2014-2015 Walden University Catalog (March 2015) 
    
    Dec 07, 2022  
2014-2015 Walden University Catalog (March 2015) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    EDUC 8100 - Foundations: Higher Education and Adult Learning


    (6 sem. cr.) The purpose of this course is to engage education professionals with the environment, expectations, and content of doctoral work in the Higher Education and Adult Learning specialization of the Ed.D. program. Education professionals develop facility with Walden University’s online learning environment; understanding of the university’s and the program’s support systems and expectations and outcomes; knowledge about the field, which they synthesize with reflection on their own experiences and goals; and doctoral-level, critical-thinking and writing skills.
  
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    EDUC 8101 - How Adults Learn: Theory and Research


    (6 sem. cr.) Adult learning is similar to and different from learning at any other age. In this course, education professionals examine these similarities and differences, focusing on adult learning and developmental theory and the wide range of research that supports it. Education professionals explore adult learning theories, including andragogy and transformation; phase and stage developmental theories; and effects of gender and culture on adult learning. They also have the opportunity to reflect on the relationship of this material to their own experiences. Education professionals complete a variety of written application assignments through which they practice communicating and presenting complex concepts, critique the work of a major theorist, apply adult learning and development theories to educational practice, and construct their own positions on adult learning as scholar-practitioners.
  
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    EDUC 8102 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and the appropriate use of qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
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    EDUC 8103 - Designing and Assessing Learning Experiences


    (6 sem. cr.) Research has considerably expanded the knowledge of adult learning and development in recent years. These gains have resulted in a new paradigm for the design and assessment of learning experiences. In this course, education professionals advance their understanding of research methods as they examine literature about design and assessment. They also apply research-based principles in the design of a project to develop learning experiences for a specific population of adults using on-site, online, or hybrid models.
  
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    EDUC 8104 - Facilitating Adult Learning


    (6 sem. cr.) Using research and theory on differences in learning, education professionals in this course explore the repertoire of practices that facilitate adult learning from a teaching and learning perspective. These practices range from mentoring and coaching to collaborative engagement and reflective practices. Education professionals deepen their understanding of research methods by critiquing articles and designing research studies to investigate specific learning practices.
  
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    EDUC 8105 - Adult Learning: Trends, Issues, Global Perspectives


    (6 sem. cr.) Invariable advances in research and technology continue to change the current state of knowledge; therefore, it is necessary to function as lifelong learners. In this course, education professionals examine intriguing and potentially critical directions in adult learning, including brain research, new technologies, and the impact of globalization. They also have the opportunity to examine and reflect on the effects of these trends in their own areas of interest.
  
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    EDUC 8106 - Research in Practice


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators build on their knowledge of and experience with research design and methodology through a hands-on, in-depth study of specific data collection and analysis skills, which they need to become effective producers of research. Educators apply concepts and practice skills in research design, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of results. They complete practical exercises and engage in discussions that emphasize qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  
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    EDUC 8110 - Development of the Scholar-Practitioner


    (4 cr.) Building on the Carnegie Foundation’s metaphor of “stewards of the discipline,” education professionals in this course explore the role of the scholar-practitioner and the expectations and responsibilities inherent in obtaining a Ph.D. in Education. Using this understanding, education professionals develop a professional development plan to guide their progress through the program. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop strategies for online success. They also explore resources used throughout the program and engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence. Note: Taken concurrently with EDUC 8111.
  
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    EDUC 8111 - Principles of Social Change


    (4 cr.) Consistent with the mission of Walden University, this course is a foundation for the remainder of the program by providing education professionals with a framework for their work as scholar-practitioners and as agents of positive social change in education. Education professionals examine foundational theories of education while considering their future role in the discipline. Through an integrative process of developing an essay comparing theories of social change, they also begin to hone their skills as scholarly writers. Note: Taken concurrently with EDUC 8110.
  
