2014-2015 Walden University Catalog (December 2014) 
    
    Dec 04, 2020  
2014-2015 Walden University Catalog (December 2014) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    EDUC 6663 - Integrating Technology in the Curriculum, Part I♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This course guides teachers in exploring the use of technology with their students. The shift in pedagogy introduced in EDUC 6661 is further explored, with particular focus placed on how technology can support multiple modes of learning. Teachers investigate specific models for integrating the Internet into their curriculum, including WebQuests, telecollaborative projects, Internet workshops, and research or inquiry projects. After exploring and evaluating ready-made examples of each, teachers try their hand at designing their own.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6664 - Integrating Technology in the Curriculum, Part II♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This course continues the exploration of technology in the classroom, with a focus on its use in the standards-based environment. Teachers learn how to design technology-infused projects that help students meet specific curricular standards. They explore the use of technology in assessment, including software that helps align curricula to standards and facilitates the grading and reporting process. They explore how to manage technology in the classroom, including the need to work with limited resources, varying skill levels, and differentiated instruction.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6665 - Technology, Leadership, and a Vision for the Future♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This course prepares teachers to become agents of change beyond their classrooms in the field of technology and learning. They consider how to develop grants, manage a technology budget, and provide leadership within their districts. The course poses issues to be addressed, explores roadblocks to maneuver past, and provides troubleshooting advice. Teachers use and evaluate a variety of software and hardware tools to determine which are essential to have on hand in every classroom and on every school campus. For example, software for multimedia authoring, concept mapping, and “office” productivity are explored. Likewise, the instructional uses of hardware tools such as digital cameras, PDAs, and investigative probes are investigated. Finally, the course explores promising trends for the future, such as individualized instruction through the use of technology and online schools.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6671 - Designing Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment, Part I♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This course introduces curriculum, instruction, and assessment in the context of standards and accountability and their relationships to student learning. Teachers explore interrelationships among curriculum, instruction, and assessment: the importance of alignment, connection to learning theory and learner variables, and need for differentiation to meet diverse student needs. Teachers examine and make sense of their academic standards and investigate the history, roles, and types of curricula and instruction. Teachers analyze, evaluate, modify, and/or design curriculum and instruction for specific content and purposes.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6672 - Designing Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment, Part II♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This course examines the history, purposes, and methods of assessment and explores curriculum, instruction, and assessment implementation issues. Teachers analyze, evaluate, modify, and/or design assessments for specific content and purposes. They align assessments to curriculum and instruction as part of the design of instructional units and lessons. Methods of record keeping, grading, and reporting; use of assessment data; and test preparation are presented; and implementation issues related to accountability, planning, and collaboration are addressed.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6673 - Literacy and Learning in the Information Age♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This course redefines literacy to include the access to and the evaluation, understanding, and application of information available in print and nonprint resources. Processes and strategies for integrating literacy when designing curriculum, instruction, and assessments are presented. Teachers learn to develop their own and their students’ literacy skills—listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visually representing—via traditional and contemporary information technologies, such as the Internet, software programs, and multimedia tools.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6674 - Designing Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment for Students With Special Needs♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Educators must recognize the importance for all students, including students with special needs, to achieve high academic standards. In this course, education professionals examine the learning challenges of students who, by definition of federal law, have disabilities as well as those of students who have significant difficulty with learning but do not qualify for special education services. Education professionals learn how to adapt curriculum, instruction, and assessment to maximize learning for students with special needs. They also have the opportunity to evaluate and describe activities and experiences through the perspective of a student with a learning disability, thus gaining empathy and a deeper understanding of how to work with students with special needs.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6677 - Designing Curriculum and Instruction


    (3 sem. cr.) This course introduces curriculum and instruction in the context of standards and accountability and their relationships to student learning. Teachers explore interrelationships among curriculum, instruction, and assessment: the importance of alignment, the connection to learning theory and learner variables, and the need for differentiation to meet diverse student needs.
  
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    EDUC 6679 - Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Disabilities Through Differentiated Instruction♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This survey course helps K–12 classroom teachers understand more about their students’ reading difficulties in order to provide differentiated instruction in the classroom. Teachers learn how to identify student reading behaviors and patterns and how to apply visual and auditory discrimination tools to assist in student learning. They plan lessons that integrate remediation of reading problems, identify reading comprehension strategies and techniques, learn to recognize concepts and applications of fluency and content area vocabulary, and understand spelling and writing processes and applications. In addition to course activities, teachers complete weekly fieldwork assignments to apply what they learn in actual practice. Teachers may use their own school for required classroom fieldwork. This course has been developed to meet the standards for the Michigan state reading requirement, Public Act 118.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6681 - Early Childhood Education: Past, Present, and Future


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals examine the historical and philosophical foundations of early childhood care and education while exploring a variety of early childhood programs, from child care centers to preschools and primary-grade classrooms. Through this exploration, education professionals acquire a range of professional insights and opportunities regarding effective practice. They use this course to continue the development of a reasoned, coherent philosophy of education as a basis for ethical and professional practice and decision making in diverse settings. They consider the importance in establishing developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive learning environments and maintaining effective partnerships with families. Education professionals also have the opportunity to review early childhood learning and developmental theory as well as the knowledge needed to support and enhance the development and learning of all children from birth through grade 3.
  
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    EDUC 6682 - Teaching Reading, P–3


    (3 sem. cr.) This course presents research-based methods for developing literacy, including reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and visually representing, in grades P–3. Education professionals gain a historical perspective on teaching reading and explore various purposes and types of literacy assessments. They explore strategies for creating an effective literacy environment and for working with parents and families. They also learn effective strategies for developing phonemic awareness, phonics skills, vocabulary, comprehension, fluency, and writing. Through field experiences, education professionals plan and implement assessment-driven, developmentally appropriate classroom lessons in various areas, addressing the diverse needs of individual children.
  
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    EDUC 6683 - Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Infants and Toddlers


    (3 sem. cr.) What constitutes high-quality care and education for infants and toddlers? Through this course, education professionals have the opportunity to answer this question as they examine developmentally appropriate practices that promote children’s total well-being and that guide development in each of the domains—physical, social, emotional, and cognitive/language. They also gain a practical overview of infant and toddler growth and development, and they explore a variety of related issues, such as health and safety, early mental health, brain development, creative development, respectful and responsive adult-child relationships, and family involvement. Through field experience and practical applications, education professionals learn to design and evaluate environments that enrich the development and learning of infants and toddlers.
  
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    EDUC 6684 - Play and Learning for the Preschool Child


    (3 sem. cr.) Playtime for children is an opportunity for growth and discovery as well as a time to develop life skills and to learn about themselves and other children. Education professionals are offered an in-depth look at the development, learning, and play experiences of preschoolers in this course. Education professionals focus on developmentally appropriate theory, practices, and environments that enhance children’s development and learning in each of the domains—physical, social, emotional, and cognitive/language. They explore and discuss the integral roles of play and creativity in children’s learning; the role of observation as it relates to establishing a child-centered approach to planning curriculum and assessing young children; the promotion of pro-social, anti-bias learning communities; and the importance of being responsive to and inclusive of children’s family members. Through field experience, education professionals apply knowledge gained throughout the course to authentic contexts in which they demonstrate their growth and development as teaching professionals.
  
