2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) 
    
    Oct 29, 2020  
2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    ITEC 6170 - Fundamentals of Information Assurance


    (3 sem. cr.) The principles of confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data while it is being stored, processed, or communicated guide the policies and practices of information assurance. In this course, students investigate the theory of information security and data protection, study common system risks and vulnerabilities, and follow best practices to protect computer and data assets. These practices address organizational policies, access controls, software and network design, and logging and auditing.
  
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    ITEC 6401 - Statistical Concepts for Big Data


    (3 sem. cr.) Statistical analysis supports quality management, drives decision making, enables forecasting and prediction, and provides a means for understanding many aspects of our world. Data is everywhere in today’s integrated technological society, and statistical analysis provides the means to access and interpret data. Students in this course are introduced to statistics focused on working with complex data sets and analyzing big data. Students synthesize theory with practical applications to learn the fundamentals of statistical reasoning, descriptive statistics, visual data display, regression, hypothesis testing, research design, anomaly detection, and advanced analysis practices. They have the opportunity to practice using a statistical software package to solve statistical problems. Students use a publicly available big data set to formulate their own study and complete a statistical analysis.
  
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    ITEC 6600 - Foundations of Health Informatics♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students are provided with a broad historical, technological, and theoretical framework for the study of health informatics. Consideration is given to the past, present, and future of this rapidly evolving discipline, with exploration of critical issues and challenges within the field, as well as potential applications, benefits, and opportunities for improving the management of healthcare through information technology. Special topics to be considered include the development of virtual and interactive healthcare through technology; the interoperability, standardization, safety, and risks associated with the implementation of the electronic health record; and the emergence and adoption of new information technologies. Professional roles and responsibilities related to managing health information technology are described, as well as organizations that promote health informatics. A global perspective of trends and issues in health informatics is provided.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 6610 - Information Assurance and Risk Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course learn about the security governance structure that organizations employ to manage risks. Various laws, regulations, and organizational objectives are typically mapped to organizational policies and translated into procedures, practices, standards, and guidelines. Students examine appropriate organizational structures for providing oversight and managing security throughout the enterprise.
  
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    ITEC 6620 - Information and Systems Security


    (3 sem. cr.) Participants in this course study in-depth techniques for defending IT infrastructure against attack. Students explore tools for configuring and testing system and network security, and they examine administrative and operational countermeasures. Students discuss a range of active responses to a security breach.
  
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    ITEC 6630 - Computer Law, Crime, and Investigation


    (3 sem. cr.) Security professionals need to understand the legal context of their work: Many laws apply to IT crimes, and botched investigations can have serious consequences. Students learn about the types of offenses and their consequences under the law. Investigations of breaches must be conducted methodically and with great care. Students examine the various types of cyber offenses and techniques for investigating them, as well as ethical uses of information and computing resources in organizations.
  
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    ITEC 6631 - Information Systems Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Students learn key approaches to the integration of enterprise-wide information to support business strategy and decision making. They cover issues in data acquisition, storage, retrieval, and analysis. Topics include data warehouses; data marts; dashboards, key performance indicators, and scorecards; online analytical processing; and data visualization.
     
  
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    ITEC 6640 - Topics in High-Assurance Computing


    (3 sem. cr.) Individual, group, and organizational behavior can have an enormous effect on safety and security. Because security professionals often observe that security is more dependent on people than on technology, they must have a clear understanding of human factors. Students examine advanced topics in the practice of information assurance, such as using social psychology to implement security.
  
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    ITEC 6645 - Representation of Health Information♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students examine the need for consistency in health data standards and the importance of appropriate identification and selection of these standards. The structure of medical and health information through effective knowledge representation is presented, with an emphasis on the practice of knowledge management and the incorporation of evidence-based best practices. The diverse terminology, ontology, acronyms, coding, and classification systems used in health information technology, both by information systems users and by those who design and maintain those systems, are examined. Topics include data communication, the development and advancement of e-health technologies, and future federal initiatives to digitalize health data.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 6650 - Software Systems Engineering and Requirements Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course place software engineering in the context of systems engineering. Students discuss the role of software engineering in analyzing user needs and examine how to develop solutions while building systems involving various components. Students receive a broad perspective of the system engineering lifecycle, including requirements, design, integration, transition, operation, maintenance, and support. They focus on issues of requirements engineering such as the elicitation of requirements, analysis, specification, validation, and change management.
  
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    ITEC 6655 - Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence


    (3 sem. cr.) Students learn key approaches to the integration of enterprise-wide information to support business strategy and decision making. They cover issues in data acquisition, storage, retrieval, and analysis in this course. Topics include data warehouses; data marts; dashboards, key performance indicators, and scorecards; online analytical processing; and data visualization.
  
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    ITEC 6660 - Software Design and Construction


    (3 sem. cr.) Software architects design software to meet desired quality attributes. They must minimize complexity while following heuristics and standards, even as they anticipate change. In this course, students explore the fundamentals of software design. They examine key issues such as concurrency, event handling, interaction, and fault tolerance.
  
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    ITEC 6661 - Business Analytics and Data Mining


    (3 sem. cr.) Students learn and apply techniques for inference and discovery in large data sets. Topics include statistical inference, exploratory data analysis, data mining, text mining, and machine learning for predictive modeling.
  
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    ITEC 6670 - Software Quality and Testing


    (3 sem. cr.) Competitive organizations demand high-quality software. IT professionals employ software management techniques to measure, control, and ensure software quality. Students in this course cover software quality management processes, with a special focus on software testing.
  
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    ITEC 6675 - Introduction to Big Data Analytics


    (3 sem. cr.) The amount of data available to organizations to help them create a competitive advantage is growing exponentially. These data sets are so large and complex that traditional data modeling and data analysis processes are inadequate. In this course, students are guided through basic approaches to querying and exploring data using higher level tools built on top of a Hadoop Platform. Students will walk through query interfaces, environments, and the canonical situations for tools like HBASE, HIVE, Pig, as well as more open source tools like HUE.
  
