2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) 
    
    Nov 29, 2020  
2017-2018 Walden University Catalog (March 2018) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    FPSY 6728 - Substance Abuse Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) The impact of substance abuse on the lives of people with addictions, and the lives of their families, makes for a highly complex and challenging area of mental health counseling. Counselors working with these individuals must possess a comprehensive understanding of the background, controversies, and current approaches in regard to the treatment of substance abuse. In this course, students examine psychological aspects of addictions involving alcohol, prescription medications, and illegal substances. They also examine current research in the field of dependency and addiction. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application-based assignments on diagnosing patients, choosing among models of treatment, planning treatment, using group and family treatment plans, and ensuring treatment efficacy. They also consider strategies to promote change, including the trans-theoretical model of behavior change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6740 - Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma♦


    (5 cr.) There is no shortage of natural and human-made disasters, such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities. Individuals and communities impacted by such disasters often need assistance from professionals who understand the social, cultural, and psychological complexities of crisis and trauma. Students in this course investigate how these incidents impact the psychology of individuals and groups. They assess traditional and current literature and complete practical exercises to learn about theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with trauma. Considering the various ways crisis professionals can promote positive social change, students devote special attention to the importance and development of culturally appropriate, service-delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disasters.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6741 - Psychology of Terrorism♦


    (5 cr.) Many sources define terrorism as a type of psychological warfare, as it induces fear and feelings of vulnerability. Therefore, professionals need to understand all aspects of terrorism to help prevent further terroristic acts and respond to victims who have been affected psychologically. Students in this course explore terrorism from a psychological perspective. They examine types of terrorism; contributing factors related to the development of terrorists and terrorist organizations; counterterrorism agencies and laws; the impact of terrorist events on individuals, families, and communities; prevention, intervention, and postvention with survivors; media coverage of terrorist events; human rights and ethical issues; and future trends related to the psychology of terrorism. Students also examine the threat of terrorism in their own community and evaluate the potential impact. Using concepts presented in the course, they consider applications for preventative measures as well as strategies to promote resiliency among individual and families who may become victims of terrorism.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6742 - Conflict, Conflict Resolution, and Peace♦


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students engage in a study of conflict, conflict resolution, and peace from psychological and social psychological perspectives. Students examine the concept of conflict and methods of addressing it, including management, resolution, and transformation; theories related to conflict resolution; approaches to conflict resolution, including negotiation and third-party interventions; and social psychological factors that influence conflict and conflict resolution. They also consider the influence of culture in conflict and conflict resolution; the role of ethics; intractable and international conflicts; the concept of peace; and how third-party approaches can contribute to the peace process. Students apply conflict resolution approaches to conflicts at all levels, from interpersonal to those involving whole nations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6748 - Stress and Coping


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine contemporary theories on the perception of stress, appraisal of stressors, ways of coping, and the psychophysiological mechanisms involved in the stress response. They explore topical issues, including psychoneuroimmunology, behavioral nutrition, psychophysiology, traumatic stress, chronic pain, and stress-related psychophysiological and medical disorders as they relate to stress and coping. Students engage in discussions designed to provide practical application of course content. Demonstrating breadth and depth of knowledge and critical-thinking skills, students explore a topic of interest through a final research proposal and paper on a current issue related to course concepts. (Prerequisite(s): PSYC 6225.)
  
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    FPSY 6771 - Terrorism: A Systemic Approach for Emergency Preparedness


    (5 cr.) Terrorism continues to be a constant threat to the American public, which leads to facilitating the need for accurate information, organized resources, and established approaches to respond to emergencies and keep the public informed. Students in this course examine terrorism and related public policy on a local, national, and international level. They also assess the need and function of systemic approaches for emergency preparedness. Students explore and discuss topical issues, such as terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyberterrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Using analytic skills and tools, students assess recommendations that policymakers use in decisions to prevent or respond to terrorism. They also gain hands-on experience initiating the development and/or analysis of a terrorism-preparedness infrastructure.
  
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    FPSY 6785 - Prevention: Research and Practice♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students prepare for their roles as counselors in areas of prevention, intervention, and consultation with specific populations in different settings. Students assess these three areas of mental health counseling, including the relationships among them, methodological applications, and related ethical and legal considerations. They also discuss a variety of topics with their peers, such as applications for social change, needs of specific populations, iatrogenic harm, professional approaches and challenges, program evaluation, and future trends. Using an action-research model, students develop a blueprint for a project to address a contemporary mental health issue through the context of prevention, intervention, or consultation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6810 - Community Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Through collaborative research and action, community psychologists work to enhance the well-being of individuals and community by understanding how communities function on many different levels. Students in this course explore the fundamental concepts and practice of community psychology. They examine guiding values and assumptions of the field, basic ecological concepts, and models of intervention. Evaluating traditional and topical research, students explore diversity in community psychology, strategies for social change, primary and secondary prevention, community mental health, empowerment, stress, and resiliency. They also have the opportunity to assess and discuss their personal and professional experiences, values, and cultural background and consider how these factors are likely to influence their work as community psychologists.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6812 - Contemporary Cases and Issues in the Courts


    (5 cr.) Major issues in the Supreme Court have an impact on public policy at the state and local levels. Students taking this course examine major past and current U.S. Supreme Court decisions and explore how these decisions affect public policy. Topics include individual rights, property rights, administrative law, immigration law, and foreign policy. Students apply legal research and verdicts to case studies and current issues.
  
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    FPSY 6813 - Fundamentals of Law and Public Policy


    (5 cr.) Legal decisions and the law have an impact on the creation of public policy. Students in this course explore the relationship between laws and public policy and the impact court decisions have on policy and policy leaders. Topics include legal concepts and terminology, legal jurisdictions, case law, seminal cases, and the Supreme Court’s roles and procedures. Students apply fundamental legal concepts and principles to case studies and contemporary problems.
  
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    FPSY 6830 - Current Issues in Homeland Security


    (5 cr.) Since its inception, the Department of Homeland Security has profoundly impacted public policy and administration. Students in this course examine homeland security history, concepts, policies, and strategies of prevention and response. Topics include ethical issues, telecommunications, technology, threat assessment, contingency planning, and risk management. Students apply fundamental concepts and principles of homeland security to case studies and current issues.
  
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    FPSY 6910 - Legal Issues and Social Change in Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course critically examine the effects of recent legislation, case law, and national policies on social change and on consultation and research in forensic psychology. Students will have opportunities to explore and discuss contemporary and controversial issues such as the ethics of civil commitment, the death penalty, police use of force, investigative practices to curtail terrorism, hate crimes, and transfer of juveniles to adult criminal court. They can investigate how related legal issues affect forensic psychology and society in general. They will analyze ethical issues that often arise for forensic psychology professionals who are working in these areas.
  
