors and managers understand that market prices may be misleading; therefore, they often use valuation theories and methodologies to help them determine the intrinsic value of assets. Students in this course are introduced to advanced research topics related to the valuation of assets, entities, and general opportunities. Students engage in group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on the valuation elements of mergers and acquisitions; options; international asset pricing; valuation of intangible assets, such as human resources; and capital budgeting and valuation with leverage. Through extensive reading and literature review, students identify potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the legal, ethical, and global dimensions of valuation in finance theories and practices. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8650 - Financial Analysis, Planning, and Forecasting♦


    (4 cr.) Competitive advantage and corporate sustainability depend profoundly on the financial decisions managers make. These decisions are based on information processed and evaluated using established theories. These theories, as well as the forecasting models used by contemporary financial planners and investors, are introduced to students. Students engage in a variety of group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on advanced research topics related to financial management planning, forecasting, and decision making. They explore econometric and time series analysis, cash flow, inventory, supply chains, sales forecasting, and both short- and long-range financial planning modeling. Through extensive reading and literature review, students identify potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the legal, ethical, and global dimensions of forecasting and financial planning and analysis. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8710 - Organizational Behavior and Effective Human Resource Management♦


    (4 cr.) Human resources are the heart of an organization; therefore, their behavior, expectations, and needs should be among the factors at the forefront of managers’ interests. Students in this course explore advanced research topics in organizational behavior, including the implications for effective human resource management with a focus on individual, group, and organizational behavior. They engage in group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on individual differences in employee motivation and job satisfaction; group development; team building; organizational leadership; and organizational design, change, culture, and development. Through extensive reading and literature review, students identify potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the global and ethical dimensions pertaining to course subject matter. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8720 - Strategic Thinking for Effective Human Resource Management♦


    (4 cr.) One of the main responsibilities of human resource managers and organizational leaders is to employ human resources (HR) to align with an organization’s needs and goals, moving the organization toward competitive advantage and sustainable success. Students in this course are introduced to advanced research topics in the strategic management of HR within a systems thinking and metrics-based performance measurement context. Students engage in a variety of group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on the analysis of resource-based theories of organizational performance; strategic management; and HR strategy, planning, and management (including succession planning). Students also discuss the role of metrics, knowledge management, and human resource information systems in supporting HR and organizational strategies in global markets. Through extensive reading and literature review, students explore global and ethical dimensions of course topics and identify potential HR research topics for their dissertation. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8730 - The Development of Human Capital Within Organizations♦


    (4 cr.) How do organizational leaders determine who to hire, and in what ways do they ensure that capable employees are sustained and managed in a way that guarantees high performance and organizational achievement? Students in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions through the examination of advanced research topics, including the development and management of human capital within organizations. Students engage in group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on human resource concepts related to training and development, rewards and compensation, individual performance management, the role of human resources with individuals for global positions, and organization-wide succession planning. Through extensive reading and literature review, students identify potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the global and ethical dimensions pertaining to course subject matter. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8740 - The Legal, Ethical, and Cultural Environment of Human Resource Management♦


    (4 cr.) Considering global-level expansion, issues of diversity, and traditional ethical issues, nearly all organizations must follow a host of laws and regulations; it is the responsibility of managers to know these guidelines for the welfare of employees and the stability of the company. Students in this course explore advanced research topics that address the legal, ethical, and cultural environment, both internal to organizations and more broadly. They engage in group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on the analysis of the regulatory environment in which human resource (HR) professionals must operate, HR management’s role in communications, management of diversity and inclusion, and promotion of justice within organizations. Through extensive reading and literature review, students engage actively in identifying potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the global and ethical dimensions pertaining to course subject matter. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8750 - Human Resource Management and Its Role in Labor Relations, Negotiation, and Conflict Resolution♦


    (4 cr.) Human resource (HR) managers bridge the gap between employees and management, creating a challenging relationship requiring the ability to recognize and assess conflict, communicate strategically and effectively, and negotiate for resolutions. Students in this course explore this relationship and examine advanced research topics in labor relations, negotiation, and conflict resolution. They engage in group activities, discussions, and writing assignments on a variety of topics, including the HR role in designing and managing conflict resolution processes beginning with mediation and negotiating with labor and other major human resource constituencies. Through extensive reading and literature review, students identify potential research topics for their dissertation and explore the global and ethical dimensions pertaining to course subject matter. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8101M [may be taken concurrently].)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 8990 - Developing a Prospectus


    (2 cr.) The prospectus is a brief document that helps students organize, delineate, and make decisions regarding their final dissertation and appropriate research methodology. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to design the prospectus in collaboration with program colleagues and mentorship from a course instructor. Students learn best practices for developing the prospectus and analyze examples of past documents. Students refine their doctoral study questions and explore research methods and project types that they may incorporate into their dissertation. Finally, students engage in the iterative process of writing the prospectus, incorporating feedback from peers and the course instructor. Ultimately, the prospectus is offered by  students as a document for review for consideration by potential mentors for their dissertation. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8301M or RSCH 8201M.)
  