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    ITEC 6680 - Software Engineering Management and Processes


    (3 sem. cr.) Enterprise managers are keenly interested in implementing efficient and effective software development processes. Developments in the application of software engineering to help managers gain control over the production of software, including processes that measure progress, quality, and cost at the project and organizational levels, are covered in this course.
  
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    ITEC 6685 - Data Visualization


    (3 sem. cr.) Big Data normally refers to petabytes (1000 terabytes) or exabytes (one billion gigabytes) of unstructured data. This amount of data requires new methods to analyze, visualize, and present these data in a way that yields insight and understanding. Students in this course are introduced to elementary graphics programming, focusing primarily on two-dimensional vector graphics and the programming platforms for graphics. This infrastructure will also include lessons on the human side of visualization, studying human perception and cognition to gain a better understanding of the target of the data visualization.
  
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    ITEC 6700 - Psychology of Social Change


    (5 cr.) In this course, students analyze and evaluate theories of social and personal change. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application assignments focused on power and social inequalities, ethnic inequalities, global environment, and issues related to gender and sexism, such as homophobia. In addition, students examine the impact of social change theories on children, families, and societies. They explore the concepts of change agent and change advocate as well as the role of the psychologist as change agent. Students also engage in an integrative written assignment to synthesize theories and analyze a current social problem in their community, for which they propose an action to address the issue and drive positive social change
  
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    ITEC 6712 - Business Architecture and Process♦


    (3 cr.) Students in this course examine the structure and operations of organizations from an information-processing point of view and develop their skills in analyzing, designing, and improving operations. Topics include fundamental business structures; business process design, management, and optimization; decision support and automation; and enterprise resource planning and integration.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 6713 - Business Strategy for Competitive Advantage♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The focus of this course is on the development and implementation of business strategies that enable competitive advantage, with an emphasis on understanding the current environment in which the organization competes and forecasting how that environment may change.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 6721 - Organizational and Social Dimensions of Information Systems♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students place their technical and process work in a human context, focusing on issues and effects in a broader domain. Topics include organizational behavior and change; intellectual property issues; ethics, professionalism, and social impact; and privacy and security.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 6900 - IT Capstone


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this capstone course have an opportunity to synthesize concepts and skills in a reflective project. They build a bridge from the academic experience to the workforce. In the context of a specific IT problem, students evaluate appropriate technologies and design a solution.
  
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    ITEC 8000 - Foundation and Communications for Information Technology


    (3 sem. cr.) This course introduces students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They develop presentation and written communications skills geared toward developing a high level of competence in professional communication with colleagues, clients, novices, and IT experts. Additionally, students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence. They also have the opportunity to prepare their Professional Development Plan and program of study.
  
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    ITEC 8010 - Fundamentals of Information Systems♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The principles of computer hardware, software, and networks underlie the techniques and practices of information systems professionals. Students in this course survey the fundamental aspects of computing and prepare to use computers effectively for problem solving. Through a variety of application assignments, students delve into the types and construction of hardware, software, networks, and tools for data management. They learn ways to create an algorithm, represent data, and express their designs in a programming language. Through this course students are encouraged to become active and influential professionals by applying concepts and principles to real-world practice.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 8030 - Principles of Programming♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The discipline of software development demands a variety of skills. Students in this course assess the fundamental practices and principles of designing and constructing object-oriented programs. They engage in substantial hands-on practice, reinforcing algorithmic thinking, logical design, precise coding, and careful attention to quality.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 8040 - Systems Analysis and Design♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Like building a skyscraper, developing a large-scale software system may require the work of thousands of people over a period of several years. Analysts and designers coordinate technical plans so that individual efforts combine into a complete and effective system. This course surveys structured and object-oriented approaches to defining a system’s functional and quality requirements. It also examines how to convert these requirements into the structural and functional design elements of an effective organizational information system.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 8100 - Doctoral Study Mentoring


    (0 sem. cr.) The purpose of this course is to assist doctoral students in making steady progress toward their doctorate in information technology. The “instructor of record” for a section of the course is the chair of the doctoral study committee. Section participants are the students working with the faculty member at various stages of their doctoral study. Students in this course have a forum for ongoing exchange of ideas, input, and feedback between them and their doctoral study chair as students complete the coursework for the degree.
  
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    ITEC 8115 - Computer Networking and Operating Systems♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Within this course, students can learn the concepts of computer operating systems, including the main functions, similarities, and differences. Students can explore a variety of topics, including configuration, file systems, security, administration, interfacing, multitasking, and performance analysis. In addition, they can further their understanding of computers through the study of computer networks by learning key networking concepts, components, and the design of information and communication infrastructure solutions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 8120 - Operating System and Network Architecture♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The infrastructures of operating systems and networks are the fundamental technologies that support enterprise information systems. Students in this course examine the components of computer systems, their underlying operating systems, and their data communications networks. Students critically investigate the services these components provide and draw implications for the large-scale enterprise.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 8130 - Advanced Software Development


    (3 sem. cr.) Contemporary software development principles continue to evolve. In this course, students explore contemporary software development concepts and tools. Through application assignments designed to contextualize theories presented in the course, students apply object-oriented techniques, usability principles, and design for reuse. Students have the opportunity to acquire knowledge requisite to the development of sound, maintainable, and extensible software.
  
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    ITEC 8140 - Data Modeling and Database Design♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Data are the lifeblood of nearly every business enterprise. Through careful planning and management, the organization can ensure that its critical data remain consistent, correct, secure, and available. Students learn about this theoretical and practical introduction to relational database systems and also learn about accepted practices for data modeling, database design, and implementation in a range of application contexts.
    Note about required first courses: ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 8145 - Enterprise Database Design


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students discuss the design, implementation, and operation of databases using a principal relational database management system (DBMS). Many fundamental topics are covered in this course including: data modeling using entity-relationship diagrams; data storage, manipulation, and queries using structured query language (SQL); functional dependencies, normalization concepts, data warehouse architectures, data warehouse modeling, and data analytics.
  
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    ITEC 8150 - Principles of Software Engineering


    (3 sem. cr.) The principles of software engineering and software design allow for the methodical construction and controlled development of complex software systems. Students in this course survey the evolution and current practices of software engineering through the entire software life cycle, with emphasis on the elements that significantly influence software system quality.
  
