2014-2015 Walden University Catalog (December 2014) 
    
    Oct 29, 2020  
2014-2015 Walden University Catalog (December 2014) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    COUN 6501 - School Counseling Internship II


    (3 cr.) This course is a continuation of COUN 6500 - Internship I and focuses on the refinement of professional school counseling skills. Students are required to continue working to complete their 600 hours of counseling practice and instruction during the second term of internship. Under clinical supervision, students will continue to perform a variety of counseling activities including but not limited to individual and group counseling, classroom guidance, consultation, record-keeping, and administering referrals. Students also will complete weekly assignments and attend weekly group supervision teleconferences to further refine their professional skills. 
      (Prerequisite(s): All core courses and Internship I.)
  
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    COUN 6510 - Individual Crisis, Trauma and Recovery♦


    (5 cr.) With an emphasis on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), dissociative identity disorder (DID), and vicarious trauma, this course is designed to address the mental health needs of individuals who are traumatized by violence, neglect, natural disasters, emotional abuse, and man-made disasters. Students will gain both practical and empirical information about how trauma impacts the whole person, how to make assessments on trauma victims, and how to treat trauma-related disorders. In addition, the course focuses on providing support for first-line responders, such as mental health providers, military personnel, medical personnel, police and fire personnel, victim advocates, and family members who care for traumatized people.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6511 - Treatment of Forensic Populations♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students gain the foundational knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations, such as sex offenders, substance abusers, and white-collar criminals. Students analyze the use of traditional forms of intervention, including individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice. Applying concepts and theories learned in the course, students develop a project scenario in which they feature an offender and describe treatment approaches as well as related ethical, legal, and multicultural factors that may impact treatment. Reflecting on the course, students also consider and discuss professional identity and goals.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6511A - Treatment of Forensic Populations


    (5 cr.) In this course students are provided with the basic knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations. Various forensic populations, such as sex offenders, substance abusers, victims of crime, and employee assistance to law enforcement personnel, will be covered. The use of traditional forms of intervention, such as individual and group psychotherapy, as well s recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice, will be addressed.
  
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    COUN 6512 - Juvenile Justice, Delinquency, and Development♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students focus on the various aspects of the juvenile justice system and the population that it serves. As such, the course provides students with an overview of development theories, such as biological, cognitive, social-emotional, and social. Students apply these theories to cases of juvenile delinquency to determine appropriate prevention, treatment, and intervention strategies. They examine juvenile justice codes, case law, and effective methods for reporting offenses. Students also explore the changing landscape of the juvenile justice field based on current research of its population. Using theories presented in the course, students develop a delinquency-prevention or treatment program for their community, focusing on the underlying goal of social justice and change.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    COUN 6512A - Juvenile Justice, Delinquency, and Development


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on the various aspects of the juvenile justice system and the population that it serves. As such, a thorough understanding of normal juvenile development is provided as a backdrop in which to better apply current juvenile justice codes and case law. The changing landscape of the juvenile justice field based on current research with its population will be covered.
  
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    COUN 6520 - Psychology of Work♦


    5 cr. The meaning of work is vast and comprises a wide array of images, ideas, values, and definitions, depending on age, gender, culture, and other factors. In this course, students examine the critical role of work and vocation from multicultural and global perspectives as well as from a developmental perspective spanning childhood through late adulthood. Students explore and integrate into coursework major theories of vocational psychology. They also examine the meaning of work for individuals, groups, families, and societies as well as the interrelationship of work with family and other lifestyle roles, economic factors, and conditions. Additionally, students examine issues impacting work performance, such as crisis, substance abuse, and mental health challenges.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6671 - Counseling Practicum


    (3 cr.) Students complete a supervised practicum experience at an approved site for a minimum of 100 hours, allowing them to develop their counseling skills and professional knowledge while under supervision. Students participate in classroom and site-based activities including weekly on-site and university group supervision. Through engagement at the field site and course-based assignments and supervision, students demonstrate counseling skills and acquire application-based knowledge for counseling practice in their program area. The area of client focus is dependent on the student’s program of study and may include individual, group, couples, and/or family work. (Prerequisite(s): Approval of the field experience coordinator.)
  
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    COUN 6671A - Counseling Practicum


    (3 cr.) The focus of this course is on experiential learning, which is an essential component of applied professional training. Students complete a supervised practicum experience at an approved site with a minimum of 100 hours, allowing them to develop their counseling skills and professional knowledge while under supervision. Students communicate their learning at the site with their colleagues and instructor in the practicum course and gain additional knowledge regarding clinical practice by interacting with their colleagues and instructor. There is an offline requirement of a triadic supervision teleconference once a week with the practicum instructor or another university supervisor. (Prerequisite(s): Approval of the field experience coordinator.)
  
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    COUN 6672 - Counseling Practicum


    (3 cr.) The focus of this course is on experiential learning, which is an essential component of applied professional training. Students complete a supervised Practicum experience at an approved site with a minimum of 100 hours, allowing them to develop their counseling skills and professional knowledge while under supervision. Students communicate their learning at the site with their colleagues and instructor in the practicum course and gain additional knowledge regarding clinical practice by interacting with their colleagues and instructor. There is an offline requirement of a group supervision teleconference once a week with the practicum instructor. (Prerequisite(s): Approval of the field experience coordinator.)
  
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    COUN 6682a - Internship I


    (3 cr.) During Internship I, students focus on refining counseling and professional skills while working to complete their 600 hours of counseling instruction. Under clinical supervision, students continue to perform a variety of counseling activities, including but not limited to counseling individuals, couples, families, and/or groups (based on the student’s program of study); keeping records; writing reports; and administering referrals. Students also complete weekly assignments and attend weekly group supervision teleconferences to further refine their counseling and professional skills. (Prerequisite(s): Approval of field experience coordinator.)
  
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    COUN 6682b - Internship II


    (3 cr.) This course is a continuation of COUN 6682a Internship I. During Internship II, students continue to focus on refining counseling and professional skills while working to complete their 600 hours of counseling instruction. Under clinical supervision, students continue to perform a variety of counseling activities, including but not limited to counseling individuals, couples, families, and/or groups (based on the student’s program of study); keeping records; writing reports; and administering referrals. Students also complete weekly assignments and attend weekly group supervision teleconferences to further refine their counseling and professional skills.
    (Prerequisite(s): COUN 6682a.)
  
