2014-2015 Walden University Catalog (December 2014) 
    
    Nov 29, 2020  
2014-2015 Walden University Catalog (December 2014) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    AMDS 8535 - Professional Practice: Application of Financial Accounting


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8610 - Decision Theory and Analysis


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8611 - Theory of Stochastic Methods


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8612 - Model of Organizational Change and Development


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8613 - Theory of Investments and International Finance


    (3 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8614 - Management for World-Class Products


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8615 - Theory of Auditing and International Accounting


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8620 - Current Research in Decision Sciences


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8621 - Current Research in Stochastic Methods


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8622 - Current Research on a Model of Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8623 - Current Research in Investments and International Finance


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8624 - Collaborative/Concurrent Engineering Management


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8625 - Current Research in Auditing and International Accounting


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8630 - Models for Decision-Making


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8631 - Professional Practice: Application of Stochastic Methods


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8632 - Professional Practice Application of an Organizational Change Model


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8633 - Professional Practice: Application of Investments and International Finance


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8634 - Product Life-Cycle Cost and Time to Market


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8635 - Professional Practice: Application of Auditing and International Accounting


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8710 - Research Methods


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8720 - Selected Research Methods


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8730 - Research Design


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    AMDS 8800 - Epistemology and the Practice of Knowledge and Learning Management


    (4 cr.) The course is a broad foundation for the study of knowledge and learning management. Students explore and discuss the history of knowledge from the early contributors, including Plato and Aristotle, to contemporary writers. They review the evolution of major movements and identify the foremost schools of thought, including rationalism, empiricism, functionalism, structuralism, and behaviorism. Students are also provided with a contemporary approach through the study of authors involved with knowledge, learning, and change management, including Senge, Drucker, Deming, Nonaka, Garvin, Argyris, Knowles, and Rogers. Students have the opportunity to demonstrate their critical-thinking and interpretive skills as they propose and defend a set of guiding principles for the practice of knowledge management. Note: This is a 12-week course. Completion is required in the first four quarters of enrollment for students in the Knowledge Management and Learning Management specializations.
  
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    AMDS 8801 - Principles of Learning Management


    (4 cr.) The foundation of all universities is based on key competencies, principles, and goals. Students in this course identify these factors in relation to an organization’s core curriculum and the effectiveness of an organization’s learning management. Students explore and define the emergence of learning management, the  responsibilities of the chief learning officer, and the foundations of adult learning and development. They also explore the role of corporate universities and distance learning in support of organizational learning. Students gain practice in evaluating performance gaps as well as developing strategies for moving their organization forward. Note: This is a 6-week course. Completion is required in the first four quarters of enrollment for students in the Knowledge Management and Learning Management specializations.
  
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    AMDS 8810 - Integrating Knowledge Management With Strategic Initiatives


    (4 cr.) Knowledge management (KM) is an integral and essential component of an organizational system at both operational and strategic levels. Students in this course examine major organizational change initiatives and determine how KM can be used to leverage these initiatives. They learn how factors such as quality, systems thinking, environmental scanning, convergence, and constructive conflict are essential components in the integration of KM in regard to planning, decision-making, and implementing operational and strategic initiatives. Students examine embedded system elements, such as leadership and corporate culture. They also assess ways to circumvent roadblocks and pursue pathways to needed change when the adoption of a KM initiative requires structural and behavioral change to gain organizational acceptability. (Prerequisite(s): Foundation and core courses AMDS 8008 OR SBSF 8005; and AMDS 8800, AMDS 8801, and AMDS 8335; or permission of the program director.)
  
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    AMDS 8811 - Advanced Knowledge Management Concepts


    (4 cr.) The future of knowledge management is changing based on the demands of global competition, the needs of 21st-century organizations, and the views of futurists looking at both organizational change and organizational learning. In this course, students explore this change and the future of knowledge management as well as the history of knowledge. Students learn about the merging roles of chief knowledge officers and chief learning officers. Using knowledge gained in the course and requisite critical-thinking and creative skills, students tackle the future demands of knowledge management through the development of a strategic initiative. (Prerequisite(s): Foundation and core courses AMDS 8008 OR SBSF 8005; and AMDS 8800, AMDS 8801, and AMDS 8335; or permission of the program director.)
  
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    AMDS 8812 - Expert Systems


    (4 cr.) In this course, students examine the role of expert systems in knowledge management, including the use of artificial intelligence, neural systems, and other advanced concepts in the creation, retrieval, and competitive use of knowledge. Students use case studies to examine various types of expert systems. Upon thorough assessment of these systems, they examine current technologies used for deployment and determine which of these is most appropriate for the system. Students also define the taxonomy of knowledge that is applied to expert systems through the production of a knowledge map. (Prerequisite(s): Foundation and core courses AMDS 8008 OR SBSF 8005; and AMDS 8800, AMDS 8801, and AMDS 8335; or permission of the program director.)
  
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    AMDS 8813 - E-Systems


    (4 cr.) What are some of the ways that companies measure web traffic and advertising efforts to enhance their marketability? In this course, students have the opportunity to answer questions such as this through an examination of the function of e-systems, Internet, e-commerce, e-business, and business-to-business knowledge management (KM). They learn about the new languages, HTML, and other emerging applications. Focusing on the technical portions of KM, students define KM systems and examine how KM systems work in conjunction with other e-systems. Students process course content and share ideas with their peers through discussions on topics such as the difference between KM systems and the KM discipline, system interrelationship and methodologies, Internet-enabled KM systems, and design processes. (Prerequisite(s): Foundation and core courses AMDS 8008 OR SBSF 8005: and AMDS 8800, AMDS 8801, and AMDS 8335; or permission of the program director.)
  