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    ITEC 8160 - Enterprise Systems Architecture♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Large-scale enterprise systems often rely on architectural frameworks that define their main components as well as the interactions among these components. Students in this course survey the principal design strategies and tools for constructing the modern information system. They identify common vendor and open-source components, illustrating how they can create and integrate robust web- and cloud-based services and applications.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 8170 - Fundamentals of Information Assurance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The principles of confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data while it is being stored, processed, or communicated guide the policies and practices of information assurance. In this course, students investigate the theory of information security and data protection, study common system risks and vulnerabilities, and follow best practices to protect computer and data assets. These practices address organizational policies, access controls, software and network design, and logging and auditing.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 8201 - IT Leadership Simulator: Integrating Diverse Systems and Leading Technology


    (3 sem. cr.) In this information technology (IT) leadership course, students delve into a problem-based learning scenario focused on an organizational merger situation. Students investigate which technology set best supports the newly merged organization’s IT infrastructure. They also plan for and manage how changes to the new IT infrastructure will address the needs of the organization and its employees across countries, cultures, and diverse business areas.
  
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    ITEC 8202 - IT Leadership Simulator: Developing Proactive and Reactive Security Plans


    (3 sem. cr.) In this information technology (IT) leadership course, students delve into a problem-based learning scenario focused on an organization that has experienced a security breach. Students examine relevant IT governance, security, and privacy issues that are essential to the organization. They gain practical experience in formulating comprehensive proactive and reactive system security plans. Students also explore sound IT management principles in decision making and implementation of broad-scale change.
  
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    ITEC 8203 - IT Leadership Simulator: Leading IT in a Dynamic Environment


    (3 sem. cr.) In this information technology (IT) leadership course, students delve into a problem-based learning scenario in which they confront an impending or proposed disruptive legislative or policy change. Students work though the scenario under the assumption that the dynamic change has a direct societal influence and will affect IT accessibility and/or use. They anticipate effects, examine the societal values driving different choices, determine priorities, and develop a plan to positively influence the formation and implementation of policies for issues in which IT features prominently.
  
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    ITEC 8427 - Applied Research Methods—Qualitative and Quantitative♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course are introduced to qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods frameworks for inquiry. Quantitative designs that are covered in the course include experimental and quasiexperimental, survey, causal-comparative, evaluation, and existing action research; qualitative designs include case study, phenomenology, grounded theory, and ethnography; and mixed-methods strategies include sequential and concurrent strategies. Students work toward acquiring substantive, foundational knowledge of the philosophy of science as they construct, use, and critique concepts and theories. They can learn to produce knowledge for practice as they examine ethical, social, and political aspects of conducting research. By demonstrating knowledge and the ability to solve problems and test hypotheses, students engage in course assignments that emphasize the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the integration of professional practice at the doctoral level.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 8437 - Quantitative Decision Making for Strategic Analysis♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students develop skills in descriptive statistics, statistical inference, and quantitative techniques, including correlation, t-tests, ANOVA, regression, and various non-parametric methods. Students use quantitative data reduction and analysis and data management techniques, and they learn to utilize software for data analysis. This course is not intended for students to become fully grounded in statistical methods; rather, students learn appropriate questions to ask about data analysis, as well as how to defend their use of specific techniques in professional practice.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 8447 - Qualitative and Case Study Research for Strategic Analysis♦


    (4 sem. cr.) Students taking this course have the opportunity to extend their research and general analysis skills as they further explore research methods and project types—specifically, qualitative and case study research methods—that they may incorporate into their own doctoral study. Students explore ways of improving the quality and strategic analysis of organizational information technology (IT). They also focus on how to think in an action-oriented manner, as if they were consultants, so that their own doctoral study work could be applied in action. Finally, students begin to plan their doctoral study by engaging in an iterative process to develop their premise and a draft prospectus that incorporates feedback from peers and the course instructor. Ultimately, students offer the prospectus as a document for review and consideration by potential mentors for their doctoral study.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 8501 - Seminar in Information Security


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this doctoral seminar focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to information security. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and the strategic and organizational implications of information security, such as secure data, secure networks, vulnerabilities, and computer forensics. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.
  
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    ITEC 8502 - Seminar in IT Systems, Software, and Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this doctoral seminar focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to IT systems, software, and management. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline as well as strategic and organizational implications of IT systems, software, and management, such as system architecture, software development, and system management. During the majority of the seminar, students will work with colleagues, including faculty, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. Students have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.
  
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    ITEC 8503 - Seminar in Project Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this doctoral seminar focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to project management of information technology (IT) projects. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and the strategic and organizational implications of project management of IT projects, such as knowledge management, requirements management, and current project management tools and techniques, all within an IT framework. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.
  
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    ITEC 8504 - Seminar in Cloud and Grid Computing


    (3 sem. cr.) In this doctoral seminar, students focus on the scholarly and practice-oriented literature related to cloud and grid computing. Students explore major theoretical approaches and practices that define the discipline and strategic and organizational implications of grid and cloud computing, such as security, availability, architecture, and ownership. During the majority of the seminar, students work with colleagues, including faculty members, to identify threads and tendencies for further reading and discussion in a true doctoral seminar format. They also have the opportunity to lead their colleagues as well as to participate in academic discourse.
  
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    ITEC 8721 - Organizational and Social Dimensions of Information Systems♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students place their technical and process work in a human context, focusing on issues and effects in a broader domain. Topics include organizational behavior and change; intellectual property issues; ethics, professionalism, and social impact; and privacy and security.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ITEC 9000 - Doctoral Study Completion


    (3 sem. cr. per term for a minimum of five terms until completion) Students demonstrate a scholarly ability to examine, critique, and synthesize knowledge, theory, and experience in the final doctoral study. They show how new ideas can be tested; best practices identified, established, and verified; and theoretical, practice or policy constructs evaluated and advanced. In all cases, the doctoral study is a rigorous inquiry that results in new knowledge, insight, or practice, demonstrating its efficacy in the world of information technology. This course is a forum and structure for doctoral students to interact with the chair of their doctoral study committee, as well as other students assigned to the same chair, in order to make steady progress on their individual doctoral study research.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 5 terms and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Doctoral Study with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a doctoral study, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their doctoral study on ProQuest before their degree is conferred.

