2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) 
    
    Oct 29, 2020  
2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    HLTH 4380 - Strategies for Health Communication and Wellness♦


    (5 cr.) The principles and theories of health communication and their application to health promotion and behavior change are the foci of this course. Students examine how to design and deliver health messages to various audiences while remaining sensitive to cultural, socioeconomic, and educational factors influencing the audience. Students evaluate important dimensions of intercultural and intracultural communication and study how to make scholarly writing accessible to the general population. They also explore the use of emerging technologies and social media in marketing and communications.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 4520 - Healthcare Finance


    (5 cr.) Students engage in the foundations for financial management in delivery of healthcare services. Students in this course can learn about the purpose and methods of financial reporting, such as financial statements, balance sheets, and operational and capital budgets, in addition to financial risk, variances, and an overview of insurance principles. Students also explore the financial, political, and economic aspects of universal healthcare.
  
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    HLTH 4530 - Healthcare Economics From a Population Health Perspective


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with the foundation for economic evaluation from a population health approach. Students can develop an understanding of healthcare as a market, compare supply-and-demand principles in healthcare versus a typical business, discuss how economic losses or gains impact healthcare policy changes, sectors of the population, physician staffing, nursing staffing, and stability. Students in the course also explore epidemiological, social, global, and future economic impact of healthcare.
  
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    HLTH 4900 - Capstone


    (5 cr.) This capstone course provides students with the opportunity to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program into a practical, integrative literature review of a selected topic specific to their area of concentration and personal interest. Through this project, students gain experience in refining their résumé, locating and assessing professional literature, and presenting arguments and findings. Students also engage in weekly discussions on networking, professional organizations, and the promotion of positive social change. They also reflect on their learning experience throughout the program and consider how they can use these experiences to enrich future professional endeavors. (Prerequisite(s): All prior health core and concentration courses completed. This course must be taken in the student’s final quarter.)
  
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    HLTH 5005 - Perspectives on Health and the Developing Professional


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover the origins and evolution of the concept of health, including some of the important health problems that face the world today and emerging concerns for the future. This foundational course introduces learners to key events in history as well as some of the health systems and issues that a modern health practitioner may encounter. Strategies for success as a graduate-level scholar and a health practitioner are integrated in a way that provides meaningful context to learners. Students discuss key concepts with peers, and the course culminates with a reflection paper designed to help learners evaluate their professional goals and how to progress as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Students explore careers in various public health and health education settings and experience a virtual health department in order to learn about various functions and personnel.
  
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    HLTH 5110 - Exploring Health Education in the 21st Century♦


    (5 cr.) What does it mean to be a health educator in the 21st century? Students in this foundation course explore the field of health education: historical milestones, current issues, and future opportunities and challenges. They examine settings for practice, professional competencies, inter-professional collaborations, credentialing, professional organizations, use of technology, and ethical issues pertaining to health education. Students will also analyze current issues in the field by reviewing scholarly publications and research pertaining to health education practice. Course assignments also include an introduction to commonly used health education theories and models, and students will have the opportunity to develop a philosophy statement for health education practice in the new millennium.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 5205 - Assessing Community Needs for Health Education♦


    (5 cr.) It is important for health educators and other health professionals to understand the unique characteristics and health needs of a community in order to provide effective and relevant health education and services. Students in this course will be introduced to the principles and processes of needs assessment and community capacity-building as a first step in the program planning process. Students will learn about individual, small-group, and community-based assessments as well as quantitative and qualitative approaches. Students will directly apply what they are reading and discussing in class to their own communities by conducting a assessment unique to their community. Other topics covered include use of primary and secondary data; selection and development of instrumentation to collect community data; interpretation and analysis of data; and prioritization of health education needs. Community mapping tools and other technology used in the assessment process will also be explored.
    Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 5412 - Health Education and Communication Strategies♦


    (5 cr.) Effective communication plays a vital role in the diffusion of a health behavior or innovation. Students in this course are introduced as health educators to a wide range of health communication strategies. Assignments will allow students to apply and evaluate the use of health education delivery methods for various populations and practice settings (e.g., community, clinical, worksite, global, schools). Principles and theories of health communication and behavior change will be applied to a variety of health education case studies. Students will also demonstrate how to design and communicate culturally tailored health information to an audience of their choice. They will also explore the use of emerging technologies and social media in delivering and promoting health education.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6005 - Perspectives on Health and the Developing Professional♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover the origins and evolution of the concept of health, including some of the important health problems that face the world today and emerging concerns for the future. In this foundational course, stuents are introduced to key events in history as well as some of the health systems and issues that a modern health practitioner may encounter. Strategies for success as graduate-level scholars and health practitioners are integrated in a way that provides meaningful context to learners. Students discuss key concepts with peers, and the course culminates with a reflection paper designed to help learners evaluate their professional goals and how to progress as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Students explore careers in various public health and health education settings and experience a virtual health department to learn about various functions and personnel.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6030 - Socioecological Perspectives on Health♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students will identify and discuss social and ecological perspectives of public health including individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, societal, and public policy factors. Students will explore the socioecological model (SEM) and other theoretical frameworks to prevent morbidity and reduce mortality from major causes of disease. The range of topics are primarily centered on the U.S.; however, recognizing the growing need to understand how disease impacts the global community, international settings will also be explored to deepen the understanding of public health perspectives. Students will apply these frameworks and other theories presented in the course to address current public health problems and reduce health disparities. Students will demonstrate their understanding of SEM through researching and describing a specific health issue in their/a community, discussing contributing factors, and proposing an appropriate intervention. They will also share ideas and perspectives and provide feedback to peers through discussion forums.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6031 - Public Health Administration and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course acquire the foundational understanding of the administrative, managerial, and organizational practices of public health and healthcare delivery systems. Students examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. They engage in a variety of contextual and practical assignments focused on management theories, policy processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. Students also consider the impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6051 - Diversity, Human Rights, and Social Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this foundational course broadly address race and ethnicity, socioeconomic status and class, culture, religion, gender, sexual orientation, ability and disability, and environment in an effort to better understand social identity. Throughout this course, students benefit from course assignments, discussions, and course materials that address the role of power and privilege and oppression and marginalization on the development of clients. Students specifically focus on activities that help them recognize systems that support or foster power inequities, oppression, and underutilization of human talent and skills. In addition, students engage in self-awareness activities that foster their understanding of their role in the hierarchy of power and privilege. At the completion of this course, students understand the importance of social workers developing competence in providing evidence-based, contextually and culturally relevant assessments and interventions for individuals, families, groups, and communities.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6100 - Critical Issues in Emergency Management♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the theories and concepts underpinning contemporary emergency management and how to understand the phenomena of natural and human-caused disasters. Students examine the historical context of emergency management, the general process of risk assessment, the emergency management cycle, communications within emergency management and crisis planning, and the general policy and legal framework surrounding the process of emergency management in the United States with a focus on the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Case studies of major catastrophes are used to explore contemporary and practical hazard management. Students can complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute courses IS-100.b - Introduction to Incident Command System and either IS-800.b - National Response Framework: An Introduction or IS700.a - National Incident Management System as part of this course. Nationally recognized certificates are awarded for successful completion of FEMA courses.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6110 - Exploring Health Education in the 21st Century♦