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    EDUC 6685 - Teaching Mathematics, P–3


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course explore instructional and assessment strategies, including the best use of materials and technology, to develop children’s conceptual understanding of mathematics. They engage in coursework that emphasizes real-world problem solving and incorporates content and process standards of The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). They assess and apply the latest research on the most effective methods for teaching developmentally appropriate mathematics curriculum from preschool through grade 3. Applying course concepts, education professionals complete various field experience assignments, such as developing various lessons on computation, algebra, data analysis, and probability.
  
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    EDUC 6686 - Teaching Across the Content Areas, P–3


    (3 sem. cr.) An important skill for early childhood educators is to recognize the benefits and work through the challenges of implementing an integrated approach to curriculum and instruction. In this course, education professionals focus on standards-based, data-driven, developmentally appropriate teaching, learning, and assessment within and across content areas in preschool through grade 3. They learn the importance of integrating literacy and mathematics in meaningful and relevant ways, and they engage in practical assignments that focus primarily on teaching in content areas of science, social studies, and the arts. Education professionals examine standards; apply effective methods and strategies to plan instruction, including approaches to meet diverse needs; and develop ideas for integrating multiple content areas.
  
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    EDUC 6687 - Demonstration Teaching: Early Childhood Education


    (6 sem. cr.) Demonstration teaching is the culminating experience in the Teacher Preparation Program with an M.A.T.; it provides education professionals the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills and to demonstrate required competencies. Demonstration teaching occurs in two different classroom settings throughout the semester. During demonstration teaching, education professionals gradually assume complete teaching responsibility of the classroom, gaining real-world experience and the opportunity to translate theory into practice. The university supervisor and classroom cooperating teacher work closely with students and evaluate their performance. Note: The first 5 weeks of demonstration teaching run concurrently with EDUC 6686 - Teaching Across the Content Areas, P–3. The remainder of demonstration teaching runs concurrently with EDUC 6611 - Seminar: Professional Ethics, Communication, and Collaboration: Early Childhood Education.
  
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    EDUC 6688 - Action Research


    (3 sem. cr.) This course provides a structured approach to the practice of action research. Educators learn how to address relevant problems, become involved in collaborative inquiry, and use data and research to inform their practice, improve student academic success, and contribute to positive change in their classroom and school environments. Educators will engage in reflective practices as they collect and analyze student data and develop and implement data-informed decisions/actions to improve student learning and enhance their professional growth.
  
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    EDUC 6689 - Guiding and Supporting School Literacy Environments


    (3 sem. cr.) The reading teacher serves as a knowledgeable resource throughout the school or district. This course gives education professionals the knowledge and skills to work with staff, students, and others to create a vibrant literacy environment that promotes a vision of literacy for all children building upon their linguistic, cultural, and academic diversity. Education professionals learn how to use school assessment data to determine appropriate supports for students and staff, including Response to Intervention (RTI), leadership activities, and intervention programs that incorporate foundational knowledge and effective practices. Approaches to providing teacher professional development and to managing and improving school-wide literacy initiatives, including the integration of technology tools and resources, will be emphasized.
  
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    EDUC 6691 - Foundations of Special Education♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The field of special education integrates complex and critical components of medicine, psychology, education, politics, law, parenting, and moral/societal issues. In this course, education professionals engage in a thorough study of policies and practices related to individuals with exceptional learning needs; through this exploration, they gain an understanding of the opportunities and challenges within this dynamic profession. They review topical literature that dispels myths and mysteries of exceptionalities from a historical perspective as well as current issues, laws, attitudes, and conundrums. They also address traditional and evolving policies, procedures, and service delivery models, and they learn to apply them to individual state requirements. Through this course, education professionals work toward developing the knowledge and skills necessary for building collaborative relationships with parents, related services, and agencies.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6692 - Individualizing Education for Learners With Disabilities


    (3 sem. cr.) All learners possess unique characteristics, interests, and abilities. Special educators are responsible for connecting instructional planning to individual strengths and needs of learners with disabilities. In this course, education professionals examine inclusion and the collaboration skills necessary for its effectiveness. They investigate the academic, functional, and social characteristics of learners defined by the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Improvement Act (IDEA) of 2004 as they affect learning and teaching. Education professionals also explore research-based practices and subject area instructional strategies that result in accommodations and modifications for  students with special needs. Through this course, education professionals gain the skills and knowledge to promote effective and proactive transdisciplinary teaming that supports a coordinated effort to optimize learning experiences, opportunities, and environments for students across a range of learning abilities and exceptionalities.
  
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    EDUC 6693 - Current Issues in Assessment and Intervention


    (3 sem. cr.) Gathering and interpreting assessment information to inform curriculum strategies and/or intervention techniques and resources promotes maximum achievement for all learners, especially those who have learning disabilities or emotional/behavioral disorders. In this course, education professionals examine problem-solving models and response to intervention (RTI) approaches, in addition to laws related to eligibility; ethics and parents’ rights; standardized and informal assessments; and data analysis. They also engage in guided field experiences thorough which they interview experienced teachers about current issues and practices in assessment and intervention. Through this course, education professionals gain the skills needed to write an individualized educational program (IEP) based on diagnostic tools.
  
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    EDUC 6694 - Reading and Writing Instruction for Learners With Exceptionalities


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals explore and evaluate teaching theories; principles; assessment; and scientific, research-based instructional strategies in the area of reading and writing instruction for learners with exceptionalities. Education professionals become familiar with formal and informal diagnostic tools to identify students experiencing reading difficulties, and they discuss scientific research-based intervention programs and teacher effectiveness. They also explore the interface of technology and literacy instruction. Through assignments designed to provide practical application of content, they explore resources, technology, research, and practices that facilitate specific skill development in students. They also learn about strategies to support enjoyment of reading and writing for students with diverse and challenging learning needs.
  
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    EDUC 6695 - Planning Positive Behavior Support Strategies


    (3 sem. cr.) Promoting positive behavior and effectively responding to misbehavior are critical skills necessary for all students. In this course, education professionals develop practical skills that can be transferred to actual classroom challenges by examining behavior-support strategies from two different perspectives—classroom management and individual behavior management. By gaining an in-depth understanding of both perspectives, they prepare to create and sustain positive learning environments. Education professionals gain practical insight on research-based principles and practices through applications in field experience, teacher interviews, and classroom observations.
  
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    EDUC 6696 - Instructional Strategies for Students With Emotional/Behavioral Disorders


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals are provided with an overview of research-validated academic and behavioral strategies demonstrated to be effective for students with emotional and behavioral disabilities. Education professionals examine specific content areas and the means for integrating strategies across the disciplines. They also research related subject matter, reflect on course content, and share perspectives through weekly discussions on a variety of topics, such as subtypes of emotional and behavioral disorders; assessment, eligibility, and placement; strategies to promote positive behavior; universal design for learning; and strategies for academic success/functional skill. As they continue to synthesize and develop material and experience from previous coursework (e.g., individualized education program (IEP) case study, classroom management plan), they apply skills developed in this course to construct appropriate activities for a collaborative lesson plan.
  
