2014-2015 Walden University Catalog (December 2014) 
    
    Oct 23, 2020  
2014-2015 Walden University Catalog (December 2014) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    CMIS 4501 - Computer-Supported Collaborative Work♦


    (5 cr.) With the advancement of technology, most organizations, including educational institutions, now rely on multiple-user applications to maximize workflow efficiency, enhance learning, and allow for collaboration of diverse skills and experiences. In this course, students examine existing systems and proposals for information support for collaboration in formal and informal settings, along with their organizational and cultural contexts. Drawing upon students’ own experience in online collaboration and requisite knowledge of information systems analysis and design, they analyze and discuss case studies to better understand new collaboration capabilities and ways to improve computer-based collaborative work continually.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 4204.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4502 - Web 2.0 Systems and Applications♦


    (5 cr.) This course examines the phenomenon of “Web 2.0,” a cluster of technologies and applications centered around collaboration among users and their collective ability to add content and value to a community. Topics include social networks, special interest communities, volunteer collaborative efforts, and innovative incentive systems. Students analyze the technical and commercial properties of different approaches. (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 4204.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4502 - Web 2.0 Systems and Applications♦


    (5 cr.) The phenomenon known as “Web 2.0,” is a cluster of technologies and applications centered around collaboration among users and their collective ability to add content and value to a community. In this course, students examine these technologies and applications to understand society’s social patterns, business dealings, and even the educational and political landscape. They engage in contextual application assignments to analyze the technical and commercial properties of different approaches to systems and applications. They also have the opportunity to enhance communication skills through discussions on topics including social networks, special interest communities, volunteer collaborative efforts, and innovative incentive systems.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 4204.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4601 - Information Systems Service Management♦


    (5 cr.) This course examines the conception of information systems as collections of services, aggregated in a supply chain that stretches across organizations and continents. Students investigate the concept of Service Oriented Architecture and the various disciplines of open interfaces, open source software, service level agreements, and client-vendor relationships that allow complex assemblies of services to work. Students analyze the business and organizational strengths and weaknesses of different approaches. (Prerequisite(s): ISYS 3001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4601 - Information Systems Service Management♦


    (5 cr.) Businesses often do not have the knowledge or resources to execute a project on their own. As a result, they rely on external resources, often times using offshore vendors who have the skills and tools required to complete the job. While this process allows business-lucrative opportunities, it also requires someone to manage the relationship between the organization and outside vendor. In this course, students examine the conception of information systems (IS) as collections of services aggregated in a supply chain that stretches across organizations and continents. Students investigate the concept of service-oriented architecture and the various disciplines of open interfaces, open source software, service-level agreements, and client-vendor relationships that allow complex assemblies of services to work. They analyze and discuss the business and organizational strengths and weaknesses of different approaches for a real-world, practical understanding of IS service management.
      (Prerequisite(s): ISYS 3001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4999 - IS Capstone Project


    (5 cr.)

    In this capstone project course, students complete an integrative information systems project that combines multiple aspects of their information systems program. The project requires collaboration with a team of students to manage, analyze, design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based information system. The system development process is initiated with a case study included within the course structure. Students will develop a project charter that will guide them through the discovery of system requirements, the creation of a system design, and the development and testing of a functional computer application. Students will develop a management presentation to describe the project design and justify the continuation of the project. Students will also examine their professional goals in the context of their education and develop plans for continued learning and career development based on their personal objectives and priorities.

  
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    COMM 1003 - Introduction to Mass Communication♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to basic concepts of communication to mass audiences. Students’ primary focus is the application of communication principles and theories needed to achieve intended outcomes in crisis scenarios, public relations, public and community affairs, and when influencing thinking or opinions. Students explore mass communication theory, historical context, concepts, and applications. Through this course, students work toward gaining applied skills and sensitivity to the social impact of mass communication.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 1004 - Interpersonal Communication♦


    (5 cr.) Effective interpersonal communication is a necessary tool for productivity and quality of life. Students in this course examine practical concepts and skills for enhancing communication with others. They analyze and discuss theories and models of interpersonal communication, listening, verbal communication, nonverbal communication, communication styles, affective and cognitive communication, giving and receiving feedback, and communicating interpersonally in a variety of modalities. Using insights gained from their weekly analyses, students engage in a final project through which they improve the status and satisfaction of their real-world work relationships.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 1005 - Developing Student Portfolios for Communication


    (1 cr.) In this course, students are provided with a framework for developing a student portfolio. Students learn the value of creating a portfolio and how it is used to communicate and demonstrate their academic accomplishments. They also explore tools and techniques that help them to develop, manage, and maintain their portfolios. Students demonstrate their ability to apply the structure and methods presented in this course by composing a high-level design and comprehensive outline for a student portfolio. Note about required first courses: Students should review the program description section of the Walden University Catalog carefully to determine which first course is required.
     
  
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    COMM 2001 - Dynamics of Group Communication♦


    (5 cr.) Now more than ever, organizations are looking for individuals who can work effectively in a group. Students delve into the concepts and strategies of effective group functioning while applying these concepts to a group experience. In addition, students examine research on groups and teams including the following topics: stages of team development, handling conflict effectively, communicating effectively through various modes, valuing diversity, the impacts of groupthink, and encouraging creativity.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 2002 - Fundamentals of Public Speaking♦


    (5 cr.) Whether you participate in training, a business meeting, or community event, being a skilled public speaker differentiates an uninteresting experience from an engaging one. Students in this course work to develop and enhance their ability and confidence in presentation skills, empathic listening, and critical thinking. Topics include developing content and organizing ideas using proven techniques for the oral delivery of informative and persuasive speeches. Additional topics include audience analysis, critical listening and thinking, and the use of technology in presentations. This course gives students an opportunity to improve their public communication skills, as well as plan, create, and deliver presentations. Note: This course is delivered over a 6-week term but is equated to COMM 2002E, which is delivered in a 12-week term.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 2002E - Fundamentals of Public Speaking♦


    (5 cr.) Whether you participate in training, a business meeting, or community event, being a skilled public speaker differentiates an uninteresting experience from an engaging one. Students in this course work to develop and enhance their ability and confidence in presentation skills, empathic listening, and critical thinking. Topics include developing content and organizing ideas using proven techniques for the oral delivery of informative and persuasive speeches. Additional topics include audience analysis, critical listening and thinking, and the use of technology in presentations. This course gives students an opportunity to improve their public communication skills, as well as plan, create, and deliver presentations. Note: This course is delivered over a 12-week term, but is equated to COMM 2002, which is delivered in a 6-week term.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 2003 - Writing for the Digital Age♦