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    COUN 6691 - Foundation of Special Education


    (5 cr.) xxxx
  
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    COUN 6700 - Psychology and Social Change♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students analyze and evaluate theories of social and personal change. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application assignments focused on power and social inequalities, ethnic inequalities, global environment, and issues related to gender and sexism, such as homophobia. In addition, students examine the impact of social change theories on children, families, and societies. They explore the concepts of change agent and change advocate as well as the role of the psychologist as change agent. Students also engage in an integrative written assignment to synthesize theories and analyze a current social problem in their community, for which they propose an action to address the issue and drive positive social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6705 - Professional Identity and Ethics in Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an introduction to the field of professional counseling and the foundations of mental health counseling. Students explore and discuss a variety of topics, including history, philosophy, cultural dynamics, consultation, trends in professional and mental health counseling, and client and counselor advocacy with a focus on the counselor’s role as social change agent. Students also address the counseling profession’s ethical standards, devoting special attention to the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics and counselor ethical decision-making processes. Sharpening scholarly writing and critical-thinking skills, students synthesize knowledge and apply course concepts through biographical and professional identity essays.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6720 - Diagnosis and Assessment♦


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with an overview of what is commonly referred to as abnormal psychology; however, students also consider factors constituting normalcy from multiple perspectives. Students explore the application of diagnostic criteria in various mental health work settings, such as schools, rehabilitation facilities, community agencies, and private practices. Using the scholar-practitioner model, students consider environmental and biological factors contributing to behavioral disorders. Students also examine techniques commonly used for the diagnosis and treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial problems. Though coursework and discussions, students consider multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis as well as current trends and contemporary issues in clinical assessment and diagnosis.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6720A - Diagnosis and Assessment


    (5 cr.) This course is an overview of what is commonly referred to as abnormal psychology; however, what constitutes normalcy is considered from multiple perspectives. Specifically, this is an applied course where students explore the application of diagnostic criteria in various mental health work settings such as schools, rehabilitation facilities, community agencies, and private practices. Environmental and biological factors contributing to behavioral disorders are considered, using the scholar-practitioner model. Techniques are reviewed for the diagnosis and treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders, as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial problems. Multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis are reviewed.



  
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    COUN 6721 - Advanced Psychopathology♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students engage in an in-depth examination of current theory and research associated with major psychological disorders and their diagnoses. Students explore the primary classification systems in terms of their applicability and limitations as well as the factors that impact the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders along a continuum of mental health. Students engage in practical assignments, focusing on applications of the diagnostic criteria in terms of case conceptualization. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 6220.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6722 - Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories♦


    (5 cr.) There are hundreds of therapeutic theories and techniques available to frame the practice of counseling and psychotherapy. An important skill for mental health counselors is to understand the strengths and limitations of these theories to determine which are most appropriate and work best in their own personal practice. In this course, students explore the history of counseling and psychotherapy theories. They examine the major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy in current use, including empirical foundations, advantages, and limitations. Students assess examples of theory-based applications and develop a personal theory of counseling based on theories and techniques assessed in the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6722A - Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories


    (5 cr.) This course summarizes the history and explores the primary concepts of the major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy in current use. The empirical foundations of each theory are examined, and examples are supplied showing how each method is applied to clients. Limitations of each approach are also explored.

     

  
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    COUN 6723 - Multicultural Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students can increase their sensitivity, awareness and knowledge of, and skills related to multicultural counseling and working effectively with diverse clients in this course. Students explore how their own cultural development, biases, values, and strengths impact the development of their counseling approach. Embracing diversity and various client identity issues and their impact on the counseling relationship are foundational to the course. The application of traditional theoretical orientations and current multicultural theories to culturally diverse groups is also addressed. Topics include age, race, gender, sexual orientation, religious preference, physical disability, social class, ethnicity and culture, culturally sensitive diagnosis and assessment, and family patterns. (Prerequisite(s): Counseling Residency I.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6723A - Multicultural Counseling


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to increase students’ awareness and knowledge of, and skills related to, multicultural counseling and the delivery of psychological services. Students explore diversity and identity issues and discuss their impact on the therapeutic relationship. The application of traditional theoretical orientations and current multicultural theories to culturally diverse groups is addressed. Topics include race and ethnicity, sex and gender, sexual orientation, social class, and age and ability.
  
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    COUN 6724 - Child Psychotherapy♦


    (5 cr.) What are some of the special considerations of therapeutic treatment approaches in children? In this course, students have the opportunity to answer this question as they explore the psychological treatment of children from an array of theories and techniques, including play therapy. Students examine and discuss fundamentals and contemporary issues related to playroom organization, intake interviews, psychological assessment, treatment, evaluation, and intervention. They also explore typical play behaviors of children at various levels of development, cross-cultural aspects of play and their meanings as well as issues of cultural sensitivity and ethical practice. Students complete a final written assignment to synthesize course concepts and demonstrate their understanding of child psychotherapy.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6725 - Understanding the English Language Learner


    (5 cr.) xxxx
  
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    COUN 6726 - Couples and Family Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) An important skill for clinicians is to have a fundamental understanding of the dynamics and functioning of couples and families. Students in this course are introduced to concepts and applications in theoretical perspectives and techniques, classical schools of thought, and recent developments in couples and family therapy. Students explore culture, gender, and ethnicity factors in family development. They also review and compare theoretical frameworks in couples and family therapy, including psychosocial, psychodynamic, transgenerational, strategic, cognitive-behavioral, and social constructionist models. Additionally, students assess the roles of culture, spirituality, and values in understanding families.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6727 - Religion and Spirituality in Counseling and Therapy♦