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    MGMT 8991 - Writing a Proposal


    (4 cr.) The proposal is the first three chapters of a dissertation; it establishes the rationale for conducting the study, includes a review and analysis of relevant literature, and describes the study’s design and methodology. All previous work throughout the program is integrated, providing students with the opportunity to design a proposal in collaboration with members of their dissertation committee and committee chair. The development of a proposal feeds the final dissertation, allowing students to incorporate feedback from the course into the completion of their dissertation. Students often prepare multiple revisions of their proposal, requiring approval from Walden’s Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students present their final proposal to their committee via an oral presentation. (Prerequisite(s): [RSCH 8250, RSCH 8251, RSCH 8350, RSCH 8351, RSCH 8450, or RSCH 8451] and MGMT 8990.)
  
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    MGMT 9000 - Doctoral Dissertation


    (5 credits per quarter for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion) In the final Dissertation, independent scholars demonstrate their ability to examine, critique, and synthesize knowledge, theory, and experience so that new ideas can be tested; best practices identified, established, and verified; and theoretical, practice, or policy constructs evaluated and advanced. In all cases, independent scholars engage in rigorous inquiry that results in new knowledge, insight, or practice, demonstrating efficacy in the world of business and management. Through this course, independent scholars gain assistance in working through the process of the dissertation. They design personal best practices for completing their study within a designated context. They also select their committee members, with whom they establish and maintain strong working relationships and on whom they rely to mentor and approve their proposal and final study. Ultimately, independent scholars completing the doctoral study make a fresh contribution to the field of practice in the professional business environment.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 4 quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Dissertation with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook. (Prerequisite(s): All other courses in program [may take MGMT 8991 concurrently].)

