2014-2015 Walden University Catalog (December 2014) 
    
    Dec 04, 2020  
2014-2015 Walden University Catalog (December 2014) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    EDUC 6174 - Developing a Repertoire of Effective Teaching Practices♦


    (3 sem. cr.) A number of best practices in adult teaching and learning have been identified based on decades of research and experience. Education professionals in this course examine these evidence-based practices to build their skills and gain strategies to facilitate learning in a variety of settings. They also explore promising new ideas and emerging trends in the field of adult learning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6175 - Planning, Assessing, and Improving Adult Learning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Given the wide variety of settings in which adult learning takes place, it is no small challenge to plan and implement robust learning experiences tha can be effectively evaluated. This course examines the ingredients essential to succesfully promote learning, including multiple needs assessment models, approaches to program design, implementation strategies, and models of evaluation and assessment.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6176 - Facilitating Collaboration and Group Process♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Research shows that adults learn best in a social environment. Through collaboration and idea exchange, a supportive “community of practice” is generated where learners co-create their experience in socially meaningful ways. This may take the form of discussions, peer-to-peer activities, small-group work, and student-centered assignments, among other approaches. This course examines the mechanics of collaboration and identifies facilitation practices that lead to student success. Also addressed are issues of consensus and decision making, trust-building, collaborative teaching, and group process online.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6177 - Using Technology to Enhance Adult Learning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Emerging technologies are rapidly altering the field of adult education today. Innovative technologies are removing traditional boundaries to learning and encouraging a global perspective on school, work, and communications. New developments in software, multimedia applications, Internet technologies, and mobile computing are transforming the educational landscape and empowering learners around the world. This course explores how educators and students can leverage these advances to enhance the learning process and improve outcomes in today’s digital information society.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6178 - Organizations, Systems, and Change♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Adult learning takes place in a wide variety of formal and informal settings. Each of these environments has its own organizational structure, or “system,” that must be understood and considered when designing and implementing learning strategies. Understanding the fundamentals of organizational behavior, systems theory, and change management is essential for facilitating innovation and performance enhancement. In this course, key issues such as policy, advocacy, complexity, change, organizational development, and group dynamics are addressed in the context of developing transformational experiences for adult learners.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6179 - Online Instructional Strategies for Adult Learners♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective instruction in an online setting requires strategies that leverage the unique characteristics of distance learners and online environments. In this course, students analyze, select, and design instructional strategies that are most effective for engaging and teaching adult online learners. Students learn methods for managing and delivering online instruction, with the goal of integrating effective strategies with course management tools and multimedia technologies in both synchronous and asynchronous environments.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6180 - Assessments in Online Environments for Adult Learners♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The online environment provides instructors with the opportunity to reach beyond traditional practices and explore new ways of assessing student learning outcomes. In this course, students apply their knowledge of learning theory and assessment practices to the development of assessment strategies in online education and training environments. Students review research and practical strategies for assessing student learning in both synchronous and asynchronous environments.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6181 - Developmental Education: Theory and Practice♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The need for developmental education in community colleges and 4-year institutions continues to grow, as does the need for developmental educators who are prepared to help this population of students achieve success. In this course, students examine developmental education from a historical perspective and will explore the theoretical frameworks, political and economic issues, and key research surrounding developmental education. Students also learn common organizational approaches to offering developmental education and the characteristics of developmental education student populations, courses, and programs.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6182 - Strategies for Success in Developmental Education♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Meeting learners’ needs for developmental education requires creativity and perseverance as well as a willingness to learn from the experiences of other institutions. This course will examine approaches to developmental education that have proven successful in a variety of contexts, including strategies for intake and placement, advising, teaching, and assessment. Students will also investigate best practices in curriculum design and the use of technology in developmental education, programs to support student retention and persistence, and ways of facilitating collaboration between academic and student affairs in support of developmental education.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6183 - Performance Improvement in the Workplace♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course survey the research, models, and issues associated with improving human performance in workplace settings. They explore methods and techniques for recognizing and analyzing performance gaps, conducting needs assessments, determining appropriate instructional and performance support interventions, and measuring the results of implemented solutions. Emphasis is placed on determining whether adult education or performance improvement interventions are appropriate for addressing identified needs. Education professionals also use results from analyses to inform the design of job aids, instruction, and other performance support systems.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6184 - Training and Development Systems♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The ability to manage and deliver training is an essential skill for human resource and performance improvement professionals working with adult learners. In this course, students study models, techniques, and best practices for managing and delivering training systems and modules. Topics include managing the learning environment, selecting appropriate materials and assessments, and tracking learner performance and completion. Students also explore technologies that support the planning, presenting, and managing of instructor-led and self-directed courses and training systems in both face-to-face and virtual environments.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6185 - Fundamentals of Teaching Adults English as a Second Language♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This course introduces students to the fundamentals of teaching English as a second language to adult learners. The vocabulary and acronyms relevant to the field are introduced, and the essential theories and concepts of second language acquisition are explored. The diversity of adult learners and their motivations, as well as the variety of formal and informal teaching settings, both in the United States and abroad, are examined. Professionalism and respect for differences in language, culture, and belief systems are emphasized.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6186 - Methods of Teaching Adults English as a Second Language♦


    (3 sem. cr.) A variety of instructional methodologies for teaching English as a second language to adult learners are introduced. The basic principles, current trends, and established techniques of second language instruction are examined, with an emphasis on the communicative language teaching (CLT) approach. Best practices in reading/writing and speaking/listening instruction are given special attention, while challenges such as community building and managing the learning environment are also addressed.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6187 - Planning, Assessment, and Evaluation for Teaching Adults English as a Second Language♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Students are introduced to the basics of planning lessons, designing assessments, and evaluating adult learners in English as a second language settings. Strategies for creating meaningful, authentic lessons and materials for a variety of contexts are explored; the various approaches to testing and assessing language needs and competencies are analyzed; and best practices in evaluation and placement are examined with the goal of creating the most conducive and effective environments for language learning possible.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6190 - Capstone: Practical Application in Adult Learning


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course education professionals are provided with the opportunity to integrate and apply the theories, concepts, and practices learned in previous coursework to real-world issues and problems. The capstone experience, in which education professionals are asked to select a specific adult learning situation of personal relevance for study, serves as the culmination of the program. Education professionals conduct a detailed analysis and offer solutions to a problem or suggest interventions to improve current practice.

     

  
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    EDUC 6200 - Teaching and Learning for School Leaders


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective educational leaders influence the quality of teaching by understanding how to recognize outstanding teaching and facilitate improvement by communicating how and why learner-centered teaching enhances the learning outcomes of every student. This course introduces candidates to the latest research on education, teaching, and learning, and fosters the development of an understanding of how effective approaches to instruction are informed by research.
  