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    EDUC 6697 - Instructional Strategies for Students With Learning Disabilities


    (3 sem. cr.) Students with learning disabilities tend to have deficits in four main areas that affect learning across the curriculum: working memory, strategy knowledge, vocabulary knowledge, and language coding. In this course, education professionals become familiar with the characteristics of students with learning disabilities, learn instructional methods to support student learning, develop and design appropriate accommodations, and learn specific strategies for teaching in math, literacy, and across the content areas. They learn to use assessment as an integral part of the instructional process to determine present levels of performance, set annual goals, and continually monitor individual progress relative to these goals. They also explore methods of developing specialized instruction that are individualized and responsive to student progress, thus supporting learning in ways that enhance and strengthen students’ abilities.
  
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    EDUC 6698 - Demonstration Teaching: Special Education: Learning Disabilities


    (6 sem. cr.) Demonstration teaching is the culminating experience in the Teacher Preparation Program with an M.A.T.; it provides education professionals the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills and to demonstrate required competencies. Demonstration teaching occurs in two different classroom settings throughout the semester. During demonstration teaching, education professionals gradually assume complete teaching responsibility of the classroom, gaining real-world experience and the opportunity to translate theory into practice. The university supervisor and classroom cooperating teacher work closely with education professionals and evaluate their performance. Note: The first 5 weeks of demonstration teaching run concurrently with EDUC 6697 - Instructional Strategies for Students With Learning Disabilities. The remainder of demonstration teaching runs concurrently with EDUC 6609 - Seminar: Professional Ethics, Communication, and Collaboration: Special Education.
  
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    EDUC 6699 - Demonstration Teaching: Special Education: Emotional/Behavioral Disorders


    (6 sem. cr.) Demonstration teaching is the culminating experience in the Teacher Preparation Program with an M.A.T.; it provides education professionals the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills and to demonstrate required competencies. Demonstration teaching occurs in two different classroom settings throughout the semester. During demonstration teaching, education professionals gradually assume complete teaching responsibility of the classroom, gaining real-world experience and the opportunity to translate theory into practice. The university supervisor and classroom cooperating teacher work closely with education professionals and evaluate their performance. Note: The first 5 weeks of demonstration teaching run concurrently with EDUC 6696 - Instructional Strategies for  Students With Emotional/Behavioral Disorders. The remainder of demonstration teaching runs concurrently with EDUC 6609 - Seminar: Professional Ethics, Communication, and Collaboration: Special Education.
  
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    EDUC 6700 - Clinical Practicum: Special Education, Learning Disabilities


    (3 sem. cr.) The clinical practicum is the culminating experience in the Special Education Endorsement Program in Learning Disabilities (K–12); it provides education professionals the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills as well as to demonstrate required competencies. During the clinical practicum, education professionals gradually assume complete teaching responsibility of the classroom. The clinical practicum provides real-world experience and the opportunity to implement theory into practice. The university supervisor and classroom cooperating teacher work closely with education professionals and evaluate their work throughout the experience.
  
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    EDUC 6701 - Clinical Practicum: Special Education, Emotional/Behavioral Disorders


    (3 sem. cr.) The clinical practicum is the culminating experience in the Special Education Endorsement Program in Emotional/Behavioral Disorders (K–12); it provides education professionals the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills as well as to demonstrate required competencies. During the clinical practicum, education professionals gradually assume complete teaching responsibility of the classroom. The clinical practicum provides real-world experience and the opportunity to implement theory into practice. The university supervisor and classroom cooperating teacher work closely with education professionals and evaluate their work throughout the experience.
  
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    EDUC 6705 - Foundations of Reading and Literacy♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course establish a mindset for reading and literacy instruction through which they recognize the dynamic landscape of 21st-century education. They explore historical perspectives on literacy education and the social, political, economic, and cultural forces that influence today’s classroom. They learn, analyze, and apply research-based foundations of effective literacy instruction, including the five pillars of reading—phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. They explore and discuss a variety of related topics, including language development, new technologies, writing, learner diversity, assessment, and developmental approaches to instruction. Through this course, education professionals also learn the importance of collaboration, parent/family connections, data-driven decision making, and ongoing professional development.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6706 - The Beginning Reader, PreK–3♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Building a strong foundation of literacy skills and experiences in young children is critical to their success in school and life. This course takes a developmental approach to literacy instruction and provides practical research-based approaches to help students in preschool through third grade achieve the literacy goals of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and/or other state standards. The characteristics of emergent and beginning readers and writers are explored, focusing on essential literacy components including oral language, phonological awareness, concepts of print, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Education professionals evaluate the role of motivation in learning to read, and explore writing and multiple text genres. Education professionals plan and implement developmentally appropriate assessment and instruction, including technology tools, to support the literacy development of all learners in preschool through third grade.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6707 - The Developing Reader, Grades 4–6♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The intermediate grades present unique challenges and opportunities for literacy learning, including complexity of text, students’ use of technology, student motivation to learn, and student identity development. This course provides opportunities to evaluate research-based instructional and assessment practices to help students in grades 4–6 actively engage in literacy learning and achieve the literacy goals of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and other state standards. Education professionals examine the role of literacy in content area learning, explore ways to teach close reading of complex texts, and consider how to incorporate different levels, types, and genres of text to support all students’ learning and literacy development. Coursework focuses on effective strategies to support writing about text, academic vocabulary, listening and speaking, and the effective use of technology tools to support content area reading
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6708 - Literacy Development in a Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classroom♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Today’s classrooms reflect the rich cultural and linguistic diversity of the world outside of school. Through this course, education professionals work toward establishing a culturally responsive classroom where literacy development can flourish for all  students. Education professionals learn and apply strategies to scaffold and support English-language learners at all levels of language acquisition. They examine the second-language acquisition process and methods to assess second-language and literacy proficiencies. Additionally, they learn to select culturally sensitive and relevant instructional materials and work with parents, community members, and other colleagues to support student success.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6709 - Literacy Development in an Academically Diverse Classroom♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Today’s inclusive classrooms require teachers to become competent and confident in working with students who struggle with reading and writing. Education professionals in this course focus on accelerating the literacy development of students with reading difficulties, including students who have specific learning disabilities, and addressing the needs of  students considered gifted. They use diagnostic assessments, apply research-based strategies, and work with reading specialists/coaches and special educators to support academically diverse needs within the larger classroom context. They also explore and discuss a variety of topics, including informal and formal assessment, methods to differentiate and scaffold instruction, progress monitoring, leveling books, intervention strategies, and use of motivating texts. Additionally, education professionals learn the importance of collaboration with support resources.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6710 - Understanding the Impact of Technology on Education, Work, and Society♦