    (5 cr.) Religious and spiritual movements as well as the interactions and divergences between religion and spirituality are topics that can emerge in counseling or therapy. Professionals must be prepared to discuss these issues and incorporate them into therapy with their clients. In this course, students explore and discuss religious and spiritual values, assessment of religious manifestations, relations with clergy/spiritual leaders, use of bibliographic materials, methods to handle religious/spiritual materials and themes presented by clients, and cultural considerations that may intersect with religion and spirituality related to race, ethnicity, and nationality. Other topics that students consider include sex and gender roles, sexual orientation, and treatment techniques. Employing critical-thinking and scholarly-writing skills, students apply concepts to weekly journal assignments and synthesize knowledge into a final paper. Students also reflect on course material to identify their own attitudes toward religion, and they consider how they can address issues of religion and spirituality in a professional context.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6728 - Substance Abuse Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) The impact of substance abuse on the lives of people with addictions, and the lives of their families, makes for a highly complex and challenging area of mental health counseling. Counselors working with these individuals must possess a comprehensive understanding of the background, controversies, and current approaches in regard to the treatment of substance abuse. In this course, students examine psychological aspects of addictions involving alcohol, prescription medications, and illegal substances. They also examine current research in the field of dependency and addiction. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application-based assignments on diagnosing patients, choosing among models of treatment, planning treatment, using group and family treatment plans, and ensuring treatment efficacy. They also consider strategies to promote change, including the trans-theoretical model of behavior change.



    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6728A - Substance Abuse Counseling


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine psychological aspects of addictions involving alcohol, prescription medications, and illegal substances. Current research in the field of dependency and addiction is explored. Topics include diagnosis, models of treatment, treatment planning, use of group and family treatment plans, and efficacy of treatment. Strategies to promote change, including the transtheoretical model of behavior change, are discussed.
  
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    COUN 6740 - Disaster, Crisis, and Trauma♦


    (5 cr.) There is no shortage of natural and human-made disasters, such as war, violence, genocide, and terrorist activities. Individuals and communities impacted by such disasters often need assistance from professionals who understand the social, cultural, and psychological complexities of crisis and trauma. Students in this course investigate how these incidents impact the psychology of individuals and groups. They assess traditional and current literature and complete practical exercises to learn about theories of trauma; actions and behaviors following a disaster; stress, coping, and adjustment difficulties; psychological disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder); and available resources to deal with trauma. Considering the various ways crisis professionals can promote positive social change, students devote special attention to the importance and development of culturally appropriate, service-delivery programs and interventions for individuals affected and traumatized by disasters.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6742 - Conflict, Conflict Resolution, and Peace♦


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students engage in a study of conflict, conflict resolution, and peace from psychological and social psychological perspectives. Students examine the concept of conflict and methods of addressing it, including management, resolution, and transformation; theories related to conflict resolution; approaches to conflict resolution, including negotiation and third-party interventions; and social psychological factors that influence conflict and conflict resolution. They also consider the influence of culture in conflict and conflict resolution; the role of ethics; intractable and international conflicts; the concept of peace; and how third-party approaches can contribute to the peace process. Students apply conflict resolution approaches to conflicts at all levels, from interpersonal to those involving whole nations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6743 - Psychopharmacology♦


    (5 cr.) The potential for addictive disorders to present like a variety of medical and psychological disorders is common. In this course, students examine how to treat addictions that may coexist with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive behavior, and other psychological disorders as described in the DSM-IV-TR. They survey a spectrum of psychotropic medications and their use in the treatment of mental, behavioral, and addictive disorders. Students also explore factors that increase the likelihood for a person, community, or group to be at risk for psychoactive substance use disorders. Through this course, students gain an understanding of the basic classifications, indications, and contraindications of commonly prescribed medications so that they make appropriate referrals within treatment teams.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6753 - Career Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to develop practical skills in career and vocational assessment as well as functional knowledge of how career assessment can assist in the exploration and understanding of the interrelationship among work, family, and life roles. They examine major sources of career and work information available on the Internet as well as through printed material and computer-based guidance systems. Gaining practical career counseling experience, students administer, score, and interpret printed and computer-based assessments of career interests, beliefs, and values. Students learn how to integrate career development theory and assessment results with career clinical interventions. They also examine clinical and assessment issues, devoting attention to computer-based applications and multicultural implications.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6753A - Career Counseling


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine major career development theories, assumptions, and implications for practice. Career information programs and systems in terms of their application to personnel assessment, counseling, development, and placement are reviewed. Focus is placed on the implications of individual differences in culture-, gender-, and age-related issues. Students obtain a theoretical and practical basis for supporting individuals in vocation selection and career development.
  
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    COUN 6777A - Essentials of Public Health: A Case Study Approach


    (5 cr.) Students evaluate key aspects of public health, including its history, mission, essential services, core functions, infrastructure, resources, workforce, achievements, challenges, and career options in this course. They explore these facets through case studies, a hypothetical scenario, and journal articles. Although the main focus of this course is on the U.S. public health system, students are also exposed to global issues and views of public health.
  
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    COUN 6778A - Social, Behavioral, and Cultural Factors in Public Health


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are presented with an examination and analysis of the major social, behavioral, and cultural variables and issues that affect the health of populations, including community, gender, age, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, and environment, as well as behavioral risks. Research, theoretical, and conceptual frameworks from the social and behavioral sciences are explored as applied to public health problems and the reduction of health disparities.
  
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    COUN 6784 - Psychological Consultation♦


    (5 cr.) What is the role of consultation in the delivery of psychological services and how does it differ from therapy or counseling? Students in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions as they examine the history, theory, process, and methods in the field of psychological consultation. They explore the qualifications and techniques required of psychologists who consult in various settings, including the courtroom; business and industry; and educational, mental health, and medical situations. Students apply concepts and theories learned in the course to a consultation action plan based on personal experience or one anticipated in a future professional situation. Through this project, students consider multiple factors, such as setting, clients, data collection, professional challenges, multicultural considerations, and ethical issues.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6785 - Prevention, Intervention, and Consultation♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students prepare for their roles as counselors in areas of prevention, intervention, and consultation with specific populations in different settings. Students assess these three areas of mental health counseling, including the relationships among them, methodological applications, and related ethical and legal considerations. They also discuss a variety of topics with their peers, such as applications for social change, needs of specific populations, iatrogenic harm, professional approaches and challenges, program evaluation, and future trends. Using an action-research model, students develop a blueprint for a project to address a contemporary mental health issue through the context of prevention, intervention, or consultation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6785A - Prevention, Intervention, and Consultation


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an inquiry into prevention and intervention programs for individuals, groups, and communities. Students consider cultural, social, psychological, family, organizational, and political factors bearing on the mental health and development of people in various settings, including schools, communities, and organizations. Theoretical frameworks guiding prevention and intervention are explored, including constructivist and ecological-developmental perspectives. Students gain experience in developing prevention-oriented programs within diverse systems.
  