    (5 cr.) What does it mean to be a health educator in the 21st century? Students in this foundation course explore the field of health education: historical milestones, current issues, and future opportunities and challenges. They examine settings for practice, professional competencies, interprofessional collaborations, credentialing, professional organizations, use of technology, and ethical issues pertaining to health education. Students analyze current issues in the field by reviewing scholarly publications and research pertaining to health education practice. Course assignments include an introduction to commonly used health education theories and models, and students have the opportunity to develop a philosophy statement for health education practice in the new millennium.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6111 - Leadership and Organizational Change♦


    (5 cr.) Successful public sector organizations require high-caliber leaders who are accountable to multiple constituencies. A rapidly accelerating rate of change and blurring of organizational boundaries contribute to the need for leaders who are equipped to meet the challenge. In this course, students explore the theoretical underpinnings of leadership and the important role of the leader in organizational change. By exploring leadership theory, current research, and practice within an area of public administration or nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations, students will demonstrate their understanding leadership in organizations that are increasingly complex in nature. Ethical dimensions, boundary-spanning functions, and how leaders influence positive social change are key factors of this course. Students in this course draw on historical and current events and their personal experiences to examine the demands of leadership.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6112 - Governance and Public Policy♦


    (5 cr.) Democratic principles are the foundation of modern life. Students in the course receive an overview of democratic governance in public administration, public policy, or nonprofit/nongovernmental organizations in modern society. Students examine the theoretical underpinnings of democratic governance and public policy in their chosen area of specialization necessary for doctoral-level research. Students review fundamental theories of governance, research current literature on a specialized topic, and apply best practices within the area of specialization. The emphasis is on the context in which public and nonprofit leaders function and the social institutions that influence public policy and guide administrative decision making.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6200 - Risk Assessment, Preparedness, and Disaster Mitigation♦


    (5 cr.) Risk assessment and mitigation are key components to effective all-hazards emergency management. In this course, students focus on the methods and techniques required to assess a community’s risk and what measures are needed to protect human life and capital assets. Students can learn ways to evaluate the social vulnerability and identify special needs of populations who may be at greater risk during an emergency or disaster. Students then explore methods to reduce risk and build capacity through preparedness and mitigation techniques. In addition, as part of this course, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS-393.a: Introduction to Hazard Mitigation.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    HLTH 6205 - Assessing Community Needs for Health Education♦


    (5 cr.) It is important for health educators and other health professionals to understand the unique characteristics and health needs of a community in order to provide effective and relevant health education and services. Students in this course are introduced to the principles and processes of needs assessment and community capacity-building as a first step in the program planning process. Students learn about individual, small-group, and community-based assessments as well as quantitative and qualitative approaches.  Students directly apply what they are reading and discussing in class to their own communities by conducting a assessment unique to their community. Other topics covered include use of primary and secondary data; selection and development of instrumentation to collect community data; interpretation and analysis of data; and prioritization of  health education needs. Community mapping tools and other technology used in the assessment process are also explored.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6207 - Grant Writing♦


    (5 cr.) Grant writing is a highly marketable skill that requires many non-profit, educational and community organizations to secure external funding in order to provide needed services to the community. In this course, students will explore the basic skills needed for grant writing including identifying potential funding sources, creating objectives and a need statement, preparing and justifying a budget, identifying appropriate assessment plans, and writing an executive summary.  Course assignments will allow students to directly apply what they are reading and discussing by writing a full grant proposal based on an actual Request for Proposal (RFP).
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6245 - Applied Research in Public Health♦


    (5 cr.) Public health professionals use the results of research in many ways, including in the development of programs and interventions designed to enhance the health of communities as well as to demonstrate the efficacy of programs to stakeholders who provide funding. In this course, students will engage in an examination of the research that informs public health programs, policy, and practice.  Specific topics to be covered include study designs, sampling, identification of variables, methods of data collection and analysis, key concepts in measurement (including reliability and validity), program evaluation, and research ethics. As a major assignment in this course, students will engage in an integrative literature review and begin to develop what may become their capstone project.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6280 - Policy and Politics in American Political Institutions♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the crafts of policymaking and policy analysis in the U.S. democratic system. Students examine the tasks involved in the policy process, including setting agendas, using policy analysis tools, managing the political process, implementing policy, and providing evaluations and feedback. Through this analysis, students work toward developing skills to conduct policy and economic analyses as well as to determine the political feasibility of proposed policies. They learn about regulation as a policy choice. They also work toward enhancing their ability to develop alternatives and to assess strategies proposed to achieve certain policy objectives. Students engage in scholarly-writing assignments and discussions on policy areas of interest, such as communications, immigration, transportation, housing, labor, arts, and environmental policies. 
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6300 - Disaster Response and Recovery♦


    (5 cr.) A major concern of disaster response professionals is meeting basic and humanitarian needs of disaster-affected populations. In this course, students explore a range of issues, including evacuation, relocation, and tactical and strategic decisions in the immediate aftermath of an emergency episode. Students study important federal policies related to disaster response and recovery, including the National Response Framework (NRF), and they can gain an understanding of how local, state, and federal policies mesh in response and recovery efforts. Through their exploration, they study how recovery begins once the immediate threat of the emergency wanes and the focus shifts to restoring disaster-affected areas. As part of this course, students complete the FEMA Emergency Management Institute course IS208.a: State Disaster Management.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6405 - Ethics and Social Justice♦


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. Students in this course explore ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends, and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    HLTH 6412 - Health Education and Communication Strategies♦


    (5 cr.) Effective communication plays a vital role in the diffusion of a health behavior or innovation. This course is designed to introduce the health educator to a wide range of health communication strategies. Assignments allow students to apply and evaluate the use of health education delivery methods for various populations and practice settings (i.e., community, clinical, worksite, global, schools). Principles and theories of health communication and behavior change are applied to a variety of health education case studies. Students also demonstrate how to design and communicate culturally tailored health information to an audience of their choice. They explore the use of emerging technologies and social media in delivering and promoting health education.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6475 - Program Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on the competencies required of the public health professional in planning for the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of community health promotion and disease prevention initiatives. Attention is given to needs assessment, logic models, and collaboration with stakeholders. Strategic approaches to planning, implementation, and evaluation with particular attention to study design and sampling are addressed. Health behavior theories are considered in the development of health promotion programs, the application of evaluation findings, and prioritization of community concerns and resources.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6510 - Essentials of the U.S. Healthcare Delivery System and Population Health


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will analyze health and the healthcare systems from a population health perspective. Emphasis includes the role of health education and health administration, workforce, public health foundations, and technological developments in improving health from local, national, and global perspectives. Various approaches used historically to improve population health and health equity in the United States will be explored. Current and emerging U.S. health transformation efforts, including steps to reduce cost and improve prevention strategies, and quality of care will be considered. Students will also consider the provider, payment, and public health perspectives in improving health outcomes and explore various perspectives and trends such as international settings and lessons currently being taken from these settings and developments in the use of technology. Investigation and analysis of the coordination among various stakeholders who play a role in prevention, health, and healthcare systems will be addressed.
  