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    EDUC 8112 - Social Change in Education


    (4 cr.) The choice to effect positive social change in education demands that scholar-practitioners have the requisite skills and abilities to take responsibility for generating new knowledge, conserving the values of education, and communicating information to others. In this course, education professionals examine these key principles of disciplinary stewardship while building strategies to effect positive social change. Demonstrating their understanding of course concepts, they develop a social change proposal that fills an area of need in their organization, workplace, or community. Through this proposal, they analyze prospective requirements, challenges, and effects of their proposed plan of action. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8110 and EDUC 8111.) Note: Taken concurrently with RSCH 8100.
  
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    EDUC 8113 - The Learner Across the Lifespan


    (4 cr.) Educational scholars recognize the important role of human development in the educational process. In this course, education professionals gain an understanding of the theories and frameworks relevant to the development and experiences of individuals from birth through old age. They engage in coursework that emphasizes application of this knowledge to educational settings, and they discuss a range of topics, such as personal teaching experiences, theory-based approaches to a contemporary problem, influences of moral development, and intergenerational relationships, among others.  Education professionals also explore different strands of development across the lifespan as well as how they relate to the individual as a learner. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8111.)
  
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    EDUC 8114 - Learning and Instruction


    (4 cr.) The processes of teaching and learning are central to the educational enterprise. In this course,  education professionals examine learning from a variety of perspectives, focusing on supporting academic and co-curricular success in education. They explore curriculum theory and design, with emphasis on the theoretical, practical, and political aspects of curricula. Through a variety of written and applied assignments, they investigate learned societies; make connections to research; develop a course proposal, including a course outline that identifies learning objectives; analyze the influence of technology on education; review and reflect on the importance of the curriculum development process and the role of curriculum to guide instruction and assessment; and develop their own approach to instruction and learning. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8112.)
  
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    EDUC 8115 - Assessment and Accountability in Education


    (4 cr.) Increasingly, schools and educational committees ask educators at all levels to account for the influence of the educational process on learners and to make research-based decisions. In this course, education professionals build on their knowledge of theories of development and learning as they gain foundational skills in assessing and evaluating student learning, developmental outcomes, and educational programs. Acquiring key evaluation concepts, they also examine the purposes for collecting student data as well as the distinctions among various approaches to assessing learning. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8112.)
  
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    EDUC 8116 - Leadership in a Global Society


    (4 cr.) Leadership roles in education take a wide range of forms, from the teacher in the kindergarten classroom to the president of a university. Academic leaders recognize the interplay between local challenges and national and global influences as well as the unique societal pressures on the educational process. Education professionals in this course explore these challenges and influences to gain an understanding of the skills and sensibilities needed to lead in a global society. They examine leadership theories and research as well as the principles of leadership within educational communities. They also have the opportunity to analyze their own leadership skills in the context of these theories and principles. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8114).
  
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    EDUC 8117 - Educational Organizations and Contexts


    (4 cr.) Research efforts to support the educational process and effective leadership demand an understanding of schools and academic institutions as complex systems and units of change. In this course, education professionals examine theories of organizational functioning and apply these insights to the behaviors of individuals and groups within educational systems. They also explore systems thinking and organizational effectiveness that supports teaching and learning. Education professionals engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of course content through which they analyze ethical behavior in organizational development; summarize, test, and evaluate theories; construct an organizational development scenario; evaluate a case study related to organizational development; and assess their own educational organization. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8115.)
  
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    EDUC 8118 - Innovation and Change in Education


    (4 cr.) Understanding the impact of new innovations and change has emerged as a field of theory and research in education. Education professionals in this course build on the principles of social change as well as research and theories of leadership and organizational functioning as they focus on the challenges inherent in initiating and managing change in educational organizations. They explore the role of change agents as well as the influences of technological innovations on the academic process. Applying course concepts, education professionals design plans to implement and evaluate new programs to support change. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8116 and EDUC 8117 OR EDUC 8841.)
  