    (5 cr.) It has been said that “good writing is good writing no matter the medium,” but is that really true? In this course, students examine the fundamentals of writing such as purpose, context, voice, and structure, as well as how the implementation of those fundamentals varies for print, Internet, advertising, and broadcast mediums. Students explore the best ways to use productivity software such as documents, presentations, spreadsheets, charts, and graphs to create a compelling argument. In addition, students will study and then apply the knowledge of digital communication to interpret tone and purpose. No matter the industry or career focus, writing for the digital age is an increasingly important topic of study.
    Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.); 1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 2003E - Writing for the Digital Age


    (5 cr.) It has been said that “good writing is good writing no matter the medium,” but is that really true? In this course, students examine the fundamentals of writing such as purpose, context, voice, and structure, as well as how the implementation of those fundamentals varies for print, Internet, advertising, and broadcast mediums. Students explore the best ways to use productivity software such as documents, presentations, spreadsheets, charts, and graphs to create a compelling argument. In addition, students will study and then apply the knowledge of digital communication to interpret tone and purpose. No matter the industry or career focus, writing for the digital age is an increasingly important topic of study. 
  
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    COMM 3001 - Applied Interpersonal Communication♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to examine the cognitive and affective aspects of communication, thus increasing self-awareness. They explore acceptance, perception, emotional intelligence, self-presentation, learning styles, models of human information processing, and aspects of the psychology of language. Through a comprehensive self-assessment, students gain insight into their ability to communicate, manage conflict, influence others, and work effectively with those who have different values and beliefs.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 3001E - Applied Interpersonal Communication♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to examine the cognitive and affective aspects of communication, thus increasing self-awareness. They explore acceptance, perception, emotional intelligence, self-presentation, learning styles, models of human information processing, and aspects of the psychology of language. Through a comprehensive self-assessment, students gain insight into their ability to communicate, manage conflict, influence others, and work effectively with those who have different values and beliefs. (Prerequisite(s): COMM 1004.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 3002 - Negotiation and Persuasion


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to communication theory and research on persuasion and negotiation. Through the application of theory, this course seeks to help students become more informed, critical senders and receivers of persuasive messages in their professional and everyday lives. Students explore the skills needed to plan, design, and deliver persuasive oral and written messages, while learning to identify and resist undesirable propaganda efforts.
  
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    COMM 4001 - Intercultural Communication♦


    (5 cr.) Globalization has created a smaller world. Media, culture, commerce, new neighbors, and new family members have drastically increased interactions among culturally diverse people. In this global environment, people need to interact effectively with all types of people, cultures, and world views. In this course, students are provided tools for observing, evaluating, and understanding various cultures to communicate effectively with others. Students explore the impact of culture and personal identity on communication strategies. They distinguish the modes and styles of communication unique to their personal culture from the cultures of others. Students explain how theories of cultural differences can help to anticipate and overcome challenges in intercultural situations. In addition, students apply effective intercultural communication skills to academic, personal, and professional settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 4001E - Intercultural Communication


    (5 cr.) Globalization has created a smaller world. Media, culture, commerce, new neighbors, and new family members have drastically increased interactions among culturally diverse people. In this global environment, people need to interact effectively with all types of people, cultures, and world views. In this course, students are provided tools for observing, evaluating, and understanding various cultures to communicate effectively with others. Students explore the impact of culture and personal identity on communication strategies. They distinguish the modes and styles of communication unique to their personal culture from the cultures of others. Students explain how theories of cultural differences can help to anticipate and overcome challenges in intercultural situations. In addition, students apply effective intercultural communication skills to academic, personal, and professional settings. Note: This is a 12-week version of COMM 4001.
  
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    COMM 4101 - Organizational Communication♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course work toward gaining skills to communicate effectively in a diverse, global environment. They examine the relationship of culture and personal identity to communication strategies. They also learn to distinguish the modes and styles of communication unique to their personal culture from the cultures of others; explain the theories of cultural differences; anticipate and overcome challenges in cross-cultural situations; and apply effective cross-cultural communication skills to academic, personal, and professional settings. Students engage in a final project through which they gain hands-on experience working with someone from another culture, acquiring practical skills to use in the 21-century global society. (Prerequisite(s): MGMT 4401 or BUSI 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 4901 - Communication Capstone


    (5 cr.) The course concludes students’ study in communications as they integrate theory and practice developed throughout the program. Students create a comprehensive communications plan through which they apply concepts and tools appropriate to the needs of a chosen setting based on a thorough assessment of strategic direction, audience or market, advantages, weaknesses, obstacles, and opportunities.
      Note: Students complete this course after they meet all other requirements in the program.
  
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    COMM 6100 - Communication Theory in Practice: Here and Now♦


    (3 sem. cr.) It has been said that all communication is persuasive in nature. Whether this assertion is true or not, it is likely that individuals frequently attempt to persuade others on a daily basis. In this course, students explore the theories and approaches needed to enhance persuasive messages, make communication more effective, and generate a desired effect. Students examine how to craft oral, written, and visual messages that integrate persuasive theory for a selected audience. Topics include the psychology of messaging, communicating a consistent message across various media, rhetorical theory, persuasion, negotiation, and cognitive dissonance.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    COMM 6110 - Media Effects: Mass Media in Modern Society♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Today’s mass media is constantly evolving. Technological advances have shifted the concept of mass media from analog waves to digital bytes. Both content creators and consumers alike interact with their media in new ways. Through this course students prepare for today’s global audience. In this course, students examine the history and evolution of the mass media landscape. They explore the theories, concepts, and trends that support informed digital consumers and content creators. Also, students explore the effects of media on consumer actions and the ethical boundaries that arise in creating mass media. Ultimately, their study will reveal the impact of social media, the effects of media on society, and the nature of the global mass media audience.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    COMM 6120 - Persuasive Storytelling♦