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    HLTH 6530 - Disease Prevention and Care Management


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore evidence-based population health programs and how they assist in addressing and promoting best practices in disease and preventive care management. In this course, students will learn how population health interventions teach individuals and populations how to manage chronic diseases and take responsibility for understanding how to best care for themselves. Students will also explore health administrator and health educator leadership strategies and interventions to manage and prevent chronic disease.
  
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    HLTH 6540 - Population Health Management Applications


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will apply the skills needed to manage population health programs and initiatives to enhance the health of a defined population. Students focus on health behaviors, public and business influences, health policy, economic forces, and other related healthcare system issues in health promotion and disease prevention.
  
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    HLTH 6740 - Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma♦


    (5 cr.) Students taking this course define natural and human-made disasters such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities, and they review how they impact the psychology of individuals and groups. Topics include theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with the trauma. Students focus on the importance and development of culturally appropriate service delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disaster(s).
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6771 - Terrorism: A Systematic Approach for Emergency Preparedness♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of terrorism—local, national, and international—and the need to develop a systemic approach for emergency preparedness. Topics include terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyber terrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Students participate in online discussions and begin the development and/or analysis of a terrorism preparedness infrastructure.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6800 - Health Education and Promotion Capstone


    (5 cr.) The capstone course is intended to be taken last in the MS in Health Education and Promotion program. Students have an opportunity to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program by completing a capstone project focused on social change. The MS in Health Education and Promotion Capstone project is designed to empower students with the skills necessary to secure external grant funding through grant proposal writing. Students will integrate theoretical and practical knowledge as well as scientific research to prepare a grant proposal for funding a health education program that addresses a pressing health need in their community.  Emphasis is placed on grant sources and resources, the grant proposal process, grant management, and sustainability.
  
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    HLTH 6840 - Health Policy and Management♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the factors that influence and improve health outcomes of individuals and populations, with attention to the goals of Healthy People 2010 and the main components and issues of organization, financing, and delivery of health services and public health systems in the United States. Topics include management theories and processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. The policy process is addressed, as well as the advocacy role of the public health professional in influencing local, state, and federal policy. The impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems is also considered.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 6880 - Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation: A Global Perspective


    (5 cr.) Social entrepreneurs are gaining international attention motivated by the desire for change and to see the world as it can be, not as it is. Students in the course will learn how social entrepreneurs have developed creative solutions to address social problems. The intention of the course is to develop knowledge, appreciate of the role of social entrepreneurs who create social change, deepen students’ understanding of the world around them, and to inspire them to use their skills and knowledge to be, as Gandhi said, “the change you wish to see in the world.”

    Students in this course will gain knowledge about social entrepreneurs and how they are creating solutions to address societal problems, learn how to develop creative solutions to address social problems, and empower students to see social entrepreneurship as a force for social change. The course is designed for those who want to gain valuable tools to prepare them to make an impact on the lives of others. This course will be housed in the School of Public Policy and Administration for future upgrades and course maintenance.

  
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    HLTH 6882 - Improving Healthcare Performance Through Social Entrepreneurship


    (5 cr.) Social entrepreneurship is a dynamic approach to problem solving that individuals, entrepreneurs, or scholar-practitioners can use to address societal needs and problems related to healthcare. In this course, students select a healthcare issue and develop an entrepreneurial project to address it. Students will define beneficiaries and stakeholders and develop tactics to identify and address opponents, allies, and the ambivalent. Students will test, evaluate, and identify both opportunities and potential weaknesses of their proposed entrepreneurial solutions. By the end of the course, students will have experienced the process of developing concept statements supported by research, articulating business propositions, defining the market and competition, and addressing the sociopolitical landscape. Finally, students will evaluate the feasibility of their proposed entrepreneurial healthcare solutions.
  
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    HLTH 8003 - Building a Multidisciplinary Approach to Health♦


    (3 cr.) In this course, students will explore the multidisciplinary nature and integration of professional practice in the health field. Students will have the opportunity to utilize their scholarly voice with diverse audiences and with academic integrity to assure academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. As leaders in their profession, students will discuss critical health services in the health field utilizing a response to a natural disaster, review of emerging topics in the health field, and what it means to be part of a multidisciplinary team to develop community partnerships with key stakeholders to address health issues impacting their communities, agencies, and/or organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8030 - Socioecological Perspectives on Health


    (5 cr.) In this course, students will identify social and ecological approaches to public health at the individual, interpersonal, organizational, community and environmental, and policy levels. Students will explore and apply the socioecological model (SEM) and other theoretical frameworks to address public health issues and to eliminate health disparities in t morbidity and mortality. Students will demonstrate an understanding of course concepts through peer discussion and research on specific health issues in special populations, identifying contributing factors, and proposing appropriate interventions.
  
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    HLTH 8031 - Public Health Administration and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a foundational understanding of the administrative, managerial, and organizational practices of public health and healthcare delivery systems. They examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. Students engage in a variety of contextual and practical assignments focused on management theories, policy processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. They also consider the impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8032 - SPSS Revealed


    (5 cr.) This is a laboratory-type course where students learn the skills needed to use the statistical computer package SPSS in public health practice and research. Topics include importation of data, management of various types of data, creation and exportation of tables and graphs, and computation of basic statistical tests using SPSS.
  
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    HLTH 8033 - Interpretation and Application of Public Health Data


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about biostatistical methods and concepts used in public health practice and research. Emphasis is placed on interpretation and application of concepts rather than statistical calculations. Major topics include identification of types of data, creation and interpretation of narrative and graphical descriptive statistics, conceptualization of statistical inference and probability, and interpretation of common nonparametric tests, analysis of variance, and simple linear regression models. Students are required to use the statistical computer package SPSS. 
  
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    HLTH 8034 - Environmental Health: Local to Global


    (5 cr.) This course provides a comprehensive overview of environmental factors that affect the health and safety of 21st century communities. Students examine associations and interrelationships between chemical, physical, and biological hazards in the environment and their impact on human health.  Concepts cover food, water, air, waste, radiation, noise, pests, population growth, and climate change. Students analyze and discuss current local and global problems and solutions and consider new ways to address environmental issues.
  
