2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) 
    
    Oct 29, 2020  
2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    HLTH 8574 - Women’s Health Issues


    (5 cr.) Student in this course cover diseases and disorders in children and adolescents. Topics include diabetes, anorexia, headaches, epilepsy, burn injuries, cystic fibrosis, asthma, addiction, and adolescent obesity. Health promotion for children and adolescents is discussed including cardiovascular health, nutrition, and exercise. Also covered are insights into special issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder, daily stress, sexually transmitted diseases, sleep disorders, and ethical and legal issues in pediatric and adolescent health psychology. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8745.)
  
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    HLTH 8701 - Cultural Psychology


    (5 cr.) Culture often has a profound influence on individual beliefs, personality development, and social behavior. Therefore, mental health professionals must have a fundamental understanding of the impact and psychological implications of culture. In this course, students focus on core themes of cross-cultural psychology—specifically, cultures representing different parts of the world and cultural influences on human psychology. Students explore the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology, and they assess the overall impact of culture on the field of psychology around the world. Additionally, they engage in readings and practical assignments to gain a better understanding of human development and the interactions between culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses.
  
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    HLTH 8745 - Health Psychology


    (5 cr.) Health psychologists work toward positive change in healthcare and health behavior through the study of relationships between patients and providers, how individuals and groups adapt to illness, damaging health behaviors, health cognitions, and many other related issues. In this course students explore the field of health psychology with a focus on the biopsychosocial model. They discuss behavioral and biomedical theories as well as the effect of psychological (personality), behavioral (health behaviors and coping), and social factors (stress and physician-patient relationships) on physical health and wellness. Through the examination of current literature and peer discussions, students explore and address issues related to cardiovascular and immune health, including heart disease, stroke, cancer, and HIV/AIDS. They demonstrate their understanding of course material and consider how topics apply to their personal and professional life through the development of taskforce papers, a health brochure, and a final essay. 
  
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    HLTH 8750 - Foundations of Industrial/ Organizational Psychology


    (5 cr.) An understanding of the psychological principles of leader development often enhances leadership skills and ability to influence others to work toward common goals. In this course, students examine the psychology of leadership and leader development through cross-cultural, social, psychological, and political contexts. They identify and assess the psychological theories of leadership, leadership styles, qualities of great leaders, global leadership competencies, and instruments used to assess leadership and leadership potential. Students apply these psychological theories to assess and develop their own capacity for leadership.
  
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    HLTH 8800 - Marketing Management and Business Communication♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course analyze the four Ps of marketing—product, price, place, and promotion and how they affect the five Ps of healthcare marketing— physicians, patients, payers, public, and politics. The interrelationship of a healthcare organization’s strategic plan, business plan, and marketing plan is analyzed and social marketing will also be an area of focus. Students will practice effective oral and written business communication skills.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8815 - Contemporary/Gerontology/Geriatric Psychology


    (5 cr.) Statistical data indicate that people are living longer and the number of older persons is continually increasing. As the population ages, society must prepare to address their needs. Students in this course are provided with a multidisciplinary approach to the study of aging in contemporary societies. Students examine the biological, psychological, social, and societal contexts of aging. They also explore the historical and cross-cultural perspectives on aging, social theories of aging, managing chronic diseases, cognitive changes associated with aging, mental health issues, sexuality, and social interactions. Through a series of taskforce reports on various topics, such as sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, and elder abuse, students apply course concepts and critically examine current issues in gerontology.
  
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    HLTH 8825 - Psychology of Gender


    (5 cr.) Gender has been the focus of many stereotypes developed over time; but how much does the biological sex of an individual actually influence one’s behavior, development, or emotions? Students in this course are introduced to theories and research on gender role expectations and their influence on the psychosocial developmental experience of women, men, and children. Students apply current gender research to understanding achievement, work, relationships, sexuality, violence, and physical health and illness. They also engage in readings and assignments that emphasize the responses of women and men to life stresses, women as clients in psychotherapy, and the increasing role of gender research in the mental health professions.
  
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    HLTH 8830 - Psychology of Sexuality


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore sexuality through a variety of frameworks, including historical, psychological, sociological, anthropological, biological, public health, and media and cultural studies. Using a variety of theoretical perspectives, including essentialist and constructivist notions of sex, sexuality, and sexual identity, students examine traditional understandings of sexuality, including male and female sexual anatomy, physiology, and response; variations across the lifespan; sexual communication; love and interpersonal attraction; and sexual disorders. They also explore and discuss different expressions of sexual identity, including heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality as well as different expressions of gender identity from cross-cultural and interdisciplinary viewpoints. Students complete an integrative final paper incorporating research, ideas, and peer feedback from discussions on a topic related to the psychology of sexuality.
  
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    HLTH 8840 - Health Policy and Management


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the factors that influence and improve health outcomes of individuals and populations, with attention to the goals of Healthy People 2010 and the main components and issues of organization, financing, and delivery of health services and public health systems in the United States. Topics include management theories and processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. The policy process is addressed, as well as the advocacy role of the public health professional in influencing local, state, and federal policy. The impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems is also considered.
  
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    HLTH 9001 - Health Services Dissertation


    (5 cr. per term for a minimum of four terms until completion) In this course, doctoral students have the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration within an interest area through the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation independently, with the guidance of a dissertation supervisory committee chair and committee members. They must also participate in an accompanying online course and complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and final dissertation paper and presentation. Once students register for HLTH 9001, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 4 quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Dissertation with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula; appointment of an approved dissertation committee chair.)

  
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    HLTH 9101 - Dissertation


    (5 cr. per term for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion) In this course, doctoral students have the opportunity to integrate their Program of Study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation independently, with the guidance of a dissertation supervisory committee chair and committee members, in a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and dissertation.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 4 quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Dissertation with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook.

  
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    HMNT 1001 - Living and Learning in a Technological World


    (6 cr.) Imagine life without cell phones, television, or the Internet. Recent technological developments have significantly altered all aspects of human life: at work; in play; and in personal, family, and social interactions. In this course, students examine the advantages, disadvantages, and controversies of living and learning in an ever-changing technological environment. By exploring multiple perspectives, students discover how technology is changing media, culture, business, health, human behavior, and overall access to information. In a dynamic, reflective, and engaging classroom environment, students use a variety of audio, visual, literary, and artistic resources, to engage in open dialogue. Students are also introduced to the tools essential to success at Walden. Students complete the course with a personalized success plan that provides a customized roadmap and tools that they can use immediately on their journey toward the completion of their bachelor’s degree. *Note: virtual, cyber, digital, and asynchronous are used to describe online environments in this course.
    Note about required first courses: Required first term course.
  