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    FPSY 6912 - Mental Health Law♦


    (5 cr.) Mental health counseling professionals in all areas, especially criminal forensic psychological practice, may encounter various conflicts regarding psychological and legal approaches to treatment. Therefore, it is important for counselors to have a firm understanding of mental health law to avoid conflicts, such as issues of liability and malpractice. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to examine several different aspects of the law related to mental health issues, including those constituting forensic psychological practice, such as civil matters (personal injury and civil competency issues) and criminal matters (competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, diminished capacity, and death-penalty issues). Students employ recent court decisions and laws, such as the Tarasoff ruling, mandated reporting, and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), to examine how mental health law influences the practice of psychology and mental health counseling.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 6915 - Field Experience


    (5 cr.) Students engage in a 12-week practical field experience at a site specific to students’ degree program and their anticipated employment setting or service population. Students work a specified amount of time on site, interact with peers, and share their experiences and perspectives. Gaining hands-on, practical experience, they apply concepts and theories learned throughout the program to the responsibilities encountered in their field experience setting.
  
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    FPSY 8002 - Foundations of Graduate Study in Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students build a foundation for academic and professional success as social change agents. They assess the relationship of Walden’s mission and vision to professional goals. They establish connections with their peers and the broader Walden community. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of scholarly writing, critical-thinking skills, academic integrity, ethics, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence within the field of psychology.
  
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    FPSY 8101 - Introduction to Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an expansive overview of forensic psychology, including basic tenets, practices, and procedures. Students explore subspecialties of forensic psychology; roles and responsibilities; and related legal, ethical, and diversity issues. They learn how forensic psychology links to the criminal justice system as they explore related topics, including criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, and correctional psychology. Through this course, students acquire a broad understanding of forensic psychology theories and concepts, which they apply to the analysis of controversial issues and contemporary challenges within the field.
  
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    FPSY 8102 - Intersection of Crime, Psychology, and the Law


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an expansive overview of forensic psychology, including basic tenets, practices, and procedures. Students explore subspecialties of forensic psychology; roles and responsibilities; and related legal, ethical, and diversity issues. They have the opportunity to learn how forensic psychology links to legal systems as they explore related topics, including criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, and correctional psychology. Through this course, students can acquire a broad understanding of forensic psychology theories and concepts, which they apply to the analysis of controversial issues and contemporary challenges within the fields.
  
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    FPSY 8115 - Writing A Quality Prospectus in Psychology


    (5 cr.) This five-credit course is focused specifically on the process of writing the doctoral study prospectus. Students will use their preliminary research plan, developed previously, and develop a problem statement, to be used in the doctoral study. They further refine the problem statement and carry out the planning and the library research that will bring them to the formulation of a doctoral study prospectus. The prospectus is a brief paper, typically 15–20 pages in length, that lays out the background for the problem statement, the problem statement itself, a survey of the relevant literature (typically 25–75 references), and a research, implementation, and evaluation plan for the solution of the problem.
  
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    FPSY 8116 - Understanding Forensic Psychology Research


    (5 cr.) Forensic psychologists, and others in the field, often rely on psychological research for a variety of functions; for example, to extract empirical data about psychological tests or to determine the efficacy of different interrogation techniques. Through this course, students work toward becoming astute consumers of forensic psychology research, acquiring skills needed to understand and interpret data. Students assess the relevance of research as well as the significance of incorporating ethics into practice. They examine basic principles of statistics, such as reliability and validity. Students also learn how to critically read forensic psychology research and how best to apply research results to forensic situations in clinical, correctional, court, public policy, and police settings.
  
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    FPSY 8126 - Understanding Violence, Risk, and Threat Assessment


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore the various assessment techniques and instruments used within the forensic psychology arena. Some of the assessment areas covered include risk assessment, juvenile evaluations, child custody evaluations, and capital punishment, as well as the various psychological instruments that are used in these types of evaluations. Students are provided a solid foundation of the knowledge of forensic psychology techniques and assessment rather than specific skills in administering and interpreting psychological tests.
  
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    FPSY 8135 - Criminal Behavior


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with contemporary views, theories, and case-study analysis of maladaptive and criminal behavior, victimology, and victim-offender relationships. A broad conceptualization of criminal behavior, such as that woven from biological, sociological, and psychological perspectives, is explored and evaluated. Theories of crime and the application of risk factors associated with criminal behavior are examined. Additionally, students will be exposed to specific offender groups, both violent and nonviolent, including psychopaths, serial and mass murderers, criminal paraphiliacs, arsonists, white-collar thieves, scam artists, domestic terrorists, and others.

     

  
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    FPSY 8200 - Advanced Issues in Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are allowed to examine current trends and issues in forensic psychology through the lens of developing their own expertise and forming a consultative group with fellow doctoral students. Students will develop skills and expertise necessary as a forensic consultant and expert witness, and in criminal investigative analysis. In this seminar-style course, students apply problem-based learning to cases and scenarios such as juvenile delinquency, terrorism, and human trafficking. They will address the ethical challenges faced by forensic psychologist professionals and analyze the role of restorative justice for positive social change.

     

  
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    FPSY 8201 - Psychological Aspects of Violent Crime


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students explore the nature and extent of the psychological nexus of criminal homicide across various environments to include serial, mass, spree, workplace violence homicide, school shooter homicide, and child abduction homicide. Students will examine the theories and trends of these types of violent crime regarding offender and victim psychological and behavioral characteristics.
  
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    FPSY 8202 - Criminal Investigative Analysis and Profiling


    (5 cr.) Law enforcement officials characterize serial murder among one of the most abhorrent of all criminal behaviors. In this course, students examine the interest in serial and mass murder in popular culture and explore typologies and theories of criminal behavior. They assess and discuss the history and evolution of profiling; roles, goals, and responsibilities of profilers; the use of profiling in criminal investigations; and populations victimized by serial and mass murderers. Students also apply typologies and criminal theories to real-world case scenarios. This course is designed to provide an overview of theory and research in the core areas of forensic psychology, as it pertains to the interdisciplinary behavioral science that provides psychological profiling and assessments of political leaders and individuals in a variety of situations.
  
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    FPSY 8203 - Victimology


    (5 cr.) What is the relationship between victims and those who commit crimes against them, and how does the criminal justice system protect and respond to victims of crime? In this course, students have the opportunity to answer such questions through a comprehensive assessment of victimology, a relatively new discipline in the field of criminal justice. Students examine victim patterns and tendencies and learn how victims interact with the police and the legal system. They also examine how factors of class, race, and sexual orientation affect the perception of the victim by different constituents, including the public, the court system, and the media. Students assess and discuss the concept of primary and secondary victims and gain practical insight on a range of services and resources available to all types of victims.
  
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    FPSY 8204 - Sex Offender Behavior and Treatment


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide an oversight of sex-offending behavior. Legal issues raised in both criminal and civil cases that involve sex offenses will be discussed. Psychological interventions have been determined to have empirical evidence in helping to reduce sex-offending behavior. Students will be expected to learn about the sex-offender assessment tools used by psychologists to conduct legal and psychological research.
  