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    EDUC 8121 - Current Research in Social Change: Special Education


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8122 - Current Research on Social Change and Community Colleges


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8122 - Current Research on Social Change and Community Colleges


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8123 - Theoretical Foundations of Early Childhood Program Practices


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8124 - Current Research in Social Change and Adult Education


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8124 - Current Research in Social Change and Adult Education


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8125 - Current Research in Social Change and Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8127 - Current Research in Higher Education, Social Change, and Development


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8128 - Strategic Leadership in Education and Social Change


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8131 - Professional Practice and Social Change: Special Education


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8132 - Professional Practice, Social Change, and Community Colleges


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession
  
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    EDUC 8133 - Theory to Practice: Curriculum Contrasts and Implementation


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8134 - Professional Practice, Social Change, and Adult Education


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8135 - Professional Practice in Social Change Related to Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8137 - Professional Practice and Emerging Trends in Higher Education


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8138 - Professional Practice in Strategic Leadership and Social Change


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8140 - Leadership for Today’s Schools


    (6 sem. cr.) Today’s schools are dynamic places and require leaders who understand how learning communities operate and thrive and are prepared to deal with the demands of internal and external forces. In this course, education professionals make connections between change theory and the continual appraisal of evolving needs of the learning community and application of a grounded knowledge base of theory and practical strategies supported by research. Education professionals are empowered to explore current and future technology as they assess educational trends and issues. Education professionals also analyze their own and others’ paradigms and leadership styles, and they determine best practices to promote positive social change.
  
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    EDUC 8141 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and the appropriate use of qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
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    EDUC 8142 - Teaching and Learning: Theory and Research


    (6 sem. cr.) Research has considerably expanded the knowledge of teaching and learning in recent years. A new paradigm for the design and assessment of learning experiences is a result of these gains. In this course, education professionals advance their understanding of research methods as they examine literature about design and assessment. They also apply research-based principles, via technological means, to collect, analyze, and present data with the goal of solving a learning problem in their school or district.
  
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    EDUC 8143 - Collegial Interactions and Professional Development


    (6 sem. cr.) This course expands the role of teacher leadership from the classroom to the school community. Education professionals in this course focus on the development of knowledge, abilities, and dispositions necessary for effective and productive leadership in effecting professional partnerships, participating in collegial study teams, facilitating professional development of other educators, and adeptly using collegial and collaborative processes, such as coaching and mentoring.
  
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    EDUC 8144 - Teacher Leadership: Trends, Issues, and Global Perspectives


    (6 sem. cr.) Invariably, advances in research and technology continue to change the current state of knowledge; therefore, it is necessary to function as lifelong learners. In this course, education professionals examine intriguing and potentially critical directions in adult learning, including brain research, new technologies, and the impact of globalization. They also have the opportunity to examine and reflect on the effects of these trends in their own areas of interest.
  
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    EDUC 8145 - Research in Practice


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators build on their knowledge of and experience with research design and methodology through a hands-on, in-depth study of specific data collection and analysis skills, which they need to become effective producers of research. Educators apply concepts and practice skills in research design, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of results. They complete practical exercises and engage in discussions that emphasize qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  
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    EDUC 8210 - Governance and Politics of Education


    (4 cr.) In this course, education professionals develop an understanding of the political forces that shape the educational process. They engage in coursework that emphasizes governance structures and the influences of federal, state, and local policies and decisions. They also discuss contemporary research on political power in decision making and the role of educational leaders. (Prerequisite(s): Core courses EDUC 8113, EDUC 8114, EDUC 8115, EDUC 8116, EDUC 8117, and EDUC 8118.)
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 8900.)
  
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    EDUC 8211 - Economics of Education


    (4 cr.) Education is a critical component of individual economic success and the education sector is a key contributor to the stability of local, state, national, and global economies. Addressing challenges related to these key ideas, education professionals in this course explore the financing and provision of education. They apply economic principles and econometrics to their understanding of educational practices and policies. They also identify research to create opportunities for improved efficiency and quality of education. (Prerequisite(s): Core courses EDUC 8113, EDUC 8114, EDUC 8115, EDUC 8116, EDUC 8117, and EDUC 8118.)
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 8900.)
  
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    EDUC 8212 - Education Law


    (4 cr.) In this course, education professionals examine legal and ethical issues within the context of an educational setting. Supporting development of their legal reasoning skills, education professionals discuss the laws and statutes that inform the operation of educational organizations. They also engage in assignments that emphasize the ways ethics affect decision making, professional conduct, and educational policies when analyzing critical issues in educational leadership. (Prerequisite(s): Core courses EDUC 8113, EDUC 8114, EDUC 8115, EDUC 8116, EDUC 8117, and EDUC 8118.)
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 8900.)
  