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    AMDS 8830 - Adult Learning


    (4 cr.) While it’s true that many of the traditional styles of learning are applicable to both child and adult learners, adult learning presents many differences in regard to the design, implementation, and evaluation of content and instruction. Students in this course examine the foundational concepts essential for understanding adult learning and developing adult learning content, including understanding the adult as a client, diagnostic procedures for adult education, participative learning, and small-group theory in adult education. Students assess the various adult education models as well as the basic elements of adult education program design. Using classic literature and theory, they also have the opportunity to develop their own adult education philosophy to put into practice in the professional area. (Prerequisite(s): Foundation and core courses, or permission of the program director.)
  
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    AMDS 8831 - Lifelong Learning


    (4 cr.) A well-established presumption is that lifelong learning improves the effectiveness of adult learners and strengthens career development. In this course, students identify strategies for these outcomes. They also examine and discuss how individuals use education to develop career options, while organizations use education to help obtain and retain the best individuals. Students assess elements of adult learning in contrast to human resource development in corporate education to identify the factors of success. They also engage in practical assignments to discover the current role of technology in the design and function of lifelong learning. (Prerequisite(s): Foundation and core courses; or permission of the program director.)
  
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    AMDS 8832 - Education Design for Adult Learners


    (4 cr.) What is transformational learning and which approaches are most effective? Students are provided with the opportunity to answer questions such as this through the examination of theories and concepts of the learning process, including intelligence, cognition, motivation, and facilitation of adult learners. Students evaluate the components involved in the design and development of an adult learning curriculum. Gaining hands-on experience, students apply existing principles and current concepts to design a curriculum for a specific adult-learner population. They also engage in the reflection process by assessing their project as well as their existing experience in curriculum development to identify areas for additional knowledge and skill building. Aiding their continual doctoral-level study, students prepare an annotated bibliography to help them better understand their sources and to ensure the relevance, accuracy, and quality of sources used in research. (Prerequisite(s): Foundation and core courses; or permission of the program director.)
  
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    AMDS 8833 - Integration of Knowledge and Learning Management With Strategic Educational Initiatives


    (4 cr.) In this course, students examine the design and use of appropriate organizational learning, including the function of corporate universities, distance-learning techniques, and other advanced educational concepts. Using case studies and contemporary presentations by experts in the field, students gain tools to help plan, implement, and assess learning projects for corporations and traditional and non-traditional universities. Students also build a learning program case study based on their current experiences in learning management to gain a thorough understanding of the elements and governing dynamics of learning initiatives. They use findings from their case study to complete a final paper in the form of a proposal through which they demonstrate the breadth and depth of knowledge of learning and knowledge management principles and practices. (Prerequisite(s): Foundation and core courses; or permission of the program director.)
  
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    AMDS 8899 - Capstone Seminar


    (6 cr.) Students in this course integrate all of their previous work on knowledge and learning management, resulting in a comprehensive dissertation proposal. Students assess various research methods and data-gathering techniques; determine best practices; explore the various Walden resources, and review APA style and Walden evaluation format. They consider their professional goals in the context of their education and develop plans for continued learning and career development in the context of their personal objectives and priorities. Students also identify future areas for research and development in their specialization. Throughout this seminar course, students engage in discussions to share progress, new perspectives, and peer feedback. (Prerequisite(s): Foundation, core, and specialization courses, and at least one KAM; or permission of the program director.)
  
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    AMDS 9000 - Dissertation


    (20 cr.) This course offers doctoral students the opportunity to integrate their program of study into an in-depth exploration of an interest area that includes the completion of a research study. Students complete the dissertation independently, with the guidance of a dissertation supervisory committee chair and committee members. Students complete a prospectus, proposal, Institutional Review Board application, and dissertation. Once students register for AMDS 9000, they will be registered each term until successful completion of the dissertation. (Prerequisite(s): Foundation course, core KAMs, RSCH 8100Z, and RSCH 8200Z.)
  
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    ANTH 3001 - Indigenous Peoples in the Modern World♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students work toward developing a modern and inclusive understanding of indigenous peoples of the world. They explore indigenous identity; historical continuity with pre-colonial and/or pre-settler societies; indigenous identity in relation to natural resources; and indigenous languages, cultures, and beliefs. Students complete a series of weekly field note assignments in which they address topics or themes related to the exploration of their own indigenous identity. Through this course, students gain the knowledge needed to explain processes of indigenization, adaptation, and communication as phenomena of globalization. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    ARTS 2001 - Fundamentals of Photographic Arts♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to the fundamentals of photography and visual fine arts using photography as the medium of expression. Students will be required to have simple film or digital cameras to produce their photographs. Topics include history and principles of design such as emotion, line, plane, space, color, light, value, texture, proportion, and scale. Upon completion, the students will be able to communicate ideas and experiences through photography, edit a portfolio of photographs in color and monochrome, and participate in an online exhibition of images. (Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BIOL 1001 - Introduction to Biology♦


    (5 cr.) The basis of study in a variety of fields requires the capacity to view the world from multiple perspectives as well as the ability to ask investigative question on the intricacies of life. Students in this course work toward gaining such skills as they survey fundamental biological principles. They engage in discussions and application-based assignments that emphasize basic biology, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, taxonomy, evolution, ecology, and diversity. The course also provides students with an introduction to the scientific method. Upon completion, students are able to demonstrate increased knowledge and a better understanding of biology as it applies to everyday life.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BIOL 1001E - Introduction to Biology♦


    (5 cr.) The basis of study in a variety of fields builds upon the capacity to view the world from multiple perspectives as well as the ability to ask investigative questions on the intricacies of life. Students in this course work toward gaining such skills as they survey fundamental biological principles. They engage in discussions, application-based assignments, and hands-on lab work that emphasize basic biology, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, evolution, ecology, and diversity. Students also gain an introduction to the scientific method. Through this course, students have the opportunity to increase their fundamental understanding of biology as it applies to everyday life. Note: This course is delivered over a 12-week term, but is equated to BIOL 1001.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BIOL 2320 - Nutritional Science♦