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    FPSY 8205 - Psychological Aspect of Cyber Crimes


    (5 cr.) In this course, students review the psychobehavioral factors of criminals who engage in criminal activities using digital social media and other online resources. Students analyze the types and trends of both domestic and global cyber crime. In addition, students will examine characteristics of cyber perpetrators and cyber victims. Students are also provided a foundational understanding of the origins and consequences of human trafficking; sexual exploitation of children from psychological, social, and legal perspectives; and how technology facilitates these types of crimes. Lastly, the students in this course examine the best practices in preventing and responding to cyber crimes.
  
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    FPSY 8206 - Family Violence


    (5 cr.) In this course, students review the victims and the perpetrators of crimes involving intimate partner violence, child maltreatment and abuse, and elder abuse. Students address the growing literature related to the psychological damage caused by these traumatic events, including the role of mental illness and how it impacts issues involving the criminal, civil, family, and juvenile law areas.
  
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    FPSY 8214 - Consulting for Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Organizational and professional development (OPD) professionals promote and implement organizational change by using fundamental techniques of change management. Students in this course examine and apply these tools, including consulting competencies, approaches, and organizational change models to learn the skills of an OPD consultant. Students explore methods for accelerating individual, group, and organizational performance through consulting, coaching, and change management. They also explore related topics, such as organizational assessment; team development; strategic planning; group dynamics; power, politics, and influence; leadership; and conflict management. Students apply course concepts to the assessment of an organization and the development of strategies to address identified needs for change.
  
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    FPSY 8245 - Family Violence


    (5 cr.) In this course, students review the victims and the perpetrators of crimes involving intimate partner violence, child maltreatment and abuse, and elder abuse. Students address the growing literature related to the psychological damage caused by these traumatic events, including the role of mental illness and how it impacts issues involving the criminal, civil, family, and juvenile law areas.
  
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    FPSY 8247 - Social Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of classic and contemporary topics in social psychology with a focus on how social contexts influence and shape individual behavior. Topics covered include research methods in social psychology, the relation of self and culture, person perception, attitudes and their relation to behavior, attribution theory, persuasion, conformity and obedience, interpersonal attraction, prejudice, aggression, group dynamics, intergroup relations, and multiculturalism. The course is presented with a focus on cross-cultural similarities and variations in the impact of context on behavior.
  
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    FPSY 8252 - Themes and Theories of Psychology


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are introduced to theories, research, and themes that form the tenets of psychology. Basic theoretical models will be reviewed, including psychodynamic, cognitive, developmental, social learning/socio-cognitive, behaviorist, learning and motivation, systems, biopsychosocial, and gender theories. Theories encompassing diverse populations, including cross-cultural and feminist theories, will also be examined. Students will critically examine the strengths and limitations of these theories and their utility in the field of psychology. Contemporary themes in psychology will be explored, with an emphasis on application of theories designed to effect positive social change. 
  
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    FPSY 8310 - Research Design


    (5 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to build a foundation in the design of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches to psychological research. Students learn the strengths and limitations of each method and under what circumstances each approach would be the most appropriate research design. They also learn the importance of scholarly writing as well as how to identify a topic for research and how to conduct a literature search. Students gain hands-on practice developing a research proposal through which they address key elements, such as collecting and analyzing data, writing an introduction, stating a purpose for the study, identifying research questions and hypotheses, using theory, and defining the significance of the study. Additionally, students consider the legal and ethical issues associated with human subjects’ protection. (Prerequisite(s): FPSY 6305.) Note: To register for this course, please contact the Academic Advising Team.
  
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    FPSY 8314 - Program Evaluation


    (5 cr.) The skills required to assess research and work effectively with stakeholders are among the many proficiencies required of professionals who evaluate and develop programs. In this course, students examine these skill sets as well as the history, theory, and major approaches underlying program evaluation. Students learn how to select appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative models and techniques to perform evaluations, demonstrate program effectiveness, and disseminate results. Additionally, students explore the procedures and techniques involved in offering their evaluation services to a specific group or organization. They also examine strategies to gain stakeholder interest in developing appropriate standards, research progress, and evaluation outcomes. Students acquire practical experience evaluating a program of interest through which they outline organizational structure, identify stakeholders, employ evaluation models, explain steps in planning, and predict possible challenges or stakeholder fears, for which they recommend solutions.
  
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    FPSY 8333 - Vicarious Trauma and Compassion Fatigue


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students gain an understanding and awareness of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue for trauma-response-helping professionals. They examine intervention strategies and models of treatment and prevention of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue through the lens of counselor educators, supervisors, and clinicians. Applying course concepts, students gain hands-on practice conducting a needs assessment and examining the use of standardized instruments. They also propose social change recommendations related to vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue to promote informed and competent trauma-response-helping professionals. Students engage in course assignments that emphasize the ethical, legal, multicultural, and spiritual implications for wellness and self-care, including personal, professional, and organizational elements. As a final project, students interview a trauma-response-helping professional and develop an organizational wellness plan for their setting.
  
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    FPSY 8400 - Advanced Issues in Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are allowed to examine current trends and issues in forensic psychology through the lens of developing their own expertise and forming a consultative group with fellow doctoral students. Students develop skills and expertise necessary as forensic consultants and expert witnesses and in criminal investigative analysis. In this seminar-style course, students apply problem-based learning to cases and scenarios such as juvenile delinquency, terrorism, and human trafficking. They address the ethical challenges faced by forensic psychologist professionals and analyze the role of restorative justice for positive social change.
  
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    FPSY 8412 - Research Foundations


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine and receive support for student readiness regarding the use of quantitative and qualitative research approaches. They study research fundamentals, including the distinction between social problems and research problems, the functions of research problems versus research purpose statements, and the role of theory and conceptual framework in informing research. Students examine quantitative and qualitative concepts central to research methods, design, and analysis. They also study how research design, methods, and analyses properly align for both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Students demonstrate their knowledge by creating two research outlines, using quantitative and qualitative approaches, which they develop throughout the course. They determine appropriate conditions for the use of mixed-methods approaches and differentiate between types of mixed-methods research designs. Students engage in pre- and post-assessments of skills and knowledge.
  
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    FPSY 8480 - Psychology of Organizations


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the application of behavioral theories in organizational settings. The focus is on individual, group, and organizational behavior. Topics include individual differences in employee motivation and job satisfaction, group development, team building, organizational leadership and organizational design, culture, and development. Students acquire a broad knowledge base in organizational psychology, its research, and its applications.
  
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    FPSY 8511 - Treatment of Forensic Populations


    (5 cr.) In this course, students gain the foundational knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations, such as sex offenders, substance abusers, and white-collar criminals. Students analyze the use of traditional forms of intervention, including individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice. Applying concepts and theories learned in the course, students develop a project scenario in which they feature an offender and describe treatment approaches as well as related ethical, legal, and multicultural factors that may impact treatment. Reflecting on the course, students also consider and discuss professional identity and goals.
  
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    FPSY 8512 - Advanced Issues in Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine current trends and issues in forensic psychology through the lens of expert guest presenters who specialize in this area of forensic psychology. They have an opportunity to obtain a more in-depth understanding of these current issues and gain the insights from professionals who are seasoned in the field.
  