  
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    MATH 1010 - Intermediate College Math♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course have the opportunity to gain fundamental skills needed for College Math. Through weekly lab assignments, students engage in problem-solving, use of formulas, number operations and notations, exponents and exponential expressions, variation, linear and nonlinear equations and graphs, polynomials, rational and radical expressions, and basic geometry. They also collaborate with peers through discussions in which they complete solutions to more challenging math problems.
      Note: This course is considered an elective.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MATH 1015S - Introduction to College Algebra


    (5 cr.) Students in this course have the opportunity to gain fundamental skills needed for Exploring Mathematics in the Everyday World (MATH 1025), College Math (MATH 1030), and College Algebra Concepts (MATH 1040). Students complete weekly quizzes on a variety of topics, including the order of operations, simplifying algebraic expressions, polynomials, exponents, basic geometry, and solving linear equations and inequalities. Students have the opportunity to engage in weekly discussions on any challenges regarding these math topics to promote student success. Note: This course can be taken for elective credit only. Completion of this course does not fulfill the general education requirement.
  
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    MATH 1020 - Intermediate Algebra♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to gain requisite skills needed for College Algebra Concepts. Through weekly lab assignments, students work through algebra problems involving exponents and exponential functions, linear and absolute value equations and inequalities, quadratic and polynomial functions and their graphs, rational and radical equations, and systems of linear equations. The course also provides students with an introduction to complex numbers.
      Note: This course is considered an elective.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MATH 1025 - Exploring Mathematics in the Everyday World♦


    (5 cr.) How is math relevant and useful in our lives? How do we see math in the world around us? In this course, students will answer these questions and communicate an understanding of how mathematics applies to their everyday lives. Through the study of innovative mathematical topics, students will discover the relevancy, utility, and beauty of math. Students will practice reasoning and justification to evaluate contemporary mathematical problems while focusing on representations that best fit into their own lives. Throughout the course, students will investigate math in context as they study connections between math and culture, art, architecture, and nature. While critically thinking about these topics through a mathematical lens, students will apply techniques from topics such as graph theory, scheduling and critical paths, geometry, finances, voting, probability and combinatorics, and data analysis.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MATH 1030 - College Math♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with accessible mathematical tools to analyze and solve real-world problems. Using these tools, students build skills in critical thinking and numerical, logical, and statistical reasoning as applied to workplace, academics, and everyday topics. They engage in conceptual and applied assignments on such topics as set theory, logic, measurement and geometry, probability, statistics, and financial literacy. Through this course, students gain the knowledge and skill to apply inductive and deductive reasoning to real-world problems in mathematics.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MATH 1040 - College Algebra Concepts♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn a solid foundation in key algebra skills. Students gain a thorough understanding of algebra concepts through the iterative process of working through a range of problems, including solving and graphing linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions; composing and inverting functions; analyzing rational and radical functions; modeling exponential and logarithmic data; and solving systems of equations and inequalities. Through individual lab work, collaborative activities, and discussions, students in this course cultivate perspectives and analytical skills required for efficient use, appreciation, and understanding of algebraic concepts.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MATH 6551 - Understanding Number Systems and Operations♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Understanding rational numbers is the foundation for understanding other critical mathematic concepts and their application to everyday life. In this course, middle-level mathematics teachers explore exciting ideas to help students determine appropriate operations for solving problems and becoming more proficient in working with factors, multiples, fractions, decimals, percents, and negative numbers. Teachers develop problem-based activities to engage students in using common algorithms and other mathematical reasoning and sense-making strategies for adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing rational numbers. Strategies for estimation and using the number line to represent and solve problems are also provided in this course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MATH 6552 - Geometric Thinking and Measurement♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Understanding the relationship among geometry and measurement and solving problems using day-to-day real life experiences can motivate and guide students’ thinking and reasoning around these concepts. In this course, middle mathematics teachers learn strategies to connect geometric thinking and measurement to other topics and develop their own conceptual understanding of geometry and measurement by learning what it means to estimate and measure attributes of objects and how to develop fundamental measurement concepts and skills. In this course educators are challenged and supported as they engage in opportunities to foster students’ mathematical processes, proficiencies, and habits of mind around the concepts of shape, spatial relationships, and measurement, including estimation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MATH 6553 - Algebraic Reasoning, Functions, and Equations♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Algebra builds on a strong understanding of arithmetic and its properties in the real number system. Middle mathematics teachers have opportunities to move beyond the traditional teaching of algebra to the idea of algebraic thinking as an important component of all mathematics and everyday life. The use of tools, such as manipulative materials, calculators, and other emerging technological resources, provides educational professionals with concrete examples of how to incorporate the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice into their teaching. The goal of this course is to deepen educators’ understandings of the role algebra plays in problem-solving and decision making so that they can apply this knowledge to support their students in developing similar knowledge and understandings. Educators explore a range of topics, including reasoning and sense-making; various types of functions; multiple uses of variables; pattern recognition; mathematical modeling; estimation; and the development of linear functions from rates, ratios, and proportional reasoning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MATH 6554 - Data, Probability, and Statistical Reasoning


    (3 sem. cr.) Understanding data, probability, and statistics is critical to making sense of the vast amounts of information available in today’s world. Educators taking this course have authentic contexts for collecting, representing, and interpreting data, and they reinforce essential number concepts in promoting students’ ability to think statistically. Middle mathematics teachers focus on using data as a context for developing a variety of mathematical topics and as an important step toward understanding statistical ideas and processes. The goal of this course is to develop educators’ understanding and pedagogical practices so that they can promote their students’ ability to use data, probability, and statistics to better understand real-world issues and to solve a wide range of relevant and engaging problems in many contexts.
  