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    EDUC 6201 - Communication and Collaboration for Leaders


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective educational leaders work to foster shared understanding of and commitment to making sure that every student learns and succeeds; this requires the ability to communicate and the capacity to create conditions and processes that foster collaborative problem solving and decision making. Education professionals in this course explore the characteristics of effective leaders. They learn how to model open and responsive communication as well as how to create time and use tools to ensure that such interactions are common within the school and throughout the school community. They also explore the role of schools in communicating with and drawing upon community resources of various types, including public agencies and organizations that serve youth and families. Through this course, education professionals work toward establishing the personal, ethical, and moral platforms to become effective leaders who model and promote ethical and productive civic behavior.
  
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    EDUC 6202 - Ensuring Quality Education for Students With Diverse Needs


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course explore and analyze the issues, complexities, responsibilities, and opportunities associated with leading schools with diverse student populations. By acknowledging differences among learners, as well as biases, discrimination, prejudices, and stereotypes, school leaders can identify diversity as a dynamic contributing factor to a rich learning environment in which individual differences are honored and respected. A focus of the course is also on one of the most challenging tasks facing schools today: to substantially increase the achievement of students placed at risk because of limited facility with English, and physical, mental, and emotional disability. Candidates will study diverse and inclusive approaches that have proven most effective in supporting all language learners and students with special needs to reach high standards of performance.
  
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    EDUC 6203 - Policy and Law in School Organizations


    (3 sem. cr.) This course includes a study of selected general legal principles, case and statute law, and law-making agencies that impact leaders and their educational institutions. Key content areas include but are not limited to the legal status of the local school district; the role of federal, state, and local governments that  may apply; governance of schools; and policies, rules, and regulations. Educators in the course will also cover the legal rights, responsibilities, and obligations of administrators, teachers, students, parents, and school boards, community education, civil rights, collective bargaining, torts and contracts, and legal research, as well as the development of policy to meet regulations and other provisions.
  
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    EDUC 6204 - Using Data to Strengthen Schools


    (3 sem. cr.) Education leaders must use data extensively to guide them in defining needs, setting and prioritizing goals, monitoring and evaluating progress, and identifying effective strategies for improvement. The continuing analysis of the gaps between student performance and student learning goals defines the actions of effective school leaders. Decision-makers must understand the array of data that are needed for school improvement. They must know the principles and techniques of measurement, evaluation, and data analysis. They must use a multitude of strategies to analyze data to propel teaching and learning and school improvement. They should use technology to support the collection and use of data. They need to engage the school community (teachers, parents, and students) in understanding and supporting data to guide the analysis of strengths, weaknesses, threats, and opportunities in the ongoing pursuit of school improvement.
  
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    EDUC 6205 - Budgeting and Allocating Resources


    (3 sem. cr.) Research on effective schools provides guidance on the most productive ways to organize time, people, money, technology, and other resources. To use these resources most effectively, leaders need to have a strategy that defines the most important priorities, the overall educational design, and the organizational structures that best match the necessary goals for improvement. Effective leaders need to be able to (1) link whole-school strategic plans to effective instructional practices and improved use of time and money; (2) ensure individualized attention where needed in subject areas; (3) evaluate alternative paths to school improvement; (4) invest wisely in improving teaching quality; and (5) organize staff and use other resources in new ways that allow focused investment in teaching and learning.
  
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    EDUC 6206 - Creating Positive, Safe, and Effective Learning Environments


    (3 sem. cr.) Effective educational leaders develop capabilities to foster cultures for learning based on mutual respect among students, teachers, staff, parents, and the larger community. Strategies for fairly and effectively administering discipline and resolving conflict are addressed. This course is intended to help leaders understand and treat individual and group differences and potential conflict as opportunities for developing the dispositions, knowledge, and skills that result in social competencies essential to civic participation and interpersonal effectiveness in school and beyond. Candidates also study issues related to safety and violence in schools, considering both methods of prevention and ways to respond to unsafe and violent situations.
  
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    EDUC 6207 - Leading Curriculum Initiatives: Literacy and Math


    (3 sem. cr.) To be effective, school leaders must understand the foundational principles of teaching—curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Education professionals in this course also focus on the considerations with which they need to engage as they plan for the adoption and implementation of a new or substantially revised program to enhance student learning in a content domain. Literacy and math are two content areas that are problematic in many schools, especially those serving diverse students and students who are underperforming. Thus, while the lessons are applicable to other subjects, the focus here is on how to ensure that content standards, curriculum materials, assessment, instruction, professional development, and parental and community involvement, among other initiatives, are aligned in ways that foster student achievement in literacy and math.
  
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    EDUC 6208 - Recruiting, Evaluating, and Retaining School Personnel


    (3 sem. cr.) Candidates study human resources policies and practices for recruiting, selecting, hiring, inducting, developing, evaluating, and retaining or dismissing school personnel. Identifying teachers’ needs for professional growth is important, but leaders must also ensure that teachers have the opportunity and motivation to use their professional expertise and to participate in ongoing professional development focused on enhancing the learning of every student. As well, school leaders must be able to identify characteristics of productive teacher evaluation processes and programs; distinguish between supervising teaching and supervising learning; and utilize a process and structure for evaluating school personnel that is productive and supportive, motivates improvement, results in retention of highly competent staff members, embodies standards of due process, and takes into account the provisions of the contractual agreements for staff.
  
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    EDUC 6209 - Collaboration to Support All Learners


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, candidates explore strategies for effective communication and collaboration with colleagues, specialists, families, and community agencies to provide support for all children. Candidates examine collaboration strategies that promote the growth and learning of all children in the elementary classroom, including those with exceptionalities: students with disabilities, developmental differences, or emotional and behavior disorders; gifted and talented students; and English Language Learners. Candidates learn about the roles of all participants in collaborative teams (Individualized Education Plan (IEP), Response to Intervention (RTI), Alternative Learning Plan (ALP), Child Study). Candidates examine the role of the school in supporting all learners within the larger community context. They identify factors in the students’ environments that may impact their growth and learning and explore strategies for effective collaboration with families.
  