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    FPSY 8520 - Psychology in the Courts


    (5 cr.) Forensic psychology professionals play a vital role in the court system, providing consultation, expert testimony, and recommendations for treatment. In this course, students have the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills used by forensic psychology professionals working in the courts. Students examine major roles of psychology professionals, their responsibilities, and required proficiencies, such as oral and written communication skills. Through application-based exercises, students engage in practical exercises, such as in writing reports, planning evaluations, and preparing witnesses for testimony. Students also consider contemporary challenges, ethical and legal issues, and the impact of technology on courts in the United States. 
  
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    FPSY 8521 - Police Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about the various roles and responsibilities of forensic psychology professionals working with and in police departments, the structures and organizations in which they work, and the skills needed to perform daily functions, such as counseling and supporting police. Students analyze and discuss common issues and challenges, including crisis situations, psychological risks of police work, and stress management. They also explore less common roles of psychology professionals working with police, such as training in hostage negotiations and the selection of special officers (SWAT, snipers, and tactical commanders). Engaging in assignments designed to provide application of content, students gain practical insight on a variety of topics, such as diversity issues and training, community impact, and forensic psychology operations.
  
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    FPSY 8522 - Psychology in the Legal System


    (5 cr.) Students in this course cover the major roles that a forensic psychologist could have within the court system. Issues such as expert testimony, jury selection, eyewitness testimony, and consultation with attorneys will be covered. Additionally, practical skills such as documentation and report writing will be addressed.
  
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    FPSY 8530 - Forensic Applications in Community Settings


    (5 cr.) Professionals must devote considerable attention to forensic psychology perspectives and approaches to address issues such as the overpopulation of prisons; decrease in healthcare availability; and cases in which courts remand treatment in community settings. Students in this course examine forensic psychology theories and perspectives, and then they apply these concepts to various community settings. They engage in practical assignments and topical readings that focus on working with offenders upon re-entry to the community and offenders who receive nonincarceration community placements. In addition, students explore less-common applications, such as restorative justice and community crime prevention. They also analyze the impact of personal perspectives and setting on the application of forensic psychology.
  
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    FPSY 8700 - Dissertation Literature Review Lab


    (2 cr.) The purpose of this course is to help students prepare to write a well-structured, soundly presented, critical literature review. Students in the course cover topic selection, research analysis, writing, and editing. Upon completing the course, students produce an annotated bibliography and outline of a literature review using a minimum of 10 self-selected research articles. This course is appropriate for doctoral students who are preparing for their dissertation research.  

     

  
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    FPSY 8701 - Literature Review Lab


    (2 cr.) The purpose of this course is to help students prepare to write a well-structured, soundly presented, critical literature review. Students in the course cover topic selection, research analysis, writing, and editing. Upon completing the course, students produce an annotated bibliography and outline of a literature review using a minimum of 10 self-selected research articles. This course is appropriate for doctoral students who are preparing for their dissertation research. 
  
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    FPSY 8720 - Abnormal Behavior


    (5 cr.) Understanding the characteristics and causes of atypical thoughts and actions—commonly known in mental health professions as abnormal behavior—is essential in determining accurate diagnoses, answering forensic referral questions, and planning effective treatment programs. In this course, students examine the history and evolution of abnormal psychology and how practitioners use contemporary diagnostic criteria of abnormal behavior in various settings, such as schools, rehabilitation facilities, community agencies, and forensic situations. They examine specific techniques for the diagnosis, assessment, and/or treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders, as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial problems. Using the scholar-practitioner model, students consider environmental and biological factors contributing to behavioral disorders. Students also investigate and discuss current and future trends, legal and ethical issues, and multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis and clinical assessment.
  
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    FPSY 8740 - Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma


    (5 cr.) There is no shortage of natural and human-made disasters, such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities. Individuals and communities impacted by such disasters often need assistance from professionals who understand the social, cultural, and psychological complexities of crisis and trauma. Students in this course investigate how these incidents impact the psychology of individuals and groups. They assess traditional and current literature and complete practical exercises to learn about theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with trauma. Considering the various ways crisis professionals can promote positive social change, students devote special attention to the importance and development of culturally appropriate, service-delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disasters.
  
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    FPSY 8748 - Stress and Coping


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine contemporary theories on the perception of stress, appraisal of stressors, ways of coping, and the psychophysiological mechanisms involved in the stress response. They explore topical issues, including psychoneuroimmunology, behavioral nutrition, psychophysiology, traumatic stress, chronic pain, and stress-related psychophysiological and medical disorders as they relate to stress and coping. Students engage in discussions designed to provide practical application of course content. Demonstrating breadth and depth of knowledge and critical-thinking skills, students explore a topic of interest through a final research proposal and paper on a current issue related to course concepts.
  
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    FPSY 8755 - Leadership and Leader Development


    (5 cr.) Forensic psychologists and others in the field often rely on psychological research for a variety of functions; for example, to extract empirical data about psychological tests or to determine the efficacy of different interrogation techniques. Through this course, students work toward becoming astute consumers of forensic psychology research, acquiring skills needed to understand and interpret data. Students assess the relevance of research as well as the significance of incorporating ethics into practice. They examine basic principles of statistics, such as reliability and validity. Students also learn how to critically read forensic psychology research and how best to apply research findings.
  
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    FPSY 8762 - Teaching of Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine techniques and issues related to teaching psychology at the college and/or university level. The primary focus is on teaching skills, developing rapport with students, managing the course, and managing the classroom. Classroom communication and ethical issues relevant to both faculty and students are also covered.
  
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    FPSY 8785 - Prevention: Research and Practice♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students prepare for their roles as counselors in areas of prevention, intervention, and consultation with specific populations in different settings. Students assess these three areas of mental health counseling, including the relationships among them, methodological applications, and related ethical and legal considerations. They also discuss a variety of topics with their peers, such as applications for social change, needs of specific populations, iatrogenic harm, professional approaches and challenges, program evaluation, and future trends. Using an action-research model, students develop a blueprint for a project to address a contemporary mental health issue through the context of prevention, intervention, or consultation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    FPSY 8810 - Community Psychology


    (5 cr.) Through collaborative research and action, community psychologists work to enhance the well-being of individuals and community by understanding how communities function on many different levels. Students in this course explore the fundamental concepts and practice of community psychology. They examine guiding values and assumptions of the field, basic ecological concepts, and models of intervention. Evaluating traditional and topical research, students explore diversity in community psychology, strategies for social change, primary and secondary prevention, community mental health, empowerment, stress, and resiliency. They also have the opportunity to assess and discuss their personal and professional experiences, values, and cultural background and consider how these factors are likely to influence their work as community psychologists.
  
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    FPSY 8910 - Legal Issues and Social Change in Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course critically examine the effects of recent legislation, case law, and national policies on social change and on consultation and research in forensic psychology. Students will have opportunities to explore and discuss contemporary and controversial issues such as the ethics of civil commitment, the death penalty, police use of force, investigative practices to curtail terrorism, hate crimes, and transfer of juveniles to adult criminal court. They can investigate how related legal issues affect forensic psychology and society in general. They will analyze ethical issues that often arise for forensic psychology professionals who are working in these areas.
  