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    HMNT 1050 - Humanities Through the Arts♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course survey central themes of the humanities through the arts. They examine the interconnectedness of the arts, as well as a general overview of the philosophy and activities of such art forms as painting, photography, sculpture, literature, and architecture. In addition to participating in class discussions, completing short exercises, and writing short essays, students are required to complete a term-long research project concerning a specific art form. The topic of the research project is to be chosen in consultation with the Instructor.

     
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    HMNT 1050C - Humanities Through the Arts♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course survey central themes of the humanities through the arts. They examine the interconnectedness of the arts, as well as a general overview of the philosophy and activities of such art forms as painting, photography, sculpture, literature, and architecture. In addition to participating in class discussions, completing short exercises, and writing short essays, students are required to complete a term-long research project concerning a specific art form. The topic of the research project is to be chosen in consultation with the instructor.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HMNT 3001 - Modern Popular Culture♦


    (5 cr.) The study of popular culture is a way to understand the current values, beliefs, and cultural norms of modern society. In this course, students analyze the artistic and philosophical impact of contemporary media and popular culture. They explore graphic novels, film, advertising, television, cyber culture, and popular music. Demonstrating their understanding of course concepts in a final written project, students compare and contrast how different genres within a media type address specific issues. Students learn to analyze the ways in which social, political, and economic issues are evident in artistic and creative forms of expression in popular culture.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HMNT 3001C - Modern Popular Culture♦


    (5 cr.) The study of popular culture is a way to understand the current values, beliefs, and cultural norms of modern society. In this course, students analyze the artistic and philosophical impact of contemporary media and popular culture. They explore graphic novels, film, advertising, television, cyber culture, and popular music. Demonstrating their understanding of course concepts in a final written project, students compare and contrast how different genres within a media type address specific issues. Students learn to analyze the ways in which social, political, and economic issues are evident in artistic and creative forms of expression in popular culture.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HRMG 3001 - Human Resource Management♦


    (5 cr.) This course is a comprehensive overview of human resource management for students. They discuss the role of human resources managers as strategic partners who focus on the mission and goals of an organization. Students examine traditional topics, such as job analysis and design, recruitment, selection, performance appraisal, training, staffing, career management, compensation, benefits, health and safety, and employee relations. They also evaluate technology-based resources that aid contemporary HR processes and responsibilities. Through case studies and practical exercises, students work toward gaining the skills that enable them to develop important employment policies and procedures, such as those addressing ethical and equal opportunity issues in regard to legal and environmental regulations. (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HRMG 4200 - Strategic Human Resource Management


    (5 cr.) Despite common misperceptions, human resource (HR) managers are tasked with more than hiring, firing, and managing employee benefits. In this course, students learn why it important for a company to adjust to the varying needs of both domestic and international clients as well as how HR management helps to ensure this happens through various activities, including sourcing in a global environment. Students examine how HR management functions and activities can be the key to long-term business success, strategically aligning corporate goals with those of stakeholders and all major areas of a business, including marketing, finance, technology, and operations. They compare and contrast HR management strategies, such as incentive cash and/or stock compensation programs, employee ownership, and nonmonetary rewards. Students also evaluate the impact such strategies have on employee motivation and retention. (Prerequisite(s): HRMG 3001.)
  
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    HRMG 4201 - Strategic Human Resource Management♦


    (5 cr.) Despite common misperceptions, human resource (HR) managers are tasked with more than hiring, firing, and managing employee benefits. In this course, students learn why it important for a company to adjust to the varying needs of both domestic and international clients as well as how HR management helps to ensure this happens through various activities, including sourcing in a global environment. Students examine how HR management functions and activities can be the key to long-term business success, strategically aligning corporate goals with those of stakeholders and all major areas of a business, including marketing, finance, technology, and operations. They compare and contrast HR management strategies, such as incentive cash and/or stock compensation programs, employee ownership, and nonmonetary rewards. Students also evaluate the impact such strategies have on employee motivation and retention.
      (Prerequisite(s): HRMG 3001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HRMG 4202 - Human Resource Development and Change♦


    (5 cr.) Growth and innovation are important aspects of all organizations. To achieve this, companies must provide an environment conducive to diversity and change. They must also provide the opportunity for employees to learn the goals and mission of the organization. In this course, students learn how to promote and maintain such an environment through the process of human resources development and organizational change, including training and development, leadership development, and performance improvement. Students engage in discussions, reflections, and group case studies, which focus on a variety of topics, such as learning principles, interventions, employee orientation and socialization, performance management and coaching, and diversity.
      (Prerequisite(s): HRMG 4201 or HRMG 4200.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HRMG 4203 - Human Resource Management: Analysis and Problems♦


    (5 cr.) Human resource (HR) managers possess a dual role with the responsibility of ensuring wellbeing of employees while maintaining the goals of company. To fulfill this role, HR managers must have a thorough understanding of the federal laws and regulations governing the workplace as well as compliance guidelines regarding employee regulations. In this course, students examine and discuss the role of federal regulations, including equal opportunity, sexual harassment, discrimination, and other employee-related regulations. They also explore the role of human resource management in regard to performance appraisal systems, compensation, and labor-management issues.
      (Prerequisite(s): HRMG 4202.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 1010 - The Human Service Professional in a Changing World


    (5 cr.) Human services is a field that provides rewarding as well as challenging situations as professionals support a diverse range of clients in solving problems and working through difficult situations. Students in this course explore the historical development of the human services field, human services theories, the systems approach to human services, and the role of the human service professional. They examine a range of roles and areas of specialization available to those in the profession as well as related challenges, such as ethical and diversity issues when working with people in different populations. Applying foundational concepts, students also investigate trends in the field of human services, such as medical and mental health breakthroughs and changes in client populations. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, or PSYC 1002, or PSYC 1003, and SOCI 1001.)
  