    (3 sem. cr.) As new and emerging technologies transform the landscape of education, the possibilities for learning and discovery grow exponentially. Through this course, education professionals examine the history and evolution of technology in society and its influence on education. Education professionals explore technology as a vehicle for broad access, and they employ a variety of digital-age tools, including social networking, interactive learning tools, and collaboration software, to inspire and motivate today’s learners. They also explore and discuss ethical considerations, responsible use, and cyber safety issues. Through practical applications, such as designing a lesson that incorporates blogs, wikis, or podcasts, they gain hands-on experience integrating technology into the classroom.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6711 - Bridging Learning Theory, Instruction, and Technology♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course explore various learning theories and research on how the brain processes information as well as how they can use this knowledge to support the use of technology in the classroom. They explore and evaluate various technologies, such as computer-mediated instruction and virtual learning environments, as means to foster learner-centered classrooms where students are motivated. Education professionals also learn how to support and enhance instructional practices using technology and how to integrate developmentally appropriate practices in teaching and learning with the latest digital resources available. Applying course concepts, they revise a lesson plan to support and facilitate student engagement using technology-based cognitive tools.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6712 - Supporting Information Literacy and Online Inquiry in the Classroom♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals develop a new, expanded definition of what it means to be literate in today’s technology-rich world. Education professionals explore the use and application of multimedia and Internet technologies that enhance learning and support collaborative problem-solving in a digital information society. They learn strategies for how to prepare students across the grade levels for the complex challenges related to reading, critical thinking, researching, and communicating in the 21st century. Synthesizing course concepts, they assess curriculum standards in their area and develop an inquiry-based unit plan designed to develop their students’ information and visual literacy skills and meet a specific learning outcome or standard in their subject area.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6713 - Integrating Technology Across the Content Areas♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals expand their focus of technology use in the classroom by exploring instructional strategies and digital tools that facilitate content area literacy and learning. Education professionals learn how to design technology-infused projects that motivate students and help them meet specific curricular standards. They also explore developmentally appropriate ways of using multimedia and Internet technologies to bring discipline-specific concepts to life and foster interdisciplinary connections that enhance learning across the curriculum.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6714 - Reaching and Engaging All Learners Through Technology♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course learn to apply various technologies to enable and empower learners with diverse backgrounds, learning preferences, and ability levels. They employ digital-age solutions for differentiating instruction to meet varying needs, including assistive technologies that facilitate learning in students with special needs, programs that support English-language learners, and projects that engage and motivate gifted students. Through this course, they learn to harness the power of leading-edge technologies to increase learning and achievement for all students.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6715 - New and Emerging Technologies♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Through this course, education professionals consider the future of teaching and learning, discover promising trends in technology, and investigate opportunities to become leaders in the field of technology and learning. They consider how to address school-wide challenges, such as limited resources and resistance to change, and they explore skills and strategies, such as grant writing and leading change. Additionally, they complete a capstone project that demonstrates their ability and willingness to become advocates and change agents who use technology to address challenges and create opportunities within the field of education.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6716 - Clinical Experience 1


    (1 sem. cr.) This is an 8-week course taken concurrently with the methods course EDUC 6632 - Assessment and Instruction to Promote Literacy Development. Both courses align to Minnesota Reading Teacher standards. Education professionals read and view standards-based learning resources, and discuss and apply learning objectives in the methods course. Concurrently, they implement the Literacy Assessment and Instructional Plan (LAIP) project in their clinical setting. The LAIP is designed to bring the course learning and weekly application of the learning into focus via implementation of various assessments with different learners and creation of an instructional plan.
  
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    EDUC 6717 - Clinical Experience 2


    (1 sem. cr.) This is an 8-week course taken concurrently with the methods course EDUC 6633 - Reading, Writing, and Critical Thinking in Content Disciplines. Both courses are aligned to Minnesota Reading Teacher standards. Education professionals read and view standards-based learning resources, and discuss and apply learning objectives in the methods course. Concurrently, they implement the Content Literacy Lesson Plan (CLLP) project in their clinical setting. During the CLLP project, education professionals apply their knowledge and skills in planning, implementing, assessing, and reflecting upon the implementation of three lesson plans designed to address students’ literacy needs across content areas.
  
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    EDUC 6718 - Clinical Experience 3


    (1 sem. cr.) This is an 8-week course taken concurrently with the methods course EDUC 6634 - Assessment and Intervention for Students With Reading Difficulties. Both courses are aligned to Minnesota Reading Teacher standards. Education professionals read and view standards-based learning resources, and discuss and apply learning objectives in the methods course. Concurrently, they implement the Struggling Reader Case Study (SRCS) project in their clinical setting. The SRCS is designed to bring the course learning and weekly application of the learning into focus via implementation of various assessments with one learner who struggles with reading tasks and create an intervention plan.
  
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    EDUC 6719 - Clinical Experience 4


    (1 sem. cr.) This is an 8-week course taken concurrently with the methods course EDUC 6689 - Guiding and Supporting School Literacy Environments. Both courses are aligned to Minnesota Reading Teacher standards. Education professionals read and view standards-based learning resources, and discuss and apply learning objectives in the methods course. Concurrently, they develop the Schoolwide Literacy Plan (SLP) Project in their clinical setting. The SLP Project is designed to bring the course learning and weekly application of the learning into focus via creation of a school-wide literacy improvement plan, collaborative review of the plan with key stakeholders, and evaluation of the impact of the project as a whole on professional growth and student learning.
  