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    FPSY 8912 - Mental Health Law


    (5 cr.) Mental health counseling professionals in all areas, especially criminal forensic psychological practice, may encounter various conflicts regarding psychological and legal approaches to treatment. Therefore, it is important for counselors to have a firm understanding of mental health law to avoid conflicts, such as issues of liability and malpractice. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to examine several different aspects of the law related to mental health issues, including those constituting forensic psychological practice, such as civil matters (personal injury and civil competency issues) and criminal matters (competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, diminished capacity, and death-penalty issues). Students employ recent court decisions and laws, such as the Tarasoff ruling, mandated reporting, and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), to examine how mental health law influences the practice of psychology and mental health counseling.
  
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    FPSY 8915 - Field Experience


    (5 cr.) Students engage in a 12-week practical field experience at a site specific to students’ degree program and their anticipated employment setting or service population. Students work a specified amount of time on site, interact with peers, and share their experiences and perspectives. Gaining hands-on, practical experience, they apply concepts and theories learned throughout the program to the responsibilities encountered in their field experience setting.
  
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    FPSY 9000 - Dissertation I-IV


    (5 cr. per term for a minimum of 4 quarters until completion) Doctoral students in this course are provided with the opportunity to integrate their Program of Study into a research study through which they explore a specific area of interest. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members through a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with their dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for FPSY 9000, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation for a minimum of four terms.

    Students take this course for a minimum of 4 quarters and are continuously enrolled until completion of their Dissertation with final Chief Academic Officer (CAO) approval.

    To complete a dissertation, students must obtain the academic approval of several independent evaluators including their committee, the University Research Reviewer, and the Institutional Review Board; pass the Form and Style Review; gain approval at the oral defense stage; and gain final approval by the Chief Academic Officer. Students must also publish their dissertation on ProQuest before their degree is conferred. Learn more about the dissertation process in the Dissertation Guidebook.

     

  
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    GEOG 1001 - World Regional Geography♦


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to introduce students to the geographic method of inquiry used to examine, describe, explain, and analyze the human and physical environments of the major regions of the world. Topics include spatial and geographic perspective, as well as cultural, organizational, and environmental properties of geography. Upon completion, students will be able to identify the human and physical features that give uniqueness and diversity to world regional patterns on Earth’s surface.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    GRPL 6100 - Group Lab


    (0 cr.) This is an experiential lab in which students learn by doing (i.e., participate in a small group activity). This lab is provided to students as part of their program requirements set forth by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). To maintain CACREP accreditation, all students must participate in a minimum of 10 hours of small group activity over the course of one academic term (CACREP, 2016, 2.F.6.h.).
  
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    HINF 6100 - Introduction to Health Informatics


    (3 sem. cr.) This course is a broad historical, technological, and theoretical framework for the study of health informatics. Students consider the past, present, and future of this rapidly evolving discipline, and they explore the critical issues and challenges within the field as well as potential applications, benefits, and opportunities for improving the management of healthcare through information technology. They explore a variety of related topics, including the development of virtual and interactive healthcare through technology; the interoperability, standardization, safety, and risks associated with the implementation of the electronic health record; the emergence and adoption of new information technologies; and a global perspective of trends and issues in the field. Students investigate the professional roles related to managing health information technology as well as organizations that promote health informatics. They conduct an in-depth investigation on a specific health informatics position to learn the responsibilities, essential skills sets, and professional and educational requirements of the job.
  
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    HINF 6115 - U.S. Health System♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The structure and function of the U.S. healthcare delivery system consists of multiple components, including policies, programs, and organizations. Healthcare professionals must understand how these components integrate and affect the access, cost, quality, and safety of health services. In this course, students explore the components of the system, including patients, organizations, healthcare professionals, public and private third-party payers, regulators, reimbursement, and technology as well as the continuum of health services, such as hospital systems and services, including ambulatory care, long-term care, wellness and prevention, and community and public health. Engaging in written-application assignments, students gain a practical understanding of factors and challenges linked to the delivery and management of services, including the U.S. health policy-making process, quality and patient safety initiatives, expenditures and sources of funds, among others.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HINF 6120 - Contemporary Topics in the U.S. Healthcare Delivery System


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course assess the causes and consequences of historical events on health and medical care in the United States. They appraise the impact of barriers related to cost, quality, and access to health and medical care. Students analyze unique and complex aspects of subsystems and differentiate vertical and horizontal integrated healthcare delivery systems. They compare characteristics of healthcare and medical care in the United States with healthcare and medical care systems in other countries. Students also evaluate current and future issues, trends, and forces in healthcare and medical care reform.

     

  
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    HINF 6130 - Information Systems Management


    (3 sem. cr.) An effective healthcare information system is one that provides value by addressing the requirements of an organization and the needs of the individuals who will use the system. Such a system requires knowledgeable, ongoing management at each step within the complex process. Students in this course explore the technical aspects of information systems management, including key issues of systems design and development as well as system support and maintenance. Focusing on the systems development life cycle (SDLC) approach, students analyze and describe necessary steps in the cycle, such as identifying and selecting appropriate systems technology and data standards, creating requirements, evaluating security, and accommodating human factors in design and use. Additionally, students learn terminology, functions, and standards as well as the basics of information architecture and systems infrastructure.
  
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    HINF 6145 - Nature, Structure, and Representation of Health Information


    (3 sem. cr.) Consistency in health data standards and appropriate identification and selection of these standards is important for many reasons, including supporting electronic data interchange and enhancing interoperability across information systems. Students in this course explore and discuss these concepts, including the structure of medical and health information through effective knowledge representation as well as the practice of knowledge management and the incorporation of evidence-based best practices. Students examine the diverse vocabularies, terminology, ontology, acronyms, coding, and classification systems employed by information systems users and by those who design and maintain the systems. They also consider related topics, such as data communication, the development and advancement of eHealth technologies, and future federal initiatives to digitalize health data. Students sharpen their critical-thinking and written-communication skills through case scenarios to distinguish among standards, an explication of the most commonly used clinical classification systems, and a multi-stage scenario focused on improving patient health through standardized representations of health information.
  