    (3 sem. cr.) What do lawyers, journalists, and advertisers have in common? Whether they are addressing a jury, a readership, or a consumer, each wants to influence individuals to action and attempts to do so through persuasive storytelling. In this course, students explore the elements of a story and the approaches used to frame narratives. In addition, students examine the methods used to put persuasive theory into practice through public speaking, presentations, and written and visual communication and communicate a single story in a variety of media. Topics include written and visual narrative, elements of story, and persuasion applied to various media.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information
  
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    COMM 6130 - Communicating Using Social and Digital Media♦


    (3 sem. cr.) While some companies may still be asking, “why should we care about social media?” most are now asking “how can we leverage the power of social media?” In this course, students examine how social media has changed the way consumers interact with brands and apply elements of storytelling to develop a social media strategy for an organizational scenario. In addition, students explore issues of ethics, privacy, and media law that are heightened by social media and digital communication distribution. Topics include types of social media, audience appropriateness, reputation management, social media strategy, evaluation methods, and the communications regulatory environment, including media law and privacy.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 6140 - Message Design, Audience, and Evaluation♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Using reputable sources lends credibility to a message. But how does a communication professional determine which supporting information is appropriate to help craft a message, gain audience insight, choose a communication channel, or evaluate the impact of a message? In this course, students examine research approaches that are common to the field of communication and appropriate for answering questions about audiences and evaluating messages. Topics include simple quantitative analysis and qualitative research approaches such as focus groups, interviewing, and surveys, as well as basic metrics such as cost of media, cost per sale, return on investment, and web analytics.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 6150 - Interpersonal Communication♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The ability to communicate with others influences success in both professional and personal settings. As communities and places of work become increasingly diverse, the intersections of interpersonal and intercultural communication also increase, and communicators need to be aware that the cultural diversity of their audiences should affect the way they convey information. Students in this course examine interpersonal and intercultural intersections and study the influence of cultural diversity on interpersonal communication. By examining theory, students develop an approach to practice and hone individual strategies for communicating successfully in diverse interpersonal situations. Topics include interpersonal communication theory, intercultural communication theory, individual communication competence, nonverbal channels, person perception, conflict resolution, and listening and communication barriers.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 6160 - Creative Strategy and Execution: From Brief to Presentation♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course leverage a wide range of knowledge and skills to conceive and execute a global communication campaign that uses traditional and digital media. Grounded in concepts of integrated marketing communication, this course provides students with the opportunity to develop and review a creative or innovative brief. Students generate solutions for that brief across the phases of the creative process, present and defend solutions, and evaluate solutions using metrics. Topics include the creative process, integrated marketing communication, selecting appropriate channels, pitching and selling ideas, and evaluation metrics.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 6170 - Public Relations Concepts and Strategy♦


    (3 sem. cr.) To successfully build and manage the relationship between an organization and the public in today’s increasingly global community, a strategic communications plan requires the use of both traditional and new technology. Students in this course explore, from a global perspective, the needs of various public relations stakeholders, including the customer, the press, and the investor. Topics include how to change behaviors, advocate for causes, design messages for specific audiences, select appropriate communication channels, and evaluate results of public relations campaigns. Students also consider the potential legal and ethical aspects of the practice of public relations.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 6180 - Crisis Communication♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Protecting an individual, company, or organization from the potential negative results of a crisis requires the development of a crisis management plan to anticipate and mitigate risk. Students in this course explore the use of media relations and public-opinion research techniques to minimize unwanted impacts from crises. Students review real-world controversies and crisis management plans to develop original communication plans that address risks and provide value to the stakeholders. Other topics include the impact of criminal or government investigations, media inquiries, lawsuits, and other scenarios involving ethical disputes.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COMM 6900 - Communication Capstone


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course incorporate theory in practice to synthesize knowledge gained throughout the program. Through the creation of a communication research project, students examine how a communication professional can influence others to enhance positive social change in both organizations and communities. In addition, students reflect on their own communication strengths and opportunities, and develop a communication action plan. Through the completion of the research project and action plan, students have the opportunity to create portfolio pieces.
  
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    COUN 6000 - Foundations for Graduate Study in Mental Health Counseling


    (6 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in psychology and counseling.
  
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    COUN 6100 - Introduction to Mental Health Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students are introduced to the mental health counseling profession in this course. The history, philosophy, and theoretical foundations of the profession, and the scope of practice, credentialing, and other professional issues are explored. The course, which focuses on the student as a future mental health counselor, provides an overview of the mental health counseling program, the profession, and professional competencies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6101 - Foundations for Graduate Study in Counseling♦


    (1 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals, and they develop a program of study, a professional development plan, and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. They engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6101A - Foundations for Graduate Study in Counseling♦


    (1 cr.) Students in this course are introduced  to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum.They are provided with a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioner and social change agents. Topics include the relation of mission and vision to professional goals; development of the program of study and Professional Development Plan; strategies for online success; introduction to the online library; and introduction to critical thinking, professional writing, and academic integrity. The focus of course assignments is on the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the promotion of professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in psychology and counseling.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6102 - Introduction to Career Counseling♦


    5 cr. In today’s unstable economy and fluctuating job market, individuals must contend with a gambit of challenges, including forced early retirement, working past retirement, changing jobs, and seeking further education to start new careers. For these reasons, counselors are often needed to help such individuals work through these issues. Through this course, students are introduced to the career counseling profession, including the history, philosophy, and theoretical foundations. They also explore the scope of practice, credentialing, and other professional issues. Through written assignments and other application-focused activities, students assess theories and issues specific to the career counseling role and consider their future in a professional context.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6103 - Introduction to Addiction


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to aspects of professional functioning as an addiction counselor, including but not limited to: role setting of addiction counselors; history, philosophy, and trends in addictions counseling; professional standards for addictions counselors; effects of crises and trauma-causing events on persons with addictions; self‐care; and ethical and culturally sensitive practice of addiction counseling. Students also explore competencies, credentialing, and other professional issues. The student explores the future as an addiction counselor and an overview of the addiction counseling profession.
  
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    COUN 6110 - Foundations of Graduate Study in School Counseling


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students are provided a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Topics include the relation of mission and vision to professional goals; development of the program of study and Professional Development Plan; strategies for online success; introduction to the online library; and introduction to critical thinking, professional writing, and academic integrity. Students view the New Student Orientation and read and agree to the Counseling Student Guide. The focus of the course assignments is on the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the promotion of professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in school counseling.
  