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    COUN 6800 - Capstone


    (5 cr.) A capstone project provides students with the opportunity to synthesize knowledge and skills acquired throughout their program into a practical, integrative project designed to promote positive social change. During this capstone course, students select an issue in mental health counseling and develop a problem statement related to the issue. They review the literature surrounding the issue, design a research study, and make recommendations to address the problem. Students report the results of their study through a written paper and a narrated PowerPoint presentation.
  
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    COUN 6805 - Facilitating Productive Working Relationships and School Culture to Enhance Student Learning


    (5 cr.) xxx
  
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    COUN 6806 - Collaborating with Families and Communities for Student Success


    (5 cr.) xxx
  
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    COUN 6815 - Contemporary Gerontology/Geriatric Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) Statistical data indicate that people are living longer and the number of older persons is continually increasing. As the population ages, society must prepare to address their needs. Students in this course are provided with a multidisciplinary approach to the study of aging in contemporary societies. Students examine the biological, psychological, social, and societal contexts of aging. They also explore the historical and cross-cultural perspectives on aging, social theories of aging, managing chronic diseases, cognitive changes associated with aging, mental health issues, sexuality, and social interactions. Through a series of taskforce reports on various topics, such as sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, and elder abuse, students apply course concepts and critically examine current issues in gerontology.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6820 - Successful Practice Management♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine management principles and practices for applied and consulting psychologists. They explore various professional tasks, such as setting client goals; developing treatment/intervention plans; coordinating treatment and assessing progress; scheduling and billing; managing risk; supervising staff; and keeping abreast of current research, legal, and ethical issues. Students also address practice demographics and systematic intake procedures. Through the design of a business plan or strategic analysis, students research and explicate a specific issue or topic presented in the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6830 - Psychology of Sexuality♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore sexuality through a variety of frameworks, including historical, psychological, sociological, anthropological, biological, public health, and media and cultural studies. Using a variety of theoretical perspectives, including essentialist and constructivist notions of sex, sexuality, and sexual identity, students examine traditional understandings of sexuality, including male and female sexual anatomy, physiology, and response; variations across the lifespan; sexual communication; love and interpersonal attraction; and sexual disorders. They also explore and discuss different expressions of sexual identity, including heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality as well as different expressions of gender identity from cross-cultural and interdisciplinary viewpoints. Students complete an integrative final paper incorporating research, ideas, and peer feedback from discussions on a topic related to the psychology of sexuality.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6912 - Mental Health Law♦


    (5 cr.) Mental health counseling professionals in all areas, especially criminal forensic psychological practice, may encounter various conflicts regarding psychological and legal approaches to treatment. Therefore, it is important for counselors to have a firm understanding of mental health law to avoid conflicts, such as issues of liability and malpractice. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to examine several different aspects of the law related to mental health issues, including those constituting forensic psychological practice, such as civil matters (personal injury and civil competency issues) and criminal matters (competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, diminished capacity, and death-penalty issues). Students employ recent court decisions and laws, such as the Tarasoff ruling, mandated reporting, and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), to examine how mental health law influences the practice of psychology and mental health counseling.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    COUN 6912A - Mental Health Law


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine several different aspects of the law related to mental health issues. Laws and court decisions that affect the practice of psychology—such as the Tarasoff ruling, mandated reporting, and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)—are addressed, as are the many areas of law that constitute forensic psychological practice, including civil matters (such as personal injury and civil competency issues) and criminal matters (such as competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, diminished capacity, and death penalty issues).
  
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    COUN 8001 - Foundations of Graduate Study in Counselor Education and Supervision


    (1 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence as they relate to counselor educators and supervisors.
  
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    COUN 8110 - Professional Orientation, Ethics, and Identity


    (5 cr.) Students in this doctoral-level course work toward preparing their professional identity as counselor educators and supervisors. They explore the professional orientation and characteristics of counselors, counselor educators, and supervisors as well as related ethical and legal issues encountered in daily work situations. Students engage in discussions and assignments designed to provide practical application of competencies and responsibilities of counselor educators and supervisors. Students also examine the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics and other relevant standards of practice as well as multicultural issues related to counselor preparation training. Through this course, students have the opportunity to gain professional awareness and create a professional development plan that can be implemented throughout their degree program. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 8001.)
  
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    COUN 8111 - Leadership and Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Successful organizations in a rapidly changing and complex world require leaders who embrace change and are able to engage others in change. In this course, students use traditional literature, current articles, and interactive media to explore the qualities, characteristics, and skills of effective leaders as well as the theories, models, and relationships between leadership and organizational change. They assess the ethical issues and standards as well as the opportunities and challenges related to leading diverse organizations through change. Students also examine how current leaders employ leadership and organizational change to contribute to social change, and they consider how to use these lessons to make further positive changes within an organization or their own community.
  
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    COUN 8115 - Advanced Counseling Theories♦


    (5 cr.) There are many counseling theories available for professional use in practice. It is the responsibility of the counselor, however, to understand these theories, know which to use in specific settings and situation, and decide which are best suited to his or her own style or methods. In this course, students explore and evaluate major traditional and contemporary theories of the counseling profession, including psychoanalytic, person-centered, rational emotive behavioral therapy (REBT), multicultural, feminist, and solution-focused. Students apply these and other theories to diverse populations and settings. They also consider how they might advise students and supervisees who use these theories, and they analyze related challenges in teaching and supervising. In doing so, students consider the impact of their own psychosocial, racial, and ethnic identities. Finally, students develop a personal integrative theoretical orientation. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 8110.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8116 - Understanding Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) This course aims to help the student better understand how to be an astute consumer of forensic psychology research. Basic principles of statistics, such as reliability and validity, are covered. At the same time, this course places emphasis on teaching the student how to critically read forensic psychology research and how best to apply research results to forensic clinical settings.
  