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    HINF 6160 - Legal, Regulatory, and Ethical Issues♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The nature of healthcare imposes a host of legal, regulatory, and ethical considerations for which providers and organizations must be aware. Students in this course are provided with an overview of these considerations. Students explore state, federal, and international privacy laws and regulations as well as the government agencies and regulatory bodies charged with creating and upholding these laws and regulations, devoting particular consideration to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996. Applying course concepts, students complete application-based assignments through which they consider key topics, including privacy, confidentiality, licensing, liability, compliance, accreditation, and professional ethics. Students also examine the impact of information technology on patient safety and the potential opportunities and risks of electronic health record systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HINF 6175 - Quality Assessment and Improvement♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Healthcare organizations are increasingly concerned about providing high-quality and safe services. Students in this course are introduced to the basis for quality and patient safety, and they receive an overview of healthcare quality, methods of assessing quality, and techniques for improving quality. They can learn key terminology and concepts, including defining quality care; measuring quality in terms of the structure-process-outcomes model; distinguishing between clinical and customer service quality; identifying techniques to avoid adverse clinical events; and exploring customer service quality in terms of defining, measuring, and improving patient satisfaction. Students also explore and discuss the roles of governmental agencies in promoting and reporting quality information regarding hospitals and other health organizations, accrediting bodies, and recent performance initiatives of government and private payers. They apply course concepts to current issues of improving clinical and service quality in healthcare organizations, with special consideration of the 5 Million Lives Campaign—a national effort initiated by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement designed to improve medical care in the United States.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HINF 6190 - Project Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Through this course, students work toward gaining the knowledge and skills to implement a health information technology solution through the systems development life cycle (SDLC) using Project Management Institute-defined processes drawn from the Institute’s Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) guide. Within the context of recognized PMBOK-project management standards, students learn to assess organizational need and readiness for a health information system, to engage in strategic and tactical planning for that technology, and to apply critical-path analysis. Students also explore preparation of the request for proposal (RFP) and evaluation of vendor responses as a part of an overall health information technology project management process. Through an integrative, collaborative project, students engage in a hypothetical health information technology project in which they develop a project schedule and charter, apply project management principles and concepts, work though project challenges, and reflect on lessons learned as part of their project closeout.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HINF 6205 - Research Methods and Quantitative Analysis♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Healthcare professionals often rely on research to make informed decisions on critical issues affecting programs, policy, and practice. In this course, students examine the logic underlying scientific research; study design; sampling; identification of variables; methods of data collection and analysis; concepts in measurement, including reliability and validity; program evaluation; and research ethics. They explore numeric methods for data description; the Donabedian model of program evaluation; data modeling and research; data mining; and information system assessment. Through statistics software exercises, students learn basic research methods, strategies, and skills for presentation of research results; they also become familiar with statistical software used to support research. Note: There is a special technology requirement for this course for accessing required interactive tutorials. PC: Students using a PC platform must have a minimum of Windows 2000, Internet Explorer 6.0, and 1GB of RAM. Mac: Students using a Mac platform must have a minimum of an Intel® Mac with OS X version 10.4.11, 1GB of RAM, and Windows 2000. Mac users who do not already have Windows 2000 on their Macs must purchase one or two Mac add-ons from an outside vendor to access the interactive tutorials. For details on which adds-ons to purchase and how to purchase them at discount pricing, please contact a member of Walden’s Student Support Team at 1-800-925-3368 or 1-612-925-3368, option 2.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HINF 6220 - Leadership, Organizational Behavior, and Change Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The structure of healthcare organizations is complex and unique, and the behaviors within these organizations often have a direct impact on their success. Students in this course examine organizational behavior as well as the roles and responsibilities of management within healthcare organizations through the macro (organization-wide) perspective and micro (individual and team performance) perspective. Students also focus on understanding organizational values, mission, and vision; management and leadership principles to help navigate change; and effective delivery of services in an increasingly global environment. Students also learn and apply theories of organizational design, governance, and alternative organizational structures, and they consider the theory and practice of managing individuals and groups through motivation, communication, teamwork, leadership, organizational change, coalition building, negotiation, and conflict management and resolution. Through group assignments and personal assessments, students work toward developing self-awareness and effective management styles and strategies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HINF 6235 - Healthcare Information Technology, Business, and Finance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Through this course, students learn key business and financial aspects of developing health information technology solutions, and they analyze the technological impact on patient safety and healthcare liability. They explore functions of analyzing the cost benefit of health information technology, assessing the return on investment (ROI) of implementing an information technology system, engaging in vendor evaluation and negotiations, and facilitating the acquisition of health information technology systems with consideration of global opportunities. Students also engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of course concepts, including financial scenarios through which they perform monetary value calculations. Additionally, students explore human resources management issues; expand on their knowledge of project management, delving deeper into the request for proposal process; and reflect on information technology industry trends that will impact the future of healthcare delivery and access.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HINF 6950 - Practicum


    (3 sem. cr.) Through the practicum, students have an opportunity to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the MS in Health Informatics program of study and further develop key professional competencies. Students engage in a supervised field experience, which they align to their academic and professional goals. Supervision by an on-site preceptor involved in the planning or conduct of a clinical research study is a critical component of the practicum. The on-site supervisor and the course instructor monitor and evaluate students’ performance throughout the entire practicum experience. Students are required to complete 120 hours of practicum work. They must also participate in an accompanying online seminar course and begin to develop an ePortfolio based on assigned professional development activities. 
  
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    HINF 6960 - Scholarly Project


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course are provided with an opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the principles, concepts, and content addressed throughout the MS in Health Informatics program of study. Students choose from a selection of overarching themes and topical areas reflecting the breadth of subjects covered in the program. Guided by their faculty advisor, students identify a particular area of interest and produce a substantive written paper and presentation in an area of health informatics. Students also engage in group discussions through which they consider their career development plan, share information on their paper topic and process, and exchange feedback on project presentations.
  
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    HIST 2005 - World History 1900–1945♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the history of the modern world from 1900 to 1945. Students explore and discuss major historical events and global conflicts that shaped the development of the world from the Era of Imperialism through the end of World War II. Through assignments designed to provide practical application of course content, students compose short essays on such topics as the essential elements to make a nation thrive, such as political policies and alliances; the impact of culture and technology on society; and the strengths and weaknesses of monumental historical documents. Students in this course learn to use a historical perspective to evaluate global events and key changes that shaped the first half of the 20th century.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HIST 2006 - World History 1945–2000♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the history of the contemporary world from 1945 to 2000. They explore and discuss major historical events that shaped the development of the world from post-World War II decolonization through the post-Cold War era. Students consider elements introduced in this era, such as scientific advancements, technological innovations, and political policies, and then they write about the elements that they believe are most important in influencing contemporary life. Students also learn to use a historical perspective to evaluate global events and key changes that shaped the second half of the 20th century.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HIST 2050C - U.S. History Through the Lens of Social Change♦


    (5 cr.) Social change defines the values Americans share, how society reflects those values, and increasingly, how those values play out in different cultures around the nation. Since the earliest days of the nation, the history of the United States has been shaped and reshaped by social change movements as Americans have consistently fought for freedom; civil, political, and gender rights; improved standards of living; and other forms of social, political, and economic equality. Students in this course examine the leaders, the activists, and the grassroots organizations that forged these social movements as well as the historical interplay between the movements and federal, state, and local government agencies. Within a U.S. historical context, students examine how social movements have played out at different points in history and explore how lessons drawn from that history can be applied today. Through readings, collaborative discussions, reflective essays, journal entries, authentic assessments, and a final project, students examine the organizational structures, objectives, outcomes, and historical evolution of social change movements in America since the 19th century. Through this historical lens, students are exposed to the tradition of social change that continues to impact lives through recent social movements such as the WTO, the Tea Party, and Black Lives Matter.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 1000 - Concepts of Health Promotion


    (5 cr.) Initiatives to prevent illness and promote healthy lifestyles are often more effective and cost efficient than efforts to intervene or treat disease, which is why health promotion is an increasingly popular trend in the field of healthcare. In this course, students formulate a definition of health and discuss the many influences that shape our individual and collective perceptions of health. Students consider the health-wellness continuum, including a number of factors, such as behavioral, demographic, psychological, and social forces. They also examine evidence-based methodologies for interventions to promote health and enhance wellness, and they evaluate health information found online to determine credibility and accuracy. Additionally, students reflect on ways to shape their future career in health and to promote positive change.
  