    (5 cr.) An understanding of the fundamental principles of nutrition can help people make important decisions regarding a healthy diet to keep the body functioning as it should. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the nutritional sciences with an emphasis on the biochemistry of human systems. Through discussions, lab work, and other practical assignments, students explore the body’s digestive and metabolic processes, the components of a healthy diet, the role of nutrition in growth and health through the life cycle, and the relationships between nutrition, health, culture, and the environment. Through this course, students gain knowledge needed to apply scientific principles when interpreting nutritional information.
      (Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BIOL 3020 - Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology♦


    (5 cr.) This course is a study of human anatomy and physiology, which is the structure and function of bodily systems. The course extends from an analysis of cellular processes and tissue structures to the 11 major systems of the human body. Students focus specifically on the regulatory functions of the body that maintain homeostasis and how disruptions in homeostasis may result in injury and/or disease. This course is designed for a general education undergraduate audience. (Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1001).
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BIOL 3020E - Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology♦


    (5 cr.) This course is a study of human anatomy and physiology, which is the structure and function of bodily systems. The course extends from an analysis of cellular processes and tissue structures to the 11 major systems of the human body. Students focus specifically on the regulatory functions of the body that maintain homeostasis and how disruptions in homeostasis may result in injury and/or disease. This course is designed for a general education undergraduate audience. Note: This course is delivered over a 12-week term, but is equated to BIOL 3020. (Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 1000 - Developing Student Portfolios


    (1 cr.) A portfolio is a valuable tool for students to communicate and demonstrate their academic accomplishments as well as a means to advance their professional prospects. In this course, students learn about the tools for developing an electronic portfolio. They compose a high-level design and comprehensive outline through which they apply the structure and methods learned in the course. They also examine tools and techniques for managing and maintaining an electronic portfolio. Note about required first courses: Students should review the program description section of the Walden University Catalog carefully to determine which first course is required.


    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 1001 - Introduction to Business♦


    (5 cr.) In this introductory course, students address the roles and functions of managers, specifically, principles and procedures for planning, organizing, leading, and controlling organizations. Students engage in practical assignments, focusing on the application of theory to reality. Through this course, students gain an understanding of the interrelationships among the functions, components, and disciplines that comprise the field of management. Students acquire comprehensive perspectives on management and leadership to use as a foundation for the further study of the management of business.
      Note: Students who have the need to complete this course as a degree requirement after July 2012 should instead register for  .
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 1002 - Introduction to Management and Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) The role and functions of managers, specifically principles and procedures for planning, organizing, leading, and controlling organizations, are addressed in this introductory course. Emphasized is the practical application of theory to reality. This course is structured so that students have the opportunity to see the interrelationships among the functions, components, and disciplines that comprise the field of management and thereby gain a comprehensive perspective as a foundation for the further study of management.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 2001 - Business Law♦


    (5 cr.) Responsible business leaders and decision makers must conduct transactions and operations according to clearly defined rules, laws, and processes to ensure stability and protection for their company. Students in this course examine the legal issues faced by managers, fundamental legal principles, and common issues in the field, such as workplace law, contract disputes, and intellectual property guidelines. Students engage in discussions and application assignments focused on the responsibilities of business professionals, such as understanding the fundamental legal principles in business and commerce; analyzing business contracts; adhering to legal issues in interviewing, hiring, and firing; developing, using, and defending intellectual property; and understanding the regulatory context.  (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 2002 - Global Business♦


    (5 cr.) This course is a survey of the global business environment in the 21st century. Students examine the basic concepts of global business activity and theory. They also engage in a variety of conceptual and application-based assignments, focusing on strategic management issues, including competitive, financial, economic and socioeconomic, cultural, political, legal, and labor factors.
      (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 2003 - Operations♦


    (5 cr.) An overview of the concepts, methodologies, and applications of business operations management is provided to students in this course. Students can learn about operations as related to the process of transforming resources into products and services. They explore the responsibility of operations managers to make sound, cost-effective decisions that increase the productivity and competitiveness of manufacturing and service organizations. Students also have the opportunity to learn the process of planning, implementing, and monitoring operations to ensure the continuous improvement of goods and services. (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 3001 - Knowledge Management and Organizational Change♦


    (5 cr.) Students learn how information systems enable organizations to systematically identify, acquire, store, analyze, distribute, and reuse information and knowledge from all sources (e.g., internal and external, explicit and tacit) to enhance organizational productivity and competitiveness. The course extends the theory of Knowledge Management and Intellectual Capital to the development of learning organizations and evaluates the definition of learning organizations and the creation of environments that facilitate knowledge growth and distribution. (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1001 or BUSI 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 3002 - Ethical Leadership♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students prepare for a leadership role in the modern organization. They examine the basic principles of leadership, motivational theory, the importance of communication, and current and future trends. Students assess, discuss, and learn how to apply their own styles of leadership in the workplace and the community. They engage in a range of assignments that emphasize ethical leadership through personal and interpersonal effectiveness and organizational development. Students also learn the importance of followership and the similarities between the roles of follower and leader at all levels of the organization.
      (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1001 or 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 3003 - Dynamics of Change♦


    (5 cr.) All businesses experience change. Sometimes change is required to ensure stability; other times, the purpose of change is expansion for competitive advantage. In this course, students explore the responsibilities of managers and leaders to implement effective organizational change as well as to ensure that employees understand the function and benefits of change. Students examine change as it impacts people, processes, and products. They learn to employ tools for dealing with and managing change. They also examine methods for coping with change as an individual, a member of a group, and a member of an organization.
      (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 3004 - Entrepreneurship for Small Business♦