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    EDUC 6260 - Managing Resources for Organizational Success: Human Resources♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Faculty members and staff are the most important resource in any higher education institution. In this course, education professionals focus on strategies for human resource management in higher education, including recruitment and staffing, professional development, compensation, performance evaluation, and legal considerations. They investigate issues specific to faculty members, including promotion and tenure, collective bargaining, and collaboration with adjunct faculty members. They also examine the skills needed to coach, support, motivate, and facilitate collaboration among staff, enabling the organization to move toward desired outcomes.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6261 - Managing Resources for Organizational Success: Finance♦


    (3 sem. cr.) As costs escalate and resources dwindle, the effective, ethical, and socially responsible management of financial resources becomes an increasingly important skill in higher education. Education professionals are introduced to the fundamentals of financial administration in 4-year colleges, community colleges, and universities in this course. They explore financial issues specific to higher education, such as budget management, asset management, state appropriations, administration of financial planning, and fundraising. They also engage in practical learning activities through which they develop and assess strategies for deploying and managing resources to achieve established goals.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6262 - Optimizing Quality and Productivity♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Optimizing quality and productivity in a higher education organization requires the ability to initiate and support positive change efforts. In this course, education professionals explore and discuss best practices for analyzing and evaluating organizational performance; identifying opportunities for improvement; and leveraging available resources, including technological resources, to support productive change initiatives. They also investigate strategies for achieving quality and productivity goals in the context of accountability, including defining outcomes aligned with the institution’s strategic plan, establishing credible outcome measures, and demonstrating how to use outcomes data to improve programs and services.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6263 - Best Practices for Student Success♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Student success depends not only on the quality of the institution’s academic programs but also on the quality and availability of student services. In particular, the growing need to help increasingly diverse student populations succeed in college requires innovative approaches to retention and support initiatives. In this course, education professionals explore strategies to plan, organize, and manage student services and programs effectively as well as for ensuring that these programs meet legal and regulatory requirements. They also engage in coursework that emphasizes the design and deployment of programs and services, which enables students from diverse backgrounds to achieve their educational goals.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6264 - Program Planning and Assessment♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Higher education institutions achieve their goals primarily through instructional programs as well as through student support programs and services. Stakeholders at all levels within and outside the organization, including students, administrators, employers, legislators, and the public, expect institutions to demonstrate that their programs accomplish desired goals and that processes are in place to support data-driven improvement. In this course, education professionals engage in the cyclical process of program planning and assessment, including establishing goals and outcomes, creating and implementing an assessment plan, sharing results and determining strategies for improvement, and involving faculty, staff, and students in the assessment process.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6357 - Diversity, Development, and Learning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Diversity can have a profound influence on children’s development and learning. Education professionals in this course explore areas of diversity, including developmental and learning needs, such as English-language learners, children on the autism spectrum, and children with developmental delays. They also address the impact of living in poverty and experiencing stress/violence/trauma in the context of families, early childhood settings, and school classrooms. Applying course concepts, education professionals engage in practical exercises through which they reflect on their own perspectives and biases and learn the complex ways families influence their children. Moreover, they learn the importance of using current research and resources to improve developmental and learning outcomes for every child.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6358 - Strategies for Working With Diverse Children♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Working with children and families who have diverse developmental and learning needs requires not only a deep understanding of and respect for the individual child but also research-based knowledge of effective practices, strategies, and services. Through this course, education professionals develop and assess practical strategies and tools needed in educational settings to plan curriculum, teach, assess, and, if necessary, refer young children. They learn to use knowledge of children’s unique characteristics to help create respectful, supportive, and challenging environments and experiences that foster healthy development and learning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6360 - How Adults Learn♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The early childhood field offers a variety of opportunities for early childhood professionals to teach and work with adults. These professionals must understand the principles of adult learning. Education professionals in this course explore the major theories of adult learning and motivation to prepare to work in such roles as higher education faculty, community trainers, technical assistance providers, parent educators, coaches, mentors, professional developers, and Child Development Associate (CDA) trainers. The share ideas and perspectives with peers through discussions on a variety of topics, including traditional learning theories and andragogy, theories of cognitive development, and adult learning models, among others. Additionally, education professionals synthesize and apply various theories to real-world situations, including their own development; summarize how the idea of wisdom impacts their experiences as adult learners; interview an adult learner; and assess various perspectives in regard to educating diverse learners.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6361 - Instructional Strategies for Adult Learners♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals focus on strategies and techniques integral to working effectively with adults in the early childhood field in such roles as higher education faculty, community trainers, technical assistance providers, parent educators, coaches, and mentors. Education professionals gain practical experience in planning learning experiences, assessing and modifying instruction, and incorporating technology in teaching geared specifically to the unique strengths and needs of the adult learner. Additionally, they examine the distinctions between teaching in the early childhood field at a community college or university, and they explore ways to provide professional development for early childhood practitioners and support to adults working with young children and families in community settings.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6510 - Young Adolescent Development and Implications in a Global Society♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals gain an understanding of early adolescence in contemporary society and knowledge of the social, emotional, physical, intellectual, and moral development of early adolescence. They learn how to apply major concepts, principles, theories, and research in teaching and interactions with young adolescents. They also engage in assignments designed to provide authentic context to course content, such as an inquiry project though which they observe students or interview young adolescents to determine their perspectives on life and school. Moreover, education professionals develop a presentation designed to inform parents about key information on the development of young adolescents in middle school programs.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6520 - Organizational Structures for High-Performing Middle Grades Schools♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Each level of education requires special consideration and focus based on grade-specific student needs. Students in the middle grades must prepare for transition into high school, focus on state-required achievement exams, and develop skills to help them adapt to the transformation into young adulthood. Education professionals are provided with information to gain an understanding of these needs through exploration of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research on which current middle level education is based. Education professionals consider philosophical foundations and essential components of middle level education used in a variety of school settings. Coursework emphasizes team teaching for improving student outcomes, including varied use of time within the school, team, and classroom.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6525 - Concepts of Technology♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals are provided with an overview of educational technology for classroom integration based on current literature and research in this course. Through conceptual and application-based assignments, education professionals practice evaluating educational technologies to attain learning goals; developing lesson plans or units based on Bloom’s Taxonomy; and selecting appropriate software applications, programs, or support materials that enhance students’ learning environment. They also explore criteria and analysis for selecting educational software, correct uses of various activities in educational software to improve the learning process, and research methods using the Internet.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6530 - The Middle Grades Curriculum Continuum♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Through this course, education professionals gain practical insight into the curriculum of middle school as well as the process by which it is designed, integrated, implemented, and evaluated. They learn major concepts, principles, theories, models, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum, which they can use in their own classrooms. They apply course concepts and theories to practical assignments, such as a research summary on exemplary components of a middle level curriculum, the development of a hypothetical democratic classroom, the foundation for an integrative unit, and a fully integrated unit that represents multiple concepts and skills from different subject areas that relate to a chosen theme.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6540 - Pedagogy and Exemplary Practices for Learning in the Middle Grades♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The focus of this course is on current pedagogical theories, instructional strategies, and best practices for teaching young adolescents in middle grades. Education professionals engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of content on such topics as instructional technology, research strategies, learning styles and multiple intelligence theory, cooperative learning structures and service learning, and instructional best practices in social equity and justice. They also have the opportunity to revise and reflect on their integrated unit, which they designed in a previous course. Through these activities, education professionals gain the knowledge and experience needed to create developmentally responsive curriculum, instruction, and assessment to promote high levels of learning in the middle grades.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6550 - Assessment and Evaluation as Tools for Student Success♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals gain a comprehensive understanding of major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to middle level assessment. They investigate and assess the theory of middle level assessment, and they research, create, and evaluate methods of assessment and evaluation for the middle level classroom. Education professionals engage in various course assignments that emphasize performance assessment and evaluation strategies, rubrics, and multiple intelligence theory. Demonstrating their knowledge and ability to apply course content in the classroom, school, and community, they explain implications of standards-based reform as it relates to authentic assessment in the middle grades. They also develop a position paper to persuade faculty and administration to implement student-led conferencing and create a brochure for parents highlighting important information regarding assessment and evaluation.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6560 - Middle Level Professional Roles♦