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    HLTH 1000 - Concepts of Health Promotion♦


    (5 cr.) Initiatives to prevent illness and promote healthy lifestyles are often more effective and cost efficient than efforts to intervene or treat disease, which is why health promotion is an increasingly popular trend in the field of healthcare. In this course, students formulate a definition of health and discuss the many influences that shape our individual and collective perceptions of health. Students consider the health-wellness continuum, including a number of factors, such as behavioral, demographic, psychological, and social forces. They also examine evidence-based methodologies for interventions to promote health and enhance wellness, and they evaluate health information found online to determine credibility and accuracy. Additionally, students reflect on ways to shape their future career in health and to promote positive change.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 1005 - Context of Healthcare Delivery♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course describe the causes and consequences of historical events on health and medical care in the United States. They explain barriers related to cost, quality, and access to health and medical care. Students examine unique and complex aspects of subsystems and classify vertical and horizontal integrated healthcare delivery systems. They compare characteristics of healthcare in the U.S. with healthcare systems in other countries. Students also identify current and future issues, trends, and forces in healthcare reform.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 2110 - Behavioral and Cultural Issues in Healthcare♦


    (5 cr.) Many factors influence the health behavior and wellness of individuals and populations. Understanding these factors helps healthcare professionals reduce health disparities and address healthcare access issues for vulnerable populations. Students in this course examine the cultural and behavioral factors and issues that influence the management and delivery of healthcare services. Students develop a framework for assessing the effect of culture and behavior in a variety of settings and situations. They identify health disparities attributable to diverse cultural and behavioral factors and discuss their implications for healthcare policy. Students also engage in application-based writing assignments to further examine the goals and objectives of addressing health disparities as well as obstacles for confronting vulnerable populations.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 2115 - Aging Across the Lifespan♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students experience an overview of the effects of aging on health and development across the entire human lifespan. Students examine the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive milestones in childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age, with a particular emphasis on the significant changes that occur toward the end of life. Students engage in weekly discussions on various scenarios related to socioemotional development, as well as on topics such as attitudes on aging, environmental risk factors, and cognitive development. Demonstrating knowledge and synthesizing course concepts, students critically analyze a specific socioemotional issue and explain how it manifests in the various developmental stages.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 2120 - Health Informatics♦


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on the application and use of information technology to support clinical and managerial decision making in healthcare. Emphasis is placed on information technology that supports the delivery of services, including the collection, storage, retrieval, and communication of data; information systems safeguards; ethical and legal issues; and information management to promote patient safety and quality of care. Information literacy and basic hardware and software concepts are addressed. Fundamental software applications, including spreadsheets and healthcare databases, are considered.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 2500 - Theories of Health Behavior


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to established and emerging health behavior, health education, and health promotion theories and models. Students can develop the knowledge and skills necessary to apply various theoretical frameworks and models related to psychosocial, cultural, and environmental factors influencing health behavior and behavior change. Throughout this course, students will focus on the role of theories and models in planning, implementing, and evaluating health interventions in a variety of settings.
  
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    HLTH 3100 - Ethical and Legal Issues in Healthcare♦


    (5 cr.) The nature of health services, such as personal evaluations, clinical research, invasive surgeries, and end of life care, facilitates a host of ethical and legal considerations of which professionals must be aware. In this course, students examine the legal and ethical issues that are fundamental to the practice of healthcare and the conduct of health-related research. They explore a historical overview of events and milestones that have shaped the contemporary regulatory landscape. They also investigate and assess issues of privacy and confidentiality, informed consent, licensing, and malpractice, among others. Additionally, students consider ethical, decision-making models for assuring the quality, safety, and appropriateness of healthcare and services. They also apply ethical principles and legal considerations to real-world scenarios.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 3105 - Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Healthcare♦


    (5 cr.) This course introduces students to a patient-centered interdisciplinary model for healthcare delivery in which individual practitioners collaborate as members of a team. Students examine the benefits of this interdisciplinary approach for patients and providers, focusing on how it can lead to improved outcomes. They also explore and discuss professional challenges and institutional barriers, such as delineation of responsibilities, reimbursement, and licensing. Students gain practical experience with the patient-centered model through the development of a patient case study, a hypothetical interdisciplinary healthcare team, and an appropriate treatment plan. They also consider the benefits of such a model on the future of healthcare. (Prerequisite(s): COMM 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 3110 - Current Issues in Healthcare Policy and Practice♦


    (5 cr.) Many factors, such as access, affordability, insurance, quality, safety, and technology, affect the delivery of healthcare and the development of policies. In this course, students examine the nature of healthcare facilities, major factors influencing the quality of care, and the impact of policy initiatives on all stakeholders, including providers and consumers. They explore the major issues in acute and long-term healthcare policy and practice from the perspective of the patient and the provider. Students devote special attention to the social, institutional, economic, and regulatory contexts in which providers deliver services. Using concepts and issues addressed in the course, students complete a variety of application-based activities, such as a comparison of healthcare facilities in their region and an analysis of the practical role of policy. (Prerequisite(s): COMM 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 3115 - Public and Global Health♦


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students widen their perspectives of promoting health and preventing disease as they examine health issues that transcend national borders, class, race, ethnicity, and culture. Students discuss the role of the healthcare provider in preserving and promoting health among diverse populations as well as their role in illness prevention and health promotion, protection, and maintenance of targeted populations. They explore principles of epidemiology and the influencing sociopolitical factors that impact health and well-being of humankind. Students also engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of content on topical issues, such as infant mortality rates in the United States and abroad, infectious or communicable disease, and implications of global climate change on health, among others.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 3510 - Health Insurance and Reimbursement


    (5 cr.) Students in this course will examine the history of third-party reimbursement, the culture of patient expectations for healthcare, and Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement funding and management. Students will consider how healthcare policy, insurance, and reimbursement impact quality and population health.
  