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    COUN 6111 - Introduction to School Counseling


    (5 cr.) This is a foundation course designed to introduce students to the school counseling profession. The course explores the history of the profession; the roles, functions, and professional identity of the school counselor; and the current models of school counseling programs such as the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) national model. Students will develop knowledge of the current issues and directions for the profession, and the requirements and challenges of being a professional school counselor.
  
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    COUN 6145 - Crisis Management♦


    (5 cr.) Small- and large-scale disasters of all types continue to abound. Communities need trained individuals who are prepared to respond to such incidents and who can help plan for future disasters as well as train others to plan and respond. In this course, students learn the fundamentals of crisis management and crisis leadership. They develop an understanding of the theories and models related to crises, disasters, and other events caused by trauma. Students also learn about ethical, legal, and diversity considerations in crisis and trauma response. Through analyses of topical literature, applications, and discussions, students gain a practical understanding of the models for training and supporting other counselors in the areas of crisis response applicable to community, national, and international crises. Employing concepts learned in the course, students develop a crisis management plan for their own community.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6145A - Crisis Management


    (5 cr.) In this course, counselor educators learn the fundamentals of crisis management and crisis leadership. In addition, students develop an understanding of the theories and models related to crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events. Students also learn about ethical, legal, and diversity considerations in crisis and trauma response. By the end of the course, students understand models for training and supporting other counselors in the areas of crisis response applicable to community, national, and international crises. Students develop a crisis management plan for their own community.
  
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    COUN 6201 - Introduction to Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling


    (5 cr.) Counselors seeking to work with couples and families must understand the changing landscape of family dynamics and the diverse perspectives through which they must practice. Students in this course are introduced to the specialty area of marriage, couple, and family counseling and provides an orientation to professional organizations, preparation standards, credentials relevant to the specialty area, and legal and ethical issues. Students explore the history, philosophy, and trends in marriage, couple, and family counseling and examine a variety of theoretical perspectives, techniques, and related concepts, such as systems, family development, wellness, and family life cycle. Through topical literature, case studies, and shared experiences, students assess societal trends and treatment issues related to working with multicultural and diverse family systems. They also consider future trends and potential challenges in the field.
  
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    COUN 6201A - Introduction to Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling


    (5 cr.) Students are introduced to the specialty area of marriage, couple, and family counseling in this course. They are provided an orientation to professional organizations, preparation standards, and credentials relevant to the specialty area. Through this course, students will be exposed to the history, philosophy, and trends in marriage, couple, and family counseling. A variety of theoretical perspectives, techniques, and related concepts (e.g., systems, family development, wellness, and family life cycle) are reviewed. Societal trends and treatment issues related to working with multicultural and diverse family systems are explored. Legal and ethical issues related to working in this specialty area are addressed.
  
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    COUN 6202 - Theories, Treatment, and Case Management of Addiction


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore treatment intervention and case management strategies for addiction counseling, using various models of treatment, recovery, relapse prevention, and continuing care for addictive disorders. They learn treatment principles and philosophies of addiction-related programs, and they increase self-awareness as addiction counselors by assessing their own limitations; recognizing when they need additional resources and support; and knowing when and where to refer clients when appropriate. In addition, students examine substance abuse policies and regulatory processes that influence service delivery in addiction counseling.
  
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    COUN 6203 - Psychopharmacology and Biopsychosocial Considerations


    (5 cr.) The potential for addictive disorders to present like a variety of medical and psychological disorders is common. In this course, students examine how to treat addictions that may coexist with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive behavior, and other psychological disorders as described in the DSM-IV-TR. They survey a spectrum of psychotropic medications and their use in the treatment of mental, behavioral, and addictive disorders. Students also explore factors that increase the likelihood for a person, community, or group to be at risk for psychoactive substance use disorders. Through this course, students gain an understanding of the basic classifications, indications, and contraindications of commonly prescribed medications so that they make appropriate referrals within treatment teams.
  
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    COUN 6204 - Assessment in Counseling and Addiction


    (5 cr.) Based on professional standards for testing, this course provides students with an overview of the different types of diagnostic and assessment tools used in addictions counseling. Students engage in a comprehensive examination of psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. They learn various models and approaches to clinical evaluations for addictive disorders and examine the appropriate use of assessments for addictions. Moreover, students learn how to assess for a biopsychosocial and spiritual history, and they address ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues, including cultural bias and fairness.
  
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    COUN 6205 - History and Systems of Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) This course focuses on the historical and philosophical roots of psychology and counseling. Topics include structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, psychoanalysis, gestalt, and existentialism, as well as contemporary perspectives including evolutionary psychology, positive psychology, postmodernism, and feminist psychology. Themes of diversity and multiculturalism in psychology and counseling are highlighted within each of the perspectives.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    COUN 6210 - Ethics and Legal Issues in School Counseling


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with an introduction to the field of professional counseling and the foundations of school counseling. The course addresses the following topics: history, philosophy, client and counselor advocacy with an emphasis on the counselor’s role as social change agent, cultural dynamics, consultation, and trends in professional counseling. The counseling profession’s ethical standards are also addressed with an emphasis on the American School Counselor Association and American Counseling Association code of ethics and counselor ethical decision-making processes.
     
  
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    COUN 6214 - Lifespan Development


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with an advanced overview of development through the lifespan, including prenatal, childhood, and adolescent phases. Basic developmental processes and theories are examined and applied to developmental milestones that occur within these phases of development. Themes of diversity are highlighted throughout the course. Additional topics include ethics, research, global perspectives, and social change.
     
  
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    COUN 6215 - Lifespan Development♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an advanced overview of human development through the lifespan, including prenatal, childhood, adolescent, adult, and late-adult phases. Students examine and apply basic processes and theories to developmental milestones that occur within these phases of development. They explore factors of heredity and environmental elements on human development, and they consider ethical issues, research considerations, and global perspectives as they assess strategies to promote optimal development. Students also engage in coursework and discussions that highlight themes of diversity and social change.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    COUN 6215A - Lifespan Development


    (5 cr.) This course provides students with an overview of development through the lifespan, including childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging experiences. Physical, social, emotional, and cognitive issues are covered, as well as the expected developmental milestones during each of these phases of development. The latest research in attachment theory, brain research, and aging is included, and themes of diversity issues related to developmental research are highlighted throughout the course.
  