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    EDUC 6720 - The Special Educator as Instructional Leader♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Powerful internal and external forces affect the leadership capacity and influence potential of special educators. In this course, education professionals examine internal variables, such as their emotional, spiritual, mental, and physical health. They also consider external variables, including current trends and issues related to medicine, neuroscience, research, law and governance, and technology. Moreover, education professionals explore the influence of these variables on teaching and learning and on enhancing their leadership capacity.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6721 - The Impact of Disabilities on Learning and Teaching♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Special educators understand the breadth and depth of each disability and they continually expand their knowledge and skills related to the impact of cognition, behavior, sensory input, and physical/health issues on learning and teaching. Education professionals in this course examine disabilities beyond the surface level of definitions, characteristics, and common understandings to a deeper, life-encompassing, and future-planning perspective. Through this course, education professionals further their ability to advocate for individuals with disabilities and for the field of special education.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6722 - Strategic Collaboration in Special Education♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Teaming, partnerships, and collaboration are practices that special educators must embrace and continually hone and refine. Education professionals in this course explore the attitudes, skills, and dispositions that foster healthy and productive collaborative relationships, which are essential for working with teams to provide services for individuals with disabilities. They also examine the benefits and challenges of collaborating with others to maximize the learning potential of every student.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6723 - Advanced Instructional Strategies in Special Education♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Providing accommodations and differentiating instruction are essential practices for special educators. In this course, education professionals learn advanced research-based approaches for designing, adapting, prescribing, and delivering instruction in the content areas, with special emphasis on progress monitoring. They also examine content-area standards and curriculum, focusing on the goal of designing standards-based, individualized instruction that is functional, appropriate, and systematic.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6724 - Literacy Interventions in Special Education♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Reading, writing, and communicating are literacy competencies that impact the quality of life for all people, especially individuals with disabilities; however, learning and behavioral disabilities often have a major influence on literacy development, thus requiring special educators who are well-versed in this area of learning and teaching. In this course, education professionals learn to identify reading and writing disabilities and collaborate with others to devise appropriate and effective interventions, including the use of assistive technologies. They engage in a variety of conceptual and application-based assignments that emphasize progress monitoring and ongoing assessment of literacy skills, strategies, and dispositions.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6725 - Advanced Behavioral Interventions in Special Education♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Behavior impacts human development at all ages and stages of life and is typically a matter of concern for individuals with disabilities. Education professionals in this course focus on understanding, assessing, managing, teaching, and monitoring behavior. They also review classroom and school management strategies, and they explore in greater depth individual functional analysis and individual behavior management plans, focusing on the goal of transition planning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6726 - Understanding the English Language Learner♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals gain a historical and cultural perspective of K–12 English-language learners. They explore concepts, theories, research, and first and second language acquisition differences to understand and teach this diverse group of  students. Education professionals also examine their own attitudes, beliefs, and biases and learn the importance of developing culturally responsive learning environments. They also learn the value of working collaboratively with families and school staff to support the needs of all students in the general classroom.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6727 - Strategies for Teaching English as a Second Language♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course learn effective instructional skills and strategies to teach English as a second language in the K–12 classroom. Through conceptual and practical discussions and activities, they learn strategies and techniques to help students develop listening, speaking, reading, writing, and vocabulary skills in a variety of English-language learning environments. They also examine a range of language-learning programs, such as dual language immersion, transitional bilingual education, and structured English immersion. Additionally, education professionals learn to apply theories of second-language learning, literacy development, and standards-based teaching strategies to provide productive learning environments for English-language learners in general classroom settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6728 - Strategies for Teaching Content to English Language Learners♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Making academic content accessible and comprehensible for English Language Learners requires specific strategies that K-12 teachers need to know and be able to do. By focusing on academic language, content acquisition, the use of adaptive technology, and English language models including Specifically Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE), teachers learn practical ways to meet content standards for students with diverse needs, learning styles, and abilities.  This course also addresses ways to prepare lessons that integrate both content and literacy objectives to better enhance the English language development of their English Language Learners.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6729 - Assessment and the English Language Learner♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This course introduces a variety of formative and summative assessment tools to inform instruction and identify and evaluate language proficiency levels of English Language Learners in K-12 classrooms. Teaching professionals utilize assessment strategies designed to measure listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Topics include an overview of the challenges and issues teachers face, including language bias and testing, the inappropriate placement of English Language Learners, and the role of standards and high-stakes testing. Teachers will be able to interpret quantitative and qualitative assessment data results of both formal and informal assessments.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6730 - Curriculum Design for Learning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Professional educators must have the knowledge and skill to make important decisions regarding what students learn and how they will learn it to ensure student success. In this course, education professionals engage in a research-based process for designing and mapping curriculum that motivates students and promotes academic success. Beginning with the end in mind, education professionals identify clear learning goals and big ideas, create authentic assessments, and develop essential questions to guide effective instructional planning and ongoing assessments using their district or state standards and/or benchmarks. They also apply the curriculum design process to a subject area they teach, keeping in mind the influence of learning environment, family involvement, and social development on the design process.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6731 - Assessment for Student Learning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course examine the historical and contemporary perspectives on assessment, including trends in high-stakes assessment and accountability. They learn types and purposes of assessment as well as how to use assessments effectively. Education professionals also analyze strengths and weaknesses of various assessment methods and use ongoing assessments to guide decisions that will improve student performance. They explore and discuss data collecting and analysis, grading, record-keeping, and reporting. Additionally, they learn the importance of student self-assessment and the best ways to support their students in monitoring learning and reflecting on how to improve personal performance.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6732 - Differentiated Instruction♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The practice of differentiating instruction is a way for educators to meet diverse learning needs and preferences without having to individualize instruction for every student. In this course, education professionals learn how to differentiate five instructional elements—content, product, process, affect, and learning environment—according to  students’ interests, readiness, and learning profile. They explore flexible grouping and managing the differentiated classroom. Using their classroom curriculum, they plan and implement differentiated lessons and align them to important learning goals, essential questions, and formative and summative assessments while ensuring that their instruction includes meaningful applications of knowledge. Education professionals also learn how to draw on resources, such as staff, community members, and educators to support the “whole” child in the learning process.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6733 - Action Research for Educators♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Educators are provided with a structured approach to the practice of action research in this course. They have the opportunity to learn how to address relevant problems, become involved in collaborative inquiry, and use data and research to inform their practice, improve student academic success, and contribute to positive change in their classroom and school environments. Educators engage in reflective practices as they collect and analyze student data and develop and implement data-informed decisions/actions to improve student learning and enhance their professional growth.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6734 - Differentiating Instruction for Student Success


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K-12 • Print & DVD and Online

    Maximize learning for every student in the class—no matter how far behind or ahead he or she may be. With this course, teachers examine student differences, learn how and when to differentiate their instruction, and learn how to use assessment to adjust their instructional planning. Work with curriculum and standards, using differentiation strategies to design lessons that can be applied immediately with the students.

    Learn how to:

    • Analyze and summarize student differences based on readiness, interest, and learning profile.
    • Evaluate and plan changes to one’s learning environment to better support differentiated instruction.
    • Develop classroom organization and management routines to address student readiness, interest, and learning profile.

  
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    EDUC 6735 - Helping Students Become Self-Directed Learners


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K-12 • Print & DVD and Online

    As the classroom changes, so does the role of a teacher. Teachers may find themselves acting more as coaches and facilitators as their students become more active in their own learning. In this course, teaching professionals will explore how to foster and encourage self-directedness in their students and create a learning environment that encourages collaboration and creativity. Learn how teachers can help their students manage their own learning, and inspire them to develop the skills they need to thrive.

    Learn how to:

    • Identify the characteristics of self­-directedness in one’s self and one’s students.
    • Help students refine their thinking beyond the first “right” answer.
    • Examine various ways to provide feedback that will help students produce high-quality work.

     

     