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    HUMN 1020 - The Humanitarian Professional in a Changing World♦


    (5 cr.) The social service and humanitarian services field provides rewarding and challenging situations as professionals support diverse populations in an effort to change the lives of individuals, families, and communities. Students in this course explore the profession and the role of a humanitarian professional in this increasingly diverse and complex world. As students explore the range of humanitarian efforts, they self-assess their own aspirations, abilities, skills, characteristics, ethics, and cultural identity in preparation for their future in the humanitarian profession. Students examine a range of roles, responsibilities, and social change efforts of humanitarian professionals. Students also explore ethical issues that can arise when working in diverse cultures around the globe. Applying foundational concepts, students also investigate current trends in the field of humanitarian service.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 2003 - Human Development: Adulthood♦


    (5 cr.) Adulthood represents a rich developmental experience including many significant life transitions. In this course, students explore the key theories, transitions, and applications of adult development. They examine the social, biological, and cognitive maturation processes that define development of adulthood into older age. Students engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of theories to specific transitions and topical issues, such as career changes, attachment and marital satisfaction, personality, retirement, and cognition. Applying concepts presented in the course, students discuss cross-cultural issues in development, emotional development, adult roles, memory, and physical aging.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, or PSYC 1002, or PSYC 1003.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 2005 - Social Influences on Behavior♦


    (5 cr.) Individuals are often influenced by others and by the social situations in which they find themselves. Students in this course examine the basic concepts and applications of social psychology, including attitudes, beliefs, and behavior; stereotyping; prejudice and discrimination; interpersonal relationships; group behavior; and the effect of environmental stress on behavior. They also learn how bias can sway objective conclusions as well as how ethical factors influence research in social psychology. Students apply principles and theories presented in the course to case studies and situations in daily life, including instances of stereotyping and discrimination. They also use these theories to understand strategies for helping others and reducing aggressive behavior.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, or PSYC 1002, or PSYC 1003.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 2006 - Introduction to Addiction


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the nature of addiction and the impairment in individuals who suffer from addictions. In this course, students review theories on substance disorders and approaches to identification, prevention, and treatment. Topics include historical perspectives, diagnoses, types of addictive behaviors, treatment, and current research.
  
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    HUMN 2010 - Introduction to Human Services♦


    (5 cr.) Human services is a field that provides rewarding as well as challenging situations as professionals support a diverse range of clients in solving problems and working through difficult situations. Students in this course explore the historical development of the human services field, human services theories, the systems approach to human services, and the role of the human service professional. They examine a range of roles and areas of specialization available to those in the profession as well as related challenges, such as ethical and diversity issues when working with people in different populations. Applying foundational concepts, students also investigate trends in the field of human services, such as medical and mental health breakthroughs and changes in client populations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 3010 - Crisis and Intervention♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine situational procedures and techniques necessary in defusing situations identified as crises. Students work toward gaining skills to evaluate crisis experiences by combining active listening with an understanding of crisis patterns. Through class activities, such as case studies and comparative analyses, they learn how to work through difficult emotional, social, and health crises. Students also assess concepts and share perspectives through peer discussion on related topics, such as intervention models and strategies; system crisis intervention; collaboration; countertransference; secondary traumatic stress disorder and vicarious trauma; burnout prevention; and referral resources.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, or PSYC 1002, or PSYC 1003.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 3011 - Addictions Assessment


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is learning a systematic, multidisciplinary approach to the assessment and interpretation of data collected from clients with addictions. The most current screening, assessment, and documentation approaches will be reviewed.
  
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    HUMN 3012 - Prevention and Treatment of Addiction


    (5 cr.) Models and theories of addiction are covered, as well as various treatment approaches. Prevention in various settings is addressed, including the etiology, patterns, and risk factors of addiction, as well as strategies for prevention. Treatment methodology, treatment planning, goal setting, and evaluation are also addressed. The multicultural context of addiction and client diversity are included.
  
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    HUMN 4001 - Case Management for Persons in Need♦


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with practical skills for organizing and brokering community resources for human service clients. This will include emphasis on needs assessment for different client communities, developing plans for comprehensive care services, and utilizing formal and informal networks to maximize client access to services. Emphasis will be placed on interagency coordination as well as human service community resource building to achieve success in service delivery.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 4002 - Effective Human Services Interviewing♦


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with basic skills for directly interfacing with a diverse community of clients. This will include emphasis on active listening, paraphrasing and summarizing, and respecting clients’ cultural backgrounds in all aspects of information gathering. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the roles of different types of interviews, and the differing functions of open or closed questions for addressing distinct problems in living and areas of need that clients present.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 4003 - Measuring Effectiveness of Human Services Delivery♦


    (5 cr.) Human service professionals engage clients with a variety of needs. How can students be certain, though, that their services are effective in preventing recidivism in a population of drug-addicted persons, or that they have provided the necessary life skills training for a homeless person to transition into the workplace? This course is designed to provide skills for community needs assessment, program development, design, implementation, and evaluation across a variety of human services domains. Specific focus will be given to planning quality measures that demonstrate a program’s effectiveness to all key stakeholders.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 4004 - Brain and Behavior♦


    (5 cr.) The study of the brain and how it functions has contributed significantly to the understanding of how people react and adapt to their environments. In this course, students examine basic brain physiology and learn how the brain functions to control behavior. Students explore specific applications of brain structure to memory and attention, sensation and perception, development, socialization, motivation and emotion, and socialization. They apply concepts and theories about the brain to psychological health and well-being.
      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, or PSYC 1002, or PSYC 1003.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 4005 - Case Management and Addictions♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore the definitions and methodologies of case management services. The course is designed to provide students with the most up-to-date research and clinical applications of services management in the practice of addictions counseling.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 4008 - Intergroup Conflict and Peace Building♦


    (5 cr.) In a world encumbered with conflict, tension, and injustice, strategies for building peace are essential. In this course, students assess theories and principles of conflict management and resolution. They examine and employ theories and applications of intergroup dynamics; principles and underlying philosophies of non-violence; and social science principles to understand conflict and promote peace. Students gain practical experience applying principles of peace building to proposing solutions for contemporary, individual, and social issues.

      (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1001, PSYC 1002, or PSYC 1003.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 4402 - Planning and Budgeting


    (5 cr.) Planning and applying effective budgeting strategies are critical elements in managing corporate and government criminal justice organizations. In this course, students have the opportunity to gain fundamental skills for effective management while focusing on short- and long-term financial analysis as well as on policy and budget creation. They complete practical application assignments, focusing on issues of plan development, grant sources, and different tasks and challenges related to budgeting. Students also engage in discussions with peers on a variety of topics, such as the public and private budgets, strategies, financing, forecasting, and ethical issues related to public budgeting.
  