    (3 sem. cr.) What are some of the performance standards, specialized skills, and professional dispositions required of middle level specialists to teach young adolescents successfully? Education professionals in this course have the opportunity to answer this question as they apply theory to practice while developing and refining the knowledge and skills required of the middle level educator. They analyze how they have met performance standards, develop their own view of middle level reform, and conceptualize the role and responsibility of middle level professionals. They prepare their culminating portfolio, consider their professional development needs and their role as a middle-level advocate, and analyze a case study simulation of a middle school to practice using evaluation criteria. They also reflect on and summarize their personal growth in the program in terms of student achievement, and they develop goals and strategies to address areas for improvement in their current school setting.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6561 - Mathematics for Middle Level Teachers♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The purpose of this course is to enhance the content knowledge of current or future middle level teachers while increasing their understanding of how middle level students best learn mathematics. Education professionals examine international mathematics studies, national achievement tests, and national standards, and they evaluate their teaching preparedness according to these standards. They engage in a variety of content-based application assignments to sharpen their own mathematics skills, on such topics as front-end estimation, table and graph analysis, and functional relationships. They also consider and describe learning activities that would help students develop a deeper understanding of mathematics problems and principles.

     
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.

  
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    EDUC 6562 - Understanding and Teaching the Language Arts♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course focus on principles and content standards defined and described by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) and the International Reading Association (IRA). They learn that English language arts should be taught in a manner consistent with the constructivist view of learning and teaching within a culturally diverse and global society. Through weekly assignments and discussions, education professionals examine the characteristics of an effective teacher and a dynamic classroom; explore the role of motivation, comprehension, and engagement in helping students acquire 21st-century literacy skills; synthesize information on diversity and consider ways to make all students feel competent and capable; assess the effectiveness of 21st-century resources in motivating students; and evaluate the impact of new learning.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6563 - Science for Middle Level Teachers♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The purpose of this course is to enhance the content knowledge of middle level teachers while increasing their understanding of how middle level students best learn science. Education professionals examine national standards and evaluate their own classroom according to these standards. They explore research-based assessment practices, analyze factors of motivation and engagement, consider what they can do to help students develop productive learning habits, and identify rudiments of differentiated instruction. They also have the opportunity to sharpen their awareness of critical issues in the science classroom, such as laboratory safety. Synthesizing course concepts and the fundamentals of education planning, education professionals demonstrate their understanding through the development of a formal science unit of study.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6564 - Understanding and Teaching the Social Studies♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The principles and standards underlying the essential characteristics of social studies described by the National Council for the Social Studies are covered in this course. Education professionals in this course develop the understanding that social studies should be taught in a manner consistent with the constructivist view of learning and teaching within a culturally diverse and global society. They discuss standards of instruction, preview assignments and strategies, diversity in the classroom, and metacognition. Applying course concepts and national standards, education professionals develop a unit plan of instruction that is interdisciplinary in nature and contains examples of best practices related to content standards in social studies and other subject areas.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6565 - Arts Education for the Middle Level Educator♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Each arts discipline can add richness to the learning environment. Education professionals in this course work toward sharpening their basic knowledge and skills in the arts. They engage in conceptual and practical assignments, applying theory into practice and focusing on all areas of the arts, including music, dance, drama, and visual arts. Education professionals learn to weave the arts through the middle level curriculum to contribute to student learning and motivation. They assess, modify, and adapt lesson plans to include the arts. They also have the opportunity to research and evaluate resources for integrating the arts across middle level education.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6570 - Distance Education♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Online education could be the catalyst that transforms education in the 21st century. Through this lens, education professionals explore the current trends impacting the field of distance education and their implications for K–12 teachers. They examine the different models, theories, and technologies used in the development and delivery of online learning. They also explore the implications and considerations of designing instruction for blended, fully online, teacher-led, self-paced learning environments. Practicing essential skills required to teach K–12 students successfully online, education professionals develop, facilitate, and assess a lesson for their students using an online platform.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6571 - Online Instruction♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Online education could be the catalyst that transforms education in the 21st century. Through this lens, education professionals explore the current trends impacting the field of distance education and their implications for K–12 teachers. They examine the different models, theories, and technologies used in the development and delivery of online learning. They also explore the implications and considerations of designing instruction for blended, fully online, teacher-led, self-paced learning environments. Practicing essential skills required to teach K–12 students successfully online, education professionals develop, facilitate, and assess a lesson for their students using an online platform.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6572 - Online Assessment♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The online environment provides teachers the opportunity to reach beyond traditional practices and explore new ways of assessing student learning outcomes. In this course, education professionals apply their knowledge of learning theory, assessment practices, and instruction to the development of assessment strategies in online environments. They also review research and practical strategies for assessing student learning in synchronous and asynchronous learning experiences.



    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6573 - Trends and Issues in K–12 Online Learning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Online education presents teachers and students with both opportunities and challenges. In this course, teachers will explore several trends and issues in online instruction, such as differentiation for diverse populations including students with special needs and English-language learners, and motivating and engaging the online student. Teachers will learn how to manage the online classroom and explore the ethical, legal, and safety issues related to teaching students in an online K–12 environment. Teachers also will examine strategies for communicating effectively with parents and collaborating with colleagues online.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6600 - Program Portfolio


    (Non-credit) Candidates who are working on their ePortfolio are registered for this non-course requirement. The portfolio brings together work from all the courses in the master’s degree program and demonstrates that the candidate has acquired both the knowledge (scholar) and the ability to apply (practitioner) it; in other words, it demonstrates that the degree completion yields the scholar-practitioner. A portfolio assessor works with candidates on an individual basis to ensure that each artifact required in the portfolio is adequately completed. Once the ePortfolio and all other program requirements are met, the Master of Science degree can be awarded.
  