  
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    EDUC 6740 - Qualities of Effective Professional Development♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective professional development is foundational in improving a school system’s ability to raise student achievement. Education professionals in this course examine the history and research that supports the need for ongoing professional learning for teachers, principals, and all adults who interact with students in P–12 schools. They use case studies of schools and districts that have achieved results to learn the standards of exemplary professional-development programs and analyze the attributes necessary for success. Education professionals also have the opportunity to explore the roles and responsibilities of professional developers inside and outside the classroom as well as career paths for developing leadership skills in the area of adult and student learning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6741 - Designing Professional Development♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Professional development that ensures quality teaching for all students is based on a model of continuous improvement that is data-driven and grounded in research-based practices. In this course, education professionals examine a variety of professional-development models and select and plan the most appropriate approach to support their goal. Using adult-learning theory as a foundation, education professionals explore models of adult learning and change and cycles of improvement. They also design strategies to build strong professional-development programs that include planning, delivering, following-up, and evaluating influence on teacher practices and student learning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6742 - Implementing Professional Development♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Delivering and sustaining professional development requires an understanding of culture and change. In this course, education professionals develop skills to set expectations, facilitate professional learning, support individual growth, and build collaborative teams. Using change theory, they learn to monitor and support adult learning by organizing professional learning communities that focus on student needs and school goals. They explore strategies for delivering and providing continuous follow-up and support of professional learning. Education professionals also learn how to use collaboration, facilitation, coaching, and mentoring skills to involve colleagues, staff, families, and other key stakeholders in making decisions that are based on research-based practices and support a culture of learning that involves educators, students, parents, and community.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6743 - Evaluating Professional Development♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Evaluating the influence of professional-development efforts is crucial to ongoing success. Education professionals in this course explore systemic and comprehensive approaches for linking professional learning to student learning and using data to make informed decisions on how to improve the practices of educators and assess the influence on student learning. Using logic theories, they learn how to collect and analyze data from student work and teacher practice to make informed decisions that lead to continuous improvement. They engage in coursework that emphasizes communicating and disseminating results to multiple constituents within the school system. They also focus on system approaches that promote shared leadership in continuing, improving, and sustaining effective professional development at the district, school, and classroom levels.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6751 - Creating Supportive Learning and Service Environments♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Supporting and retaining  students until graduation is central to the mission of all institutions of higher education. In this course, education professionals investigate strategies for increasing student success throughout their college experience, from admission to graduation. They explore the ways in which faculty and staff throughout the institution can work collaboratively and leverage resources, such as emerging technologies, to create positive learning experiences. Educators focus on the interplay between academic and student support programs as well as how to design and implement such programs to maximize opportunities for student success.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6752 - Leading Change in Student Support Programs♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals explore strategies for leading change in programs and services to support student success and retention. Education professionals engage in research and discussion on a variety of issues, such as assessing needs, developing programs, and seeking resources through fundraising and grant writing. They also engage in activities that focus on ways that change efforts can support an institution’s mission and strategic goals, such as increasing the participation of traditionally underrepresented populations in key program areas and building more inclusive communities of learners. 
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6753 - Planning and Program Development for Online and Distance Learning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Learning technologies continue to advance and diversify; therefore, a critical task in education is to ensure that such technologies are used in a manner that works for the institution and its  students. Education professionals in this course are introduced to the process of planning and developing online and distance-learning programs. Education professionals investigate best practices in program structure and approach; steps in the planning process; requirements for accreditation and accountability; and emerging trends in integrating online technologies into a variety of learning environments. Through an integrative course project, they apply course concepts as they develop a project management toolkit that integrates specific steps and requirements associated with planning and developing an online program.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6754 - Administration and Assessment in Online and Distance Learning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Implementing a high-quality online or distance-learning program requires careful planning and attention to a range of issues affecting the program’s operational effectiveness, productivity, and ability to support and retain students. In this course, education professionals explore strategies for staffing, scheduling, and supporting students as well as methods for assessing the effectiveness of these strategies in achieving program goals. They engage in discussions and critical analyses of approaches to program management, assessment, and continuous improvement, focusing on the goal of ensuring that online and distance-learning programs maintain their competitive edge.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6755 - Principles of Marketing and Enrollment Management♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In an increasingly competitive market, colleges and universities must develop strategies for attracting and retaining  students according to their missions and the needs of the community. In this course, professionals learn fundamental principles of marketing, institutional promotion, and enrollment management in a higher education context, including branding, differentiating and positioning, forecasting, and communicating with the public and alumni. They engage in discussions on a variety of issues related to strategic enrollment management processes, including legal and regulatory considerations related to student recruitment, financial aid, diversity issues, and methods to align marketing and recruitment efforts with institutional mission and goals. Demonstrating understanding of course concepts, education professionals complete an institutional case study to examine institutional approaches to enrollment management and marketing as well as related challenges.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6756 - Emerging Trends in Marketing, Recruitment, and Institutional Promotion♦


    (3 sem. cr.) New technologies that can support an institution’s efforts to recruit and retain students are emerging every day. These technologies can be powerful tools for promoting and increasing awareness of an institution’s products and services. Education professionals in this course explore applications of online social networking systems, digital media, and other communications tools. They also examine traditional media and public relations strategies, which leaders at all levels of an institution can use to attract, engage, and retain students and to generate institutional awareness. Additionally, they gain practical experience developing a marketing and communication plan in which they incorporate strategies and media tools to refine an institutional message.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6757 - Planning for Learning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective learning experiences start with a clear plan. Decisions about what to teach, how to teach, and how to ensure students are achieving important learning goals confront every college instructor. Education professionals are introduced to concepts of planning curriculum and courses, establishing goals and outcomes, aligning outcomes with professional or disciplinary standards, prioritizing content, and planning for student engagement and active learning in this course. They engage in discussions and activities that emphasize the development of decision-making processes, which they can use to create effective plans for learning. Through an integrative course project, education professionals apply course concepts as they develop a learning plan that incorporates learning goals and teaching and assessment strategies.



    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6758 - Creating Engaging Learning Experiences♦


    (3 sem. cr.) A growing body of literature on effective practices in higher education highlights the importance of student engagement in the learning process. In this course, education professionals explore principles and processes for creating meaningful, student-centered learning experiences in a variety of educational contexts, including ways of using technology to support learning. They focus on how they can address the needs of diverse learners using active learning strategies, share responsibility for learning with their students, and empower their students to become more self-directed. Education professionals also learn to anticipate and address the challenges that self-directed approaches might create for students who are more familiar with traditional learning environments.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6759 - Assessing for Learning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Assessment in college teaching involves several critical processes: giving students meaningful tasks that allow them to demonstrate their learning; providing feedback that enables students to improve their performance; and using data about student learning to continually improve teaching. Education professionals are provided with opportunities to design and discuss approaches to evaluation and assessment that support learner motivation and development, track progress toward outcomes, and gain information they can use to inform their own practice, including ways that technology can augment these approaches. Through this course, education professionals can learn what it means to engage in teaching scholarship—the process of investigating their teaching and sharing demonstrably effective approaches with their peers.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6760 - Facilitating Learning Online♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Online learning represents the fastest growing sector of higher education and is used in a variety of contexts. Education professionals in this course analyze how online learning can serve as a supplement to textbooks and traditional classroom instruction, a substitute for face-to-face time in blended or hybrid classes, and the exclusive method of learning in fully online courses and programs. They explore how online learning presents special opportunities as well as challenges to faculty and  students. Through the development of an online learning experience, education professionals practice strategies for planning, facilitating, and assessing learning online, and they gain a better understanding of how to use online learning technologies to enhance learning and motivate students.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6761 - Globalization in Higher Education♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Globalization is a phenomenon affecting almost every aspect of society, from politics to commerce to entertainment. Higher education is no exception; technology and social mobility increasingly lead to opportunities for collaboration and competition among institutions globally. In this course, education professionals investigate trends and issues in higher education worldwide, including ways in which institutions serve the needs of an increasingly mobile student population. Through assignments designed to provide practical application of course content, education professionals consider globalization through a variety of contexts, such as in their personal and professional lives, student experiences, and challenges and opportunities. They also explore international differences in institutional organization and governance, operations and services, accountability, and articulation; they use this knowledge to inform later study of program development and administration.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6762 - Administering International Higher Education Programs♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Leaders in academic programs and student services have a growing number of opportunities to provide their students with educational experiences that take place in one or more international contexts. Education professionals in this course address strategies for international student recruitment and support; development and administration of cooperative programs, such as study abroad; implementation of technology applications to support international experiences; and other approaches to entering and enhancing their position in the global higher education market.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6765 - Early Childhood Systems♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Involvement in public policy and advocacy efforts help foster the well-being of young children and families as well as the field of early childhood education. Effective involvement in the field of early childhood education, however, requires a foundational understanding of the system, its functions, and all its parts. In this course, education professionals examine the complexities of the early childhood infrastructure from local, state, national, and international perspectives. They explore, discuss, and blog about a variety of topics, such as public opinion with regard to the value and importance of providing quality services; parent, family, and community engagement; influence of current sociocultural, economic, and political contextual factors; and personal perspectives and reflections on the bonds of a collaborative learning community. Education professionals also analyze case studies to understand policy formation; connections between policies, politics, government; and allocation of funds.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6766 - Tools for Policymakers and Advocates♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Early childhood professionals must be skilled advocates to effect change positively. Education professionals are provided with the opportunity to gain the necessary tools, strategies, and insights to influence policy and advocate for young children, families, and the profession. Education professionals explore grant writing as well as family and political advocacy and research practices integral to effective leadership roles. Through a variety of conceptual and application-based assignments, they gain practical insight on building coalitions, developing communications plans, and designing effective public policies and advocacy initiatives.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6801 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Field experiences provide principal candidates with authentic opportunities to apply what they have learned in courses and expand what they know and are able to do. All principal candidates in the program are required to spend a total of 240 hours in three settings (elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school) mentored by licensed and practicing school principals. Field experience must include at least 160 hours in the candidate’s preferred level or primary teaching experience and 40 hours at each of the other two levels.
  