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    HUMN 4920 - Capstone♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students synthesize information and experiences gathered over the course of the Bachelor of Science in Human Services program. Students will identify a human service gap in their local area and develop a detailed proposal for addressing the needs of the client population who are affected. This will include a background literature review, description of the problem area and the history of the community’s response, and a detailed plan for addressing the gap with attention given to multicultural considerations. In accordance with Walden University’s mission, students will be expected to demonstrate clearly the social change implications of the plan that they develop.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 5011 - Interviewing and Case Management in Human and Social Services


    (5 cr.) The first step in helping individuals, families, organizations, and communities is to form effective helping relationships. These relationships are characterized by the ability to connect with clients and those around them through demonstrating empathic caring, respect for people and institutions, and genuineness that leads to perceived trustworthiness. Just as an ERG is a unit of energy in physics, Empathy, Respect, and Genuineness (ERG) is the unit of energy in helping relationships. In this course, students will learn how to talk with people in ways that demonstrate empathy, respect, and genuineness while obtaining the kind of information required to help clients identify their unmet needs and participate in finding ways to meet them. Students will participate in mock interviews and will participate in critiques of their own work along with their instructor. Students in this course will also focus on the essential functions of case management including how to write up important case notes appropriately with special attention to ethical and legal issues. While the basic principles underlying an effective helping relationship may be close to universal (ERG), the actual process of demonstrating them could vary greatly across cultures or countries; therefore, student will explore how this might differ in a different setting and among different professions.
  
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    HUMN 5100 - Introduction to Mental Health Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students are introduced to the mental health counseling profession in this course. The history, philosophy, and theoretical foundations of the profession, and the scope of practice, credentialing, and other professional issues are explored. In this course, the focus is on the student as a future mental health counselor, and students receive an overview of the mental health counseling program, the profession, and professional competencies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 5103 - Introduction to Addiction


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to aspects of professional functioning as an addiction counselor, including but not limited to: role setting of addiction counselors; history, philosophy, and trends in addictions counseling; professional standards for addictions counselors; effects of crises and trauma-causing events on persons with addictions; self‐care; and ethical and culturally sensitive practice of addiction counseling. Students also explore competencies, credentialing, and other professional issues. The student explores the future as an addiction counselor and an overview of the addiction counseling profession.
  
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    HUMN 5150 - Helping Individuals, Organizations, and Communities


    (5 cr.) This course is designed for students to receive a doctoral-level foundation in the history and development of the various human services professions. Students integrate information from various specializations, in areas such as counseling, social work, psychology, family studies, and criminal justice. Examining both the strengths and weaknesses of the human services delivery systems, students will review the origins of the profession as well as its various responses to the changing needs of society. Students can begin to develop their identities as leaders, researchers, and best practices informants in the area of human services. They do this through critical literature reviews related to research, policy, and practice; discussions about human services and contemporary society; and course assignments. The focus of this course is on the competencies and ethics of human services professionals.
  
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    HUMN 5152 - Human Services Administration


    (5 cr.) Diminishing resources are compounding the societal challenges facing human services agencies today. In this course, students will examine the core competencies that human services administrators need to address these challenges and make a greater difference in the communities they serve. A broad range of skills and innovative approaches will be discussed, including cross-agency collaboration, stakeholder communication, supervision of people and processes, creation and implementation of policies, and strategic planning and management. Through course discussions, applications, and critical literature reviews, students can demonstrate knowledge and skills that are directly translatable to their current work environment. In addition, they will explore how administration of Human Services organizations would differ across different cultures or societies. In addition to using case studies and access to a virtual city to bring life to the readings by giving students a chance to apply the material in complex situations, students will also use part 2 of a graphic novel that started in a prior course to help them see the transition from a focus on individuals and families to a focus on organizations and communities. In addition, students will participate in group activities that don’t require synchronous communications as each student will be responsible for their own project, but they will also participate in feedback and critiques of group members’ presentations and final projects.
  
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    HUMN 5200 - Cross-Cultural Ethics in Human Social Services


    (5 cr.) In this course students will examine the philosophy of ethics and social justice, with a focus on the interplay among race, religion, and culture within and between different societies and organizations. Students will explore the complex social, political, and related ethical challenges Human Services professionals face as they seek to meet the needs of diverse populations. They will examine ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Applying concepts presented in the course, students will engage in an in-depth assessment of an emerging or persistent ethical or social justice issue, through which they will demonstrate their ability to make recommendations for improvement or change. They will engage in readings, case studies, and practical assignments to gain a better understanding of the interactions between culture, ethics, and social behaviors.
  
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    HUMN 5202 - Theories, Treatment, and Case Management of Addiction


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore treatment intervention and case management strategies for addiction counseling, using various models of treatment, recovery, relapse prevention, and continuing care for addictive disorders. They learn treatment principles and philosophies of addiction-related programs, and they increase self-awareness as addiction counselors by assessing their own limitations; recognizing when they need additional resources and support; and knowing when and where to refer clients when appropriate. In addition, students examine substance abuse policies and regulatory processes that influence service delivery in addiction counseling.
  
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    HUMN 5203 - Psychopharmacology and Biopsychosocial Considerations


    (5 cr.) The potential for addictive disorders to present like a variety of medical and psychological disorders is common. In this course, students examine how to treat addictions that may coexist with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive behavior, and other psychological disorders as described in the DSM-IV-TR. They survey a spectrum of psychotropic medications and their use in the treatment of mental, behavioral, and addictive disorders. Students also explore factors that increase the likelihood for a person, community, or group to be at risk for psychoactive substance use disorders. Through this course, students gain an understanding of the basic classifications, indications, and contraindications of commonly prescribed medications so that they make appropriate referrals within treatment teams.
  
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    HUMN 5204 - Assessment in Counseling and Addiction


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive an overview of the different types of diagnostic and assessment tools used in addictions counseling based on professional standards for testing. Students engage in a comprehensive examination of psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. They learn various models and approaches to clinical evaluations for addictive disorders and examine the appropriate use of assessments for addictions. Moreover, students learn how to assess for a biopsychosocial and spiritual history, and they address ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues, including cultural bias and fairness.
  
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    HUMN 5205 - Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector


    (5 cr.) Nonprofit organizations (NPOs) can serve to positively affect people’s lives through social change, but they require leaders who have a fundamental understanding of the nonprofit sector, including related ethical, legal, and global perspectives. Students in this course explore these viewpoints as well as the history, foundations, and types of NPOs. They also examine the diverse political, social, and economic contexts within which NPOs exist. Students explore and apply marketing, public relations, and communication concepts and strategies to case studies and contemporary situations. Gaining practical insight, students also apply theories presented in the course to the development of a concept paper guiding the development of a nonprofit organization.
  