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    EDUC 8213 - Policy Development and Implementation


    (4 cr.) Education policy is crucial to educational improvement and renewal throughout the P–20-plus system of education. In this course, education professionals develop the skills for critical analysis of education policy at the local, state, national, and international levels. They discuss the definition and formulation of policies and they explore a wide range of topics, including the identification of and work with policy advocates, the processes of policy implementation and evaluation, and the use of logic models in the policy process. (Prerequisite(s): Core courses EDUC 8113, EDUC 8114, EDUC 8115, EDUC 8116, EDUC 8117, and EDUC 8118.)
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 8900.)
  
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    EDUC 8214 - Leadership for Change in Education


    (4 cr.) Building on the core knowledge from earlier courses, students will engage the emerging theories of leadership that reflect the current challenges in culturally responsive education, and the research on motivation and performance. The focus is on entrepreneurial and creative solutions, which reach across learning organizations and other consistencies, to effect positive social change in education. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8118, RSCH 8200, and RSCH 8300.)
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 8900.)
  
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    EDUC 8215 - Capacity, Capability, and Sustainability


    (4 cr.) Students explore strategies to build capacity and commitment in the education process, within the context of their role as scholar-practitioners. The focus is on leadership for sustainable practices and policies that renew and re-energize the educational process. Included are topics that focus on group processes, grant-writing, planning models, readiness factors, implementation concerns and policies, and institutionalization issues. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8118, RSCH 8200, and RSCH 8300.)
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 8900.)
  
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    EDUC 8221 - Current Research in Human Exceptionality


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8222 - Current Research in Human Development and Community Colleges


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8223 - Current Research: Psychological Foundations of Early Childhood Growth and Development


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8224 - Current Research in Human Development and Adult Education


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8225 - Current Research in Human Development and Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8227 - Current Research in Ways of Knowing and Individual Differences in Human Development


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8231 - Professional Practice and Human Exceptionality


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8232 - Professional Practice, Human Development, and Community Colleges


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8233 - Psychological Considerations in Application to Early Childhood Programs


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8234 - Professional Practice, Human Development, and Adult Education


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8235 - Professional Practice in Human Development in Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8237 - Professional Practice and Human Development in Higher Education


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8304 - Effective College Teaching: Engaging Diverse Learners


    (6 sem. cr.) As colleges and universities broaden their missions to serve new groups of learners, and as more people pursue a college education, college educators must strive to engage increasingly diverse student populations. At the same time, changing workplace needs and growing demands for accountability require that college educators must be able to help demonstrate that learners have met important learning goals. In this course, education professionals will investigate the research-based teaching and assessment strategies that can support all learners. Education professionals also assess methods for critically reflecting upon their own practice, engaging in education scholarship, and collaborating with colleagues on the continuous improvement of learning experiences and environments.
  
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    EDUC 8306 - Effective College Teaching: Using Technology to Support Learning


    (6 sem. cr.) Technology is a tool that can support student engagement and the development of critical knowledge and skills. College educators must learn how to harness the growing number of new technologies for constructive use in diverse learning contexts. In this course, education professionals consider how to stay abreast of available technologies and related research as well as how to use these tools and research most effectively in face-to-face, hybrid, and online environments. Through a variety of contextual and application-based assignments, education professionals practice making critical decisions on when and how to implement technological solutions, how to assess the value of these tools for students in particular learning contexts, and how to use maximize the power of technology for learning in a global environment.
  
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    EDUC 8321 - Individuals With Special Needs: Social, Legal, Political, and Economic Systems in Context


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8322 - Current Research in Social Systems and Community Colleges


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8323 - Early Childhood Education: Implications for Social and Organizational Systems


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8324 - Current Research in Social Systems and Adult Education


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8325 - Current Research in Social Systems and Change in Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8327 - Current Research in Social Systems and Change in Higher Education


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8328 - Current Research in Organizational and Social Systems: K–12 Education


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8331 - Professional Issues in Organizations and Systems: Special Education


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8332 - Professional Practice, Social Systems, and Community Colleges


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession
  
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    EDUC 8333 - Professional Practice in Organizational and Social Contexts


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8334 - Professional Practice, Social Systems, and Adult Education


    (4 cr.)