    (5 cr.) Students examine the processes required to undertake the creation and maintenance of a successful business enterprise, with an emphasis on small business, in this course. Students focus initially on startup basics for a new small business, followed by the details involved in the development of a business plan. Finally, the nuts and bolts of day-to-day business management are examined, with issues ranging from legal matters to employment decisions.
      (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1001 or BUSI 1002 or SOCI 4080.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 3005 - Critical Thinking♦


    (5 cr.) Problem-solving and decision making based on recognizing problems, gathering data, developing alternatives, and choosing solutions are critical skills for the professional manager. In this course, students apply these skills to a variety of business examples. Students become familiar with the importance of the scientific method as the basis for critical thinking and decision making. They gain practical experience identifying logical fallacies, analyzing research methodologies, and choosing appropriate problem-solving techniques. Students also reflect on content presented in the course to consider ways to become more effective critical and logical thinkers.
      (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1001, BUSI 1002, or COMM 1004.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 3006 - Advanced Business Law♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students build on concepts and skills learned in BUSI 2001 to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the laws, regulations, and principles that affect business operations. Students devote special attention to business law topics included on the Uniform CPA Exam. They analyze law of agency, debtor-creditor relationships, bankruptcy, government regulation of business, real and personal property, commercial paper, and secured transactions. Through this course, students work toward gaining the ability to identify legal issues, determine if legal action is required, and to competently discuss the issues with other professionals.
      (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 2001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 3007 - Knowledge Management♦


    (5 cr.) Information systems enable organizations to systematically identify, acquire, store, analyze, distribute, and reuse information and knowledge from all sources (e.g., internal and external, explicit and tacit) to enhance organizational productivity and competitiveness. Students in this course examine these processes and apply the theories of knowledge management (KM) and intellectual capital to the development of learning organizations. Students also evaluate the definition of learning organizations and the creation of environments that facilitate knowledge growth and distribution. Using course concepts and theories, students reflect on KM and explain how they plan to employ it in personal and professional endeavors.
      (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1001 or BUSI 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 3008 - Corporate Entrepreneurship♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine how corporations succeed and grow by embracing a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship within the organization. Students learn current models for corporate entrepreneurship and innovation that align with the strategic objectives of the enterprise. Students also examine the design of repeatable and sustainable processes that leverage existing business practices and support entrepreneurial initiatives.

    (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 4001 - Strategic Business Capstone Project


    (5 cr.) In this capstone course, students use knowledge gained throughout the entire program to demonstrate mastery of various course competencies. The major course project in which students engage is a simulation-based, strategic case study. Students apply and integrate a variety of skills, tools, and knowledge to assess the strategic issues in a real-world case analysis and arrive at recommendations for change and/or improvement. Through this course, students demonstrate their understanding and competency in identifying complex problems and solutions.
      (Prerequisite(s): All required core and upper-division business administration courses.)
  
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    BUSI 4002 - Small Business Ventures♦


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is on evaluating business concepts and business plans for small businesses so that students can develop strategies for successfully launching and operating a small business. Students examine the small business life cycle and explore resources available to small business owners. Real-world case studies expose students to the challenges of running a small business venture. Topics covered include startup business ideas, financing the small business, legal and liability issues, employment decisions, ethical and moral considerations, and expansion opportunities for small businesses.
      (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 4003 - Marketing Strategies for Small Business♦


    (5 cr.) This course addresses the unique aspects of marketing a small business. Students examine market definition, product development, and diversification strategies designed to help small business owners expand their business reach. Students learn effective ways small businesses can leverage technology such as e-commerce, social media, and other online marketing methods. (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 4002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 4004 - Customer Relationship Management for Small Business♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students learn about the impact of operating decisions on customer relationships as they relate to building, maintaining, and growing a loyal customer base. Students assess approaches to customer relationship marketing and management for competitive advantage. They also evaluate strategies for excellence in customer service within a culture driven to meet and exceed customer expectations. (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 4002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    BUSI 4900 - Capstone: Strategic Business Management


    (5 cr.) In this capstone course, students use knowledge gained throughout the entire program to demonstrate mastery of various core competencies. The major course project in which students engage is a simulation-based strategic case study. Students apply and integrate a variety of skills, tools, and knowledge to assess the strategic issues in a real-world case analysis and arrive at recommendations for change and/or improvement. Through this course, students demonstrate their understanding and competency in identifying complex problems and solutions. Each student, based on his or her concentration area, will demonstrate validation of skills by taking part in a third-party nationwide simulation/examination administered online. (Prerequisite(s): all required core and concentration courses.)
  
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    BUSI 5510 - Leading People


    (5 cr.) Modern leaders must understand contemporary leadership concepts, including varying leadership styles, ways to accommodate diversity, and the impact of culture on an organization. In this course, students focus on major leadership theories and the human dimension of business, including individual and group behaviors and organizational culture. They explore some of the basic dimensions of human resource management, as those dimensions affect the organization and the employee. Students explore contemporary thinking about leadership and its importance in today’s business world. They also develop a plan for personal and professional growth to enhance their current position or prepare for a successful career in leadership.
      (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1002. To register for this course, please contact the Academic Advising Team.)
  