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    EDUC 6802 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Field experiences provide principal candidates with authentic opportunities to apply what they have learned in courses and expand what they know and are able to do. All principal candidates in the program are required to spend a total of 240 hours in three settings (elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school) mentored by licensed and practicing school principals. Field experience must include at least 160 hours in the candidate’s preferred level or primary teaching experience and 40 hours at each of the other two levels.
  
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    EDUC 6803 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Field experiences provide principal candidates with authentic opportunities to apply what they have learned in courses and expand what they know and are able to do. All principal candidates in the program are required to spend a total of 240 hours in three settings (elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school) mentored by licensed and practicing school principals. Field experience must include at least 160 hours in the candidate’s preferred level or primary teaching experience and 40 hours at each of the other two levels.
  
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    EDUC 6804 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Field experiences provide principal candidates with authentic opportunities to apply what they have learned in courses and expand what they know and are able to do. All principal candidates in the program are required to spend a total of 240 hours in three settings (elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school) mentored by licensed and practicing school principals. Field experience must include at least 160 hours in the candidate’s preferred level or primary teaching experience and 40 hours at each of the other two levels.
  
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    EDUC 6805 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Field experiences provide principal candidates with authentic opportunities to apply what they have learned in courses and expand what they know and are able to do. All principal candidates in the program are required to spend a total of 240 hours in three settings (elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school) mentored by licensed and practicing school principals. Field experience must include at least 160 hours in the candidate’s preferred level or primary teaching experience and 40 hours at each of the other two levels.
  
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    EDUC 6806 - Field Experience


    (1 sem. cr.) Field experiences provide principal candidates with authentic opportunities to apply what they have learned in courses and expand what they know and are able to do. All principal candidates in the program are required to spend a total of 240 hours in three settings (elementary school, middle or junior high school, and high school) mentored by licensed and practicing school principals. Field experience must include at least 160 hours in the candidate’s preferred level or primary teaching experience and 40 hours at each of the other two levels.
  
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    EDUC 6901 - The High-Performing Teacher


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K–12 • Print & DVD and Online

    For teaching professionals seeking ways to refresh and revitalize their teaching, this course offers proven strategies that other successful teachers use to consistently bring out the best in themselves and their students. Master daily challenges through practical problem-solving and stress-reduction techniques, and develop effective goals to maintain motivation. See how practical strategies and technologies can inspire the students and keep teachers energized in the classroom.

    Learn how to:

    • Increase self-esteem and lower the odds of classroom burnout.
    • Empower students to take responsibility for their actions.
    • Identify strategies to connect with resources for peer support.

  
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    EDUC 6902 - Learning Differences: Effective Teaching With Learning Styles and Multiple Intelligences


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K–12 • Print & DVD and Online

    Each student brings something unique to the classroom, including distinct learning styles and preferences. Understanding the individual differences of each student and using that understanding to design instruction can help teaching professionals become more effective in the classroom. This course addresses these aspects of student diversity and offers practical strategies that allow teachers to enhance each student’s strengths.

    Learn how to:

    • Explore the underlying foundations of multiple intelligences theory.
    • Identify and analyze behaviors in students that reflect the four basic learning styles.
    • Explore ways to use students’ strengths and affinities to teach essential skills.

     

  
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    EDUC 6903 - Building Your Repertoire of Teaching Strategies


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K–12 • Print & DVD and Online

    In today’s diverse classrooms, the ability to reach all students requires a full repertoire of teaching strategies. This course features several dynamic strategies that build on existing teaching skills. Explore four innovative models of effective instruction, each supported by strategies that combine theory with practical teaching practices. Learn how to design and implement a variety of lessons that promote the potential of all learners in the classroom.

    Learn how to:

    • Identify and define four models of effective instruction: mastery, understanding, self-expressive, and interpersonal.
    • Use the four models to explore and adapt new strategies.
    • Understand the relationship between teaching, learning, and thinking as it affects both the teacher and the students.

  
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    EDUC 6904 - Helping Students Become Self-Directed Learners


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K–12 • Print & DVD and Online

    As the classroom changes, so does the role of a teacher. Teachers may find themselves acting more as coaches and facilitators as their students become more active in their own learning. In this course, teaching professionals will explore how to foster and encourage self-directedness in their students and create a learning environment that encourages collaboration and creativity. Learn how teachers can help their students manage their own learning, and inspire them to develop the skills they need to thrive.

    Learn how to:

    • Identify the characteristics of self­-directedness in one’s self and one’s students.
    • Help students refine their thinking beyond the first “right” answer.
    • Examine various ways to provide feedback that will help students produce high-quality work.

     

  
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    EDUC 6908 - Improving Reading in the Content Areas


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): 6–12 • Print & DVD and Online

    Students’ literacy skills limit content area learning. As the concepts and vocabulary in middle and secondary textbooks and digital resources become more specialized, and the vocabulary and concepts within them become more abstract, students need more sophisticated strategies for reading and comprehension. With this course, teachers can acquire practical strategies that can be used across grade levels and subject areas to build their students’ comprehension skills and help them succeed in a content area.

    Learn how to:

    • Create lessons that seamlessly integrate literacy development with subject matter.
    • Use strategies before, during, and after reading that increase student engagement to important content.
    • Use assessment methods for a continuous view of student progress.

  
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    EDUC 6909 - Motivating Today’s Learner


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K–12 • Print & DVD and Online

    Are students lacking the energy, enthusiasm, and motivation to learn? This course will help teachers refresh and revitalize their instruction with easy-to-use strategies and techniques that will bring lessons to life for all types of learners, even the seemingly unmotivated ones. Explore a variety of issues that may impact student learning, including issues of gender bias. Discover ways to enhance one’s own presentation skills and design fast-paced, engaging lessons to grab and keep the attention of all students.