  
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    MHRM 6100 - Foundations of Human Capital Development♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The field of human resource (HR) management continues to evolve and is becoming central to the strategic health of organizations. Students in this course establish a foundation of knowledge centered on the exploration of a framework of human capital development that students can use as a baseline for enhancing the practice of human resource management. Students explore keys to success in the program, including goal setting and priority establishment, time management, the basics of effective communication, the use of feedback and reflection, and effective work in group or virtual settings. Students are also provided with a brief introduction to Walden University, graduate studies at Walden and related processes and policies, the MS in Human Resource Management program, and the essentials of scholarly writing.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6110 - Talent Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) One of the most important assets of an organization is its talent, in other words, its human capital. However, too often there is little planning or strategy applied to the creation and management of this huge asset. In this course, students have the opportunity to develop the skills and knowledge to create and work effectively within a talent management and planning process. They explore recruiting strategies within a human capital development context and focus on building specific skills in managing an organization’s talent through position planning, talent selection and placement, and retention. Using industry best practices, students also engage in applications and group projects to practice developing initiatives that align with organizational strategies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6120 - Human Resource Metrics♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Understanding the specific value of the human resource (HR) capital of an organization is crucial. Metrics for HR management provide the tools for both measuring human capital value and for overseeing and managing an organization’s human resources. Students in this course explore HR metrics as tools for organizational and individual performance improvement. They work toward establishing a foundation for the effective deployment of performance metrics as part of the recruitment, training and development, and retention of human resources. Students learn which metrics to employ and how to manage the results—a pivotal responsibility of HR managers. Students in this course are provided with the tools to make informed decisions required to create, apply, interpret, and manage results of appropriate metrics as an HR professional.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6130 - Negotiation and Conflict Resolution♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective business practice requires the ability to handle important negotiations, from internal disputes to international mergers, as well as the knowledge of methods and tools to prevent, manage, and break inherent conflict. Students in this course explore the challenges of managing people in times of perceived conflict and dispute, and they work toward developing skills to identify different types of conflict situations. They engage in hands-on, practical exercises in general contingency thinking and action approaches, negotiation and bargaining strategies, and communication styles designed to help them resolve conflicts and move toward win-win outcomes.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6140 - Budgeting and Resource Allocation♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course explore the role of budgeting and resource allocation along with related processes within the organizational context. Students examine processes related to managing budgets and strategies to effectively read, interpret, and communicate the often complex financial information related to both unit and organizational performance. Students also explore the implications of resource availability as well as methods to plan for and prioritize the use of resources, while considering ethical issues related to sustainability and resource scarcity.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6510 - Personal Leadership: Mentoring and Coaching♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Mentoring requires an understanding and integration of many theories, including leadership, interaction, and communication, that support the development of effective leaders. Students in this course understand and apply skills of effective mentoring, such as active listening, learning, empowering, and enabling change. Students engage in practical exercises, such as using feedback to create interactive dialogue and asking questions to acquire a deeper understanding of mentoring and coaching processes. In consideration of modern and virtual environments, students explore the challenges of mentoring or coaching individuals in a virtual or team setting.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6530 - Leadership in a Global Landscape♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Leaders encounter many challenges as people from different cultures, social structures, religions, and languages participate in a globalized landscape and workforce. Students in this course examine these challenges and develop an understanding of the interrelatedness of nations in the global economy. They also explore the changing nature of international business and leadership. Students evaluate and discuss the concepts of sustainable business strategies, international trade, foreign direct investment, and regional economic integration in relation to leadership in a global environment.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6600 - Performance Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Performance management is a set of practices and processes that creates career opportunities to attract appropriate resources, establishes an environment that nurtures individual productivity and development, and smoothly transitions individuals to their next position or organization. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to address these three key sets of processes. They practice writing job descriptions, selecting the right employees, developing skill-based performance standards, effecting relevant onboarding programs, and implementing educational and training programs intended to drive the success of employees and the organization as a whole. They explore how to maximize employee productivity through structured feedback, coaching, reflective performance development conversations, effective compensation models, employee recognition programs, and career development paths. Students also examine ways to improve performance management systems by integrating feedback from the exit interviews of valued employees.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6605 - Strategic Human Resource Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In today’s organization, human resource management plays an important strategic role and increasingly contributes to its competitiveness. Students will explore how a more proactive and systemic approach to human resources addresses strategic business challenges throughout the organization—market positioning, talent acquisition, innovation, product development, quality, customer service, and operating functions. Students will see how results-based performance management is tied to the organization’s strategic agenda. Students will compare different theoretical perspectives of strategic human resource management and see the value of preparing employees of the future today to create sustainable competitive advantage. 

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    MHRM 6610 - Aligning Human Resources With Business Operations♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Contemporary organizations typically strive to align human resources with their functional strategies and business units, lending to the fulfillment of the short- and long-term goals of the organization. In this course, students explore the role of effective human resource (HR) professionals, who engage with colleagues that lead these operating areas and develop HR solutions that support their success. Students identify and discuss the key drivers and metrics that managers in accounting, finance, information systems, sales, marketing, distribution, regulatory, supply chain, and other operating areas within the organization employ to craft their functional-level strategies. Students discover that this knowledge is what provides HR professionals the credibility to be valued partners with functional management figures, thus helping to prepare students for the inherent challenges of the HR manager role.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6611 - Managing People and Promoting Collaboration


    (3 sem. cr.) Contemporary business environments are increasingly competitive, global, fast paced, and knowledge intensive. In these environments, effective use of human capital is vital to an enterprise’s success and survival. In this course, students will explore practical issues related to developing individuals and managing collaboration and will examine the skills and strategies necessary to address them effectively. Students will examine ethical and legal implications of managing a diverse workforce including issues that arise from cross-cultural differences and virtual work settings. The importance of communication as a tool to manage internal and external relationships is emphasized as it relates to the effectiveness of managing people to achieve organizational goals. Topics include planning and executing staffing strategies, developing individuals, fostering positive work environments, creating and sustaining teams, maintaining influence in the organization, managing a global workforce, managing programs for productivity improvement, and planning and managing the human side of organizational change.
  
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    MHRM 6615 - Legal and Regulatory Environment of Human Resource Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Successful organizations leverage their knowledge of the legal and regulatory environment to proactively develop their human resources strategy. In this course, students explore the laws that define multiple dimensions of the employer-employee relationship, including employment agreements, pay structures, personnel policies, equity, access, and dispute resolution protocol. Engaging in a variety of assignments designed to help students apply course content to real-world issues, they work toward developing business intelligence skills to track the dynamic legal environment and work with legal partners in the organization to implement human resource strategies globally.
  