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    MATH 6561 - Learning and Teaching Mathematics♦


    (3 sem. cr.) To foster high levels of learning and achievement in math, teachers must first have a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and know how best to teach them. In this course,  teachers of K—8 mathematics are introduced to exciting ideas and practices to address their own learning and teaching of mathematics. Authentic and engaging mathematics experiences, including modeling, representing mathematical ideas in multiple ways, and identifying and addressing student misconceptions, are emphasized. Educators engage in effective practices for fostering students’ ability to reason, analyze conceptual relationships, and persist in solving challenging problems. Connections across mathematics topics, skills, and levels as well as educational policies that impact the learning and teaching of mathematics are emphasized in this course. The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics, including the Standards for Mathematical Practice, and the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) practices are frameworks for addressing fundamental principles and skills.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MATH 6562 - The Base Ten Number System and Operations: Addition/Subtraction♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective elementary mathematics instruction requires a deep understanding of numbers and operations, the real-world situations in which these arise, and how children learn these ideas. In this course, teachers refine their knowledge of the structure of the base-ten number system and how it is used in addition and subtraction. They examine various methods of multi-digit calculations, including methods commonly created by students and variations of standard algorithms. Teachers extend their own conceptual understanding by modeling mathematics visually and explaining relationships between visual representations and mathematical notation. Teachers also learn how to develop appropriate interventions by diagnosing common student misconceptions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MATH 6563 - The Base Ten Number System and Operations: Multiplication/Division♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Developing students’ mathematical habits of mind and leading them to become mathematical thinkers is an important goal of elementary mathematics education. In this course, educators extend their own understanding of the base ten number system and the relationships among addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Educators explore various interpretations and meanings of these operations while working with properties of multiplication, division, and proportionality. They investigate students’ misconceptions and struggles and develop effective intervention strategies. Educators further develop their own mathematical habits of mind as they engage in challenging tasks and solve real-world mathematical problems.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    MATH 6564 - Measurement, Data, and Geometric Thinking♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Measurement and geometry are often challenging topics for elementary students, but they represent some of the most visible uses of mathematics in students’ day-to-day lives. In this course, educators learn strategies for connecting these topics to other mathematical concepts, including fractions, decimals, and the number system. In geometry, educators move beyond strategies for developing a familiarity with basic shapes and their properties to explore higher-order tasks that involve geometric thinking, measurement concepts, and proportional relationships. Using data as a context to support students’ learning of these mathematical ideas, educators have the opportunity to explore real-world problems and collect, represent, and interpret data.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MATH 6565 - Understanding Rational Numbers and Proportional Reasoning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Understanding fraction concepts is a critical foundation for learning about proportional relationships and developing algebraic concepts. In this course, educators learn how to extend students’ knowledge of whole numbers and basic operations—addition, subtraction, multiplication, division—to fractions and decimals. Educators learn instructional practices to help students understand, represent, develop, and engage in rational number operations with meaning, proficiency, and precision. They also investigate ways to foster deep conceptual understandings of ratios, rates, and proportional relationships, thus building in students the critical skill of proportional reasoning. Educators consider how proportional reasoning builds a bridge to the study of other important mathematical topics, including geometry, measurement, and data as well as the use of proportionality as a connecting thread throughout the elementary and middle math curriculum.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MATH 6663 - The Base Ten Number System and Operations: Multiplication/Division (Accelerating)


    (3 sem. cr.) Developing students’ mathematical habits of mind and leading them to become mathematical thinkers are important goals of elementary mathematics education. In this course, teachers extend their own understanding of the base ten number system and the relationships among addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Teachers explore various interpretations and meanings of these operations while working with properties of multiplication, division, and proportionality. They investigate students’ misconceptions and struggles and develop effective intervention strategies. Teachers further develop their own mathematical habits of mind as they engage in challenging tasks and solve real-world mathematical problems.
  
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    MEDC 3001 - Communicating Through Media and Technology♦


    (5 cr.) Technology provides a competitive advantage to those who utilize it most successfully. In this course, students learn that technology can be a valuable tool in optimizing communications for appeal and impact when combined with the use of media. Students explore all aspects of existing and newly emerging social media and its relationship to business communication. They apply their knowledge of the dynamics of effective communications to sequenced components of a portfolio project using both media and technology for enhanced outcomes. Through this course, students work toward gaining the skills necessary to develop an effective social media plan.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MEDC 4101 - Leveraging Emerging Media for Mass Communication♦


    (5 cr.) Blogging, podcasting, social networks, wikis, web conferencing and broadcasting, and mobile messaging have become integrated means of expressing and sharing our thoughts. Students in this course will delve into these and other new technologies, developing an appreciation of their usefulness, their best applications, and their overall utility in a variety of settings. They assess and discuss a variety of topics related to social media, such as how to harness it to create demand for products, reach the intended audience, and broadcast ideals and values. Students in this course have the opportunity to develop the knowledge and ability to build a social media strategy as well as a professional website incorporating social media.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MEDC 4102 - Emerging Media and Global Communication♦


    (5 cr.) As with the use of digital media in domestic business, expanded markets—especially global markets— benefit from their use as well. Students in this course investigate how to use these new tools to establish a type of universal “language” that cannot be established in other ways. They examine new media in a variety of global contexts, such as politics, economics, and education. Students apply concepts from the course in a project through which they practice employing new media tools to effectively reach a global arena, enhancing their own capacity and marketability.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MEDC 4103 - Emerging Media Design♦


    (5 cr.) Technology and new media continue to evolve, primarily due to interest coupled with new-found capabilities derived from 21st-century know-how. With this invitation to create, students apply their understanding of new media as a set of effective tools in the practice of communications to design a conceptual prototype appropriate to enhancing mass communications. Students learn to test, refine, and appraise their product, taking into account visual components, audience information, and user feedback. They also discuss topics of new media design with their peers and reflect on its implications in modern business.
      (Prerequisite(s): MEDC 3001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 3001V - Management in the 21st Century


    (3 sem. cr.) Students gain a working knowledge of the essential principles and concepts of management theory and practice. The course is structured so the students examine the interrelationships among the major business disciplines and gain a comprehensive perspective with which to organize additional study in management. Practical applications of the manager’s role in planning, organizing, directing, and controlling are demonstrated and evaluated.
  