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    COUN 8120 - Professional Consultation, Program Evaluation, and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students work toward increasing their knowledge and skills related to the roles of consultant and program evaluator in community agencies, mental health settings, P–12 schools, and university settings. Through a variety of practical discussions and assignments, students explore leadership theory and skills; systems theory; consultation models and processes; program evaluation models and methods; ethical, legal, and professional issues; and availability of funding sources. Students synthesize knowledge and apply skills to case studies and real-life examples. They also apply the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) standards to an evaluation of the components of a counselor education program. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 8115.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8125 - Teaching in Counselor Education♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students prepare to become competent teachers of counselor education through the examination of various adult learning methods to work effectively with different learning styles, cultural dynamics, and diversity. They learn how to help students acquire and apply knowledge and skills, and they examine methods to evaluate learning outcomes. Students also have the opportunity to reflect on past learning experiences to examine the qualities of effective teachers and teaching practices, and they consider how they can apply these practices to their own teaching endeavors. Incorporating concepts and skills learned throughout the course, students videotape themselves teaching a presentation to demonstrate their progress in becoming an effective teacher of counselor education. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 8120.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8126 - Assessment in Forensic Psychology


    (5 cr.) This course covers the varied assessment techniques and instruments used in the forensic psychology arena. Some of the assessment areas covered include risk assessment, juvenile evaluations, lie detection, custody evaluations, and many of the psychological tests and instruments that are used in these assessments. The course will provide a solid foundation of the knowledge of forensic psychology techniques and assessment rather than specific skills in administering and interpreting psychological tests.
  
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    COUN 8135 - Clinical Supervision


    (5 cr.) Clinical supervision of counselors and counselors in training requires in-depth knowledge of major conceptual approaches, methods, and techniques; evaluation; and ethical and legal issues related to supervisory interactions and responsibilities. Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to develop their professional identity and learn the skills of a clinical supervisor. Throughout this course, students engage in experiential applications, discussions, and self-reflective assignments that focus on the strategies for working with supervisees representing diverse backgrounds and developmental and learning styles. After a critical analysis of the purpose of supervision, theoretical frameworks, and models of supervision, students develop and apply their own theory of supervision in a practice setting in which they each oversee a group of practicum students.
  
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    COUN 8140 - Professional Counselor as Scholar-Practitioner♦


    (5 cr.) The responsibility of scholar-practitioners in the field of counseling is to consume and disseminate information in clinical, academic, and administrative settings. Students are provided with a model for development as a professional counselor scholar-practitioner through which they learn to process knowledge and engage in professional advocacy in this course. Students explore relationship, professional-writing, and presentation proficiencies and apply these skills in practice scenarios through application-based assignments. They also identify and evaluate publication and presentation venues. Applying course concepts and acquired knowledge, students gain practical experience as scholar-practitioners as they complete a manuscript for submission to a peer-reviewed, counseling-related journal.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8145 - Crisis Management♦


    (5 cr.) Small- and large-scale disasters of all types continue to abound. Communities need trained individuals who are prepared to respond to such incidents and who can help plan for future disasters as well as train others to plan and respond. In this course, students learn the fundamentals of crisis management and crisis leadership. They develop an understanding of the theories and models related to crises, disasters, and other events caused by trauma. Students also learn about ethical, legal, and diversity considerations in crisis and trauma response. Through analyses of topical literature, applications, and discussions, students gain a practical understanding of the models for training and supporting other counselors in the areas of crisis response applicable to community, national, and international crises. Employing concepts learned in the course, students develop a crisis management plan for their own community.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8146 - Crisis Management


    (5 cr.) Small- and large-scale disasters of all types continue to abound. Communities need trained individuals who are prepared to respond to such incidents and who can help plan for future disasters as well as train others to plan and respond. In this course, students learn the fundamentals of crisis management and crisis leadership. They develop an understanding of the theories and models related to crises, disasters, and other events caused by trauma. Students also learn about ethical, legal, and diversity considerations in crisis and trauma response. Through analyses of topical literature, applications, and discussions, students gain a practical understanding of the models for training and supporting other counselors in the areas of crisis response applicable to community, national, and international crises. Employing concepts learned in the course, students develop a crisis management plan for their own community.
     
  
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    COUN 8203 - Survey Research Methods


    (5 cr.) An in-depth study of a range of survey methods administered via in-person interview, self-report, phone interview, and Internet administration is introduced in this course. Topics will include survey design, administration, analysis, and addressing sources of bias. The course will also review theoretical and empirical research on question and questionnaire effects. The course prepares students in the practice of writing questions and designing questionnaires, both in general and in light of existing research.

      (Prerequisite(s): RSCH 8100 and RSCH 8200.)

  
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    COUN 8214 - Counseling for Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) This course explores methods for accelerating individual, group, and organizational performance through consulting, coaching, and change management. The course addresses topics such as organizational assessment; team development; strategic planning; group dynamics; power, politics, and influence; leadership; and conflict management. Applications include the assessment of an organization and the development of strategies to address identified needs for change.
  
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    COUN 8215 - Lifespan Development♦


    (5 cr.) This course provides students with an advanced overview of development through the lifespan, including prenatal, childhood, adolescent, adult, and late adult phases. Basic developmental processes and theories are examined and applied to developmental milestones that occur within these phases of development. Themes of diversity are highlighted throughout the course. Additional topics include ethics, research, global perspectives, and social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8250 - Group Process and Dynamics♦


    (5 cr.) This course prepares students to work with groups in various settings. It examines group theory, process, and dynamics. Using relevant literature, multimedia resources, and scholar-practitioner model, students develop an understanding of culturally and contextually relevant group practice, group leaders’ roles and responsibilities, the relevance and purpose of group work, and strategies for using groups to foster social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8310 - Research Design♦