    This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.

     

  
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    EDUC 8335 - Professional Practice in Social Systems and Change in Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8337 - Professional Practice in Social Systems and Change: Higher Education


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8338 - Professional Practice in K–12 Educational Organization


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8341 - Trends and Issues in Educational Technology


    (5 cr.) Using new technologies in new ways sparks learning, creativity, and innovation. Trends and issues in educational technology are examined to discover how they influence learning and creativity in the workplace. Learners collaborate to demonstrate the evolution of a current technological trend, analyze its impact on learning and society, and evaluate the societal issues and problems caused by that trend.
  
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    EDUC 8342 - Emerging and Future Technologies


    (5 cr.) Conceive of a world where emerging and future technologies are a seamless facet of learning and work. Learners explore this world through social networking, mobile technologies, gaming and simulations, collaborative tools and strategies, and more, to become thought leaders in their field. Critical thinking and decision-making skills are developed to analyze obsolete technologies, assess new technologies, and predict future technological movements. Insights are examined from the view of a futurist, guiding learners as they become experts in the evaluation and use of emerging and future technologies.
  
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    EDUC 8343 - Creating Digital Media


    (5 cr.) The effective use of digital media in learning environments requires leaders in the field to be both consumers and creators. Learners become knowledgeable developers of digital media by applying principles of instructional design and pedagogy to multimedia. Learners collaborate in the design and creation of digital and interactive media based on visual design principles.
  
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    EDUC 8344 - Innovations and the Diffusion of Learning Technologies


    (5 cr.) Thought leaders instigate change in the workplace. Learners explore Rogers’s diffusion of innovations theory, research effective practices for integrating technology and overcoming resistance to change, and apply methods for being a catalyst for change. Playing a diffusion simulation game enables learners to analyze the power of gaming in instructional environments. Learners analyze the needs of an organization and demonstrate their skills of persuasion to convince key stakeholders to adopt a technological innovation in their workplace.
  
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    EDUC 8345 - E-Learning


    (5 cr.) Learning continues to change globally through the availability of a wide variety of electronic devises. Principles of distance education, mobile learning, MOOCs, virtual schooling, global collaboration, and online teaching and learning are the focus of this course. Learners create a digital video on a topic related to eLearning, by applying problem solving and critical thinking skills to determine the most appropriate tools and learning environments for their workplaces.
  
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    EDUC 8346 - Leading Change


    (5 cr.) Effective leaders direct the vision and goals for sustainable change initiatives in organizations. Based on the Human Performance and Training Model, learners explore strategies and tactics needed to bring about positive social change through an analysis of leadership, strategic planning, motivation, communication, and learning technologies. Problem solving skills are developed as learners effect change in the workplace focusing on a human performance issue. Components for successful grant writing are developed.
  
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    EDUC 8347 - Designing Instruction for E-Learning


    (5 cr.) Opportunities for learning have expanded as a result of e-learning technologies. Learners evaluate MOOCs, blended environments, mobile devices, and online learning as means for delivering content and for providing collaboration and global connectivity. Instructional design principles are applied to effectively design and create an online e-learning module that engages students in learning beyond the walls of the classroom.
  
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    EDUC 8348 - Current Research in Educational Technology


    (5 cr.) The field of educational technology is constantly changing, requiring scholar-practitioners to transform their thinking about research. Learners develop research skills to become critical consumers and contributors of new knowledge to the field. Analytical skills are used to develop an ethical research study in educational technology that contributes to positive social change.
  
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    EDUC 8350 - A New Vision of Assessment, Evaluation, and Accountability


    (4 cr.) The role of assessment and evaluation as a vehicle for positive change is recast in this course. The notion of accountability is supported by the concepts of social and ethical responsibility, and informs continual improvement efforts for individuals and organizations. Theory, trends, and systemic perspectives of the field are connected to changes required for enhancing performance and increasing effectiveness. Topics include evaluator credibility, national and international assessments and comparisons, and facilitation with individual and cultural values underpinning evaluation purposes, processes, and judgments. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8118, RSCH 8200D, and RSCH 8300D.)
  