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    HLTH 8035 - Epidemiology: Decoding the Science of Public Health


    (5 cr.) Epidemiology is the science concerned with controlling and preventing disease in communities.

    Students in this course are provided with an epidemiological approach to the study of the incidence, prevalence, and patterns of disease and injury in populations, and the application of this study to the control of public health problems. Key sources of data for epidemiological purposes are identified, and principles and limitations of public health screening programs are addressed. Students learn to calculate basic epidemiological measures and to draw appropriate inferences from epidemiological data and reports. (Prerequisite(s): PUBH 6125).

  
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    HLTH 8050 - Global Health and Issues in Disease Prevention♦


    (5 cr.) An in-depth review of how population-based strategies are used in the prevention of disease and disability is provided to students in this course. Students explore the topics of population health and disease prevention from the perspective of understanding the determinants of health. Using a cross-disciplinary approach, students examine how economics, social factors, health policy, urbanization, globalization, the environment, and other factors influence disease. Students consider how research in disease prevention, health determinants, and population health apply to public and community health efforts.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8050 - Global Health Issues in Disease Prevention


    (5 cr.) This course provides an in-depth review of how global health-based strategies are used in the prevention of disease and disability in diverse populations. Students explore global health topics and disease prevention activities from the perspective of understanding the determinants of health. Using a cross-disciplinary approach, students examine how economics, social factors, cultural competency, health literacy, health policy, urbanization, globalization, the environment, and other factors influence disease. Students consider how research in disease prevention, health determinants, cultural ecology and global health applies to public and community health efforts.
  
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    HLTH 8051 - Contemporary Topics in the U.S. Healthcare Delivery♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to gain thorough insight into the current structure and components of health services and delivery. Students identify and describe components of the system, including patients, healthcare professionals, public and private third-party payers, regulators, reimbursement methods, and technology. They engage in activities and discussions focused on the continuum of services related to healthcare, such as hospitals and hospital systems, ambulatory care, and long-term care. Students also explore issues related to these services, such as wellness, prevention, and community and public health, for a comprehensive understanding of the system. Students contextualize their study through the examination of current factors and challenges as well as the impact these challenges have on delivery and management.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8110 - Exploring Health Education in the 21st Century


    (5 cr.) What does it mean to be a health educator in the 21st century? Students in this foundation course explore the field of health education: historical milestones, current issues, and future opportunities and challenges. They examine settings for practice, professional competencies, interprofessional collaborations, credentialing, professional organizations, use of technology, and ethical issues pertaining to health education. Students also analyze current issues in the field by reviewing scholarly publications and research pertaining to health education practice. Course assignments also include an introduction to commonly used health education theories and models, and students will have the opportunity to develop a philosophy statement for health education practice in the new millennium. (Prerequisite(s): HLTH 8003).
  
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    HLTH 8111 - Leadership and Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Successful organizations in a rapidly changing and complex world require leaders who embrace change and are able to engage others in change. In this course, students use traditional literature, current articles, and interactive media to explore the qualities, characteristics, and skills of effective leaders as well as the theories, models, and relationships between leadership and organizational change. They assess the ethical issues and standards as well as the opportunities and challenges related to leading diverse organizations through change. Students also examine how current leaders employ leadership and organizational change to contribute to social change, and they consider how to use these lessons to make further positive changes within an organization or their own community.
  
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    HLTH 8111 - Leadership and Organizational Change♦


    (5 cr.) Successful organizations in a rapidly changing and complex world require leaders who embrace change and are able to engage others in change. In this course, students use traditional literature, current articles, and interactive media to explore the qualities, characteristics, and skills of effective leaders as well as the theories, models, and relationships between leadership and organizational change. They assess the ethical issues and standards as well as the opportunities and challenges related to leading diverse organizations through change. Students also examine how current leaders employ leadership and organizational change to contribute to social change, and they consider how to use these lessons to make further positive changes within an organization or their own community.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8112 - Governance and Public Policy♦


    (5 cr.) Democratic principles are the foundation of modern life. Students in this course are provided with an overview of democratic governance in public administration, public policy, or nonprofit or nongovernmental organizations in modern society. Students examine the theoretical underpinnings of democratic governance and public policy in their chosen area of specialization necessary for doctoral-level research. Students examine the context in which public and nonprofit leaders function and the social institutions that influence public policy and guide administrative decision making. Students also review fundamental theories of governance, research current literature on a specialized topic, and apply best practices as they relate concepts to complete practical application assignments and a final case scenario project.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8127 - Public Health Policy, Politics and Progress♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the role of federal, state, and local government in the assurance of public health through health policy and law.  Consideration is given to contemporary policy, law, and regulatory issues arising in public health practice, as well as to the economics and financing of public health programs.  The advocacy, political, and creative process in the formulation, implementation, and modification of health policy are examined and discussed.  Students also learn how to write and structure a health policy analysis.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8129 - Global Perspectives on Health


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about current public health issues and problems affecting individuals and communities around the globe, with particular emphasis on etiology, impact, and possible intervention strategies. Students also learn about organizations that work to support and advance health care locally and internationally. Topics of focus include maternal and child health, food security, hunger and nutrition, global water shortage, HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, emerging infectious diseases, selected chronic illnesses and injuries, poverty, human rights, and health equality. Students complete an extensive review of a specific global health issue.
  
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    HLTH 8130 - Communications, Marketing, and Public Relations for Public Health Leaders


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive an overview of marketing and public relations principles as they relate to public health, highlighting theoretical concepts that are commonly used in health communications research. Topics include using social marketing techniques, promoting health literacy, developing community partnerships, community-based participatory engagement and research, and creating culturally sensitive and appropriate promotional materials. Students focus on using social media to identify and advance public health interests and ethical principles. Through case studies, students examine how they can use marketing practices to translate health research into social action and behavioral change.
  
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    HLTH 8136 - Leadership, Professionalism, and Ethics in Public Health Practice♦


    (5 cr.) Critical issues, such as infectious diseases, inadequate healthcare access, and an aging population, require leaders who have a diverse skill set as well as the professional and ethical sensibilities needed to lead efforts that improve quality of life for individuals and communities. In this course, students examine theories of leadership as well as the professional attributes, skills, styles, and strategies required to advance public health goals. They explore ethical choices, values, professionalism, opportunities for advocacy, and the application of principles of social justice implicit in public health decisions and practice. Students learn how to employ collaborative methods for working with and motivating diverse communities and constituencies, and they consider methods and develop new strategies for evaluating and solving current problems in healthcare.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8150 - The Art of Online Teaching


    (5 cr.) Higher education is undergoing a radical paradigm shift with the rapid growth of online degree, program, and course offerings. Educators are provided with the foundational skills necessary to successfully facilitate learning in an online environment in this course. They have the opportunity to acquire the essential pedagogical competencies to provide targeted instruction and accurately assess student work in a virtual setting. Through the exploration of simulated classroom interactions and creative problem-solving scenarios, educators experience how online learning leverages technology to enhance knowledge and skill development. Upon successful completion of this course, educators can demonstrate professional skills to meet the growing demand for facilitators of online learning and the potential to positively influence a global population of learners.
  