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    COUN 6220 - Psychology of Personality♦


    (5 cr.) Professionals study personality in a variety of contexts to better understand the factors that compose an individual’s psychological framework, including feelings, thoughts, and motivations. Students in this course are introduced to the major theories of personality and personality assessment approaches. Students examine research that supports multiple theories as well as basic concepts and principles of the various schools of thought. They also explore and discuss related topics, such as various aspects of psychology, including psychoanalytic, biological, behaviorist, learning, social-cognitive, trait and skill, humanistic, and existential, in addition to individual, cultural, and gender differences in personality. Students consider themes of diversity throughout the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6225 - Biopsychology


    (5 cr.) This course reviews the structure and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems and explores the impact of neurobiology, endocrinology, and physiology on human behavior. Major topics include brain functioning, including exploration of neural conduction, effects of neurotransmitters, sensory systems, and mechanisms of attention, memory, perception, and language. Issues related to neuroplasticity, lateralization, and regeneration are addressed.
  
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    COUN 6235 - Cognitive Psychology♦


    (5 cr.) The course has a basis in cognitive neuroscience and begins by providing students with an overview of the history of the field and approaches used to study the mind. Students continue with an examination of the fundamentals of cognition. They examine various domains of cognitive psychology, including how information is acquired (i.e., basic learning processes, perception, and attention); fundamental issues of memory and representations of knowledge; language and understanding; thinking (e.g., reasoning, problem-solving, expertise and creativity, and judgment and decision making); and emotions. Additionally, students explore individual and cultural differences across domains. Students apply theories and concepts to analyze and report on the impact of cognitive psychological research on a contemporary issue of interest.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6250 - Group Process and Dynamics♦


    (5 cr.) Students are prepared in this course to work with groups in various settings. They examine group theory, process, and dynamics. Using relevant literature, multimedia resources, and a scholar-practitioner model, students develop an understanding of culturally and contextually relevant group practice, group leaders’ roles and responsibilities, the relevance and purpose of group work, and strategies for using groups to foster social change. Students also participate in a group experience in their community.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
  •  

    COUN 6250A - Group Process and Dynamics


    (5 cr.) Students in this course prepare to work with groups in various settings. They examine group theory, process, and dynamics. Using relevant literature, multimedia resources, and a scholar-practitioner model, students develop an understanding of culturally and contextually relevant group practice, group leaders’ roles and responsibilities, the relevance and purpose of group work, and strategies for using groups to foster social change. Students also participate in a group experience in their community.
  
  •  

    COUN 6301 - Counseling Theories for School Counselors


    (5 cr.) Students summarize the history and explore the primary concepts of the major approaches to counseling and in current use in this course. The empirical foundations of each theory are examined, and examples are supplied showing how each method is applied to clients. Limitations of each approach are also explored. Theories commonly used in schools are also explored.
     
  
  •  

    COUN 6302 - Counseling Techniques in the Schools


    (5 cr.) Students in this course focus on principles and skills related to interviewing and observation as well as related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings.
      Note: In addition to the course materials listed by the university bookstore, this course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.
  
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    COUN 6305 - Statistics 1♦


    (5 cr.) Psychology practitioners use statistics in a variety of professional undertakings, such as creating studies to assess human behavior or deciding which treatment approaches are most effective for a specific client. Students in this course are provided with a thorough analysis of basic descriptive and inferential statistical methods commonly used in the social sciences. Students work toward developing the skills with which to write, analyze, and critique social science research. They learn various methods, including computation and analysis of frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, and statistical hypothesis testing. Students also examine statistical tests (and underlying assumptions), including z-score; single-sample, independent-sample, and related-sample t-tests; analysis of variance; correlation, regression; and chi-square tests. This course also provides students with an introduction to the SPSS statistical software package.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6306 - Ethics and Legal Issues in Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an introduction to the field of professional counseling and the foundations of counseling. Students explore the history, philosophy, cultural dynamics, and trends in professional counseling. They examine consultation as well as client and counselor advocacy, focusing on the counselor’s role as social change agent. Students also examine and apply ethical standards of the counseling profession, including the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics and counselor ethical decision-making processes. Through a final reflective project designed to influence their future ethical framework, students define their ethical perspectives, including influences, values, and goals.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6306A - Ethics and Legal Issues in Counseling


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with an introduction to the field of professional counseling and the foundations of mental health counseling. They address the following topics: history, philosophy, client and counselor advocacy with an emphasis on the counselor’s role as social change agent, cultural dynamics, consultation, and trends in professional and mental health counseling. The counseling profession’s ethical standards are also addressed with an emphasis on the American Counseling Association code of ethics and counselor ethical decision-making processes.
  
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    COUN 6310 - Research Design♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to build a foundation in the design of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches to psychological research. Students learn the strengths and limitations of each method and under what circumstances each approach would be the most appropriate research design. They also learn the importance of scholarly writing as well as how to identify a topic for research and how to conduct a literature search. Students gain hands-on practice developing a research proposal through which they address key elements, such as collecting and analyzing data, writing an introduction, stating a purpose for the study, identifying research questions and hypotheses, using theory, and defining the significance of the study. Additionally, students consider the legal and ethical issues associated with human subjects’ protection. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 6305.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6311 - Leadership, Advocacy, and Consultation in the Schools


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore the role of leader and consultant in a school setting. The development of a data-driven comprehensive school counseling program is emphasized in this course along with specific strategies for communicating with key stakeholders, working to close the achievement gap, and working within the mission of schools to advocate for student needs.
     
  
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    COUN 6312 - Multicultural Counseling in the Schools


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to increase students’ awareness and knowledge of, and skills related to, multicultural counseling in the schools. Students explore diversity and identity issues and discuss their impact on the counseling relationship. The application of current multicultural theories to culturally diverse groups is addressed. Topics include race and ethnicity, sex and gender, sexual orientation, social class, and age and ability.
     