    (5 cr.) This course provides students with a foundation in the design of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches to psychological research. Students learn the strengths and limitations of each method and under what circumstances each approach would be the most appropriate research design. Students learn how to identify a topic for research, how to conduct a literature search, and the importance of scholarly writing. Students learn to write a research proposal, addressing the following key elements: researching, writing an introduction, stating a purpose for the study, identifying research questions and hypotheses, using theory, defining the significance of the study, and collecting and analyzing data. Students are exposed to legal and ethical issues associated with human subjects’ protection. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 6305.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8314 - Program Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) The skills required to assess research and work effectively with stakeholders are among the many proficiencies required of professionals who evaluate and develop programs. In this course, students examine these skill sets as well as the history, theory, and major approaches underlying program evaluation. Students learn how to select appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative models and techniques to perform evaluations, demonstrate program effectiveness, and disseminate results. Additionally, students explore the procedures and techniques involved in offering their evaluation services to a specific group or organization. They also examine strategies to gain stakeholder interest in developing appropriate standards, research progress, and evaluation outcomes. Students acquire practical experience evaluating a program of interest through which they outline organizational structure, identify stakeholders, employ evaluation models, explain steps in planning, and predict possible challenges or stakeholder fears, for which they recommend solutions.
    Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8315 - Tests and Measurements♦


    (5 cr.) This course provides students with an overview of the different types of tests used in clinical, educational, and organizational settings. It includes a comprehensive examination of psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. Topics include normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, test score interpretation, and test development. The course also addresses ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues including cultural bias and fairness. Professional standards for testing provide a foundation for the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8316 - Techniques of Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course focus on principles and skills related to interviewing and observation as well as related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings. Note: In addition to the course materials listed by the university bookstore, this course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.

    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8317 - Program Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) The skills required to assess research and work effectively with stakeholders are among the many proficiencies required of professionals who evaluate and develop programs. In this course, students examine these skill sets as well as the history, theory, and major approaches underlying program evaluation. Students learn how to select appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative models and techniques to perform evaluations, demonstrate program effectiveness, and disseminate results. Additionally, students explore the procedures and techniques involved in offering their evaluation services to a specific group or organization. They also examine strategies to gain stakeholder interest in developing appropriate standards, research progress, and evaluation outcomes. Students acquire practical experience evaluating a program of interest through which they outline organizational structure, identify stakeholders, employ evaluation models, explain steps in planning, and predict possible challenges or stakeholder fears, for which they recommend solutions.
    ♦Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8320 - Counseling Practicum


    (3 cr.) The focus of this course is on experiential learning, which is an essential component of applied professional training. Students complete a supervised practicum experience at an approved site with a minimum of 100 hours, allowing them to develop their counseling skills and professional knowledge while under supervision. Students communicate their learning at the site with their colleagues and Instructor in the practicum course and gain additional knowledge regarding clinical practice by interacting with their colleagues and Instructor. There is an offline requirement of a group supervision teleconference once a week with the practicum instructor. (Prerequisite(s): Approval of the coordinator of field training.)
  
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    COUN 8326 - Research and Program Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a foundation in research methods, statistical analysis, needs assessment, and program evaluation in counseling. They are introduced to qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches; single case designs; action research; and outcomes research. Students can learn how to identify a topic for research, conduct a literature search, and use research to inform evidence-based practice. They also learn the importance of scholarly writing. Students examine the principles, models, and applications of needs assessment and program evaluation, and they learn to use the findings to effect program modifications. Emphasis will also be on the ethically and culturally relevant strategies for interpreting and reporting the results of research and/or program evaluation studies. Statistical methods used in conducting research and program evaluation are reviewed.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8333 - Vicarious Trauma and Compassion Fatigue♦


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students gain an understanding and awareness of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue for trauma-response-helping professionals. They examine intervention strategies and models of treatment and prevention of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue through the lens of counselor educators, supervisors, and clinicians. Applying course concepts, students gain hands-on practice conducting a needs assessment and examining the use of standardized instruments. They also propose social change recommendations related to vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue to promote informed and competent trauma-response-helping professionals. Students engage in course assignments that emphasize the ethical, legal, multicultural, and spiritual implications for wellness and self-care, including personal, professional, and organizational elements. As a final project, students interview a trauma-response-helping professional and develop an organizational wellness plan for their setting.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8336 - Crisis, Trauma, and Disaster Response♦


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the personal and systemic impact of crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events on individuals, couples, families, and communities. Students examine theories and response models as they relate to sexual trauma, crisis in individuals and families, crisis in the community, and crisis in the nation and in the world. They explore and discuss topics related to counselor competencies, vicarious trauma and counter transference, specific diagnoses, and advocacy. Students also engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of crisis assessment. Through contemporary articles and case studies, they consider and discuss cultural, legal, and ethical issues related to crisis, trauma, and disaster events and response.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8360 - Assessment in Counseling and Education♦


    (5 cr.)  Students in this course are provided with an overview of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation used in a variety of counseling, educational, and organizational settings. Students examine the psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. Topics include a historical perspective of assessment, basic concepts of standardized and nonstandardized testing, measures of central tendency, normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, assessment report writing, test score interpretation, and test construction. Students also address the ethical, legal, and multicultural issues related to selecting, administering, and interpreting assessment and evaluation instruments and techniques in counseling.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8550 - Writing a Quality Prospectus♦


    (5 cr.) The prospectus a brief paper, typically 15–20 pages in length, which helps students organize, delineate, and make decisions regarding their doctoral study and appropriate research methodology. Students create a prospectus to establish the background for the problem statement; the problem statement itself; a survey of the relevant literature (typically 25–75 references); and a research, implementation, and evaluation plan for the solution of the problem. Students in this five-credit course focus specifically on the process of writing the dissertation prospectus. They employ their preliminary research plan to develop a problem statement for their dissertation. Students further refine the problem statement and carry out the planning and the library research that lends to the formulation of a dissertation prospectus.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8551 - Preparing for Dissertation


    The focus of this course is on the preparation for the dissertation phase of training. In this course, students identify a dissertation topic and potential dissertation committee members; begin to conduct a literature review; develop a problem statement and research questions; and evaluate research designs, methods, and types of analyses to use for their dissertation. Students also complete their initial premise in this course and an annotated outline of their prospectus. The prospectus is a brief paper, typically 15–20 pages in length, which helps students organize, delineate, and make decisions regarding their doctoral study and appropriate research methodology. It is strongly recommended that students take this course after they have successfully completed all research courses in their program of study.
  