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    MHRM 6620 - Leading Vibrant and Diverse Teams♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course explore how leaders at all levels of an organization can better understand the diversity of people and perspectives in organizations and how they can work as partners in leading vibrant, diverse communities. Students will examine diversity in a myriad of contexts and will explore the particular challenges of building effective teams that are fueled by diversity.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6625 - Building Human Capital Through Training and Development♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Training and development provides an organization’s workforce the tools it needs to contribute to success. Students explore the processes of conducting a needs assessment and developing a training proposal that builds the business case for a training intervention for both individuals and groups, creating the basis for an annual training and development plan. Integrating adult and workplace learning theory into the development of training solutions, students learn how to design, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of a training solution.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6630 - Benefits and Compensation♦


    (3 sem. cr.) An organization can employ its benefits and compensation strategy to build relationships with employees and increase employee engagement, enabling the organization to sustain a competitive advantage. In this course, students explore both the technical and strategic aspects of benefits and their role in overall compensation. They learn about legally required and discretionary benefits at the individual and group level. Students also explore and discuss program structures that address global considerations, and they examine societal implications of benefits and compensation that lead to supporting sustainable business practices.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6635 - Managing Business Partner Relationships♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Human resource departments are increasingly becoming networked organizations. Students in this course will learn the skills needed to evaluate build-or-buy alternatives for meeting human resource needs, negotiate contracts with service providers, develop service-level agreements, and track progress of ongoing contracts. Students will examine how the human resource professional can leverage systems to integrate vendor-supplied services, such as training, consulting, recruiting, assessment, coaching, and information systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6640 - The Role of Human Resources in Mergers and Acquisitions♦


    (3 sem. cr.) An integral component of the value created in mergers and acquisitions (M&A) is through human resources. Human resource professionals partner with senior management to support the organization before, during, and after an M&A event. Students in this course work toward developing the skills to analyze how cultural fit between organizations can impact M&A success, manage redundancy, recommend appropriate organizational structures, assess IT implications of combined payroll and benefits systems, design reward systems, and map professional development paths to retain valued resources. Students engage in a variety of application-based assignments to learn how to design and implement the communications strategy that is necessary to facilitate all M&A activities in a structured time frame. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6645 - Building Organizational Capacity Through Succession Planning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Organizations need to identify strategic talent today for their future success. In this course, students explore the processes that define an organization’s future human resource needs, identify the gaps between today’s resource requirements and future needs of the organization, and develop strategies to meet these needs. Through interactive discussion and practical exercises, students learn how to develop internal talent profiles, define career management tracks, conduct internal recruiting, develop comprehensive succession planning strategies, and use information technology to support these activities.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6660 - Taking the Long View: Systems Thinking and Tools for Sustainability♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course focus on building their capacity to see things systemically so that understanding the concept and reality of a system and its dependence upon all its parts drives how decisions are made. Students will use these systems-thinking tools to model single-, double-, and multiple-loop feedback systems, both at micro and macro levels of analysis. Students will also develop skills in multiple-scenario analysis. The practice of systems thinking lays the foundation for creating sustainable outcomes once consideration is given to the impact of decisions and actions. Learning to plan for multiple scenarios creates highly agile responses in a very complex and always-changing world and prevents the vulnerability imposed by rapid change with no ready response on the part of leaders and organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MHRM 6677 - Competing in the Global Economy


    (3 sem. cr.) The purpose of the capstone course is to integrate the knowledge and concepts students have gained through the MBA program. Students will practice their skills and employ their knowledge by evaluating business strategies capable of achieving sustainable competitive advantage. Students in this course will be required to identify and address challenges and opportunities found in today’s complex and often uncertain business environment. Students complete their transformational journey through the program by reflecting on their learning and considering the next phase of their career development. The aim of the course is to improve the students’ ability to manage in an environment requiring both strategic and operational knowledge. Topics include corporate social responsibility and stakeholder management, resource-based capabilities analysis, external competitive analysis, business-level strategy evaluation and development, and change management.
  