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    HUMN 5215 - Lifespan Development♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course have an overview of development through the lifespan, including childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging experiences. Physical, social, emotional, and cognitive issues are covered, as well as the expected developmental milestones during each of these phases of development. The latest research in attachment theory, brain research, and aging is included, and themes of diversity issues related to developmental research are highlighted throughout the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 5316 - Techniques of Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course focus on principles and skills related to interviewing and observation as well as related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings.  Note: In addition to the course materials listed by the university bookstore, this course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 5722 - Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories♦


    (5 cr.) There are hundreds of therapeutic theories and techniques available to frame the practice of counseling and psychotherapy. An important skill for mental health counselors is to understand the strengths and limitations of these theories to determine which are most appropriate and work best in their own personal practice. In this course, students explore the history of counseling and psychotherapy theories. They examine the major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy in current use, including empirical foundations, advantages, and limitations. Students assess examples of theory-based applications and develop a personal theory of counseling based on theories and techniques assessed in the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 5723 - Multicultural Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students can increase their sensitivity, awareness and knowledge of, and skills related to multicultural counseling and working effectively with diverse clients in this course. Students explore how their own cultural development, biases, values, and strengths impact the development of their counseling approach. Embracing diversity and various client identity issues and their impact on the counseling relationship are foundational to the course. The application of traditional theoretical orientations and current multicultural theories to culturally diverse groups is also addressed. Topics include age, race, gender, sexual orientation, religious preference, physical disability, social class, ethnicity and culture, culturally sensitive diagnosis and assessment, and family patterns. (Prerequisite(s): Counseling Residency I.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 6000 - Foundation of Graduate Study in Human Services


    (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and as a social change agent. Topics include the relation of the mission and vision to professional goals; development of the program of study and Professional Development Plan; strategies for online success; introduction to the online library; and introduction to critical thinking, professional writing, and academic integrity. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the promotion of academic excellence.
  
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    HUMN 6011 - Interviewing and Case Management in Human and Social Services♦


    (5 cr.) The first step in helping individuals, families, organizations, and communities is to form effective helping relationships. These relationships are characterized by the ability to connect with clients and those around them through demonstrating empathic caring, respect for people and institutions, and genuineness that leads to perceived trustworthiness. Just as an ERG is a unit of energy in physics, Empathy, Respect, and Genuineness (ERG) is the unit of energy in helping relationships. In this course, students learn how to talk with people in ways that demonstrate empathy, respect, and genuineness while obtaining the kind of information required to help clients identify their unmet needs and participate in finding ways to meet them. Students will participate in mock interviews and critiques of their own work along with their instructor. Students in this course also focus on the essential functions of case management, including how to write up important case notes appropriately with special attention to ethical and legal issues. While the basic principles underlying an effective helping relationship may be close to universal (ERG), the actual process of demonstrating them could vary greatly across cultures or countries; therefore, students explore how this might differ in a different setting and among different professions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 6050 - Population Health and Issues in Disease Prevention


    (5 cr.) An in-depth review of how population-based strategies are used in the prevention of disease and disability is provided for students. They explore the topics of population health and disease prevention from the perspective of understanding the determinants of health. Using a cross-disciplinary approach, students examine how economics, social factors, health policy, urbanization, globalization, the environment, and other factors influence disease. Students consider how research in disease prevention, health determinants, and population health applies to public and community health efforts.
  
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    HUMN 6060 - Social Work Theory and Practice


    (5 cr.) One of the primary focuses of social work is to promote social justice within a diverse society. The focus of this course is on an advanced exploration of traditional and contemporary clinical social work theories for providing culturally and contextually relevant services to individuals and families. Students examine social work theories in a way that informs clinical practice and discuss the role of the social worker in social issues at the macro and micro levels. Students evaluate existing practices and policies with the goal of designing and implementing more effective practices and policies that positively impact the individual, the community, and society at large.
  
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    HUMN 6100 - Introduction to Research and Evaluation in Human and Social Services♦


    (5 cr.) To be effective professional helpers, practitioners need to have a working knowledge of how research informs practice. This is becoming even more important as the emphasis on evidenced-based practice increases across all fields that provide human and social services. Students will explore different approaches to research and evaluation and will demonstrate the ability to find, critically read, and integrate relevant research articles from trustworthy sources. In addition, they will use case studies, discussions, and readings to help see the connections between theory, research, and practice and how applications might differ in different cultures and across different professions. They will also identify important ethical considerations related to conducting and reporting research results, especially in the context of program evaluations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 6111 - Leadership and Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Successful organizations in a rapidly changing and complex world require leaders who embrace change and are able to engage others in change. Students examine theories and models of leadership and organizational change, as well as consider the relationship between leadership and organizational change. They explore qualities, characteristics, and skills of effective leaders, ethical issues and standards, opportunities and challenges related to leading diverse organizations through change, and the contribution of leadership and organizational change to social change.
  
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    HUMN 6145 - Crisis Management


    (5 cr.) In this course, counselor educators learn the fundamentals of crisis management and crisis leadership. In addition, students develop an understanding of the theories and models related to crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events. Students also learn about ethical, legal, and diversity considerations in crisis and trauma response. By the end of the course, students understand models for training and supporting other counselors in the areas of crisis response applicable to community, national, and international crises. Students develop a crisis management plan for their own community.

     

  
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    HUMN 6150 - Helping Individuals, Organizations, and Communities: Introduction to Human Services


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide a doctoral-level foundation in the history and development of the various human services professions. Students integrate information from various specializations, in areas such as counseling, social work, psychology, family studies, and criminal justice. Examining both the strengths and weaknesses of the human services delivery systems, students review the origins of the profession as well as its various responses to the changing needs of society. Students can begin to develop their identities as leaders, researchers, and best practices informants in the area of human services. They do this through critical literature reviews related to research, policy, and practice; discussions about human services and contemporary society; and course assignments. The focus of this course is on the competencies and ethics of human services professionals.
  
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    HUMN 6151 - Human Services Theory, Research, and Practice


    (5 cr.) Understanding how theory, research, and practice are connected is a vital skill for the human services scholar-practitioner. In this course, students critically review traditional and contemporary theories in human services and how they inform practice. In addition, students examine the strengths and weaknesses of the existing body of research in serving a dynamic society, placing special emphasis on cultural bias and traditional theory. Throughout the course, students review how theories and research studies apply to communities, individuals, problems, and policies. The culmination of the course is the development of a conceptual framework to address a critical issue in human services practice.
  