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    MGMT 3005V - Information Systems in Enterprises


    (3 sem. cr.) This course is an introduction to enterprise information systems. Students review the characteristics of enterprise information systems; their impact on the enterprise; how they fit in organizations; and their current architectures, enabling tools, and project cycles.
  
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    MGMT 3105V - Global Business in the 21st Century


    (3 sem. cr.) This course is a survey of the global business environment in the 21st century, and students are introduced to the basic concepts of global business activity and theory. Students are introduced to the major foreign environmental forces, focusing on strategic management issues, including competitive, financial, economic and socioeconomic, cultural, political, legal, and labor factors.
  
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    MGMT 4100 - International Business Operations♦


    (5 cr.) The need for businesses to extend their operations beyond domestic borders is growing continually. This shift to globalization brings both advantages and disadvantages. Students in this course explore the major aspects of international business environments and operations and focus on the strategic and operational issues that firms face when they do business abroad. Students engage in a variety of application exercises and written assignments involving key themes, such as the political, legal, and economic challenges of operating in a global environment; the design, implementation, and control of international business operations; and the socio-cultural aspects of doing business globally. They also discuss and reflect on current issues in international business to share ideas and gain varying perspectives from their peers.
      (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 2003.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 4109 - Management and Organizational Behavior


    (5 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the concepts of human and organizational functioning, while focusing on the managerial problems and solutions in both domestic and transnational settings. Students examine individual perception and learning, differences in personality, career development, motivating employees, and making effective decisions. They explore the ethical issues faced by domestic and transnational organizations and managers, social responsibility, communications, motivation, and leadership. Students examine the impact national culture has on leadership and management as well as the day-to-day operational issues, such as the management of diversity in the workplace. Through a diagnostic approach employing text readings, individual and case analyses, application exercises, and a final individual organizational plan, students learn course concepts and contextualize theoretical content. Ideally, this course is suited to individuals either currently operating in an international environment or contemplating doing so.
      (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1001 or BUSI 1002.)
  
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    MGMT 4109V - Management and Organizational Behavior


    (3 sem. cr.) The focus of this course is on human behavior in the context of the organization in a domestic and/or a transnational setting. Students completing this course gain an understanding of the concepts of human and organizational functioning with emphasis on application of these concepts to managerial problems and solutions in both domestic and transnational settings. Students examine individual perception, attribution, and learning; differences in personality; career development; motivating and rewarding employees; and making effective decisions. Students are also provided with an overview of ethics and the ethical issues faced by domestic and transnational organizations and managers, social responsibility, communications, motivation, and leadership. By focusing on the elements of national culture, students examine the impact culture has on leadership and management as well as the day-to-day operational issues endemic to transnational and global businesses. Finally, students investigate the management of diversity in the workplace, especially in a transnational and global setting. Learning is accomplished through a diagnostic approach employing text readings, individual and case analyses, quizzes and exercises, and a final individual organizational plan. The course is ideally suited to current potential managers either presently operating in an international environment or contemplating doing so.
  
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    MGMT 4140V - Marketing Management


    (3 sem. cr.) The course is designed to instruct students in creative decision making for market mix, channels of distribution, and industrial and international marketing. Special emphasis is on the development, organization, implementation, and control of the marketing plan.
  
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    MGMT 4141V - International Marketing


    (3 sem. cr.) Students are introduced to the world of international marketing. Students explore cultural, legal, technological, and financial aspects of various countries. In addition, students learn to apply the tools of the marketing management process to the international environment.
  
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    MGMT 4400 - Organizational Behavior and Management♦


    (5 cr.) Students address concepts of human and organizational functioning, while focusing on managerial problems and solutions in organizational settings. Topics include individual perception and learning, career development, employee motivation, effective decision making, management of diversity, ethical issues faced by organizations and managers, communications, and the impact of organizational culture on leadership and management. (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1001 or BUSI 1002 or COMM 3001.)
  
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    MGMT 4401 - Management and Organizational Behavior♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the concepts of human and organizational functioning, while focusing on the managerial problems and solutions in both domestic and transnational settings. Students examine individual perception and learning, differences in personality, career development, employee motivation, and effective decision making. They explore the ethical issues faced by domestic and transnational organizations and managers, social responsibility, communications, motivation, and leadership. Students examine the impact national culture has on leadership and management as well as the day-to-day operational issues, such as the management of diversity in the workplace. Through a diagnostic approach employing text readings, individual and case analyses, application exercises, and a final individual organizational plan, students learn course concepts and contextualize theoretical content. Ideally, this course is suited to individuals either currently operating in an international environment or contemplating doing so.
      (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1001 or BUSI 1002 or COMM 3001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 5101E - Capstone


    (3 sem. cr.) The capstone course is designed to bring together the knowledge gained through the entire concentration program, and students demonstrate competency and mastery in the various course competencies. The major focus in the capstone course is a strategic case study. Students are expected to apply and integrate a variety of skills, tools, and knowledge to assess the strategic issues in a real-world case analysis and arrive at recommendations for change and/or improvement. The course is designed to permit students to demonstrate their understanding and competency in complex problem identification and solution.
  