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    EDUC 6601 - Artifact Program Portfolio


    (Non-credit) Candidates who are working on their ePortfolio are registered for this non-course requirement. The portfolio brings together work from all the courses in the master’s degree program and demonstrates that the student has acquired both the knowledge (scholar) and the ability to apply (practitioner) it; in other words, it demonstrates that the degree completion yields the scholar-practitioner. A portfolio assessor works with students on an individual basis to ensure that each artifact required in the portfolio is adequately completed. Once the ePortfolio and all other program requirements are met, the Master of Science degree can be awarded.
  
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    EDUC 6602 - Designing Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment (Self-Directed)


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals examine classroom curriculum, instruction, and assessment in the context of standards and accountability. The importance of alignment of these components and resulting impact on student learning are emphasized. Educators explore learning theory, learner variables, and the need for differentiation to meet diverse learning needs. Multiple purposes and methods of assessment as well as effective approaches to grading and reporting will be discussed. Using their state or district standards, educators engage in a process for designing standards-driven classroom curriculum, instruction, and assessment that will meet the diverse learning needs of their students.
  
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    EDUC 6603 - Action Research for Educators (Self-Directed)


    (3 sem. cr.) Educators are provided with a structured approach to the practice of action research in this course. They have the opportunity to learn how to address relevant problems, become involved in collaborative inquiry, and use data and research to inform their practice, improve student academic success, and contribute to positive change in their classroom and school environments. Educators engage in reflective practices as they collect and analyze student data and develop and implement data-informed decisions/actions to improve student learning and enhance their professional growth.
  
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    EDUC 6604 - Creating an Effective Classroom Learning Environment (Self-Directed)


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals have the opportunity to learn to create safe, supportive, and respectful learning environments that promote social-emotional development, self-responsibility, and character, in order to optimize learning for all students. They can learn how to foster a sense of community in the classroom and develop positive relationships with and among students. Skills and strategies for managing dynamic and flexible classroom structures and for teaching conflict resolution are presented. Educators are also provided with strategies for building positive relationships and engaging in effective communication and problem solving with parents and families.
  
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    EDUC 6605 - Teacher as Lifelong Learner and Professional Educator


    (3 sem. cr.) Lifelong learning and professionalism are key components of teaching. Education professionals in this course are oriented to the skills, understandings, strategies, and knowledge necessary to become successful learners while establishing the foundations for becoming professional educators, including knowledge of child development. Course instructors help education professionals become comfortable in the online learning environment, enabling them to clarify program expectations; create support networks and learning communities with colleagues and instructors; and establish a personal professional philosophy to promote social change. Upon completion of this course, education professionals demonstrate understanding of resources and expectations, initiate an electronic professional portfolio, and determine strategies for success as professional educators.
  
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    EDUC 6606 - Today’s Classroom and the Diverse Learner


    (3 sem. cr.) The dynamics of today’s classroom are unique and challenging for teachers and learners. Education professionals in this course explore and analyze issues, complexities, and responsibilities associated with the field of education in the 21st century, including providing equal educational opportunities for all learners, regardless of their differences. They come to understand that many factors influence learning, including individual experiences, talents, prior learning, language, culture, and family and community values. Additionally, education professionals gain an understanding of the Minnesota-based American Indian tribal government, history, language, and culture. They engage in discussions and reflections on issues of diversity through which they have the opportunity to articulate, defend, and/or challenge current issues. They also address learning theory, diverse learning styles, and practical instructional strategies, and they acquire theoretical and practical knowledge about today’s classroom as well as the family and community contexts that influence children’s learning and development.
  
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    EDUC 6607 - Effective Practices: Assessment, Teaching, and Learning


    (3 sem. cr.) To help ensure high levels of learning and achievement for all students, today’s educators must be knowledgeable about learners and learning and well-versed in effective teaching and assessment practices. In this course, education professionals examine the interrelationships between assessment, teaching, and learning as well as effective practices for applying and integrating these critical components in the P–12 classroom. They gain a historical perspective on the standards and accountability movement, and they examine standards in their state or local setting. They also explore learning theory in the context of today’s challenging educational goals and standards. Education professionals learn and apply research-based practices in effective assessment, curriculum design, and instruction. Through on-site and Virtual Field Experience (VFE®), they critically analyze and implement teaching and learning principles and practices that help ensure awareness of individual and collective needs of students.
  
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    EDUC 6608 - Classroom Management


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals are helped to create safe, supportive, and respectful learning environments that promote social-emotional development, self-responsibility, and character to optimize learning for all  students in this course. Education professionals learn how to foster a sense of community in the classroom and develop positive relationships with and among  students. They explore age-appropriate skills and strategies for managing dynamic and flexible grouping structures and teaching conflict resolution. They also examine strategies for building positive relationships, fostering motivation, and engaging in effective communication and problem-solving with parents and families. Education professionals apply course concepts through the development of a hands-on, age-appropriate learning activity to implement within a classroom field experience.
  
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    EDUC 6609 - Seminar: Professional Ethics, Communication, and Collaboration: Special Education


    (1 sem. cr.) This seminar is an opportunity for education professionals to fine-tune their skills, strategies, and knowledge. They complete the requirements for their ePortfolio and determine strategies for success as professional educators. The seminar allows for problem-solving among colleagues; group and individual reflective practice; and support and feedback for current events in demonstration teaching districts, schools, and classrooms. Education professionals engage in practical seminar topics, such as collaboration, ethics, professional development, and family and community engagement, to support their transition from the program of study into employment in the field as professional educators. Note:  Education professionals take this course concurrently with EDUC 6698 - Demonstration Teaching: Special Education.
  
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    EDUC 6610 - Teacher as Professional


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals explore what it means to be a professional in today’s diverse and changing educational landscape. They examine their values, beliefs, vision, and mission, and they explore their role in the larger context of the teaching profession. They also explore the importance of collaboration in a professional learning community and the need to advocate for Education students, other educators, and the field of education. Education professionals learn how a professional stance influences student learning. Through a written reflection, they synthesize their learning throughout the course and consider how to use this knowledge to enhance professional growth and development.
  
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    EDUC 6611 - Seminar: Professional Ethics, Communication, and Collaboration: Early Childhood Education


    (1 sem. cr.) This seminar is an opportunity for education professionals to fine-tune their skills, strategies, and knowledge. They complete the requirements for their ePortfolio and determine strategies for success as professional educators. The seminar allows for problem-solving among colleagues; group and individual reflective practice; and support and feedback for current events in demonstration teaching districts, schools, and classrooms. Education professionals engage in practical seminar topics, such as collaboration, ethics, professional development, and family and community engagement, to support their transition from the program of study into employment in the field as professional educators. Note: Education professionals take this course concurrently with EDUC 6687 - Demonstration Teaching: Early Childhood Education.
  
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    EDUC 6615 - Effective Teaching Using Learning Styles and Multiple Intelligences


    (3 sem. cr.) This course expects teachers to design effective instruction to enable all students to learn. Two learning models, learning styles, and multiple intelligences are explored and integrated into instruction, curriculum, and assessment.
  