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    CHEM 1001 - Introduction to Chemistry♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore the fundamental concepts of chemistry and survey important chemical elements and their compounds. The engage in a range of assignments on such topics as chemical measurements, properties of atoms and molecules, chemical reactions, chemical calculations, and properties of gases. Through these assignments, students a gain practical understanding of chemistry needed to describe the structure and components of basic atoms, use the periodic table to locate important chemical information, describe several types of chemical bonds, and manipulate common chemical formulas and equations.
      (Prerequisite(s): MATH 1001 or MATH 1002 or MATH 1030 or MATH 1040.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CLRA 6100 - Introduction to Clinical Research♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of the clinical research enterprise from a historical and evolutionary perspective, including examples of landmark studies and controversies. Students consider the context in which researchers design and implement human clinical studies and explore a variety of topics, including the components, general principles, and issues in clinical research; types and classification of research studies; formulation of research objectives and outcomes; definition and phases of clinical trial protocols; and the roles and responsibilities of the clinical research team and study sponsors. Students become familiar with key medical terminology, including basic concepts of health, wellness, and disease. They work toward developing critical-thinking, written, verbal, and interpersonal communication skills as well as competencies needed for student success in an online environment. Students also begin work on their portfolio through assigned learning activities, including a journal of interactions and interviews with professionals in the field, an assessment of an organization’s culture, and the identification of management challenges in clinical research.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CLRA 6115 - Pathophysiological Basis of Clinical Research♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Clinical research management or monitoring requires an understanding of the pathology under investigation as well as the corresponding physiological systems related to disease. Through this course, students gain basic knowledge of normal and pathophysiological mechanisms of disease, acquiring a foundation for clinical assessment, decision making, and management of clinical trials. Students learn methods for interpreting the rationale and procedures underlying the clinical research protocol to adequately assess the subject’s response to therapeutic interventions. Students conduct case studies on various disorders and diseases through which they explain the disease process on structural and functional levels as well as the critical factors that relate to patients’ conditions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CLRA 6130 - Ethical, Legal, and Regulatory Considerations in Clinical Investigations♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The nature of human clinical research and clinical investigation facilitates a host of ethical, legal, and regulatory issues related to the treatment of subjects, personal privacy, and institutional compliance, among others. Students in this course examine ethical codes of conduct, regulatory requirements, and existing laws that govern clinical research in the context of historical events that contributed to their development. They also explore recruitment and protection of human subjects; diversity and vulnerable populations in research; informed consent; privacy and confidentiality; the role of independent review committees; and the importance of reporting serious adverse events (SAEs). Students also discuss social and ethical implications of genetic technologies and research. Applying course concepts, students complete an FDA form for a clinical trial in their region, deepening their understanding of legal protocol.



    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CLRA 6145 - Design and Conduct of the Clinical Protocol♦


    (3 sem. cr.) An introduction to the basic elements of research design for clinical inquiry is provided in this course. Students explore the methods and goals of clinical research; formulation of the research objective and hypothesis; identification of outcome measures; issues of reliability and validity; randomization procedures; documentation requirements; and data collection, analysis, and interpretation. Sharpening critical-thinking skills, students consider the potential risks and benefits of a clinical trial case study, which they use to justify continuation or termination of the drug development process. They also examine practical aspects of clinical trial management, including the design of the case report form (CRF), clinical laboratory and multicenter trial administration, and outsourcing. Through a review of scholarly literature, students explore and describe the ethical and regulatory requirements for which professionals must account in the design of a clinical research study. Additionally, students explore health disparities and cultural diversity as factors that affect participation of subjects in clinical trials.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CLRA 6160 - Good Clinical Practice (GCP) in Managing and Monitoring Clinical Trials♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Through this course, students learn the process and procedures of managing and monitoring a clinical trial from study initiation to closeout. Students examine the basic tenets of good clinical practice (GCP), including historical considerations, compliance, and recruitment of study participants, focusing on quality assurance and data safety monitoring boards (DSMBs). Through discussions and application-based assignments, students investigate and describe the relationship between regulations and GCP; how GCP affects the practical elements of conducting clinical studies; the challenges of multi-center or large-scale trials, such as risk assessment and management; protocol management and amendments; and audits and various considerations for reporting requirements. Students in this course are provided with official guidance on GCP from the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) as well as operational imperatives of GCP.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CLRA 6175 - Biostatistics♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Competent and valuable clinical research administrators are able to read and evaluate the statistical accuracy of research, summarize data, and distinguish common distributions; however, to engage knowledgeably in these tasks, administrators must understand the language of clinical research, which is rooted in biostatistics. In this course, students learn applications and interpretations of biostatistics, including descriptive methodologies, commonly used statistical tests, confidence intervals, statistical inference and probability, analysis of variance, and considerations in powering a study. Students learn basic concepts of data collection and analysis using statistical computer software, such as SPSS. Applying principles of survey research, students also complete a written analysis of a survey design, through which they assess the method and validity as well as consider ways the survey could be improved.



    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CLRA 6190 - Information and Data Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The importance of information systems and information technology in increasing efficiencies in the management of clinical research data is examined in this course. The application of legal and ethical principles is considered, with attention to the development of a data collection and management plan that promotes information archiving and access as well as edit and query management. Issues of confidentiality and the security of information systems are addressed. Emerging technology that facilitates the capture and analysis of clinical study results, such as electronic data capture (EDC) and electronic case reporting forms (eCRF), is also examined.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CLRA 6205 - Product Development in the Pharmaceutical, Biotechnology, and Medical Device Industries♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students examine current trends and issues in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device industries, focusing on how the commercial enterprise uses clinical research to bring products to market through the clinical development and regulatory process. They examine the process by which discoveries become new drugs or medical devices, the preclinical process, and the development of the clinical research plan, and they consider new drug and medical device applications, pre-market approvals, marketing authorizations, and post-marketing surveillance. Through discussions and practical assignments, students consider a variety of topics, including pharmacogenomics, pharmacoepidemiology, recent safety concerns of regulators, globalization, the politics of drug pricing and healthcare reimbursement, product life-cycle management, outsourcing of studies to developing countries, patent strategies, and accelerated approval of medications. They also analyze case studies representing several therapeutic categories from multiple perspectives, including business, medical, scientific, ethical, regulatory, and biomedical engineering.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CLRA 6220 - Health Economics and Financial Management in Clinical Research Administration♦