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    HUMN 6152 - Human Services Administration


    (5 cr.) Diminishing resources are compounding the societal challenges facing human services agencies today. In this course, students will examine the core competencies that human services administrators need to address these challenges and make a greater difference in the communities they serve. A broad range of skills and innovative approaches will be discussed, including cross-agency collaboration, stakeholder communication, supervision of people and processes, creation and implementation of policies, and strategic planning and management. Through course discussions, applications, and critical literature reviews, students can demonstrate knowledge and skills that are directly translatable to their current work environment.

     

  
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    HUMN 6200 - Cross-Cultural Ethics in Human and Social Services


    (5 cr.) In this course, students will examine the philosophy of ethics and social justice, with a focus on the interplay among race, religion, and culture within and between different societies and organizations. Students will explore the complex social, political, and related ethical challenges Human Services professionals face as they seek to meet the needs of diverse populations. They will examine ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Applying concepts presented in the course, students will engage in an in-depth assessment of an emerging or persistent ethical or social justice issue, through which they will demonstrate their ability to make recommendations for improvement or change. They will engage in readings, case studies, and practical assignments to gain a better understanding of the interactions among culture, ethics, and social behaviors.
  
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    HUMN 6203 - Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector


    (5 cr.) Nonprofit organizations (NPOs) can serve to positively affect people’s lives through social change, but they require leaders who have a fundamental understanding of the nonprofit sector, including related ethical, legal, and global perspectives. Students in this course explore these viewpoints as well as the history, foundations, and types of NPOs. They also examine the diverse political, social, and economic contexts within which NPOs exist. Students explore and apply marketing, public relations, and communication concepts and strategies to case studies and contemporary situations. Gaining practical insight, students also apply theories presented in the course to the development of a concept paper guiding the development of a nonprofit organization.
  
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    HUMN 6204 - Intergroup Relations


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will be provided with an in-depth study of basic and applied research and theory on both group processes and group relations. Some topics that could be included: prejudice, discrimination, stereotyping, social categorization, minority and majority influence, group decision-making, leadership, group structure, group socialization, bargaining and negotiation, intergroup conflict and cooperation, collective action and cognition, collective self and identity, social identity, language and identity, ethnic and cultural relations, and social dilemmas. 
  
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    HUMN 6207 - Grant Writing♦


    (5 cr.) Grant writing is a highly marketable skill that requires many nonprofit, educational, and community organizations to secure external funding to provide needed services to the community. In this course, students will explore the basic skills needed for non-research grant writing, including identifying potential funding sources, creating objectives and a need statement, preparing and justifying a budget, identifying appropriate assessment plans, and writing an executive summary. Through course assignments, students directly apply what they are reading and discussing by writing a full grant proposal based on an actual Request for Proposal (RFP).
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information
  
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    HUMN 6242 - Changing Health Behavior


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will review past and current models of health behavior change, disease prevention, disease management, and relapse prevention. Coverage of health-related issues includes dietary needs, tobacco and drug use, safer sexual practices, and stress management. In addition, students will examine the analysis of behavior change within specific populations (young, elderly, cognitively impaired, etc.) and factors that predict or serve as obstacles to lifestyle change and adherence.
  
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    HUMN 6326 - Research and Program Evaluation


    (5 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to evaluation research and to provide them with a foundation in the design of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches to counseling research and evaluation. Students learn the strengths and limitations of each method and under what circumstances each research design approach would be the most appropriate. Students learn how to identify a topic for research, how to conduct a literature search, and the importance of scholarly writing. Other topics include the history and theory underlying program evaluation, approaches to evaluation, the procedures and techniques for entering a group for which one would provide evaluation services, and techniques used to perform the evaluation. Strategies for getting gatekeepers to be invested in the development of the research and in the outcomes, demonstrating program effectiveness, and disseminating results to stakeholders are also presented. Students learn to write a research proposal, addressing the following key elements: researching, writing an introduction, stating a purpose for the study, identifying research questions and hypotheses, using theory, defining the significance of the study, and collecting and analyzing data. Students are exposed to legal and ethical issues associated with human subjects’ protection.

     

  
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    HUMN 6336 - Crisis, Trauma, and Disaster Response


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the personal and systemic impact of crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events on individuals, couples, families, and communities. Students examine theories and response models as they relate to sexual trauma, crisis in individuals and families, crisis in the community, and crisis in the nation and in the world. They explore topics including crisis assessment, counselor competencies, vicarious trauma and countertransference, specific related diagnoses, and advocacy. Students consider cultural, legal, and ethical issues related to crisis, trauma, and disaster events and response.
  
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    HUMN 6339 - Holding Up the Mirror: Understanding Different Cultures and Increasing Global Consciousness


    (5 cr.) Professionals in all areas of public policy and administration work with individuals and organizations of different cultures on a daily basis; therefore, global consciousness is vital to effective communication and interaction in the field. In this course, students explore and analyze the cultural values and styles of communication, reasoning, and leadership unique to their home culture. Students apply these concepts to better understand the people, values, and policies of other cultures. They also identify and become familiar with challenges that American nonprofit organizations face as they work internationally or cross-culturally within the United States. Sharpening critical-thinking skills, students research and assess an organization within their own community that has international links; through this assessment, students gain further awareness of different cultures and the importance of cross-cultural ties. (Prerequisite(s): A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly advised.)
  
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    HUMN 6340 - Crossing Borders: U.S. and International NGO Cultures and Environments


    (5 cr.) In this course, students study in depth the cultures, structures, and activities of NGOs in select countries and compare their activities, organizational cultures, structures, and working environments with nonprofits in the United States.

     
  
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    HUMN 6350 - Historical and Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice


    (5 cr.) Students investigate the evolution of crime—from lone criminals to worldwide syndicates—using the scientific rigor built into the selected readings and discussions. Among the topics examined are the philosophy of community- and problem-oriented policing, transnational crime, terrorism, and the new nexus between them. Current and future leaders are equipped with the knowledge and depth of understanding to assess and manage the opportunities, innovations, and challenges in their profession.

     

  
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    HUMN 6356 - Marriage, Couple, and Family Therapy


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a foundation in the theoretical perspectives and empirical framework necessary for marriage, couple, and family therapy. The theoretical perspective includes general systems theory and its applications, as well as psychosocial, psychodynamic, transgenerational, strategic, cognitive-behavioral, and social constructionist models. Students learn to conceptualize presenting issues within a systemic perspective and context. Empirically based techniques for assessment and intervention of marriages, couples, and families are reviewed and analyzed.