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    HLTH 8151 - Understanding the Adult Learner


    (5 cr.) Unique and distinctive skills are required to engage and teach adult learners. Education professionals will explore adult learning and developmental theory and the wide range of research that supports it, including andragogy and transformation, phase and stage developmental theories, and effects of gender and culture on adult learning. Educators will also be provided with the opportunity to reflect on the relationship of course material with their own experiences as adult learners. Education professionals complete a variety of realistic assignments through which they practice communicating and presenting complex concepts, critique the work of major theorists, apply adult learning and development theories to educational practice, and construct their own positions on adult learning as scholar-practitioners.
  
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    HLTH 8152 - eLearning


    (5 cr.) Educators explore the theories, paradigms, trends, and issues in the field of eLearning. Research on eLearning is critiqued and analyzed as an ecosystem, including an examination of K–12, higher education, corporate, and personal learning communities. Current social and geopolitical trends and their impact on eLearning are analyzed. Delivery methods, human presence, and sustainability of eLearning design are investigated. Through this course, educators are provided with design and development experience through the creation of multimedia presentations in an eLearning environment.
  
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    HLTH 8153 - Online Teaching Simulation


    (5 cr.) In this simulation course, learners have an opportunity to practice the art of online teaching hands-on and to develop an online instructional presence that encourages positive student outcomes. In this unique practical experience, learners develop and reinforce the skills needed to succeed as an online instructor. Scholar-practitioners hone their online teaching skills by engaging in realistic classroom scenarios with guidance and feedback from experienced online faculty members and in collaboration with their peers. With careful oversight, mentoring, and coaching, learners practice and analyze online facilitation activities, including interacting though discussion boards, assessing student work, and posting announcements.
  
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    HLTH 8175 - Health Policy and Management


    (5 cr.) Methods for influencing and improving health outcomes of individuals and populations are at the forefront of health policy and management. With this in mind, the Department of Health and Human Services launched a national, comprehensive plan—Healthy People 2010—designed to promote health and prevent disease. Students in this course expand on these goals to develop a solid foundation for understanding the need for effective health policy and management and the role of the public health professional charged with influencing local, state, and federal policy. Students identify and assess components of organization, financing, and delivery of health services and systems in the United States. They engage in a variety of contextual and practical assignments focused on management theories, policy processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. Students also consider the impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems.
  
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    HLTH 8201 - Principles of Population Health in Healthcare Administration♦


    (5 cr.) An increasing need exists for healthcare administrators to address population-wide health issues. Developing evidence-based health programs enables healthcare to be addressed on a preventive basis at the community or service area level. In this course, students utilize clinical datasets and combine this knowledge with public health datasets concerning socioeconomic and behavioral influencers of health. Students analyze these influencers to determine effective, appropriate services, programs, and solutions to benefit the population as a whole. They discover health issues facing special populations, respond to case studies, and create program plans to improve population disease outcomes.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8202 - Survey Research Methods


    (5 cr.) An in-depth study of a range of survey methods administered via in-person interview, self-report, phone interview, and Internet administration is introduced in this course. Topics will include survey design, administration, analysis, and addressing sources of bias. In this course, students will also review theoretical and empirical research on question and questionnaire effects. Students are prepared in the practice of writing questions and designing questionnaires, both in general and in light of existing research. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8100 and RSCH 8200.)
  
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    HLTH 8203 - Attitudes/Attitude Change


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover classic and contemporary models of attitudes, their functions, and how they are formed and maintained. The connection between attitudes and behavior and how attitudes are changed through the process of persuasion and cognitive dissonance are also examined. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8247 - Social Psychology).
  
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    HLTH 8205 - Assessing Community Needs for Health Education


    (5 cr.) It is important for health educators and other health professionals to understand the unique characteristics and health needs of a community in order to provide effective and relevant health education and services. Students in this course learn about the principles and processes of needs assessment and community capacity-building as a first step in the program planning process. Students learn about individual, small-group, and community-based assessments as well as quantitative and qualitative approaches. Students directly apply what they are reading and discussing in class to their own communities by conducting an assessment unique to their community. Other topics covered include use of primary and secondary data; selection and development of instrumentation to collect community data; interpretation and analysis of data, and prioritization of health education needs. Community mapping tools and other technology used in the assessment process are also explored. 
  
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    HLTH 8207 - Grant Writing


    (5 cr.) Grant writing is a highly marketable skill that requires many nonprofit, educational, and community organizations to secure external funding in order to provide needed services to the community. In this course, students will explore the basic skills needed for grant writing including identifying potential funding sources, creating objectives and a need statement, preparing and justifying a budget, identifying appropriate assessment plans, and writing an executive summary. Course assignments will allow students to directly apply what they are reading and discussing by writing a full grant proposal based on an actual Request for Proposal (RFP).
  
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    HLTH 8207 - Grant Writing


    (5 cr.) Grant writing is the method by which many nonprofit, educational, and community organizations secure external funding in order to provide needed services to the community. In this course, students will explore the basic skills needed for nonresearch grant writing including project development, identifying potential funding sources, developing a needs statement and creating goals and objectives for projects, preparing and justifying a budget, identifying appropriate methods to evaluate a project, and writing an executive summary. In their course assignments students will be able to to directly apply what they are reading and discussing by writing a full grant proposal based on an actual Request for Proposal (RFP).
  
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    HLTH 8215 - Lifespan Development


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an advanced overview of human development through the lifespan, including prenatal, childhood, adolescent, adult, and late-adult phases. Students examine and apply basic processes and theories to developmental milestones that occur within these phases of development. They explore factors of heredity and environmental elements on human development, and they consider ethical issues, research considerations, and global perspectives as they assess strategies to promote optimal development. Students also engage in coursework and discussions that highlight themes of diversity and social change.
  
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    HLTH 8219 - Health Promotion and Educational Interventions in Diverse Populations


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students explore the planning and organization of health promotion programs for underserved, economically disadvantaged, and underrepresented populations. Students learn to design health promotion programs that consider the social, economic, and medical conditions influencing the health status of diverse populations. Throughout the course, students develop a health promotion project for a specific population, based on the intervention mapping process. Through this project, students analyze and integrate principles of social change and empowerment, summarize research that supports the decision-making process, and critique institutional and social systems. Students also have the opportunity to assess and discuss the future of health promotion, considering projections of needs over the next two decades. (Prerequisite(s): Foundational and core curricula.)
  