    Learn how to:

    • Identify barriers that prevent students from achieving in school.
    • Evaluate one’s own beliefs and how they impact the expectations for student success.
    • Develop strategies for creating a supportive learning environment.

  
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    EDUC 6911 - Math: Teaching for Understanding


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K–6 • Print & DVD and Online

    Teachers have the unique opportunity to lay the mathematical foundation that can help their students succeed. By ensuring that all students receive high-quality math instruction, teachers can equip them with the mathematical literacy skills required of workers in the 21st century, including the ability to problem-solve, think conceptually, and make meaning of numbers. With this course, teaching professionals will learn how to deliver high-quality, engaging mathematics instruction while developing their own understanding of foundational mathematics concepts.

    Learn how to:

    • Eliminate apprehension and frustration often associated with math.
    • Discover meaningful ways to teach topics such as geometry, algebra, and numbers and operations.
    • Incorporate strategies aligned with standards set forth by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

  
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    EDUC 6913 - Supporting the Struggling Reader


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K-6 • Print & DVD and Online

    With today’s higher literacy standards, struggling readers are becoming increasingly common. Current research indicates that pulling struggling readers out of the classroom for additional support has not been successful in accelerating literacy development. In fact, the classroom teacher remains a key factor for student success. With this course, teachers will learn concepts and strategies to develop literary-instruction expertise so that they are better prepared to work with struggling readers in the classroom.

    Learn how to:

    • Identify risk factors and methods for diagnosing common reading difficulties.
    • Explore and implement research-based intervention strategies to advance literacy development.
    • Motivate reluctant readers and foster a value for reading.

  
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    EDUC 6914 - Designing Curriculum and Instruction With the Learner in Mind


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K–12 • Print & DVD and Online

    How do teachers ensure that all their students achieve at high levels? Through this course, teachers explore how curriculum, instruction, and assessment can work together to challenge their students while making learning a rewarding and meaningful experience. Education professionals will have current research findings translated into a practical and flexible process for designing effective curriculum and instruction in a standards-based environment.

    Learn how to:

    • Use one’s own state and local standards to design curriculum, instruction, and assessment.
    • Use research-based strategies to raise student achievement.
    • Implement easy-to-use activities to differen­tiate instruction according to student needs.

     

     

  
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    EDUC 6915 - Helping Struggling Readers With Content-Area Learning


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): 6–12 • Print & DVD and Online

    Learn research-based strategies that can maximize the ability to help all students read better and meet subject standards in the class. This course focuses on what teachers need to know about struggling readers, including how to identify and meet their needs. Discover what support resources, such as parents and reading professionals, are available to a content-area teacher.

    Learn how to:

    • Analyze the relationship between students’ reading and content learning.
    • Design a plan to use vocabulary and comprehension reading strategies in the classroom.
    • Implement interventions that will help to improve reading, writing, and learning.

  
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    EDUC 6916 - How to Get Parents on Your Side


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K–12 • Print & DVD and Online

    Discover how to improve students’ achievement by recruiting their parents to support teachers’ efforts in the classroom. With this course, teaching professionals will learn how to encourage parents to take an active role in their children’s education by creating clear guidelines for collaboration. Begin by assessing parental-involvement needs, then explore ways to develop more effective relationships. Teachers will also examine how to work with parents of diverse cultures and parents of children with special needs.

    Learn how to:

    • Take proactive steps to establish early communication with parents.
    • Work with parents in a positive and cooperative manner.
    • Develop a plan for ongoing positive communication with parents.

  
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    EDUC 6917 - Succeeding With Difficult Students


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K–12 • Print & DVD and Online

    Teachers may find themselves in a constant struggle with the same students day after day. This course offers a framework for succeeding with difficult students. Learn to see the world from the difficult student’s perspective, making it possible to begin to build trust and ultimately the foundation for a positive relationship. Discover that helping hard-to-reach students to succeed can be one of the most challenging, and rewarding, experiences of a teaching career.

    Learn how to:

    • Understand when and why a student misbehaves.
    • Respond proactively to even the most difficult students in a calm, professional manner.
    • Plan strategies for establishing a positive relationship with difficult students and their parents.

  
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    EDUC 6919 - Teaching Students to Get Along


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K–6 • Print & DVD and Online

    Many students today lack the skills for resolving everyday conflicts in a positive manner. As a result, the classroom can erupt in teasing, arguing, and bullying. With this course, teachers can learn how to create a positive learning environment where students get along, leaving the teacher free to teach. Acquire a variety of proven strategies that teachers can integrate into existing lessons and activities, and create a classroom that fosters teamwork and positive social behavior.

    Learn how to:

    • Increase students’ ability to resolve arguments on their own.
    • Identify the difference between bullying and normal conflict between students.
    • Help students understand, respect, and accept differences in others.

  
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    EDUC 6929 - Including Students With Special Needs: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K–12 • Print & DVD and Online

    As more students with special needs are integrated into general-education classrooms, many teachers are challenged by the goal of addressing the needs of all their students. This course covers both students who, by federal law, are eligible for services and have individualized education programs (IEPs), and students who may not be eligible but are considered at risk due to limited English proficiency, because they are considered “slow learners,” or who have mild learning disabilities. Teachers gain the skills to support an inclusive classroom and provide a high-quality learning experience, so that students with special needs can succeed alongside their grade-level peers.

    Learn how to:

    • Identify when and how to enlist outside resources to address the special needs of students.
    • Explore the use of technology to support students in an inclusive classroom environment.
    • Begin to create an environment of “supported inclusion.”

  
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    EDUC 6930 - Classroom Management to Promote Student Learning


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): K–12 • Print & DVD and Online

    Today’s students come with a range of learning needs, as well as social and emotional needs. As a result, there is no single formula for effective classroom management. This course explores several approaches to creating a supportive and respectful learning environment for all learners. Build a repertoire of research-based strategies, and reclaim class time once lost to handling classroom disruptions. Discover how teachers can increase parental support as well.

    Learn how to:

    • Design rules and procedures to increase students’ sense of responsibility.
    • Use preventive, rather than reactive, management strategies.
    • Create a plan for teaching a conflict-resolution process.

  
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    EDUC 6935T - The Adolescent Brain


    (3 sem. cr.)

    Self-Paced Course for Educators (in partnership with Canter): 6–12 • Print & DVD and Online

    Adolescence can be a perplexing time not just for teens but for their teachers as well. This graduate-level course, developed by experts in the emerging field of neuroeducation, examines the mysteries of the adolescent brain and shows how teens learn best. Start by building a practical understanding of the brain’s anatomy and its transformation during adolescence. Discover how to create a learning environment that respects teens’ unique social and emotional needs and encourages them to become active learners. Teach students how their brains work and what they can do to enhance their own learning.

    Learn how to:

    • Apply a new understanding of the adolescent brain’s unique characteristics and their effects on student learning.
    • Use brain-compatible teaching strategies to create lessons that work with the teen mind to make lessons more engaging.
    • Reach students who don’t perceive themselves as learners

 

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