    (3 sem. cr.) he medical product research and development process requires individuals who can make informed financial decisions that maximize health benefits, using economic principles and discerning the best allocation of resources for profitability. Students in this course are provided with a foundation for economic evaluation and financial management, with a focus on the development, analysis, and communication of economic and financial data in the context of clinical research. Students explore health economic issues in the global marketplace, and they analyze and describe advantages and disadvantages of conducting clinical global trials, considering issues of enrollment, informed consent, application of Good Clinical Practice (GCP), patient compliance, and data security. In addition, students consider financial management aspects of clinical research, including estimating cost of clinical protocol, deciding whether to outsource, calculating direct clinical costs versus research administrative costs and institutional overhead, and developing and negotiating clinical trial budgets and payment terms with sponsors.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CLRA 6235 - Epidemiology♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students are provided with an overview of epidemiologic methodology in the study of the distribution and etiology of disease and health-related conditions in human populations in this course. Students examine important study designs and discuss the strengths and weaknesses inherent in each. They also explore issues related to inference and causality that can be derived from studies as well as approaches to the evaluation of preventive measures. Students engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of course concepts on a variety of topics, such as calculation and interpretation of measures, acute outbreak investigations, incidence and prevalence, observational study designs, and investigation of randomized trials.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CLRA 6550 - Practicum


    (3 sem. cr.) Students have the opportunity to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the M.S. in Clinical Research Administration and further develop key professional competencies in the practicum. Students engage in a supervised field experience, which they align to their academic and professional goals. The field experience occurs at a clinical site where a research study is underway or with a research sponsor who is planning or facilitating a study. Supervision by an on-site preceptor involved in the planning or conduct of a clinical research study is a critical component of the practicum. The on-site supervisor and the course instructor monitor and evaluate students’ performance throughout the entire practicum experience. Students are required to complete 120 hours of practicum work. They must also participate in an accompanying online seminar course and begin to develop an ePortfolio based on assigned professional development activities. 
  
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    CLRA 6560 - Capstone


    (3 sem. cr.) The capstone is an opportunity for students to demonstrate their mastery of principles, concepts, and content presented throughout the M.S. in Clinical Research Administration program. Students choose from a selection of overarching themes and topical areas reflecting the breadth of subjects covered in the program. Guided by their faculty advisor, students identify a particular area of interest and produce a substantive written paper and presentation in an area of clinical research administration. Students also engage in group discussions through which they consider their career development plan, share information on their capstone research topic and process, and exchange feedback on final capstone presentations.
  
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    CMIS 1000 - Developing Student Portfolios for CIS


    (1 cr.) A portfolio is a valuable tool for students to communicate and demonstrate their academic accomplishments as well as a means to advance their professional prospects. In this course, students learn about the tools for developing an electronic portfolio. They compose a high-level design and comprehensive outline through which they apply the structure and methods learned in the course. They also examine tools and techniques that lend to the management and maintenance of an electronic portfolio. Through peer discussion about portfolio challenges and solutions, students work toward building their communication and problem-solving skills, which they will use throughout their program. Note about required first courses: Students should review the program description section of the Walden University Catalog carefully to determine which first course is required.
     
  
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    CMIS 1001 - Introduction to Information Systems♦


    (5 cr.) The definition of information systems (IS) is broad and can encompass a large number of components. The most important aspect, however, is that IS are vital to the daily function of nearly all individuals and organizations. In this course, students have the opportunity to gain an appreciation of the role that information systems play in their lives as well as in different types of organizations and societies. Students obtain a broad overview of the field of information systems through the examination and discussion of technology, practical applications, and related career issues. They also use case studies that represent recent situations in actual organizations to gain real-world knowledge of how a business manages its data in conjunction with business processes to create an information system.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 1002 - Information Technology Infrastructure♦


    (5 cr.) Businesses whose systems are lacking or experience failure are at risk of significant loss of time, money, and customer faith. Therefore, information technology (IT) is essential to the function and success of nearly all businesses. Through this course, students prepare for a role in the field of IT as they learn fundamental concepts of the IT infrastructure that underlie information systems. Students examine both hardware (computers, networks, interface devices) and software (operating systems, middleware, applications, system software) elements. They also explore key issues of capacity, performance, reliability, scale, and obsolescence for a thorough understanding of all aspects of IT infrastructure.
     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 1003 - Object-Oriented Programming I♦


    (5 cr.) Modern software design and programming requires techniques that simplify the development and maintenance process. Object-oriented programming (OPP) does just this by allowing programmers to develop objects that represent complex concepts in applications. This course introduces students to fundamental aspects of computer programming in an object-oriented language. Students learn about key concepts, including real-world objects, actions, and information in terms of data and algorithms; the translation and execution of computer programs; and the notion of an organized process of software development. They engage in hands-on practice in designing, creating, running, and testing programs and discuss related topics to share ideas and obtain different perspectives.
      (Prerequisite(s): MATH 1040.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 1004 - Object-Oriented Programming Concepts


    (5 cr.) Information systems rely on underlying programs that respond to users and process information. An information systems specialist must understand the structure and purpose of programs and be able to work with programmers to ensure designs that meet system requirements. Object-oriented programming (OOP) and design facilitates this by presenting information systems as classes and objects that represent complex system contexts in a manner directly transferrable to programming specifications. This course introduces students to fundamental aspects of computer programming in an object-oriented language. Students learn about key concepts, including real-world objects and methods in an information systems context. They engage in hands-on practice in designing, creating, and running programs and discuss programming and design topics to share ideas and obtain different perspectives. This concept focus enables students to relate programming to information systems and provides a foundation for learning specific programming languages and skills in the future (Prerequisite(s): MATH 1040.)
  