     

  
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    HUMN 6361 - Human Sexuality


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with a framework for understanding human sexuality in the context of couple, marriage, and family counseling. Students in this course explore empirically supported counseling approaches related to sexual functioning, intimacy, gender, and sexual orientation. Students are exposed to a systemic framework for understanding the role and impact of sexuality on couples, marriages, and families. Students will explore specific topics related to issues of sexual diversity, gender identity, sexual offending, trauma, and victimization. Legal and ethical issues related to addressing sexuality in counseling are tackled.
  
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    HUMN 6390 - Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in either a public organization, a private one, a nonprofit one, or a combined or networked one. Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration as they apply a strategic planning and management approach to the implementation of public policy. They are introduced to planning, management, financial management, performance management, and contracting processes in the organization whose purpose it is to implement public policy.
  
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    HUMN 6392 - The Language of Leadership


    (5 cr.) In today’s complex environment, leaders engaged in shaping public policy must know how to use the emotional as well as the intellectual power of language to motivate, inspire, and competently manage their organizations. Dynamic leadership requires understanding and use of techniques that affect both conscious and unconscious influences on human behavior. Effective communication connects at many different levels. Students are provided with both theoretical and practical information demonstrating the necessary components for making such connections and shows them why stories, symbols, and metaphors are an essential element in the language of leadership.

     

  
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    HUMN 6401 - Trauma, Crisis, and Stress With Military Personnel♦


    (5 cr.) The specific focus of this course is on combat trauma, crisis, and stress experiences and responses of military personnel—both wartime and post-war. Students develop an understanding of the short-term and long-term impact of post-traumatic stress and vicarious trauma. In addition to focusing on how combat and wartime experiences impact individual military personnel, students also explore the effects on families. As a result, students will be better prepared to provide services and mental health support to military personnel dealing with trauma, crisis, and stress.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 6402 - Working with Military Spouses, Families, and Children♦


    (5 cr.) The nature of military work responsibilities impacts not only military personnel but their families as well. Frequent family relocations, extensive deployments, parent-child separation, and high-risk jobs all contribute to unique family dynamics. This course is designed to educate students about the experience and unique support needs of military personnel and their families.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 6403 - Military Culture♦


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of military culture. The focus of this course is on understanding the world of work for military personnel; the sociocultural identity development of military personnel; the experience of military families; support for military personnel and their families; and socioeconomic and other lifestyle challenges for military personnel. As a result of this course, students will be more informed about the mental health and social support needs of these populations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 6405 - Ethics and Social Justice


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. Students in this course explore ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends, and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that affect the delivery of human services in a global community.
  
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    HUMN 6451 - Public Policy Analysis


    (5 cr.) Public administrators today work in a hypercharged, partisan environment with unprecedented access to public policy data. This challenging environment affords public administrators both extraordinary opportunities and severe constraints. In this course, students examine, in detail, the key stakeholders and actors in the public policy process with particular attention devoted to understanding the functions, impacts, and constraints of these stakeholders upon policy development and the policy-making process. In addition, students explore professional ethics related to the role of the policy analyst and consider the significant social outcomes of public policy. Students are provided with an introduction to the theories and strategies used by policymakers and policy analysts to develop, implement, execute, evaluate, and promulgate public policy. Students explore the impact and consequences of public policy and consider and evaluate policy in a social justice framework. Students craft a policy memorandum to a decision maker of their choosing regarding a current public policy problem that examines and evaluates competing policy alternatives.
  
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    HUMN 6465 - Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination


    (5 cr.) In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public and nonprofit organizations need to be strategic in their planning in order to fulfill the organizational mission and enhance stakeholder satisfaction. Students in this course explore the role and process of strategic planning with an appreciation for collaboration, cooperation, and coordination as they relate to the strategic planning process. Students will apply these concepts to real-life situations and organizations and develop a strategic plan.
  
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    HUMN 6511 - Treatment of Forensic Populations


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with the basic knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations. Various forensic populations, such as sex offenders, substance abusers, victims of crime, and employee assistance to law enforcement personnel, will be covered. The use of traditional forms of intervention, such as individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice, will be addressed.

     

  
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    HUMN 6530 - Forensic Applications in Community Settings


    (5 cr.) Students in this course concentrate on the application of forensic psychology to various community settings. An emphasis is placed on working with offenders upon re-entry to the community and offenders who receive non-incarceration community placements. However, students will also explore less common applications, such as restorative justice and community crime prevention.

     

  
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    HUMN 6651 - Board Governance and Volunteer Management


    (5 cr.) Volunteers are the “lifeblood” of many nonprofit organizations. These organizations rely heavily on their volunteer board of directors to govern and guide them toward their mission. The success of nonprofit organizations is largely dependent on the effective management of program volunteers and board members. In this course, students explore the volunteer management process, including volunteer recruitment, orientation, training, supervision, and evaluation, with an emphasis on creating and maintaining an effective board of directors. Students design a board development or volunteer management plan based on the concept paper they developed in the Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector course.
  
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    HUMN 6660 - Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy for Human Services Professionals


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of the responsibility of human service professionals to foster social change; provide leadership and service to the human services professions; and advocate for their community, clients, colleagues, and professions. Students use research to examine the current trends and issues of the profession and identify how community, national, and international issues affect human services professions. Students also gain an understanding of the processes of advocacy and social change. Students continue to enhance their professional development plans by identifying specific goals for professional involvement and service.

     

  
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    HUMN 6701 - Culture and Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology. In addition to the previously listed goals, students focus on the impact that culture has on the field of psychology around the world. The scope of this course is broad, with the core theme being cross-cultural psychology (focusing on cultures representing different parts of the world) and comparing cultural influence on human psychology. Many of the topics addressed are related to human development. Additionally, interactions among culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses are emphasized throughout the duration of this course.
  
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    HUMN 6702 - Introduction to Mediation and Negotiation


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are introduced to the seminal theories and practices of alternative dispute resolution (ADR). They will explore conflict analysis, negotiation, and mediation strategies. Through a series of case studies, virtual role plays, and simulation exercises, students gain insight into the practice of ADR and will have the opportunity to develop some effective negotiation and mediation skills. Students will gain a greater understanding of the differences between principled and positional negotiation and mediation, including such professional concepts as fairness, integrity, trust, and confidentiality.
  