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    HLTH 8240 - Public Health Policy and Advocacy


    (5 cr.) Contemporary public health leaders and administrators are provided with an overview of the public health policy and advocacy process, and they devote special attention to their function, impact, and constraint on policy development. In addition, students explore professional ethics related to the role of the policy analyst and consider the significant social outcomes of public health policy. They examine the theories and strategies used by policymakers and policy analysts to develop, implement, execute, evaluate, and promulgate public health policy. Through case studies of the public health response to issues such as HIV/AIDS and SARS, students explore historical challenges and successes in translating health science to effective public policy. Students also assess the impact and consequences of public health policy and evaluate it though a social justice framework. Using critical-thinking and communication skills, students craft a public health policy memorandum regarding a current public health policy problem, for which they consider and evaluate competing policy alternatives.
  
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    HLTH 8241 - Human Motivation


    (5 cr.) What are the factors that drive human behavior and in what ways can professionals harness this information to help individuals achieve their goals? Through the exploration of historical and contemporary theories and perspectives, students in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions and gain foundational knowledge of the study of human motivation. Students examine the physiological, psychological, learned, social, cognitive, and emotional aspects of motivation. They work toward developing a conceptual understanding of theories associated with motivation, which they apply to personal, professional, and contemporary social issues. Students engage in readings and assignments that incorporate themes of diversity as they relate to human motivation.
  
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    HLTH 8242 - Changing Health Behavior: Theory and Practice


    (5 cr.) Students in this course review past and current models of health behavior change, disease prevention, disease management, and relapse prevention. Students cover health-related issues, including dietary needs, tobacco and drug use, safer sexual practices, and stress management. In addition, they examine the analysis of behavior change within specific populations (young, elderly, cognitively impaired, etc.), and factors that predict or serve as obstacles to lifestyle change and adherence. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8745 - Health Psychology).
  
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    HLTH 8247 - Social Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course receive an overview of classic and contemporary topics in social psychology with a focus on how social contexts influence and shape individual behavior. Topics covered include research methods in social psychology, the relation of self and culture, person perception, attitudes and their relation to behavior, attribution theory, persuasion, conformity and obedience, interpersonal attraction, prejudice, aggression, group dynamics, intergroup relations, and multiculturalism. The course is presented with a focus on cross-cultural similarities and variations in the impact of context on behavior. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8745 - Health Psychology).
  
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    HLTH 8270 - Health Informatics and Surveillance


    (5 cr.) By addressing current trends and future applications in public health research, students develop advanced competency in health informatics and surveillance in this course. The key issues of data standards and integration, vocabularies and data transmission protocols, health information technology, surveillance systems, and the application of geographical information systems to situation awareness are addressed. Other topics include information architecture, public health records, electronic medical records, electronic health records, health information exchange, and database design, as well as information storage, security, and privacy.
  
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    HLTH 8300 - Law, Ethics, and Policy in Healthcare Administration♦


    (5 cr.) The rapidly evolving healthcare system presents the healthcare administrator with complex challenges and risks. Healthcare administrators must possess the skills needed to assess external and internal healthcare polices to influence organizational design and delivery of healthcare services. Students assess and discuss key policy initiatives from the diverse perspectives of policymakers, interest groups, and other stakeholders. Coursework focuses on required knowledge of laws and regulations developed by policymakers that impact the healthcare organizations and students will review key laws that govern patient care delivery, employee relations, contracts, and fraud. Emphasis will be placed on legal and regulatory failure points that administrators must avoid in designing and implementing policies and practices within the healthcare organization. To help frame these concepts, students examine the ethical underpinnings and principles that healthcare organizations and administrators follow in the delivery of services to patients.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8315 - Economics and Financing of Public Health Systems


    (5 cr.) In this course, students investigate the provision of resources for the delivery of public health services and the application of economic theories to health policy issues. Students explore how organizational characteristics interact with economic forces to produce systems performance outcomes, as well as how fiscal policy can influence the performance of public health systems. Students analyze grant-writing strategies and the advantages and disadvantages of various financing options. Other topics include the methods of economic evaluation and their usefulness in determining appropriate financing mechanisms for public health systems.
  
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    HLTH 8331 - Crossing Borders: U.S. and International NGO Organizational Cultures and Environments


    (5 cr.) In this course, students study in depth the cultures, structures, and activities of NGOs in select countries and compare their activities, organizational cultures, structures, and working environments with nonprofits in the United States. (Prerequisite(s): A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly advised.)
  
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    HLTH 8361 - Human Sexuality


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with a framework for understanding human sexuality in the context of couples, marriage, and family counseling in this course. Students explore empirically supported counseling approaches related to sexual functioning, intimacy, gender, and sexual orientation. They use a systemic framework for understanding the role and impact of sexuality on couples, marriages, and families. Students also explore and discuss specific topics related to issues of sexual diversity, and gender identity.
  
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    HLTH 8392 - The Language of Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) In today’s complex environment, leaders engaged in shaping public policy must know how to use the emotional as well as the intellectual power of language to motivate, inspire, and competently manage their organizations. In this course, students examine techniques, such as effective communication, used in dynamic leadership that affect conscious and unconscious influences on human behavior. Through discussions, group assignments, and individual projects, students apply theoretical and practical course content to demonstrate the necessary components for making effective human connections. Students also learn why stories, symbols, and metaphors are essential elements in the language of leadership.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8400 - Public Health Leadership, Management, and Systems Thinking


    (5 cr.) Students in this course focus on leadership models and theories, the core principles of public health leadership, and the application of systems thinking to public health. Students examine how to create strategies and solutions from a systems and ecological perspective that efficiently utilize public health and healthcare resources. Students discuss descriptive and prescriptive systems, focusing on the application of these processes to current public health issues and challenges at the organizational and community levels.
  
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    HLTH 8401 - Healthcare Financial Management and Economics♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students gain knowledge of economics principles such as cost, quality, and access as they relate to the healthcare world. The principles of healthcare financial management, including accounting and finance, are vitally important to the viability and ongoing operations of a healthcare business. Students have the opportunity to interpret and analyze the financial statements of a business, use and analyze financial ratios, utilize variance analysis, understand and implement operating and capital budgeting, and develop knowledge of the business planning process. Students create portions of a business/financial plan using these techniques and analyze the viability of their plan using accepted financial management tools.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8405 - Ethics and Social Justice


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. In this course, students examine the philosophy of ethics as well as responsibility and social justice—basic tenets of public service. Students explore the complex social, political, and related ethical challenges leaders face as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. They examine ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students also assess demographic data and current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community. Applying concepts presented in the course, students engage in an in-depth assessment of an emerging or persistent ethical or social justice issue, through which they demonstrate their ability to make recommendations for improvement or change.
  