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    EDUC 8351 - Assessment, Evaluation, and Accountability: The Sociological, Political, and Economic Contexts


    (4 cr.) At the thought-leadership level, the context of sociological, political, and economic demands are primary to understanding the purpose of assessment and evaluation. This course will focus on the decision-making models that influence assessment, evaluation, and accountability systems. Topics include political astuteness, knowledge of sociological structures including roles, status, power, rewards, and sanctions, as well as cost-benefit analyses, responsiveness to federal/state mandates, and organizational goals and objectives. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8118, RSCH 8200D, RSCH 8300D, and RSCH 8250D.)
  
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    EDUC 8352 - Assessing for Individual Growth


    (4 cr.) The value of performance assessment coupled with accountability systems can vary widely, depending on how resulting data are used to enhance learning. Students in this course examine the nature of individual evaluation in multiple educational contexts. Students will examine the use of data for measuring learner progress, data-based decision making, and personnel evaluation. Supporting technical skills are integrated into the course, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods of data gathering and analysis. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8350 and RSCH 8250D.
  
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    EDUC 8353 - Evaluating and Improving Programs, Organizations, and Systems


    (4 cr.) Determining comprehensive value and worth of a curriculum, project, instructional method, institution, or policy is a complex endeavor. This course examines the process of determining the value, purpose, efficacy, and social implications for programs, organizations, and systems within a framework for continuous improvement. Supporting technical skills are integrated into the course, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods of data-gathering and analysis. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8351.)
  
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    EDUC 8354 - Dynamics of Communication for Impact and Results


    (4 cr.) Finesse and skill are needed to communicate complex information and findings from data analysis to particular stakeholders in ways that convey understanding, impart meaning, and stimulate a call to action. Students in this course focus on how to report results, consequences, options, and recommendations in compelling ways for multiple audiences. A wide variety of communication methods are explored that include presentation technology, Internet communications, technical writing, writing for publication, press releases, grant writing, and collaborative communication. Data compression is practiced as part of the communication and recommendation process. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8351.)
  
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    EDUC 8355 - Building a Culture of Continuous Improvement


    (4 cr.) Continuous improvement is a phrase that is applied in both business and educational settings. Operationalized, the term crosses fields that include leadership, organizational development, change theory, and evaluation and assessment. This course connects continuous improvement as referenced in these fields and moves beyond to include organizational culture, professionalism, social justice, and codes of ethics that support the formation and sustainability of this type of culture. The culminating project provides a platform for individualizing a plan with a self-chosen organization that incorporates evaluation, assessment, and a vision for social responsibility as part of creating a culture of continuous improvement. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8353.)
  
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    EDUC 8401 - Cognition, Culture, and Learning


    (4 cr.) A complicated relationship exists between cognition, culture, and learning that is inextricably linked to language and sense-making. This course explores these relationships and examines research on educational neuroscience and the role of social-cultural influences in human development, teaching, and learning. Theories of learning are applied to the construction of knowledge within the context of emerging technologies that facilitate the learning process. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8118, RSCH 8200D, and RSCH 8300D.)
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 8900.)
  
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    EDUC 8402 - Learning Environments and Organizational Transformation


    (4 cr.) Learning rarely happens in a vacuum. As learning evolves over the lifespan, it will likely happen in environments that no longer are restricted by space and time. This course explores a range of learning environments and structures, including the role of the teacher or instructor, supportive of individual, group, and organizational learning. Strategies are explored for implementing innovative learning and organizational transformation that facilitate the design of communities of practice for collaboration from both a local as well as global perspective.   

      (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8118, RSCH 8200D, and RSCH 8300D.)
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 8900.)
  