  
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    COUN 6314 - Program Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) The skills required to assess research and work effectively with stakeholders are among the many proficiencies required of professionals who evaluate and develop programs. In this course, students examine these skill sets as well as the history, theory, and major approaches underlying program evaluation. Students learn how to select appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative models and techniques to perform evaluations, demonstrate program effectiveness, and disseminate results. Additionally, students explore the procedures and techniques involved in offering their evaluation services to a specific group or organization. They also examine strategies to gain stakeholder interest in developing appropriate standards, research progress, and evaluation outcomes. Students acquire practical experience evaluating a program of interest through which they outline organizational structure, identify stakeholders, employ evaluation models, explain steps in planning, and predict possible challenges or stakeholder fears, for which they recommend solutions. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 6305 and COUN 6310.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6315 - Tests and Measurement♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of the different types of tests used in clinical, educational, and organizational settings. Students engage in a comprehensive examination of psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. They examine normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, test score interpretation, and test development. Students also consider related ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues, including cultural bias and fairness. Professional standards for testing provide a foundation for the course. (Prerequisite(s): COUN 6305.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6316 - Techniques in Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Personal attitudes, values, and beliefs often affect a counselor’s ability to establish an appropriate relationship and rapport with clients. In this course, students learn to evaluate their personal attitudes and beliefs to positively influence their counseling approaches. They explore principles and skills related to interviewing and observation, and they examine related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings. Synthesizing concepts, skills, and personal reflections, students demonstrate their ability to engage in a counseling session using techniques learned throughout the course. Note: This course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    COUN 6316A - Techniques in Counseling


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on principles and skills related to interviewing and observation, as well as related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings. Note: In addition to the course materials listed by the university bookstore, this course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.
  
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    COUN 6317 - Child and Adolescent Counseling


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of empirically supported theories and techniques for working with children and adolescents in the counseling process. The course is designed to enhance students’ theoretical and practical understanding of the systemic interplay among children, adolescents, families, and the stakeholders in their lives. Emphasis is given to a family-systems view of intervention, with specific attention to developmental, cognitive, behavioral, educational, multicultural, and environmental issues. Students will be exposed to a distinct group of empirically supported interventions aimed at improving individual and family functioning. Legal and ethical issues related to counseling children and adolescents will be explored.
     
  
  •  

    COUN 6320 - Group Counseling and Guidance in the Schools


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are prepared to work with groups in school settings. They examine group theory, process, and dynamics. Using relevant literature, multimedia resources, and the scholar-practitioner model, students develop an understanding of culturally and contextually relevant group practice, group leaders’ roles and responsibilities, the relevance and purpose of group work, and strategies for using groups to foster social change.
     
  
  •  

    COUN 6322 - Crisis, Trauma, and Disaster Response


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the personal and systemic impact of crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events on children, adolescents, and families within schools and communities. Students examine theories and response models as they relate to sexual trauma, crisis in individuals and families, crisis in the community, crisis in the school, and crisis in the nation and in the world. They explore topics including crisis assessment, counselor competencies, vicarious trauma and countertransference, specific related diagnoses, and advocacy. Students consider cultural, legal, and ethical issues related to crisis, trauma, and disaster events and response.
     
  
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    COUN 6324 - Assessment in Counseling and Education


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation used in a variety of counseling and educational settings. Students examine the psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. Topics include a historical perspective of assessment, basic concepts of standardized and nonstandardized testing, measures of central tendency, normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, assessment report writing, test score interpretation, and test construction. Students also address the ethical, legal, and multicultural issues related to selecting, administering, and interpreting assessment and evaluation instruments and techniques in counseling.
     
  
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    COUN 6326 - Research and Program Evaluation♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to evaluation research and provided with a foundation in the design of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches to counseling research and evaluation. Students learn the strengths and limitations of each method and under what circumstances each design would be most appropriate. They consider the importance of scholarly writing and learn how to identify a topic for research and how to conduct a literature search. Students explore the history and theory underlying program evaluation, approaches to evaluation, and techniques used to perform the evaluation and demonstrate program effectiveness. Additionally, students explore the procedures involved in offering their evaluation services to a specific group or organization. They also examine strategies to gain stakeholder interest in developing appropriate standards, research progress, and evaluation outcomes.  Students gain hands-on experience developing a research proposal in which they address key elements, such as collecting and analyzing data, writing an introduction, stating a purpose for the study, identifying research questions and hypotheses, using theory, and communicating the significance of the study. Additionally, students consider the legal and ethical issues associated with human subjects’ protection.

     

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
  •  

    COUN 6326A - Research and Program Evaluation


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced  to evaluation research and are provided with a foundation in the design of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches to counseling research and evaluation. Students learn the strengths and limitations of each method and under what circumstances each approach would be the most appropriate research design. They can learn how to identify a topic for research, how to conduct a literature search, and the importance of scholarly writing. Other topics include the history and theory underlying program evaluation, approaches to evaluation, procedures and techniques for entering a group for which one would provide evaluation services and techniques used to perform the evaluation, strategies for getting gatekeepers to be invested in the development of the research and in the outcomes, demonstration of program effectiveness, and dissemination of results to stakeholders. Students can learn to write a research proposal, addressing the following key elements: researching, writing an introduction, stating a purpose for the study, identifying research questions and hypotheses, using theory, defining the significance of the study, and collecting and analyzing data. Students are exposed to legal and ethical issues associated with human subjects’ protection.
  
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    COUN 6328 - Research and School Counseling Program Evaluation


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with a foundation in research methods, statistical analysis, needs assessment, and program evaluation in counseling. They are introduced to qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches; single case designs; action research; and outcomes research. Students can learn how to identify a topic for research, conduct a literature search, and use research to inform evidence-based practice. They also learn the importance of scholarly writing. Students examine the principles, models, and applications of needs assessment and program evaluation, and they learn to use the findings to effect program modifications. Emphasis will also be on the ethically and culturally relevant strategies for interpreting and reporting the results of research and/or program evaluation studies. Statistical methods used in conducting research and program evaluation are reviewed.
     