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    HLTH 8410 - U.S. Healthcare Delivery System


    (5 cr.) Healthcare delivery is one of the largest industries in the United States. Students are provided with the opportunity to gain thorough insight into the current structure and components of health services and delivery; they are also presented with an abbreviated history addressing the nature of population illness and disease. Students identify and describe components of the system, including patients, healthcare professionals, public and private third-party payers, regulators, reimbursement methods, and technology. They engage in activities and discussions focused on the continuum of services related to healthcare, such as hospitals and hospital systems, ambulatory care, and long-term care. Students also explore issues related to these services, such as wellness, prevention, and community and public health, for a comprehensive understanding of the system. Students contextualize their study through the examination of current factors and challenges as well as the impact these challenges have on delivery and management.
  
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    HLTH 8410 - U.S. Healthcare Delivery System


    (5 cr.) Healthcare delivery is one of the largest industries in the United States. Students are provided with the opportunity to gain thorough insight into the current structure and components of health services and delivery; they are also presented with an abbreviated history addressing the nature of population illness and disease. Students identify and describe components of the system, including patients, healthcare professionals, public and private third-party payers, regulators, reimbursement methods, and technology. They engage in activities and discussions focused on the continuum of services related to healthcare, such as hospitals and hospital systems, ambulatory care, and long-term care. Students also explore issues related to these services, such as wellness, prevention, and community and public health, for a comprehensive understanding of the system. Students contextualize their study through the examination of current factors and challenges as well as the impact these challenges have on delivery and management.
  
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    HLTH 8412 - Health Education and Communication Strategies


    (5 cr.) Effective communication plays a vital role in the diffusion of a health behavior or innovation. In this course, the health educator is introduced to a wide range of health communication strategies. Assignments will allow students to apply and evaluate the use of health education delivery methods for various populations and practice settings (i.e., community, clinical, worksite, global, schools). Principles and theories of health communication and behavior change will be applied to a variety of health education case studies. Students will also demonstrate how to design and communicate culturally tailored health information to an audience of their choice. They will also explore the use of emerging technologies and social media in delivering and promoting health education.  (Prerequisite(s): HLTH 8003, HLTH 8110, and HLTH 8205.)
  
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    HLTH 8415 - Organizational Development and Leadership


    (5 cr.) The structure of healthcare organizations is complex and unique, and the behaviors within these organizations often have a direct impact on their success. Students in this course examine organizational behavior as well as the roles and responsibilities of management within healthcare organizations through the macro (organization-wide) perspective and micro (individual and team performance) perspective. Students also focus on understanding organizational values, mission, and vision; management and leadership principles to help navigate change; and effective delivery of services in an increasingly global environment. Students also learn and apply theories of organizational design, governance, and alternative organizational structures, and they consider the theory and practice of managing individuals and groups through motivation, communication, teamwork, leadership, organizational change, coalition building, negotiation, and conflict management and resolution. Through group assignments and personal assessments, students work toward developing self-awareness and effective management styles and strategies.
  
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    HLTH 8415 - Organizational Development and Leadership


    (5 cr.) The structure of healthcare organizations is complex and unique, and the behaviors within these organizations often have a direct impact on their success. Students in this course examine organizational behavior as well as the roles and responsibilities of management within healthcare organizations through the macro (organization-wide) perspective and micro (individual and team performance) perspective. Students also focus on understanding organizational values, mission, and vision; management and leadership principles to help navigate change; and effective delivery of services in an increasingly global environment. Students also learn and apply theories of organizational design, governance, and alternative organizational structures, and they consider the theory and practice of managing individuals and groups through motivation, communication, teamwork, leadership, organizational change, coalition building, negotiation, and conflict management and resolution. Through group assignments and personal assessments, students work toward developing self-awareness and effective management styles and strategies.
  
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    HLTH 8420 - Health Economics


    (5 cr.) Because of the complexity and uncertainty of the healthcare system, as well as the scope of resources consumed by health and health-related organizations, managers must appreciate the economic implications of decisions regarding allocation of resources. Students in this course examine the application of economic principles to managerial decision making regarding the amount, structure, and distribution of healthcare resources and services. Through discussions and application-based assignments, students build on their knowledge of economic principles as they examine the population’s demand for healthcare; the supply of organizations and practitioners; the role of insurance, moral hazard, and adverse selection; the practice of cost shifting; the structure, competitive nature, and dynamics of markets; differing objectives of for-profit and nonprofit organizations; variation in consumer access to and use of services; roles of uncertainty and information asymmetry; strategies for consumer cost sharing; and challenges that healthcare organizations face in pricing, producing, allocating, and distributing health services. Students also devote special attention to understanding how health services differ in a variety of competitive markets.
  
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    HLTH 8425 - Health Policy


    (5 cr.) The health of individuals as well as access to and delivery of health services in the United States depend on policy makers who make authoritative decisions based on legal standards, carried out at the federal, state, and local levels. Students in this course examine the process for developing and implementing policy at the various levels of the legal system, key stakeholders and interest groups involved in the health policy process, and how U.S. health policy changes over time. They also explore and discuss key health policy initiatives that address health issues in the United States, including Medicare and Medicaid; access to care and the uninsured; disease-specific efforts, such as HIV/AIDS and organ transplantation programs; emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases; terrorism and emergency preparedness; and funding issues associated with health policy. Applying course concepts, students complete practical assignments focused on various topical issues, such as stakeholder influence on the policy-making process, access to insurance and care, and pay-for-performance policies, among others. 
  
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    HLTH 8430 - Healthcare Financial Management


    (5 cr.) This course is an introduction to the terminology, theory, concepts, and techniques used in the accounting and finance functions in healthcare organizations. Students gain an understanding of the important role of finance in healthcare organizations, and they learn various techniques to develop, manage, and control finances. Using an applied approach, students also learn how to develop, apply, and interpret various financial tools, including budgets, sources of revenue/reimbursement by payer, income statements, balance sheets, dashboards, statements of cash flow, pro formas, return on investment analysis, financial ratios, capital budgeting, debt service and borrowing, depreciation, and cost allocation and cost accounting techniques. Additionally, students develop portions of a business/financial plan using these techniques and analyze the viability of their business/financial plan using accepted financial management tools.
  
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    HLTH 8430 - Healthcare Financial Management


    (5 cr.) This course is an introduction to the terminology, theory, concepts, and techniques used in the accounting and finance functions in healthcare organizations. Students gain an understanding of the important role of finance in healthcare organizations, and they learn various techniques to develop, manage, and control finances. Using an applied approach, students also learn how to develop, apply, and interpret various financial tools, including budgets, sources of revenue/reimbursement by payer, income statements, balance sheets, dashboards, statements of cash flow, pro formas, return on investment analysis, financial ratios, capital budgeting, debt service and borrowing, depreciation, and cost allocation and cost accounting techniques. Additionally, students develop portions of a business/financial plan using these techniques and analyze the viability of their business/financial plan using accepted financial management tools.
  