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    CMIS 2001 - Internet Computing♦


    (5 cr.) The Internet stitches together many disparate devices and software components into a flexible fabric that supports an enormous variety of uses. Students in this course learn about the functions of these components through a comprehensive evaluation of Internet computing. They examine the design of the Internet protocol stack, the structure and function of some of the most important Internet services and applications, and Internet governance. Students have the opportunity to gain practical experience through the application of concepts, such as performance, scale, and reliability, in the design of information systems.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 1002 or ITEC 1010.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 2002 - Object-Oriented Programming II♦


    (5 cr.) Students in this course elaborate their study of object-oriented programming by delving deeper into the key concepts of programming with objects, including complex data structures. Students examine and discuss hierarchy, modularity, and abstraction—concepts that they will use in subsequent courses in the program. Students supplement their hands-on programming practice by engaging in assignments designed to provide practical application of context, including the use and development of documentation in a Web-based environment. Through this course, students learn to write more elaborate code and solve real-world problems they will encounter in the field.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 1003.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 3001 - Computing and Society♦


    (5 cr.) There are invariable challenges in the aggressive world of information technology (IT) requiring those in the field to understand and adhere to a professional code of ethics. This course introduces students to the interaction of information systems with core social concerns, including privacy, democracy, equity, security, economic progress, and intellectual property rights. Students learn to consider the social, ethical, and legal considerations inherent in the design and use of information systems. They also examine real-world and hypothetical case studies for a practical approach to applying the professional code of ethics to the field. (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 2001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 3002 - Database Management Systems♦


    (5 cr.) All types of businesses rely on systems to manage their data and to keep that data secure, accurate, and reliable. A database is a system designed to do just this as well as to simplify the processes of data entry, search, and retrieval. Students in this course focus on the representation and manipulation of information in relational database management systems. Students learn how to map real-world concepts onto relational representations and how to manipulate them through relational queries to implement data-intensive applications. Students also learn to use a core subset of the structured query language (SQL) and how relational databases fit into a wide variety of practical information systems.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 3004.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 3003 - Requirements Analysis♦


    (5 cr.) A critical step in the development of information systems, and one in which the seeds of disaster often are sown, is the analysis and definition of system requirements, both functional and non-functional. This course provides students with an introduction to systems analysis and the responsibilities of a systems analyst. Students learn about the identification of stakeholders and techniques for requirement elicitation, representation (e.g., use cases), and life cycles (e.g., iterative methods, and maintenance). Students complete a comprehensive analysis project through which they work toward gaining hands-on experience meeting the responsibilities of a systems analyst.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 1003.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 3004 - Object-Oriented Design♦


    (5 cr.) In this course, students learn the discipline of reducing requirements to the structural and functional design of information systems through the application of object-oriented principles to the design phase of the systems development life cycle (SDLC). They engage in discussions and assignments on a variety of topics, including conceptual modeling, design patterns, and application frameworks. They learn the basics of modeling, design representations, and the role of computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools. Students have the opportunity to gain insight on contemporary methodologies employed in systems development, such as agile development, the Unified Process (UP), eXtreme Programming (XP), Model-Driven Architecture (MDA), and frameworks.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 3003.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 3005 - Information Systems Project Management♦


    (5 cr.) The process of creation, from conception through completion, is complex and requires a diverse set of management skills. This course introduces students to the knowledge, tools, and techniques needed to manage information systems projects effectively throughout a project life cycle. Students learn how information systems projects are organized and managed for efficiency and reliability. They explore topics including software process models, estimation, planning, and scheduling. Students examine case studies of successful and unsuccessful projects and gain experience with key elements of project management practice.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 3004.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4001 - CIS Capstone Course


    (5 cr.) In the capstone course, students complete an integrative independent study that combines multiple aspects of their computer information systems program. They review the work they have collected in their portfolio and reflect on their educational experience. Students revisit the career priorities they expressed upon entry into the program and consider their professional goals in the context of their education. They develop plans for continued learning and career development, in the context of their personal goals and priorities.
      (Prerequisite(s): All required core and upper-division business and computer information systems courses.)
  
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    CMIS 4101 - Information Security and Privacy♦


    (5 cr.) The responsibility of an information security specialist is to supervise operations that follow industry best practices for security and data integrity. This role helps to ensure that systems are free from external threats and risks that may jeopardize or harm an organization. In this course, students examine the role of a security specialist and learn the key concepts and concerns of information security and privacy, including technical, social, and policy issues. Students examine fundamental notions of authentication, authorization, and encryption in the context of everyday information systems activities. Students analyze and discuss case studies of security and privacy breaches to understand economic and human impact.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 2001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4102 - Information Security Techniques I♦


    (5 cr.) Today, the risk of hackers infiltrating networks and computer systems is high and all organizations are at risk of potential exploitation or data theft. In this course, students examine information security attacks and defenses at the individual computer level and explore physical and software intrusions and defenses. Students learn best practices in configuring and maintaining systems to minimize the risk of compromise. They engage in application and discussion assignments focusing on topics such as viruses, Trojan horses, physical compromise, stolen credentials, and related protective measures.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 4101.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4103 - Information Security Techniques II♦


    (5 cr.) Understanding a computer network as a symbiotic system connected to the Internet, including the relationships of network devices, such as gateways, switches, routers, and hubs, is important step in minimizing the risk of threats that compromise networks. In this course, students examine information security attacks and defenses in the network. They consider hardware and software vulnerabilities and denial of service attacks. Students take a hands-on approach to understanding defense techniques as they complete practical exercises focused on planning, detection, and recovery measures. They also explore and discuss the social and technical aspects of anonymity in the network as they relate to network abuse and free speech.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 4102.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4104 - Computer Forensics♦