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    COUN 8560 - Dissertation


    (12 cr.) Doctoral students have the opportunity to integrate their program of study into a research study through which they explore a specific area of interest in this course. Students complete the dissertation with the guidance of a chair and committee members through a learning platform classroom in which weekly participation is required. Students work with their dissertation chair to write the prospectus, complete an approved proposal (the first three chapters of the dissertation), complete an application for Institutional Review Board approval, collect and analyze data, and complete the dissertation. During the final quarter, students prepare the dissertation for final review by the university and conclude with an oral defense of their dissertation. Once students register for COUN 8560, they are registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation for a minimum of 4 terms. (Prerequisite(s): Residencies 2 and 3.)
  
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    COUN 8630 - Interviewing and Observational Strategies♦


    (5 cr.) Personal attitudes, values, and beliefs often affect a counselor’s ability to establish an appropriate relationship and rapport with clients. In this course, students learn to evaluate their personal attitudes and beliefs to positively influence their counseling approaches. They explore principles and skills related to interviewing and observation, and they examine related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings. Synthesizing concepts, skills, and personal reflections, students demonstrate their ability to engage in a counseling session using techniques learned throughout the course. Note: This course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8631 - Treatment of Forensic Populations♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students gain the foundational knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations, such as sex offenders, substance abusers, and white-collar criminals. Students analyze the use of traditional forms of intervention, including individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice. Applying concepts and theories learned in the course, students develop a project scenario in which they feature an offender and describe treatment approaches as well as related ethical, legal, and multicultural factors that may impact treatment. Reflecting on the course, students also consider and discuss professional identity and goals.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8632 - Mental Health Law♦


    (5 cr.) This course examines several different aspects of the law related to mental health issues. Laws and court decisions that affect the practice of psychology, such as the Tarasoff ruling, mandated reporting, and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) are addressed, as are the many areas of law that constitute forensic psychological practice, including civil matters (such as personal injury and civil competency issues) and criminal matters (such as competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, diminished capacity, and death-penalty issues).
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8641 - Individual Crisis, Trauma, and Recovery♦


    (5 cr.) With an emphasis on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), dissociative identity disorder (DID), and vicarious trauma, this course is designed to address the mental health needs of individuals who are traumatized by violence, neglect, natural disasters, emotional abuse, and man-made disasters. Students will gain both practical and empirical information about how trauma impacts the whole person, how to make assessments on trauma victims, and how to treat trauma-related disorders. In addition, the course focuses on providing support for first-line responders, such as mental health providers, military personnel, medical personnel, police and fire personnel, victim advocates, and family members who care for traumatized people.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8642 - Crisis Intervention and Trauma♦


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the theory, issues, and skills of crisis counseling, including models for working with children and adolescents; working with victims of violence and their abusers; issues of health-related, school, and mental health crises; and the ethical and legal factors of crisis intervention. In addition, students will be introduced to models, leadership roles, and strategies for responding to community, national, and international crises.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8650 - Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector♦


    (5 cr.) Nonprofit organizations (NPOs) can serve to positively affect people’s lives through social change, but they require leaders who have a fundamental understanding of the nonprofit sector, including related ethical, legal, and global perspectives. Students in this course explore these viewpoints as well as the history, foundations, and types of NPOs. They also examine the diverse political, social, and economic contexts within which NPOs exist. Students explore and apply marketing, public relations, and communication concepts and strategies to case studies and contemporary situations. Gaining practical insight, students also apply theories presented in the course to the development of a concept paper guiding the development of a nonprofit organization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8651 - Finance and Budgeting in the Nonprofit Sector♦


    (5 cr.) Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in the public sector. This course examines finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations, as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. Students gain an understanding of theories underlying fiscal policy; they read and analyze budgets, financial statements, and financial reports. Other topics include the use of auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, and financial technology systems specific to government organizations. Students apply what they learn to developing budget and financial projects relevant to public organizations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8652 - Board Governance and Volunteer Management♦


    (5 cr.) Volunteers are the lifeblood of many nonprofit organizations. These organizations rely heavily on their volunteer board of directors to govern and guide them toward their mission. The success of nonprofit organizations is largely dependent on the effective management of program volunteers and board members. This course explores the volunteer management process (volunteer recruitment, orientation, training, supervision, and evaluation) with an emphasis on creating and maintaining an effective board of directors. Students design a board development or volunteer management plan based on the concept paper they developed in COUN 8650 Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8660 - Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy for Counseling Professionals♦


    (5 cr.) Counselor educators have a responsibility to foster social change, provide leadership, and service the counseling professional. Students have the opportunity to gain a thorough understanding of this responsibility as well as the prospect of enhancing their professional development plans by identifying specific goals for professional involvement and service, including advocacy for their own community, clients, students, or profession. Students examine the processes of advocacy and social change. They use contemporary research to analyze the current trends and issues of the profession. Students also identify how community, national, and international issues affect the counseling profession.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8661 - Prevention, Intervention, and Consultation♦


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to prepare students for their roles as counselors in prevention, intervention, and consultation endeavors with specific populations in specific settings. Using an action research model, students will prepare a blueprint for a prevention, intervention, or consultation project for a community, agency, or organization.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8662 - Psychology and Social Change♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students analyze and evaluate theories of social and personal change. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application assignments focused on power and social inequalities, ethnic inequalities, global environment, and issues related to gender and sexism, such as homophobia. In addition, students examine the impact of social change theories on children, families, and societies. They explore the concepts of change agent and change advocate as well as the role of the psychologist as change agent. Students also engage in an integrative written assignment to synthesize theories and analyze a current social problem in their community, for which they propose an action to address the issue and drive positive social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8670 - Program Leadership and Consultation


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of, and skills in, the roles of program leader, consultant, and program evaluator and assessor in various clinical, community, and administrative settings. Throughout this course, students will focus on the competencies of program leaders, theories of leadership, and models and methods of assessment and evaluations. Additional coursework is designed to prepare students for grant writing.
  