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    MHRM 6900 - Capstone: Human Resource Planning in Action♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this integrative course synthesize knowledge gained through the program to examine how a human resource professional can direct individual and organizational performance to build an organization that delivers on its value proposition, builds sustainability, and impacts positive social change. The course is built on the fundamental idea that individual people can effect great change in organizations and communities of all sizes by changing themselves. Students will build upon this to develop an evidence-based, formally researched, annual human resources operating plan for an organization or not-for-profit with which they are familiar.  
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MMBA 5501 - Managing and Leading: A Contemporary Approach


    (4.5 sem. cr.) Students in this course explore contemporary management concepts and practices to provide a foundation for building the skills and knowledge necessary to be an effective and ethical manager in a global and interconnected environment. Students examine and contrast management and leadership theories and practice. Students also explore keys to success in the program, including setting goals and establishing priorities, time management, the basics of effective communication, the importance of giving and receiving constructive feedback, how to use feedback and reflection, and the fundamentals of working in groups in virtual settings. Students are also provided a brief introduction to Walden University, graduate studies at Walden University and related processes and policies, and the essentials of scholarly writing.
  
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    MMBA 5510 - Leading People


    (4.5 sem. cr.) Students in this course focus on the human dimension of business, including individual and group behaviors and organizational culture. Students explore some of the basic dimensions of human resource management as those dimensions affect the organization and the employee. Students also explore contemporary thinking about leadership and its importance in today’s business world. (Prerequisite(s): MMBA 5505).
  
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    MMBA 5520 - Business Operations in the U.S. and Abroad


    (4.5 sem. cr.) Students in this course immerse themselves in how business works in the United States and other regions of the world. Students focus on how organizations are structured and designed. Students consider various components of business, examining how functions fit together and support the organization’s mission and goals. (Prerequisite(s): MMBA 5510).
  
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    MMBA 5530 - Marketing


    (4.5 sem. cr.) Students in this course achieve an understanding of marketing and its relationship to the successful management of today’s business organizations. They focus on how managers assess the environment and make business decisions based on available evidence or in the face of incomplete market information and rapidly changing markets. Students also examine how to develop marketing strategies that drive profitability, such as choosing a market segment to target and deciding how to differentiate products or services from the competition’s. Finally, students receive an overview of marketing-mix decisions, such as how to price, distribute, and promote products or services in a way that is consistent with the selected target market and desired positioning. (Prerequisite(s): MMBA 5540.)
  
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    MMBA 5540 - Innovation and Technology


    (4.5 sem. cr.) Students in this course focus on how managers can make sure that they leverage technology in every possible way to achieve competitive advantages in the global marketplace. Students explore the role of information and information technology in business and learn how to identify and analyze emerging technologies including and beyond the scope of information technology. The course also focuses on the importance of technology and innovation in today’s competitive environment. Students examine strategies to nurture innovation and cultivate technology development. Students conclude the course with a section about developing and implementing a technology strategy that assures an organization’s readiness and success in the future. (Prerequisite(s): MMBA 5510.)
  
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    MMBA 6251 - International Trade


    (4 cr.) Students in this course investigate the relationship of microeconomics and the special characteristics of trade. They cover trade policy, politics, emerging considerations among developed and developing countries, and the analyses of trade and investment decisions.
  
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    MMBA 6251V - International Trade


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course investigate the relationship of microeconomics and the special characteristics of trade. They cover trade policy, politics, emerging considerations among developed and developing countries, and the analyses of trade and investment decisions.
  
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    MMBA 6252 - International Finance


    (4 cr.) Students in this course address open economy, macroeconomic models, and policies. They cover the asset approach to foreign exchange rates, implications for economic policies of fixed and flexible exchange rate systems, current examples of alternative exchange rate regimes, corporate risk management, optimum currency areas, the euro, exposure to developing countries, financial crises, and international debt-forgiveness policies. (Prerequisite(s): MMBA 6251.)
  
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    MMBA 6252V - International Finance


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course address open economy, macroeconomic models, and policies. They cover the asset approach to foreign exchange rates, implications for economic policies of fixed and flexible exchange rate systems, current examples of alternative exchange rate regimes, corporate risk management, optimum currency areas, the euro, exposure to developing countries, financial crises, and international debt-forgiveness policies.
  
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    MMBA 6253 - Case Study: International Business Strategy


    (4 cr.) Students in this course investigate case studies of multinational corporate management issues, including choices related to international and global competition, strategies for international entry to manufacturing, service and entrepreneurial industries, alliances, partnerships, global marketing, research and development, human resources, and acquisitions. (Prerequisite(s): MMBA 6252.)
 

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