    (5 cr.) The increase of information shared online puts users, both individuals and larger entities, such as government agencies and corporations, at major risk of invasion of privacy and more serious crimes, such as child pornography, financial fraud, and personal identify theft. In this course, students learn basic approaches to analyzing information systems for evidence of illegal or inappropriate activities. They engage in a range of assignments focusing on the legal, ethical, and policy implications of various forensic techniques and monitoring practices. Students also learn to analyze forensic issues of real-world case studies to learn to choose appropriate techniques to minimize risk and combat breaches in security.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 4103.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4201 - Human Factors♦


    (5 cr.) Understanding how people interact with computers in various environments is crucial to the development of interfaces that address the needs of differing personality types. In this course, students learn about human-computer interaction (HCI) including various aspects of human perception and cognitive performance that inform the design of effective and usable information system interfaces. Students also examine disabilities and appropriate adaptation thereto, such as the implementation of accessibility elements in HCI. Through the exploration of current literature and case studies, students learn techniques to help them avoid some of the most common design gaffes in the development of user interfaces.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 1001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4202 - HCI Evaluation Methods♦


    (5 cr.) An effective and user-friendly human-computer interface (HCI) requires careful analysis, assessment, and modification. Students in this course learn empirical and heuristic methods for evaluating and improving human-computer interfaces. They also learn methods in conducting and analyzing user studies and ways to measure interfaces against models of human performance. Students engage in a group project through which they apply usability evaluation methods to a real-life scenario resulting in an actual HCI evaluation and report. This course also introduces students to the ethical and regulatory issues in human studies, providing them with the opportunity to understand all factors involved in conducting HCI evaluations.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 4201.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4203 - User Interface Development♦


    (5 cr.) How do we design interfaces for optimal efficiency and appeal? Effective design requires an understanding of the goals, needs, and skills of the user. In this course, students consider these factors and build on their knowledge of user interface evaluation to synthesize effective and usable interfaces. Students discuss a variety of topics, such as basic principles and guidelines of design, application of design principles, prototyping, and mapping. Through practical exercises and other course assignments, students apply their requirements analysis skills to develop user interface designs and use rapid prototyping tools in the process of innovation and iteration.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 4202.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4204 - Computer-Mediated Communications♦


    (5 cr.) Communication through outlets such as e-mail, instant messages, blogs, and text messages is an intrinsic part of our daily lives. This evolving form of interaction continues to progress; therefore, it’s important to know how humans use media to initiate, manage, and maintain both personal and professional interaction. This course incorporates a historical perspective through which students trace the evolution of varying styles of communication, including the persistent recurrence of key concepts, such as links and threads. Students learn about the principal modes of computer-mediated communications among individuals and groups. They also learn select approaches and tools for specific applications. Students explore contemporary practices in computer-mediated communications and assess the implications of evolving applications and solutions.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 2001 or MEDC 3001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4301 - Structure of the Healthcare Industry♦


    (5 cr.) What determines patients’ plan of care and what role does technology play in their diagnosis and treatment? Through this course, students have the opportunity to answer questions such as these as well as to gain a broad understanding of healthcare as a complex business system. Students examine the main elements of the healthcare industry in the United States and elsewhere, analyzing the interests and information needs of healthcare professionals, provider organizations, researchers, pharmaceutical companies, public health agencies, regulators, insurers, individuals, and others. They examine classic literature and current articles in the field to gain an appreciation of the trends toward and obstacles to information exchange. Though this course, students also have the opportunity to survey the various professional careers available in healthcare and consider their goals and interests in relation to these opportunities.
      (Prerequisite(s): BUSI 1001 or BUSI 1002.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4302 - Patient Records Practice and Policy♦


    (5 cr.) As in most industries, healthcare relies heavily on information technology to provide the infrastructure for healthcare delivery in the global marketplace. Through this course, students have the opportunity to gain the necessary skills to understand the complexities of healthcare information systems components. Students examine the trends in the development of standardized patient records for a variety of health-related applications. They use requisite skills in requirements analysis and design to address the challenges in the field and engage in coursework on topics including privacy, confidentiality, and standardization. Students assess and discuss a variety of topics, such as medical devices, guidelines, and standards as well as the differences among electronic health records, electronic medical records, and personal health records.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 4301 and HLTH 1005 [for B.S. in Health Studies or B.S. in Public Health students]).
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4303 - Healthcare Information Systems Applications♦


    (5 cr.) The cost of delivering healthcare in the United States continues to grow exponentially; therefore, the industry is in need of ways to optimize the financial components associated with delivery while focusing on better quality of care. Through this course, students learn about healthcare information systems applications designed to add value to the delivery of healthcare from a financial and clinical outcomes-based perspective. Students examine some of the most important classes of healthcare information systems, ranging from patient care management to epidemiology to billing to research data analysis. Case studies provide students with a practical opportunity to exercise their information systems design and analysis skills as well as to consider social and ethical issues related to the field.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 4302.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4401 - Educational Uses of Computing♦


    (5 cr.) This course examines the use of computer technologies in educational settings from childhood to adulthood, including both formal and informal modalities. Students analyze case studies of approaches including media, simulations, games, group interactions, design activities and more. They consider ancillary applications such as recordkeeping and research. They study debates on the appropriate uses of technology in education, and formulate their own positions on individual and social impacts. (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 2001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    CMIS 4402 - E-Learning Concepts and Systems♦


    (5 cr.) Technology and network connectivity has forever changed the way universities conduct education and students achieve learning; it is no longer confined to the traditional classroom setting within structured timeframes. Through the electronic learning (e-learning) environment, students now have the opportunity to study at their own pace, with more flexibility of time and location, such as in the evening after work or in a café away from home. In this course, students examine key structural and functional elements of e-learning systems and explore how technology lends to the development of e-learning applications. Drawing upon both their experience as e-learners and their information systems expertise, students engage in group or individual projects focused on specific aspects of the learner experience, management functionality, and other properties of e-learning systems.
      (Prerequisite(s): CMIS 2001.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
 

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