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    EDUC 6616 - Meeting the Needs of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners


    (3 sem cr.)

    This course explores teachers’ views on the value of linguistic and cultural diversity and the powerful learning opportunities it affords today’s classrooms and schools. Teachers examine their attitudes, beliefs, and biases regarding linguistically and culturally diverse students, families, and communities and learn approaches for working together to ensure high levels of learning for all students. Strategies for ensuring equitable access to high-quality learning experiences are presented. Effective practices such as cultural responsiveness, anti-bias curriculum, differentiated instruction, and developing academic vocabulary are explored.

  
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    EDUC 6617 - Teacher Leadership for Learning and Teaching


    (3 sem. cr.) This course expands the focus of teacher leadership from self to students, increasing the sphere of influence of the teacher leader to the classroom context. Teachers concentrate on advancing their expertise as teaching professionals by increasing their knowledge and skills in three key areas: knowledge of learners and learning, knowledge of subject matter and curriculum goals, and knowledge of effective teaching models, strategies, and practices. Teacher leaders apply this expertise in the classroom.
  
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    EDUC 6618 - Teacher Leadership in Professional Learning Communities


    (3 sem. cr.) This course extends the sphere of influence of teacher leaders from working with peers to engaging with stakeholders throughout the greater school community. Teacher leaders learn the processes, benefits, and challenges of building and working in learning communities to identify issues and solve problems that impact student learning and achievement. Professional growth and development are addressed as an integral part of various types of school improvement processes.
  
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    EDUC 6619 - Including Students With Special Needs: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment


    (3 sem. cr.) This course emphasizes the need for all students, including students with special needs, to achieve high academic standards. It examines the learning challenges of students who by definition of federal law have disabilities, as well as those of students who have significant difficulty with learning but do not qualify for special education services. Teachers learn how to adapt/modify curriculum, instruction, and assessment to maximize learning for students with special needs.
  
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    EDUC 6620 - Collaborative Action Research♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This course provides a foundation for educators to become primary managers of classroom research. Acting as teacher-researchers and colleague-coaches, educators move from isolated instruction to instruction that is enhanced by collaboration with colleagues. Methodology for sequencing tasks—problem formulation, data collection from numerous sources, analysis, and action planning—is covered.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6621 - Educational Research: Foundations


    (3 sem. cr.) An underlying theory in the field of education is that research can improve classroom practice. Education professionals in this course are provided with an introduction to the fundamentals of research. They examine contemporary educational research and develop knowledge and skills in applications of theoretical frameworks; quantitative, qualitative, and action research methodologies; development of research questions; and compliance with ethical responsibilities of the researcher. Education professionals also complete an initial review of literature relevant to an identified research question.
  
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    EDUC 6622 - Educational Research: Practical Applications


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this applied research course expand their knowledge and skills through the use of tools and information gained in EDUC 6621 - Educational Research: Foundations, in the design of a timely and practical educational research project. They engage in a variety of activities, such as developing and refining research questions or needs assessments; determining appropriate research methodologies and instrumentation; collecting and analyzing data, if possible; evaluating validity; and presenting analysis and implications. In addition, education professionals link their research proposal to the social change mission of the university.
  
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    EDUC 6625 - Habits of Mind: Thinking Skills to Promote Self-Directed Learning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals in this course are helped to develop skills and strategies to prepare students for living and learning productively in today’s society. They complete a variety of assignments designed to provide practical application of course content, such as designing a lesson in which they integrate habits of mind with other instructional elements to achieve multiple outcomes. They also create a rubric that allows students to demonstrate learning in each area of the lesson. Additionally, they reflect on the theories, concepts, and strategies learned in the course and consider the influence of new knowledge on future personal and professional endeavors. Through this course, education professionals learn how to help students manage, motivate, and modify their own learning as a continuing lifelong process.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6626 - Foundations of Special Education


    (3 sem. cr.) What do special educators need to know and be able to do to support students with exceptionalities and address their unique learning needs? In this course, education professionals examine historical, legal, and philosophical foundations that inform teaching and learning for students with exceptionalities. Education professionals explore issues related to identification, eligibility criteria, and delivery of services for students across multiple disability areas. Through course assignments and discussions with colleagues, education professionals develop the knowledge and skills necessary to build collaborative relationships with families and other stakeholders to help provide appropriate services to students.
  
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    EDUC 6627 - Foundations of Literacy


    (3 sem. cr.) An important role of all educators is helping students develop the literacy skills they need to succeed in school and in life. In this course, education professionals build foundational knowledge in literacy principles, practices, and strategies so that they can effectively engage and enhance students’ reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Education professionals learn about early literacy development including phonological awareness, concepts of print, and phonics. They explore strategies to help developing readers, including ways to promote vocabulary, comprehension, fluency, writing, and content-area literacy. Education professionals identify research-based principles that support the literacy and learning of all students, including English language learners. Through field experience assignments, education professionals develop and implement literacy instruction and assessments with students in K–12 classrooms. Topics include organizing the literacy classroom, differentiating literacy instruction, and involving families to support the literacy development of all students.
  
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    EDUC 6628 - Individualizing Education Programs for Learners With Exceptionalities


    (3 sem. cr.) All learners possess unique characteristics, interests, and abilities. One of the most important responsibilities of special educators is to consider the individual strengths and needs of students with exceptionalities and to collaborate with families and other stakeholders to individualize their education appropriately. In this course, education professionals learn about the Individualized Education Program (IEP) process, including referral, eligibility, and the importance of using research-based interventions. They explore stakeholder responsibilities, consider assessments and other forms of data that inform program planning, and develop an IEP for a case study student. Education professionals consider the benefits of assistive technology and the role of transition planning in developing individualized education for learners with exceptionalities
  
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    EDUC 6631 - Foundations of Reading: Theory, Research, and Practice


    (3 sem. cr.) An effective reading teacher possesses comprehensive knowledge of the components of reading and applies this knowledge to instructional practice. Education professionals will explore the domains of development as they pertain to K–12 literacy instruction and research and explore the impact of research-based practices on literacy development. Language development and its relationship to the progression of reading development, including variations related to cultural, linguistic, and academic diversity, will be examined. Education professionals will investigate current issues in literacy education, including the reading achievement gap, brain research, standards and accountability, and new perspectives on 21st-century skills and digital literacy learning.
  
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    EDUC 6632 - Assessment and Instruction to Promote Literacy Development


    (3 sem. cr.) Literacy development is a complex process involving a profusion of skills and strategies in several critical areas: phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, comprehension, fluency, and writing. This course focuses on assessment and instruction to promote literacy development in these areas. Education professionals will learn how to use a variety of assessments to determine the literacy needs of emergent, beginning, developing, intermediate, and advanced readers, taking into consideration linguistic, cultural, and academic diversity. They will also examine a multitude of research-based instructional strategies to promote literacy development and apply them based on assessment results, student observations, and knowledge of students’ readiness, interests, learning preferences, and linguistic and cultural identities. The use of digital text, electronic resources, and critical literacies will be emphasized.
  