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    HLTH 8431 - Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector♦


    (5 cr.) Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. Students in this course examine finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. They assess theories for motivating major fiscal-policy debates, and they explore and discuss auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems, the use of dashboards for financial reporting, and the impact of globalization on finance and budget. Students read and analyze budgets, financial statements, and reports. They contextualize their learning as they apply knowledge gained from their analysis to develop a new budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8435 - Health Law and Ethics


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of law, regulation, and court decisions that affect healthcare organizations, as well as ethical underpinnings and principles that healthcare organizations follow in the delivery of services. Students explore and discuss a variety of topics, including key federal and state laws; regulatory oversight and licensing of facilities and practitioners; credentialing requirements and processes; scope of practice for practitioners; admission and discharge processes; privacy and confidentiality of patient information; patient protection, including advanced directives; organizational liability; conflict of interest legislation; antitrust law; contract law governing relationships with employed physicians and other providers; risk management; and organizational governance issues, among others. Using case studies and hypothetical situations, students assess management roles and key ethical principles and challenges underpinning healthcare organizations.
  
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    HLTH 8435 - Health Law and Ethics


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of law, regulation, and court decisions that affect healthcare organizations, as well as ethical underpinnings and principles that healthcare organizations follow in the delivery of services. Students explore and discuss a variety of topics, including key federal and state laws; regulatory oversight and licensing of facilities and practitioners; credentialing requirements and processes; scope of practice for practitioners; admission and discharge processes; privacy and confidentiality of patient information; patient protection, including advanced directives; organizational liability; conflict of interest legislation; antitrust law; contract law governing relationships with employed physicians and other providers; risk management; and organizational governance issues, among others. Using case studies and hypothetical situations, students assess management roles and key ethical principles and challenges underpinning healthcare organizations.
  
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    HLTH 8440 - Application of Public Health and Behavior Change Theories♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are presented with a comprehensive look at public health and behavior change theories that apply to community health education. Students review and assess predominant social and behavioral principles at the individual, interpersonal, and community levels. They discuss examples of how others have harnessed social marketing and communication technology to effect positive health behavior change in individuals and communities. Students learn to apply theories to public health research and practice.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8450 - Community Health Assessment♦


    (5 cr.) Community health assessment and its application to program planning are covered in this course. Students learn to identify and prioritize problems, then assess and utilize community resources to address these problems. Topics include measuring selected determinants of community health status and health services use, classifying community assets, identifying data sources, and applying certain methods to maximize community participation. Students synthesize the results of a community health assessment to create a community diagnosis that serves as the basis for program planning and research design.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8451 - Public Policy Analysis


    (5 cr.) Contemporary public administrators work in a dynamic, partisan environment with unprecedented access to public policy data—conditions leading to extraordinary opportunities and, often times, severe constraints. Students in this course thoroughly examine key stakeholders involved in the public policy process and devote special attention to their function, impact, and constraint on policy development. In addition, students explore professional ethics related to the role of the policy analyst and consider the significant social outcomes of public policy. They examine the theories and strategies used by policy makers and policy analysts to develop, implement, execute, evaluate, and promulgate public policy. They also assess the impact and consequences of public policy and evaluate it though a social justice framework. Using critical-thinking and communication skills, students craft a policy memorandum regarding a current public policy problem, for which they consider and evaluate competing policy alternatives.
  
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    HLTH 8465 - Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination♦


    (5 cr.) In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public, private, and nonprofit organizations need to be strategic in planning and creating effective, collaborative programs and services. Students in this course explore the role and process of strategic planning, with an emphasis on collaboration, cooperation, and coordination within and among organizations. Students apply these concepts to real-life situations and organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8475 - Advanced Program Implementation and Evaluation


    (5 cr.) Students in this this course focus on the competencies required of the public health professional in planning for the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of community health promotion and disease prevention initiatives. Attention is given to needs assessment, logic models, and collaboration with stakeholders. Strategic approaches to planning, implementation, and evaluation with particular attention to study design and sampling are addressed. Health behavior theories are considered in the development of health promotion programs, the application of evaluation findings, and prioritization of community concerns and resources.
  
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    HLTH 8500 - Human Resources Management and Organizational Development and Leadership for Healthcare Administrators♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine organizational behavior as well as the roles and responsibilities of management and leadership within healthcare organizations through the macro (organization-wide) and micro (individual and team performance) perspectives. Students also focus on understanding organizational values, mission, and vision; management and leadership principles to help manage change; and effective delivery of services in an increasingly global environment. They also learn and apply theories of organizational design, governance, and alternative organizational structures, and they consider the theory and practice of managing individuals and groups through motivation, communication, teamwork, leadership, organizational change, coalition building, negotiation, and conflict management and resolution. Through group assignments and personal assessments, students work toward developing self-awareness and effective management styles and strategies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 8545 - Advanced Analysis of Community Health Data and Surveillance in Public Health


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover the application of community health assessment, secondary data analysis, and the use of health informatics and surveillance for program planning. Students learn to identify and prioritize problems, and then assess and utilize community resources to address these problems. Topics include measuring selected determinants of community health status and health services use, classification of community assets, identification of data sources, simple and complex sampling designs, and application of certain methods to maximize community participation. Students will develop an understanding of statistical and epidemiological methodology to utilize secondary data to synthesize the results of a community health assessment and limitations to create a community diagnosis that serves as the basis for program planning and research design.
  
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    HLTH 8550 - Writing a Quality Prospectus


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on the process of writing the doctoral dissertation premise and prospectus. The premise will guide students through their committee selection process. The prospectus will guide students through the stages of writing a dissertation—conducting a literature review, developing a problem statement and research questions, and evaluating research designs, methods, and types of analysis. The premise and prospectus that students write for this course will be for a possible dissertation topic. This exercise is the cornerstone of this course and will prepare students for working with their chosen dissertation topic.
  
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    HLTH 8551 - Preparing for Dissertation


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on the process of writing the doctoral dissertation premise and prospectus. The premise will guide students through their committee selection process. The prospectus will guide students through the stages of writing a dissertation—conducting a literature review, developing a problem statement and research questions, and evaluating research designs, methods, and types of analysis. The premise and prospectus that students write for this course will be for a possible dissertation topic. This exercise is the cornerstone of this course and will prepare students for working with their chosen dissertation topic.
  
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    HLTH 8573 - Child and Adolescent Health Issues


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover diseases and disorders in children and adolescents. Topics include diabetes, anorexia, headaches, epilepsy, burn injuries, cystic fibrosis, asthma, addiction, and adolescent obesity. Health promotion for children and adolescents is discussed, including cardiovascular health, nutrition, and exercise. Also covered are insights into special issues such as posttraumatic stress disorder, daily stress, sexually transmitted diseases, sleep disorders, and ethical and legal issues in pediatric and adolescent health psychology. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 8745.)
 

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