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    HLTH 4000 - Introduction to Healthcare Management♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine management concepts and theories designed to influence and improve the performance of healthcare organizations. They identify and examine the external and internal environments of organizations as well as key management functions, roles, and responsibilities. Exploring essential aspects of healthcare management, students engage in a variety of conceptual and practical activities, such as profiling a healthcare manger, assessing the value of leadership in decision making, and comparing strategic plans. Students delve deeper into content through weekly discussions on a variety of topics, such as emotional intelligence, applications of financial management, issues of quality and safety, the purpose of strategic planning, and challenges in human resources. (Prerequisite(s): COMM 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 4050 - Introduction to Disaster and Emergency Management♦


    (5 cr.) Natural and human-caused catastrophes, including acts of terrorism, continue to abound in the United States, necessitating professionals who are skilled in building disaster-resilient communities as well as leading response and recovery efforts. This course provides an introduction to the historical development and evolution of disaster and emergency management. Students address the roles and responsibilities of local, regional, and national agencies as well as interagency coordination and collaboration. Through application-based writing exercises, students examine and apply phases of disaster and emergency management, including planning, preparedness, response, and recovery. They also discuss the public health system’s role in critical events, such as outbreaks of infectious disease, natural disasters, industrial emergencies, and terrorist and bioterrorist attacks.

     

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    HLTH 4100 - Healthcare Organization Theory and Behavior♦


    (5 cr.) The individual and group behaviors within healthcare organizations often have a direct impact on organizational success and the ability to deliver quality care. In this course, students examine the theories of behavior of healthcare organizations at the macro (organization-wide) level and micro (individual and team performance) level. Students explore factors that influence an organization’s behavior and performance, including the role of culture, group processes, and interactions. Sharpening analytic skills, students apply theories of motivation to assess a hypothetical situation. They also investigate famous leaders to analyze leadership traits, including the ability to implement and lead others through change. (Prerequisite(s): COMM 1001 and HLTH 4000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 4105 - Healthcare Finance and Economics♦


    (5 cr.) An unstable economy and inflating cost of healthcare affects nearly everyone, from individuals to entire hospitals, making sound financial management increasingly important. This course provides students with a foundation for economic evaluation and financial management in delivery of healthcare services, including principles of supply and demand. Students explore the financial, political, and economic aspects of universal healthcare, and they learn the purpose and methods of financial reporting, such as using financial statements and balance sheets. They also examine financial risk and insurance principles and mechanisms for healthcare reimbursement, including Medicare, Medicaid, and other payor programs. Through written applications and other practical exercises, students gain foundational skills in fiscal evaluation and financial management, which they can apply to personal or professional financial decision making. (Prerequisite(s): HLTH 4000 and (MATH 1030 or ACCT 1003 or STAT 3001)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 4110 - Healthcare Quality and Safety♦


    (5 cr.) A lack of quality service in healthcare, including medical errors, unnecessary surgery, and neglect, accounts for preventable deaths and a continual increase in the cost of delivery. Students in this course explore major quality and safety issues within healthcare organizations. They also examine methods of assessing quality and techniques to improve quality as well as opportunities to prevent adverse and never events, devoting special attention to the 5 Million Lives Campaign. Students examine current requirements for reporting indicators of quality and pay-for-performance initiatives to reward quality. They analyze weekly topics and share perspectives through discussions and case studies on critical issues, such as medical error, the patient perspective, quality and safety measurement, and improvement approaches, among others. (Prerequisite(s): COMM 1001 and HLTH 4000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 4115 - Strategic Planning and Marketing in Healthcare♦


    (5 cr.) Key concepts related to strategic planning, including the relationship of the plan to the organization’s mission, values, and vision, are presented in this course. Students examine and apply assessment techniques and methodologies for evaluating the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT analysis) of a healthcare organization. They also explore the relationship between strategic planning, marketing, and organizational performance. Through a review of mixed-media resources and interactive discussions, students assess a variety of topics, such as values, vision, and mission statements; the differences between goals and objectives; and applications of healthcare promotion and social change. (Prerequisite(s): HLTH 4000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 4120 - Managing the Healthcare Workforce♦


    (5 cr.) Healthcare organizations are able to provide quality care to patients only when their workforce is productive, satisfied, organized, and well-trained. Organizations rely on the human resource (HR) department to provide employees with support, while focusing on the needs and goals of the organization. Students in this course explore and discuss the role of HR in healthcare organizations as related to the recruitment, retention, and management of the healthcare workforce. They examine workforce development models, employee benefits, and compensation strategies. Students also explore methods used by HR professionals to develop goals and expectations for evaluating employee performance and promoting effective employee relations, and they investigate HR problem-solving strategies, such as conflict resolution, collective bargaining, and arbitration methods. Through application-based activities, students analyze effective development of position descriptions; assess practices of hiring based on organizational fit; gain real-world insight on strategies of successful organizations; and develop plans for attaining long-term professional goals.
      (Prerequisite(s): HLTH 4000.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 4200 - Principles of Epidemiology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course focus on the principles governing the study and practice of epidemiology. Consideration is given to the various methods available to health professionals for selecting and measuring factors of interest, describing their distribution, detecting associations, and identifying populations at risk. The features, advantages, and limitations of common epidemiologic research designs are addressed. (Prerequisite(s): MATH 1002/1030 or STAT 3001.) Note: Students who wish to pursue graduate school should consider taking STAT 3001 in addition to MATH 1002.
  
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    HLTH 4205 - Introduction to Research Methods and Analysis


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine the basic components required for the conduct of health-related research and provides students with the analytic tools needed to understand and assess research methods described in the scientific literature. Basic research methods are described, including surveys, observational studies, experimental and quasi-experimental design, use of primary and secondary data, and statistical techniques for analyzing and interpreting data.
  
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    HLTH 4300 - Personal Health and Wellness♦


    (5 cr.) This course is an introduction for students to the essential factors that promote or challenge the development of personal health and healthy lifestyles, including nutrition, physical fitness, stress management, mental and emotional health, sexuality and relationships, violence and injury, and substance abuse. Students examine how cultural and socioeconomic factors influence people’s perception of their health as well as their health behavior. Students review tools for assessing health and risk and have the opportunity to assess their own health and behavior using a health risk appraisal.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 4320 - Nutrition Across the Lifespan♦


    (5 cr.) Human nutritional requirements change over the course of the lifespan. Students in this course examine the fundamentals of nutrition and the variation of nutritional needs at different life stages, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age. Students discuss issues such as obesity and eating disorders as well as the link between diet and disease. Students conduct a personal dietary assessment and analyze the relationship between food choices and health status in their own lives.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 4340 - Fit and Well: Core Concepts in Exercise Science♦


    (5 cr.) Physical fitness is an important component of overall health and quality of life. In this course, students focus on the fundamental concepts and principles of physical fitness, including flexibility, cardiovascular health, muscular strength, muscular endurance, and body composition as well as the physiological and psychological processes through which exercise influences health. Students create a personalized fitness program and explore the health advantages of a physically active lifestyle, including the mental, social, and psychological benefits. They also examine the harmful effects of a sedentary lifestyle, particularly with regard to the risk of chronic disease.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    HLTH 4360 - Stress Management and Wellness♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about a holistic approach to stress management. They address the emotional and physical dimensions of stress as well as scientific foundations and physiological pathways. Students explore the mind-body connection, and they study fundamental principles, theories, and relaxation techniques—including cognitive and physical behavior change interventions—that can help people effectively manage personal stress.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
 

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