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    EDUC 6633 - Reading, Writing, and Critical Thinking in Content Disciplines


    (3 sem. cr.) Reading for information in expository text is essential for learning—in school, in the workplace, and in life. The focus of this course is on developing literacy across the disciplines through a wide range of instructional methods, materials, and practices, including flexible grouping, and the selection of texts and other materials, such as digital tools and online resources that match the cognitive, cultural, and linguistic needs of literacy learners. Education professionals learn strategies for promoting disciplinary literacy across developmental levels, proficiencies, and cultural and linguistic backgrounds. High-quality literature that meets the interests and needs of all readers and represents various cultures, genres, and text structures, and assists students in making connections and bringing relevance to content courses across disciplines will be examined. The integration of information and communication technologies and 21st century literacy skills will be highlighted.
  
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    EDUC 6634 - Assessment and Intervention for Students With Reading Difficulties


    (3 sem. cr.) The ability to effectively diagnose reading difficulties and determine appropriate interventions is at the heart of what it means to be a reading teacher. This course presents the purposes, strengths, and limitations of a wide variety of assessment instruments. Education professionals learn how to select and administer appropriate tools for diagnosis and progress monitoring, and interpret results related to individual students, class/groups, and school. Assessment data are used to plan differentiated instruction for students at different developmental stages, and from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Education professionals use assessment data to develop interventions that target specific student needs and select materials, instructional strategies, and other resources needed to implement appropriate interventions. Effective practices for communicating assessment results to students, parents/caregivers, colleagues, and administrators are addressed.
  
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    EDUC 6635 - Classroom Management to Promote Student Learning


    (3 sem. cr.) This course explores the relationships between behavior management, classroom instruction, and student learning. Teachers learn foundational principles and strategies for preventing behavior problems. They learn to establish classroom rules and procedures and to enlist parent support for their behavior-management efforts. A framework for fostering cooperation, social skills, and a sense of community in the classroom is presented, and guidelines for teaching conflict resolution and peer mediation are included.
  
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    EDUC 6636 - Characteristics of Learners With Exceptionalities


    (3 sem. cr.) Special educators must understand each category of exceptionality as well as the abilities and needs of individual learners. In this course, education professionals examine the characteristics and instructional implications of specific learning disabilities, emotional and behavioral disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, other health impairments, and giftedness. They explore accommodations and modifications for students with exceptionalities and consider how to foster effective and positive relationships with all stakeholders to support student success. In their field experience, education professionals apply course content by completing a child study project, in which they conduct an intensive case study of a single student with exceptionalities in a K–12 classroom.
  
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    EDUC 6637 - Literacy Assessment and Intervention to Support Student Learning


    (3 sem. cr.) Learners with exceptionalities often experience difficulties in literacy, which, in turn, negatively affect their learning and achievement. What can educators do to prepare these students for academic success? The focus of this course is on designing, implementing, monitoring, and adjusting instruction to support the literacy development of learners and promote their achievement across the curriculum. Education professionals use literacy assessments and interventions with students in K–12 classrooms to foster language development and to promote phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary development, fluency, and comprehension. They explore the impact of reading and writing disabilities on learning, and consider literacy practices and strategies for developing students’ academic language and supporting their diverse learning needs. In addition, they examine assessment data and other evidence to inform literacy instruction and incorporate assistive and other technology-based interventions.
  
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    EDUC 6638 - Behavior Management to Support Learners With Exceptionalities


    (3 sem. cr.) Helping students to develop the necessary skills for positive behavior is critical to creating an educational environment where all students can learn. In this course, education professionals develop data-informed practical behavior management strategies from three different perspectives—individual behavior management, classroom management, and school-wide behavior support. Education professionals apply behavior management strategies to create and implement an individualized behavior management plan in a K–12 classroom with a target student.
  
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    EDUC 6639 - Instructional Strategies for Learners With Exceptionalities


    (3 sem. cr.) How can special educators help students with exceptionalities reach their full potential? In this course, education professionals learn to use research-based instructional strategies designed to promote student success academically and socially. Education professionals learn ways to provide different interventions to support student learning and monitor students’ progress. They also explore strategies to promote the academic and social development of students with exceptionalities in a K–12 classroom. Education professionals complete a lesson-planning project by collaborating with school personnel in their field placement to design, adapt, and implement lessons that incorporate the strategies learned in this course.
  
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    EDUC 6640 - Designing Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals examine classroom curriculum, instruction, and assessment in the context of standards and accountability. The importance of alignment of these components and resulting impact on student learning are emphasized. Educators explore learning theory, learner variables, and the need for differentiation to meet diverse learning needs. Multiple purposes and methods of assessment as well as effective approaches to grading and reporting will be discussed. Using their state or district standards, educators engage in a process for designing standards-driven classroom curriculum, instruction, and assessment that will meet the diverse learning needs of their students. (Prerequisite(s): Endorsement candidates must complete special education endorsement courses and receive a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher prior to moving into M.S. in Education courses.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6647 - Dynamic Teacher Leadership♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals are introduced to the concept of teacher leadership and its value in the field of education today in this course. They engage in personal assessment and analysis so that they may cultivate the dispositions and attitudes of a teacher leader for the purpose of effecting positive change in their learning communities. They also learn the critical importance of expanding their knowledge of educational research and theory to guide leadership decisions that effectively address today’s educational challenges. Education professionals complete coursework that emphasizes self-examination and self-perceptions with regard to teacher leadership.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6648 - Demonstration Teaching


    (6 sem. cr.) Demonstration teaching is the culminating experience in the teacher preparation program and is an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills and to demonstrate required competencies. During demonstration teaching, education professionals gradually assume complete teaching responsibility of the classroom for 4 consecutive weeks over a 12-week placement, gaining real-world experience and the opportunity to translate theory into practice. Education professionals work closely with, and are evaluated by, their university supervisor, classroom cooperating teacher, and Walden instructor. During demonstration teaching, all education professionals are assessed on the Teacher Performance Assessment and the Demonstration Teaching Evaluation. This course runs concurrently with EDUC 6609 - Seminar for Professional Educators.
  
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    EDUC 6649 - Seminar for Professional Educators


    (3 sem. cr.) Taken concurrently with EDUC 6648 - Demonstration Teaching, this seminar allows education professionals to consolidate their knowledge and fine-tune their skills as they reflect on and share experiences from the districts, schools, and classrooms in which they are completing their demonstration teaching assignments. They complete the requirements for their ePortfolios and develop strategies for success as professional educators. The seminar promotes problem-solving among colleagues, group and individual reflection, and collaborative feedback to support professional practice. Seminar topics focus on promoting success as they transition from the program of study (POS) into employment in the field as professional educators.
  