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    COUN 8671 - Consulting for Organizational Change♦


    (5 cr.) This course explores methods for accelerating individual, group, and organizational performance through consulting, coaching, and change management. The course addresses topics such as organizational assessment; team development; strategic planning; group dynamics; power, politics, and influence; leadership; and conflict management. Applications include the assessment of an organization and the development of strategies to address identified needs for change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8672 - Psychological Consultation


    (5 cr.) What is the role of consultation in the delivery of psychological services and how does it differ from therapy or counseling? Students in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions as they examine the history, theory, process, and methods in the field of psychological consultation. They explore the qualifications and techniques required of psychologists who consult in various settings, including the courtroom; business and industry; and educational, mental health, and medical situations. Students apply concepts and theories learned in the course to a consultation action plan based on personal experience or one anticipated in a future professional situation. Through this project, students consider multiple factors, such as setting, clients, data collection, professional challenges, multicultural considerations, and ethical issues.
  
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    COUN 8682 - Counseling Internship


    (6 cr.—3 cr. per term for 2 terms) The internship provides mental health counseling students with an upper-level, supervised “capstone” clinical experience designed to refine and enhance their basic counseling skills, integrate their professional knowledge and skills, and continue their development in specialization areas. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 6671 and approval of the coordinator of field training.)
  
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    COUN 8720 - Diagnosis and Assessment♦


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with an overview of what is commonly referred to as abnormal psychology; however, students also consider factors constituting normalcy from multiple perspectives. Students explore the application of diagnostic criteria in various mental health work settings, such as schools, rehabilitation facilities, community agencies, and private practices. Using the scholar-practitioner model, students consider environmental and biological factors contributing to behavioral disorders. Students also examine techniques commonly used for the diagnosis and treatment of cognitive, emotional, and developmental disorders as well as for psychophysiological and psychosocial problems. Though coursework and discussions, students consider multicultural factors that complicate diagnosis as well as current trends and contemporary issues in clinical assessment and diagnosis.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8722 - Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories♦


    (5 cr.) There are hundreds of therapeutic theories and techniques available to frame the practice of counseling and psychotherapy. An important skill for mental health counselors is to understand the strengths and limitations of these theories to determine which are most appropriate and work best in their own personal practice. In this course, students explore the history of counseling and psychotherapy theories. They examine the major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy in current use, including empirical foundations, advantages, and limitations. Students assess examples of theory-based applications and develop a personal theory of counseling based on theories and techniques assessed in the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8723 - Multicultural Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with the opportunity to increase their knowledge of multicultural counseling and the delivery of psychological services as well as related skills needed in professional practice. Students explore diversity and identity issues and discuss their impact on the therapeutic relationship. They examine the application of traditional theoretical orientations and current multicultural theories to culturally diverse groups. Through a variety of assignments designed to provide practical application of content, students also investigate counseling concepts related to race and ethnicity, sex and gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, and ability.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8726 - Couples and Family Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) An important skill for clinicians is to have a fundamental understanding of the dynamics and functioning of couples and families. Students in this course are introduced to concepts and applications in theoretical perspectives and techniques, classical schools of thought, and recent developments in couples and family therapy. Students explore culture, gender, and ethnicity factors in family development. They also review and compare theoretical frameworks in couples and family therapy, including psychosocial, psychodynamic, transgenerational, strategic, cognitive-behavioral, and social constructionist models. Additionally, students assess the roles of culture, spirituality, and values in understanding families.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8728 - Substance Abuse Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) The impact of substance abuse on the lives of people with addictions, and the lives of their families, makes for a highly complex and challenging area of mental health counseling. Counselors working with these individuals must possess a comprehensive understanding of the background, controversies, and current approaches in regard to the treatment of substance abuse. In this course, students examine psychological aspects of addictions involving alcohol, prescription medications, and illegal substances. They also examine current research in the field of dependency and addiction. Students engage in a variety of conceptual and application-based assignments on diagnosing patients, choosing among models of treatment, planning treatment, using group and family treatment plans, and ensuring treatment efficacy. They also consider strategies to promote change, including the trans-theoretical model of behavior change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8753 - Vocational Psychology and Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to develop practical skills in career and vocational assessment as well as functional knowledge of how career assessment can assist in the exploration and understanding of the interrelationship among work, family, and life roles. They examine major sources of career and work information available on the Internet as well as through printed material and computer-based guidance systems. Gaining practical career counseling experience, students administer, score, and interpret printed and computer-based assessments of career interests, beliefs, and values. Students learn how to integrate career development theory and assessment results with career clinical interventions. They also examine clinical and assessment issues, devoting attention to computer-based applications and multicultural implications.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 8785 - Prevention, Intervention, and Consultation


    (5 cr.) In this course, students prepare for their roles as counselors in areas of prevention, intervention, and consultation with specific populations in different settings. Students assess these three areas of mental health counseling, including the relationships among them, methodological applications, and related ethical and legal considerations. They also discuss a variety of topics with their peers, such as applications for social change, needs of specific populations, iatrogenic harm, professional approaches and challenges, program evaluation, and future trends. Using an action-research model, students develop a blueprint for a project to address a contemporary mental health issue through the context of prevention, intervention, or consultation.
  
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    COUN 8890 - Doctoral Practicum


    (3 cr.) Students in this course focus on experiential learning, which is an essential component of applied professional training. Students complete a supervised practicum experience at an approved site for a minimum of 100 hours, allowing them to develop their counseling skills and professional knowledge while under supervision. Students communicate with the class and the practicum faculty members weekly during the quarter to discuss cases and present videos of student-client sessions.  Through these exchanges, students demonstrate what they’ve learned and acquire feedback and additional knowledge in regard to clinical practice. This course requires students to engage in a face-to-face residency. (Prerequisite(s): Residency 2.)
  
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    COUN 8895 - Doctoral Internship A


    (3 cr.) The internship is a supervised training experience that prepares students to successfully funtion in the role of counselor educator. Internship experiences emphasize the integration of theory and research through applied practice in a variety of settings and situations. This course serves as part 1 of a two-part supervised internship experience in a selected setting (supervision and leadership/advocacy). Students complete a total of 300 hours in their internship through which they engage in most of the activities of a regularly employed professional in the setting.
  
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    COUN 8896 - Doctoral Internship B


    (3 cr.) This is second part of the supervised experience in a selected setting (supervision and leadership/advocacy). The 300-hour internship includes supervised experiences in most of the activities of a regularly employed professional in the setting.
 

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