  
  •  

    COUN 6331 - Interviewing and Observational Strategies♦


    (5 cr.) Personal attitudes, values, and beliefs often affect a counselor’s ability to establish an appropriate relationship and rapport with clients. In this course, students learn to evaluate their personal attitudes and beliefs to positively influence their counseling approaches. They explore principles and skills related to interviewing and observation, and they examine related legal, ethical, and cultural issues. Students gain practice in conducting interviews, making behavioral observations, collecting and interpreting data during an interview, and developing written reports of findings. Synthesizing concepts, skills, and personal reflections, students demonstrate their ability to engage in a counseling session using techniques learned throughout the course. Note: This course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6333 - Vicarious Trauma and Compassion Fatigue♦


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding and awareness of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue for first responders. Students examine intervention strategies and models of treatment and prevention of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue through the lens of counselor educator, supervisor, and clinician. Assignments include conducting a needs assessment and examining the use of standardized instruments. Students propose social change recommendations related to vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue to promote informed and competent trauma-response helping professionals. This course places an emphasis on the ethical, legal, multicultural, and spiritual implications for wellness and self-care, including personal, professional, and organizational elements. As a final project, students interview a first responder and develop an organizational wellness plan for his or her setting.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    COUN 6333A - Vicarious Trauma and Compassion Fatigue


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding and awareness of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue for first responders. Students examine intervention strategies and models of treatment and prevention of vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue through the lens of counselor educator, supervisor, and clinician. Assignments include conducting a needs assessment and examining the use of standardized instruments. Students propose social change recommendations related to vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue to promote informed and competent trauma-response helping professionals. This course places an emphasis on the ethical, legal, multicultural, and spiritual implications for wellness and self-care, including personal, professional, and organizational elements. As a final project, students interview a first responder and develop an organizational wellness plan for his or her setting.
  
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    COUN 6336 - Crisis, Trauma, and Disaster Response♦


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the personal and systemic impact of crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events on individuals, couples, families, and communities. Students examine theories and response models as they relate to sexual trauma, crisis in individuals and families, crisis in the community, and crisis in the nation and in the world. They explore and discuss topics related to counselor competencies, vicarious trauma and counter transference, specific diagnoses, and advocacy. Students also engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of crisis assessment. Through contemporary articles and case studies, they consider and discuss cultural, legal, and ethical issues related to crisis, trauma, and disaster events and response.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    COUN 6336A - Crisis, Trauma, and Disaster Response


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the personal and systemic impact of crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events on individuals, couples, families, and communities. Students examine theories and response models as they relate to sexual trauma, crisis in individuals and families, crisis in the community, and crisis in the nation and in the world. They explore topics including crisis assessment, counselor competencies, vicarious trauma and countertransference, specific related diagnoses, and advocacy. Students consider cultural, legal, and ethical issues related to crisis, trauma, and disaster events and response.
  
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    COUN 6341 - Psychological Assessment: Cognitive


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to basic skills related to cognitive and academic achievement testing. Students examine the theoretical basis, skill sets, and examples of psychological assessment. They learn to establish and maintain rapport in a testing situation; administer, record, and score specific measures of cognitive ability and academic achievement; interpret test results; and summarize results in a written report. Students also engage in practical assignments, focusing on applied aspects of psychological testing. (Prerequisite(s): Matriculation into the Counseling Psychology or Clinical Psychology specializations, or M.S. in Mental Health Counseling students by permission; a grade of B or better in COUN 6315 or in another graduate course in tests and measurements.)
  
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    COUN 6345 - Career, Consultation, and Assessment♦


    5 cr. Through this course, students gain a comprehensive overview of the history, theory, process, and methods in the field of career counseling consultation and assessment as well as the qualifications required of the career counselor to consult in a variety of settings. Students learn the techniques that career counselors may employ within different models of consultation, and they explore the different types of assessments used in clinical, educational, and organizational settings. They also engage in an in-depth examination of the principles of assessment used to evaluate and employ assessment instruments. Students gain practical insight into the field as they explore and discuss the ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues in consultation and assessment.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    COUN 6346 - Child and Adolescent Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students examine empirically supported theories and techniques for working with children and adolescents in the counseling process. Students work toward enhancing their theoretical and practical understanding of the systemic interplay among children, adolescents, families, and the stakeholders in their lives. They engage in coursework and readings focused on a family-systems view of intervention, and they devote special attention to developmental, cognitive, behavioral, educational, multicultural, and environmental issues. Students assess a distinct group of empirically supported interventions aimed at improving individual and family functioning. They also explore the legal and ethical issues related to counseling children and adolescents.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
  •  

    COUN 6346A - Child and Adolescent Counseling


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with an overview of empirically supported theories and techniques for working with children and adolescents in the counseling process. The course is designed to enhance students’ theoretical and practical understanding of the systemic interplay among children, adolescents, families, and the stakeholders in their lives. Emphasis is given to a family-systems view of intervention, with specific attention to developmental, cognitive, behavioral, educational, multicultural, and environmental issues. Students will be exposed to a distinct group of empirically supported interventions aimed at improving individual and family functioning. Legal and ethical issues related to counseling children and adolescents will be explored.
  
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    COUN 6351 - Psychological Assessment: Personality♦


    (5 cr.) This course introduces students to basic skills related to assessment of personality and social-emotional functioning. Students are presented with theoretical basis, skill sets, and examples, and learn to establish and maintain rapport in a testing situation; administer, record, and score specific measures of personality and social-emotional functioning; interpret test results; and summarize results in a written report. The focus is on applied aspects of psychological testing. (Prerequisite(s): Matriculation into the Counseling Psychology or Clinical Psychology specializations, or M.S. in Mental Health Counseling students by permission; a grade of B or better in COUN 6315 or in another graduate course in tests and measurements.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6354 - Academic and Career Counseling


    (5 cr.) Academic and career counselors are concerned with student life on all levels to support the personal and educational development of each student. Students in this course examine educational, developmental, and counseling theories related to academic and career counseling. The focus of this course is on academic and career development from elementary school through college. Students will explore intellectual and emotional intelligence, multicultural issues, attitudes, values, and psychosocial needs of the life-long learner. Students will gain skills required to assist a highly diversified student body in academic planning, career exploration, decision making, and personal growth.
     