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    EDUC 6650 - Enhancing Learning Through Linguistic and Cultural Diversity♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, education professionals explore the value of linguistic and cultural diversity and the powerful learning opportunities it affords today’s classrooms and schools. They examine their attitudes, beliefs, and biases regarding linguistically and culturally diverse students, families, and communities, and they learn approaches for working together to ensure high levels of learning for all students. Through real-world observations, they assess strategies for ensuring equitable access to high-quality learning experiences. Education professionals also explore effective practices, such as cultural responsiveness, anti-bias curriculum, differentiated instruction, and academic vocabulary development. (Prerequisite(s): Endorsement candidates must complete special education endorsement courses and receive a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher prior to moving into M.S. in Education courses.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6651 - Teacher Leadership in the Classroom: Increasing Learning and Achievement♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The focus of teacher leadership expands from self to  students, increasing the sphere of influence of the teacher leader to the classroom context in this course. Education professionals concentrate on advancing their expertise in the field of teaching by increasing their knowledge and skills in three key areas: knowledge of learners and learning; knowledge of subject matter and curriculum goals; and knowledge of effective teaching models, strategies, and practices. They learn to apply this expertise in the classroom in ways that directly affect the learning and achievement of their  students.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6652 - Listening to Children’s Ideas♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Participants explore children’s ideas of force and motion by planning and carrying out clinical interviews with children. Through the interviewing experience, participants increase their ability to set aside their own ideas and expectations and attend to children’s ideas. They elicit information from the children about what they think and then analyze interview findings to expand their understanding of how children perceive the world around them.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6653 - Introduction to Educational Research♦


    (3 sem. cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the basic fundamentals and principles of research. The research process is explored with the underlying assumption that educational research can improve classroom practice. Course participants are expected to develop knowledge and skills in the use of theoretical frameworks; quantitative, qualitative, and action research methodologies; critiquing and evaluating research; and compliance with ethical responsibilities of the researcher. (Prerequisite(s): For endorsement candidates, must complete special education endorsement courses and receive a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher prior to moving into M.S. in Education courses.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6654 - Classroom Facilitation♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Participants consider how to help students develop scientific ideas and skills through inquiry. They study video clips of teachers facilitating classroom science to learn strategies for extending students’ experience and scaffolding scientific ideas. In classrooms, they try various facilitation and questioning strategies. Each participant creates a collection of teaching strategies that promote inquiry accompanied by classroom examples.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6655 - Teacher Leadership: Mentoring, Coaching, and Collaboration With Colleagues♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals address teacher leadership in the context of advancing the expertise and leadership of peers, thereby expanding education professionals’ spheres of influence beyond the walls of the classroom. They explore mentoring and coaching models designed to promote the professional growth of their colleagues. They learn and apply skills for mentoring novice teachers and for engaging in coaching relationships with peers at all stages of the teacher development cycle. Through conceptual and application-based activities, education professionals address various forms of collaboration with colleagues, focusing on interpersonal and communication skills.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6656 - Curriculum Designed for Understanding♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The aim of this course is to provide a framework for thinking critically about how to craft inquiry-based experiences that result in deeper understanding of important science concepts. The framework of Teaching for Understanding, developed at Harvard University, is central to the course. Participants keep the following questions in mind as they think about curriculum: What topics are worth understanding? What must students understand about these topics? How can understanding be fostered? How can we tell what students understand?
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6657 - Creating an Effective Classroom Learning Environment♦


    (3 sem. cr.) Education professionals have the opportunity to learn to create safe, supportive, and respectful learning environments that promote social-emotional development, self-responsibility, and character, in order to optimize learning for all students. They can learn how to foster a sense of community in the classroom and develop positive relationships with and among students. Skills and strategies for managing dynamic and flexible classroom structures and for teaching conflict resolution are presented. Educators are also provided with strategies for building positive relationships and engaging in effective communication and problem solving with parents and families. (Prerequisite(s): Endorsement candidates must complete special education endorsement courses and receive a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher prior to moving into M.S. in Education courses.)
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6658 - Formative Assessment: Assessment for Learning♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The focus of this course is assessment to support learning. Through classroom case studies, introductory readings, and discussions, participants distinguish the different purposes of assessment (principally formative and summative). They identify formative assessment as part of teaching, aimed at advancing learning, not at labeling or grading it. Participants experience and reflect on ways of assessing inquiry skills and conceptual understanding, the importance of self- and peer-assessment, and the provision of feedback to learners on their progress. The course culminates in participants planning formative assessment into inquiry-based classroom experiences for students.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6659 - Teacher Leadership in Professional Learning Communities♦


    (3 sem. cr.) The sphere of influence for education professionals is extended from working with peers to engaging with stakeholders throughout the greater school community in this course. Education professionals learn the processes, benefits, and challenges of building and working in learning communities to identify issues and solve problems that affect student learning and achievement. They consider professional growth and development as an integral part of various types of school improvement processes. Additionally, they engage in a variety of practical assignments, such as an analysis of their own school’s development of mission, vision, values, goals, and communication elements as a professional learning community.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6660 - Investigating Equitable Classrooms♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, participants broaden their understanding of the scope and dimensions of equity in science education through reflection, reading, classroom research, debate, and discussion. Participants learn to do independent classroom research and design and conduct a research project that includes collecting classroom data to answer a question about equity. They plan classroom actions based on their research findings to ensure that all students are successful in reaching higher levels of achievement.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
  
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    EDUC 6661 - Exploring New Technologies: The Impact on Society, Work, and Education


    (3 sem. cr.) This course provides the theoretical setup for why technology and learning is both a timely and an important topic. It covers a brief history of educational technology, the communication revolution, the impact of this revolution on society, what this means for schools, the impending paradigm shift for the teacher, the need to develop students as critical consumers of information and constructors of knowledge, and the development of a new, fuller sense of literacy.
  
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    EDUC 6662 - Multimedia Tools: How to Research, Plan, and Communicate With Technology♦


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, teachers begin to develop their understanding of and proficiency with technology on a personal and professional level. The course focuses on learning how to effectively use several key tools, which teachers will later be able to build upon and use in their classrooms. Teachers learn to use software tools such as word processors, spreadsheets, presentation programs, and image editors. They also explore online tools, such as e-mail, listservs, electronic publications, and websites.
    ♦ Students may take this as a non-degree course, which means they do not have to be enrolled in a program. Contact an Enrollment Advisor [1-866-492-5336 (U.S.);1-443-627-7222 (toll)] for more information.
 

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