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    MGMT 6000 - Dynamic Leadership♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Being an effective leader is essential in business and demands that an individual has a strong set of competencies, including the ability to understand one’s self, motivate others, understand organizational culture, and manage ambiguity. In this course, students begin their personal and professional transformation by closely examining their current strengths and weaknesses, values, decision-making processes, and approaches to dealing with difficult problems. Students also explore leadership in turbulent times by examining how effective leaders think as well as how various management styles impact situations and relationships within an organization. Topics include key leadership concepts with applications to authentic situations; personal leadership and competency assessment; personal and professional development planning; and ethical values-based leadership decision making.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6010 - Managing People and Promoting Collaboration♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Contemporary business environments are increasingly competitive, global, fast paced, and knowledge intensive. In these environments, effective use of human capital is vital to an enterprise’s success and survival. In this course, students will explore practical issues related to developing individuals and managing collaboration and will examine the skills and strategies necessary to address them effectively. Students will examine ethical and legal implications of managing a diverse workforce including issues that arise from cross-cultural differences and virtual work settings. The importance of communication as a tool to manage internal and external relationships is emphasized as it relates to the effectiveness of managing people to achieve organizational goals. Topics include planning and executing staffing strategies, developing individuals, fostering positive work environments, creating and sustaining teams, maintaining influence in the organization, managing a global workforce, managing programs for productivity improvement, and planning and managing the human side of organizational change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6100 - Managing and Leading: A Contemporary Approach♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course explore contemporary management concepts and practices to gain a foundation for building the skills and knowledge necessary to be effective and ethical managers in a global and interconnected environment. Students examine and contrast management and leadership theories and practice. They also explore keys to success in the program, including setting goals; establishing priorities; managing time; communicating effectively and working in online settings; and giving, receiving, and using constructive feedback and reflection. Students are also provided with a brief introduction to Walden University, graduate studies at Walden and related processes and policies, the MS in Management program, and the essentials of scholarly writing.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6101 - Managing First Things First


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective managers know how to identify, prioritize, and act upon the most important items of the myriad of tasks that can potentially distract them on any given day. Students will explore the qualities of effective managers and various management styles to identify those which resonate. They will examine critical skills that are imperative to successful management, including organizing and handling priorities; communicating effectively; motivating, empowering, and developing people; resolving issues and challenges; and managing oneself. Students will gain valuable skills and knowledge that they can apply immediately.
  
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    MGMT 6110 - Critical Thinking for Effective Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Managers encounter a variety of challenges on a daily basis, which require the ability to employ existing tools and strategies to strategically communicate with individuals and the organization at large and to understand the different types of attitudes and values of others. Individuals with these skills are most successful when their efforts are coupled with the ability to think critically and analytically. Students are provided with the opportunity to improve their overall critical-thinking and reasoning skills within a managerial context. Using relevant management articles, case studies, and current topics analyses, students sharpen their diagnostic-reading skills and learn to construct effective, ethical, evidence-based arguments, which are fundamental capabilities of effective managers. They also examine common fallacies in thinking and reasoning as well as the rhetorical use of language to formulate convincing and effective arguments.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6115 - Communication for Leaders and Managers♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The ability to communicate with others influences success in both professional and personal settings. As communities and places of work become increasingly diverse, the intersections of interpersonal and intercultural communication also increase, and communicators need to be aware that the cultural diversity of their audiences should affect the way they convey information. Students in this course examine interpersonal and intercultural intersections and study the influence of cultural diversity on interpersonal communication. By examining theory, students develop an approach to practice and hone individual strategies for communicating successfully in diverse interpersonal situations. Topics include interpersonal communication theory, intercultural communication theory, individual communication competence, nonverbal channels, person perception, conflict resolution, and listening and communication barriers.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6120 - Negotiation and Conflict Resolution♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective business practice requires the ability to handle important negotiations, from internal disputes to international mergers, as well as the knowledge of methods and tools to prevent, manage, and break inherent conflict. Students in this course explore the challenges of managing people in times of perceived conflict and dispute, and they work toward developing skills to identify different types of conflict situations. They engage in hands-on, practical exercises in general contingency thinking and action approaches, negotiation and bargaining strategies, and communication styles designed to help them resolve conflicts and move toward win-win outcomes.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6130 - Developing People and Managing Teams♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Business managers possess an important role in developing the people for whom they are responsible and in creating and sustaining effective teams in complex and diverse organizational settings. Students in this course explore this role while focusing on developing skills and knowledge required to obtain the best performance from individuals in order to achieve goals and create positive environments. They also consider and discuss the ethical and legal implications of managing individuals and teams. Students examine the challenges of managing a diverse workforce, including issues that arise from cross-cultural differences and virtual work settings. Through this course, students learn the importance of communication as a tool to manage internal and external relationships and practice their communication skills to prepare for an effective role in management.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6135 - Harnessing the Power of Data and Information♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Effectively using data and information can make the difference in whether the best decisions are made or problems are solved correctly. There are multiple approaches to practical managerial problem solving that are rooted in the systematic collection, analysis, and display of relevant data and information. In this course, students examine the importance of data, beginning with the process of transforming data into information, and then focusing on the best methods for presenting that information in support of sound and ethical decision making. Students evaluate common misinterpretations or errors in working with data and determine how to detect data and information presented in a deceptive manner. Students explore current paradigms in data-based decision making and problem solving. They learn how they can use these analytical-thinking practices to improve their general managerial decision-making skills.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6140 - Initiating and Managing Change♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Today’s business environment is constantly evolving to accommodate changes in economy, leadership, new regulations, and internal reduction and growth. Organizations require leaders who know how to work through barriers to effect positive and efficient organizational change. Students in this course learn about situations that constitute and require such change. They engage in a variety of assignments through which they explore effective strategies for initiating change and anchoring change into corporate culture to achieve organizational goals as well as for managing unplanned or unwelcome change. Students explore a variety of approaches and methods to transition individuals and organizations within evolving environments. They distinguish between reactive responses and proactive responses to change and examine the implications of culture, inertia, and uncertainty. Additionally, students explore the importance of understanding motivation and effective communication in mitigating negative reactions to change and facilitating the change process itself.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6150 - Creating Sustainable Solutions Through Systems Thinking♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Leaders in business must often take creative approaches to solve problems. Systems thinking is a popular method of problem-solving because it allows leaders to see how problems interrelate and influence one another, which often leads to optimal, sustainable solutions. Students in this course can expand their perception of problem-solving and stimulate positive social change on important global issues by exploring systems thinking as a process whereby problems are viewed as individual components within a larger system. Students in this course use a framework for analyzing relationships within a system and for avoiding the risks associated with viewing problems in isolation. Students use systems thinking tools to model single-, double-, and multiple-loop feedback systems, at the micro and macro levels of analysis. In addition, students learn about scenario building and examine how the practice of systems thinking provides a foundation for creating sustainable outcomes for organizations and society.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6160 - Using Data and Information to Solve Problems♦