  
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    COUN 6355 - Academic and Career Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) Academic and career counselors are concerned with student life on all levels to support the personal and educational development of each student. This course examines educational, developmental, and counseling theories related to academic and career counseling. This course will focus on academic and career development from elementary school through college. The course will explore intellectual and emotional intelligence, multicultural issues, attitudes, values, and psycho-social needs of the lifelong learner. Students will gain skills required to assist a highly diversified student body in academic planning, career exploration, decision making, and personal growth.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6356 - Theories and Techniques in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with the opportunity to gain an advanced understanding of theories and techniques for working with couples, marriages, and families as well as to acquire skills for theory integration and theory-based treatment. Through video demonstrations and other topical materials, students witness and examine empirically supported treatments and techniques in prevention, intervention, development, and promoting the well-being of marriages, couples, and families. They explore systemic implications for conceptualization, assessment, treatment planning, and interventions. Students also learn how to assess procedures for critically evaluating relevant research and how to apply these findings to their counseling practices. Additionally, they explore methods of adapting models to meet the needs of a diverse society and the legal and ethical issues related to working in this specialty area.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6356A - Theories and Techniques in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an advanced understanding of theories and techniques for working with couples, marriages, and families. The focus of this course is on empirically supported treatments and techniques for addressing prevention, intervention, development, and wellness of marriages, couples, and families. Systemic implications for conceptualization, assessment, treatment planning, and interventions will be addressed. Students will be exposed to procedures for critically evaluating relevant research and to methods for applying findings to their counseling with these groups. Methods of adapting models to meet the needs of a diverse society, as well as legal and ethical issues related to working in this specialty area, will be explored.
  
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    COUN 6360 - Assessment in Counseling and Education♦


    (5 cr.) Assessments are important tools that counselors use to gain information about clients and to aid practice. Therefore, counselors must know what assessment tools are available; have the ability to read, interpret, and analyze results of tests; and keep abreast of changing trends in working with assessments as well as new assessment tools and changes in technology. Students in this course are provided with an overview of assessments used in counseling and education as well as the responsibilities of counselors using assessments. Students learn about the different types of tests used in clinical, educational, and organizational settings, and they examine the psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. They also explore normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, test score interpretation, and test development. Additionally, students assess and discuss ethical, legal, and sociocultural issues, including cultural bias and fairness. Professional standards for testing provide a foundation for the course.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6360A - Assessment in Counseling and Education


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation used in a variety of counseling, educational, and organizational settings. Students examine the psychometric properties used to develop and evaluate these instruments. Topics include a historical perspective of assessment, basic concepts of standardized and nonstandardized testing, measures of central tendency, normative sampling and standardization, reliability and validity, assessment report writing, test score interpretation, and test construction. Students also address the ethical, legal, and multicultural issues related to selecting, administering, and interpreting assessment and evaluation instruments and techniques in counseling.

  
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    COUN 6361 - Human Sexuality♦


    (5 cr.) Students are provided with a framework for understanding human sexuality in the context of couple, marriage, and family counseling in this course. Students explore empirically supported counseling approaches related to sexual functioning, intimacy, gender, and sexual orientation. They use a systemic framework for understanding the role and impact of sexuality on couples, marriages, and families. Students also explore and discuss specific topics related to issues of sexual diversity, gender identity, sexual offending, trauma, and victimization. Legal and ethical issues related to addressing sexuality in counseling are addressed.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    COUN 6390 - Thesis


    (12 cr. minimum—6 cr. per term for 2 terms) Students in this course are provided with the tools to integrate their program of study logically and comprehensively into an in-depth exploration of a topic of research interest. Students may choose either a critical literature review with a proposed research design or an empirical study. They engage in an online course that requires weekly participation in readings, discussions, and other assignments designed to help them complete each component of the thesis. Students complete their final thesis independently under the mentorship of a thesis chair.  (Prerequisite(s): COUN 6305, COUN 6310, COUN 6315, and an additional three courses.) Note: Students are registered for COUN 6390 until successful completion of the thesis.
  
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    COUN 6400 - Military Culture


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of military culture. The focus of this course is on understanding the world of work for military personnel; the sociocultural identity development of military personnel; the experience of military families; support for military personnel and their families; and socioeconomic and other lifestyle challenges for military personnel. As a result of this course, students will be more informed about the mental health and social support needs of these populations.
     
  
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    COUN 6401 - School Counseling Practicum


    (3 cr.) The focus of this course is on experiential learning, which is an essential component of applied professional training. Students complete a supervised practicum experience at an approved school setting with a minimum of 100 hours, allowing them to develop their counseling skills and professional knowledge while under supervision. Students communicate their learning at the site with their colleagues and instructor in the practicum course and gain additional knowledge regarding school counseling practice by interacting with their colleagues and instructor. There is an off-line requirement of a triadic supervision teleconference once a week with the practicum instructor or another university supervisor.
      (Prerequisite(s): All core courses and Residency 2.)
  
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    COUN 6402 - Working with Military Spouses, Families, and Children


    (5 cr.) The nature of military work responsibilities impacts not only military personnel but their families as well. Frequent family relocations, extensive deployments, parent-child separation, and high-risk jobs all contribute to unique family dynamics. This course is designed to educate students about the experience and unique support needs of military personnel and their families.
     
  
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    COUN 6404 - Military Culture


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with an overview of military culture. The focus of this course is on understanding military work culture, the sociocultural identity development of military personnel, the experience of military families, support for military personnel and their families, and socioeconomic and other lifestyle challenges for military personnel. After completing this course, students will be more informed about the mental health and social support needs of these populations.
     
  
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    COUN 6405 - Working With Military Spouses, Families, and Children


    (5 cr.) The nature of military work responsibilities impacts not only military personnel, but their families as well. Frequent family relocations, extensive deployments, parent-child separation, and high-risk jobs all contribute to unique family dynamics. This course is designed to educate students about the experience and unique support needs of military personnel and their families.
     
  
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    COUN 6406 - Working with Military Spouses, Families, and Children


    (5 cr.) The nature of military work responsibilities impacts not only military personnel but their families as well. Frequent relocations, extended deployments, parent-child separation, and high-risk jobs all contribute to unique family dynamics. This course is designed to educate students about the experience and unique support needs of military personnel and their families.
     
  
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    COUN 6500 - School Counseling Internship I


    (3 cr.) The focus of this course is on the internship, which provides students with supervised school counseling practice and instruction. This course is the first of two courses designed to prepare students to work effectively as school counselors in an approved school site. Students are required to complete a total of 600 hours in their internship. Under clinical supervision, students will perform a variety of counseling activities, including but not limited to individual and group counseling, classroom guidance, consultation, collaboration, record-keeping, and administering referrals. Students also will complete weekly assignments and attend weekly group supervision teleconferences to further develop their professional skills.
      (Prerequisite(s): School Counseling Practicum and approval of field experience coordinator.)
 

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