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    EDUC 8403 - Motivation, Engagement, and Learning


    (4 cr.) Learning takes place when people are motivated and engaged in the process. The role of teacher or instructor is as an educational guide, helping ignite the intellectual curiosity necessary for the learner to reach both personal and curricular goals. This course delves into research, theory, and strategies that facilitate both motivation and engagement. The nature of bounded and boundless learning is examined as it relates to motivation, mindset, achievement, and intelligence. Students will apply current research and theory to inform instruction as well as the development and transformation of learning across settings and from the individual, group, and organizational levels.

    (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8118, RSCH 8200D, and RSCH 8300D.)
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 8900.)
  
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    EDUC 8404 - Creativity and Critical Thought


    (4 cr.) Reflective inquiry, critical thinking, and questioning are key components for cognitive learning. Combining these components with creative, innovative, conceptual, and entrepreneurial thinking provides a strong foundation for learning that generates and synthesizes knowledge for effective problem-solving. Research and theory related to building learner capacity for cognitive flexibility, self-regulated learning, as well as managing cognitive dissonance and ambiguity, will be explored in the overall context of facilitating thinkers for tomorrow’s challenges. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8118, RSCH 8200D, and RSCH 8300D.)
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 8900.)
  
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    EDUC 8405 - Assessing Learning: New Trends for Evaluating Learners


    (4 cr.) Innovative learning requires innovative assessment strategies. Learning and assessment will be viewed through the lens of individual, group, and organizational development at the macro and micro levels. A focus will be placed on how learning is assessed in a learning culture that emphasizes creativity and critical thinking as well as how to use assessment data for change. Methods of inquiry designed to inform instruction and improve development of cognitive, social, and emotional competencies will be explored. New trends, including the latest tools and technology designed to move learning assessment into the 21st century, are included. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8118, RSCH 8200D, and RSCH 8300D.)
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 8900.)
  
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    EDUC 8406 - Designing Responsive Curriculum for Learning


    (4 cr.) Responsive curriculum evolves and changes to meet learner needs. This course will focus on a variety of models that educators can use to design responsive curriculum that supports learning across the lifespan and within diverse contexts. Research-based processes will be investigated for creating authentic curriculum and assessment. Strategies for aligning strong content with formalized standards and goals within the learning environment will be explored. The contributing roles of instruction, technology, and globalization will set the context for this course of study.

      (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8118, RSCH 8200D, and RSCH 8300D.)
    (Co-requisites: EDUC 8900.)

  
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    EDUC 8458 - Advanced Research: Conducting Pilot and Field Studies


    (5 cr.) Pilot studies are useful for determining the adequacy of research procedures, including reliability and validity of instruments, observational techniques, interview procedures, and the degree to which the design captures the intended outcomes or effects. The benefit of pilot and field studies is the practice one receives prior to investing time and money in a larger scale research project. The intent of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to gain experience with the research methodology, method, and instruments that will be used in their dissertation. In addition to implementing the research design and analyzing the data, students critique the design for flaws as well as strengths. (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8200D and RSCH 8300D.)
  
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    EDUC 8468 - Advanced Research: Communicating Knowledge in Educational Research


    (4 cr.) Researchers are obligated to communicate the results of their research. In this course, students produce research articles based on the pilot/field studies they’ve conducted. Articles should conform to the guidelines for publication in relevant scholarly journals. The intent of the course is for students to practice their skills in transmitting the results of their scholarly inquiry to the community of scholars. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 8458.)
  
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    EDUC 8470 - Applied Research in Education


    (6 sem. cr.) In this course, educators develop a broad understanding of theoretical frameworks and the appropriate use of qualitative and quantitative methods. Educators focus on methods designed specifically for studying human development and how individuals learn. They explore these methods through the examination of the philosophy of research and particular research strategies, review of literature in the field, and research and analysis of additional literature relating to individual interests. Additionally, educators reflect on and discuss ways in which research can lead to the promotion of social change on the job or in their community.
  
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    EDUC 8510 - Theories of Intelligence, Learning, and Motivation as a Basic Praxis


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8511 - Theories and Principles of Human Learning and the Human Side of Exceptionalities


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8512 - Perspectives on the Role of the Community College


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8513 - Theories of Intelligence, Learning, and Motivation: Birth to Age 8


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    EDUC 8514 - Interdisciplinary Foundations and Theory in Adult Education and Learning


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
 

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