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    HUMN 6741 - Psychology of Terrorism


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the history, philosophy, and techniques of terrorism as well as countermeasures to terroristic threats to public safety. Topics include aspects of international and domestic terrorism with an emphasis on terrorism’s roots, viewed from the broadest possible political, sociological, and cultural perspectives; factors and catalysts attributed to the terrorism phenomenon—including poverty, psychology (e.g., motivational factors, antisocial behaviors), social injustice, oppression, and religion; and the impact of media and technology in aiding and countering terroristic activities.

     

  
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    HUMN 6742 - Conflict, Conflict Resolution, and Peace


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students engage in a study of conflict, conflict resolution, and peace from psychological and social psychological perspectives. Students examine the concept of conflict and methods of addressing it, including management, resolution, and transformation; theories related to conflict resolution; approaches to conflict resolution, including negotiation and third-party interventions; and social psychological factors that influence conflict and conflict resolution. They also consider the influence of culture in conflict and conflict resolution; the role of ethics; intractable and international conflicts; the concept of peace; and how third-party approaches can contribute to the peace process. Students apply conflict resolution approaches to conflicts at all levels, from interpersonal to those involving whole nations.
  
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    HUMN 6785 - Prevention, Intervention and Consultation


    (5 cr.) In this course, students prepare for their roles as counselors in areas of prevention, intervention, and consultation with specific populations in different settings. Students assess these three areas of mental health counseling, including the relationships among them, methodological applications, and related ethical and legal considerations. They also discuss a variety of topics with their peers, such as applications for social change, needs of specific populations, iatrogenic harm, professional approaches and challenges, program evaluation, and future trends. Using an action-research model, students develop a blueprint for a project to address a contemporary mental health issue through the context of prevention, intervention, or consultation.
  
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    HUMN 6810 - Fundamentals of Law and Public Policy


    (5 cr.) Legal decisions and the law have an impact on the creation of public policy. Students in this course explore the relationship between law and public policy and the significance of court decisions on law and public policy. They examine the role of administrative agencies in the creation and execution of law and public policy and the role of the courts in resolving challenges to agency rulemaking; conflicts between executive and legislative branches of government; and conflicts between and among federal, state, and local laws. Students apply fundamental legal concepts and processes to the creation and execution of law and public policy.
  
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    HUMN 6811 - Community Psychology


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are introduced to the basic concepts and practice of community psychology. Guiding values and assumptions of the field, basic ecological concepts, and models of intervention are examined. Topics include diversity in community psychology, social change, primary and secondary prevention, community mental health, empowerment, stress, and resiliency.

     

  
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    HUMN 6815 - Contemporary Gerontology♦


    (5 cr.) Great improvements in medicine, public health, science, and technology enable today’s older adults to live healthier, longer lives. In this course, students explore theories and practices for providing services to older adults who remain independent and vibrant members of their families and communities. Students delve into models of aging in place, including ways of assessing health, social and economic needs, and identifying and prioritizing options in physical, mental, emotional, and intellectual health promotion activities and programs.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 6912 - Mental Health Law


    (5 cr.) Mental health counseling professionals in all areas, especially criminal forensic psychological practice, may encounter various conflicts regarding psychological and legal approaches to treatment. Therefore, it is important for counselors to have a firm understanding of mental health law to avoid conflicts, such as issues of liability and malpractice. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to examine several different aspects of the law related to mental health issues, including those constituting forensic psychological practice, such as civil matters (personal injury and civil competency issues) and criminal matters (competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, diminished capacity, and death-penalty issues). Students employ recent court decisions and laws, such as the Tarasoff ruling, mandated reporting, and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), to examine how mental health law influences the practice of psychology and mental health counseling.
  
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    HUMN 8000 - Foundations of Graduate Study in Human Services


    (3 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.
  
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    HUMN 8011 - Interviewing and Case Management in Human and Social Services♦


    (5 cr.) The first step in helping individuals, families, organizations, and communities is to form effective helping relationships. These relationships are characterized by the ability to connect with clients and those around them through demonstrating empathic caring, respect for people and institutions, and genuineness that leads to perceived trustworthiness. Just as an ERG is a unit of energy in physics, Empathy, Respect, and Genuineness (ERG) is the unit of energy in helping relationships. In this course, students will learn how to talk with people in ways that demonstrate empathy, respect, and genuineness while obtaining the kind of information required to help clients identify their unmet needs and participate in finding ways to meet them. Students will participate in mock interviews and will participate in critiques of their own work along with their instructor. Students in this course will also focus on the essential functions of case management including how to write up important case notes appropriately with special attention to ethical and legal issues. While the basic principles underlying an effective helping relationship may be close to universal (ERG), the actual process of demonstrating them could vary greatly across cultures or countries; therefore, students will explore how this might differ in a different setting and among different professions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 8050 - Global Health and Issues in Disease Prevention


    (5 cr.)  

    This course provides an in-depth review of how population-based strategies are used in the prevention of disease and disability. Students explore the topics of population health and disease prevention from the perspective of understanding the determinants of health. Using a cross-disciplinary approach, students examine how economics, social factors, health policy, urbanization, globalization, the environment, and other factors influence disease. Students consider how research in disease prevention, health determinants, and population health applies to public and community health efforts.

  
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    HUMN 8100 - Introduction to Research and Evaluation in Human and Social Services♦


    (5 cr.) In order to be effective professional helpers, practitioners need to have a working knowledge of how research informs practice. This is becoming even more important as the emphasis on evidenced-based practice increases across all fields that provide human and social services. Students will explore different approaches to research and evaluation and will demonstrate the ability to find, critically read, and integrate relevant research articles from trustworthy sources.  In addition, they will use case studies, discussions, and readings to help see the connections between theory, research, and practice and how applications might differ in different cultures and across different professions. They will also identify important ethical considerations related to conducting and reporting research results, especially in the context of program evaluations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HUMN 8110 - Advanced Social Work Theory and Practice


    (5 cr.) One of the primary focuses of social work is to promote social justice within a diverse society. In this course, students focus on an advanced exploration of traditional and contemporary clinical social work theories for providing culturally and contextually relevant services to individuals and families. Students examine social work theories in a way that informs clinical practice, and they discuss the role of the social worker in social issues at the macro and micro levels. Students evaluate existing practices and policies with the goal of designing and implementing more effective practices and policies that positively impact the individual, the community, and society at large.
 

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