    (3 sem. cr.) There are multiple approaches to practical managerial problem-solving that are rooted in the systematic collection, analysis, and display of relevant data and information. In this course, students examine the importance of data, beginning with the process of transforming information into data, and then focusing on the best methods for presenting data. Students evaluate common misinterpretations or errors in working with data and determine how to detect data presented in a deceptive manner. Students explore the basic tools used by quality, Six Sigma, and lean-method practitioners. They learn how they can use these analytical-thinking practices to improve their general managerial decision-making skills. They also practice their communication skills through small group discussions on a variety of topics, such as the relationship between data and information, effective problem-solving attitudes and capabilities, production processes, data deception, and survey sampling.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6170 - Budgeting and Resource Allocation♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Managing business processes often involves careful planning and forecasting, taking into account many factors, such as expenses, investments, and, often times, unforeseen financial obligations. Students in this course explore the role of budgeting and resource allocation along with related processes within the organizational context. They examine processes related to managing budgets and strategies to read and communicate effectively the often complex financial information related to unit and organizational performance. Students also explore and discuss the implications of resource availability as well as methods to plan for and prioritize the use of resources, while considering ethical issues related to sustainability and resource scarcity.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6175 - Managing, Mediating, and Resolving Conflict♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Managers and leaders must be skilled in conflict management including the capability to mediate or resolve conflict at the interpersonal through organizational levels. Students in this course explore the challenges of managing people in times of perceived conflict and dispute, and they work toward developing skills to identify different types of conflict situations.  Students will gain the knowledge of methods and tools to prevent, manage, and break inherent conflict. Students also consider the implications of emotion and the multifaceted array of conflict-management styles—factors for which professionals must account. They engage in hands-on, practical exercises in general contingency thinking and action approaches and communication styles designed to help them resolve conflicts and move toward win-win outcomes.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6180 - Managing Organizational Performance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students focus on the challenges and opportunities for managers to create value and to increase organizational performance. Building on concepts, such as skill-based strategy and human capital development, the theory of constraints, and value innovation, students explore and exercise various strategic-thinking perspectives and tools designed to improve and sustain organization-wide performance. Students also evaluate the different stages through which organizations transition to failure and examine methods for recognizing and halting negative trends.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6600 - Introduction to Human Resource Management♦


    (4 sem. cr.) Students in this course focus on the links between human resource management and the business/strategic issues important to organizations. Topics include human resources’ strategic role and measured outcomes; employment law; recruitment and selection; workforce planning and talent management; performance appraisal and feedback; compensation, benefits, and total rewards; occupational health, safety, and security; employee and labor relations; and human resource information systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6601 - Strategic Human Resource Management


    (5 cr.) Despite common misperceptions, human resource (HR) managers are tasked with more than hiring, firing, and managing employee benefits. In this course, students learn why it important for a company to adjust to the varying needs of both domestic and international clients as well as how HR management helps to ensure this happens through various activities, including sourcing in a global environment. Students examine how HR management functions and activities can be the key to long-term business success, strategically aligning corporate goals with those of stakeholders and all major areas of a business, including marketing, finance, technology, and operations. They compare and contrast HR management strategies, such as incentive cash and/or stock compensation programs, employee ownership, and nonmonetary rewards. Students also evaluate the impact such strategies have on employee motivation and retention.
     
  
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    MGMT 6602 - Contemporary Topics in the U.S. Healthcare Delivery System♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course assess the causes and consequences of historical events on health and medical care in the United States. They appraise the impact of barriers related to cost, quality, and access to health and medical care. Students analyze unique and complex aspects of subsystems and differentiate vertical and horizontal integrated healthcare delivery systems. They compare characteristics of healthcare and medical care in the United States with healthcare and medical care systems in other countries. Students also evaluate current and future issues, trends, and forces in healthcare and medical care reform.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6604 - Law, Ethics, and Policy in Healthcare Administration♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The rapidly evolving healthcare system presents the healthcare administrator with complex challenges and risks. Healthcare administrators must possess the skills needed to assess external and internal healthcare polices to influence organizational design and delivery of healthcare services. Students assess and discuss key policy initiatives from the diverse perspectives of policymakers, interest groups, and other stakeholders. Through coursework, students focus on required knowledge of laws and regulations developed by policymakers that impact the healthcare organizations, and they review key laws that govern patient care delivery, employee relations, contracts, and fraud. Emphasis will be placed on legal and regulatory failure points that administrators must avoid in designing and implementing policies and practices within the healthcare organization. To help frame these concepts, students examine the ethical underpinnings and principles that healthcare organizations and administrators follow in the delivery of services to patients.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6605 - Finding Your Inner Leader


    (3 sem. cr.) Being an effective authentic and trustworthy leader requires considerable self-awareness based on commitment to candid self-reflection and the wisdom to recognize how one can best serve others through creating shared vision for a better future. In this course, students examine their values, experiences, skills, capabilities, preferences, and knowledge in context of their leadership aspirations. Students will examine factors that affect their ability to influence and inspire others and create plans to strengthen these leadership skills. Students will learn strategies to navigate in turbulent, changing environments that often pose difficult choices and discover how leaders rise to meet challenges and opportunities.
  
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    MGMT 6608 - Healthcare Financial Management and Economics♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students gain knowledge of economics principles such as cost, quality, and access as they relate to the healthcare world. The principles of healthcare financial management, including accounting and finance, are vitally important to the viability and ongoing operations of a healthcare business. Students have the opportunity to interpret and analyze the financial statements of a business, use and analyze financial ratios, utilize variance analysis, understand and implement operating and capital budgeting, and develop knowledge of the business planning process. Students create portions of a business/financial plan using these techniques and analyze the viability of their plan using accepted financial management tools.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    MGMT 6610 - Leading Strategic Initiatives for Growth and New Value♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course focus on the challenges and opportunities in leading organic growth and value innovation initiatives. Building on concepts such as skill-based strategy, organic growth, and value innovation, students examine the leadership challenges of developing new value and growth opportunities for organizations as they explore and exercise various analytic strategic-thinking perspectives and tools that relate to the development and implementation of potentially successful and innovative organizational strategies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
 

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