2013-2014 Walden University Catalog (June 2014) 
    
    Dec 10, 2022  
2013-2014 Walden University Catalog (June 2014) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    HUMN 6361 - Human Sexuality


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with a framework for understanding human sexuality in the context of couple, marriage, and family counseling. This course explores empirically supported counseling approaches related to sexual functioning, intimacy, gender, and sexual orientation. Students are exposed to a systemic framework for understanding the role and impact of sexuality on couples, marriages, and families. Students will explore specific topics related to issues of sexual diversity, gender identity, sexual offending, trauma, and victimization. Legal and ethical issues related to addressing sexuality in counseling are tackled.
  
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    HUMN 6390 - Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Public policy implementation can take place in either a public organization, a private one, a nonprofit one, or a combined or networked one. Students in this course are engaged in a collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration as they apply a strategic planning and management approach to the implementation of public policy. They are introduced to planning, management, financial management, performance management, and contracting processes in the organization whose purpose it is to implement public policy.
  
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    HUMN 6392 - The Language of Leadership


    (5 cr.) In today’s complex environment, leaders engaged in shaping public policy must know how to use the emotional as well as the intellectual power of language to motivate, inspire, and competently manage their organizations. Dynamic leadership requires understanding and use of techniques that affect both conscious and unconscious influences on human behavior. Effective communication connects at many different levels. Students are provided with both theoretical and practical information demonstrating the necessary components for making such connections and shows them why stories, symbols, and metaphors are an essential element in the language of leadership.

     

  
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    HUMN 6400 - Public Health Leadership and Systems Thinking


    (5 cr.) This focus of this course is on leadership models and theories, the core principles of public health leadership, and the application of systems thinking to public health. Students examine how to create strategies and solutions that efficiently utilize public health and healthcare resources. Students discuss descriptive and prescriptive systems, focusing on the application of these processes to current public health issues and challenges at the organizational and community levels.
     
  
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    HUMN 6401 - Trauma, Crisis, and Stress With Military Personnel


    (5 cr.) The specific focus of this course is on combat trauma, crisis, and stress experiences and responses of military personnel—both wartime and post-war. Students develop an understanding of the short-term and long-term impact of post-traumatic stress and vicarious trauma. In addition to focusing on how combat and wartime experiences impact individual military personnel, students also explore the effects on families. As a result, students will be better prepared to provide services and mental health support to military personnel dealing with trauma, crisis, and stress.
  
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    HUMN 6402 - Working with Military Spouses, Families, and Children


    (5 cr.) The nature of military work responsibilities impacts not only military personnel but their families as well. Frequent family relocations, extensive deployments, parent-child separation, and high-risk jobs all contribute to unique family dynamics. This course is designed to educate students about the experience and unique support needs of military personnel and their families.
  
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    HUMN 6403 - Military Culture


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of military culture. The focus of this course is on understanding the world of work for military personnel; the sociocultural identity development of military personnel; the experience of military families; support for military personnel and their families; and socioeconomic and other lifestyle challenges for military personnel. As a result of this course, students will be more informed about the mental health and social support needs of these populations.
  
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    HUMN 6405 - Ethics and Social Justice


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. Students in this course explore ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends, and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that affect the delivery of human services in a global community.
  
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    HUMN 6451 - Public Policy Analysis


    (5 cr.) Public administrators today work in a hypercharged, partisan environment with unprecedented access to public policy data. This challenging environment affords public administrators both extraordinary opportunities and severe constraints. In this course, students examine, in detail, the key stakeholders and actors in the public policy process with particular attention devoted to understanding the functions, impacts, and constraints of these stakeholders upon policy development and the policy-making process. In addition, students explore professional ethics related to the role of the policy analyst and considers the significant social outcomes of public policy. Students are provided with an introduction to the theories and strategies used by policy-makers and policy analysts to develop, implement, execute, evaluate, and promulgate public policy. Students explore the impact and consequences of public policy and consider and evaluate policy in a social justice framework. Students craft a policy memorandum to a decision maker of their choosing regarding a current public policy problem that examines and evaluates competing policy alternatives.
  
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    HUMN 6465 - Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination


    (5 cr.) In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public and nonprofit organizations need to be strategic in their planning in order to fulfill the organizational mission and enhance stakeholder satisfaction. Students in this course explore the role and process of strategic planning with an appreciation for collaboration, cooperation, and coordination as they relate to the strategic planning process. Students will apply these concepts to real-life situations and organizations and develop a strategic plan.
  
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    HUMN 6511 - Treatment of Forensic Populations


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are provided with the basic knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations. Various forensic populations, such as sex offenders, substance abusers, victims of crime, and employee assistance to law enforcement personnel, will be covered. The use of traditional forms of intervention, such as individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice, will be addressed.

     

  
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    HUMN 6530 - Forensic Applications in Community Settings


    (5 cr.) This course is directed at the application of forensic psychology to various community settings. An emphasis is placed on working with offenders upon re-entry to the community and offenders who receive nonincarceration community placements. However, this course will also explore less-common applications such as restorative justice and community crime prevention.

     

  
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    HUMN 6660 - Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy for Human Services Professionals


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of the responsibility of human service professionals to foster social change; provide leadership and service to the human services professions; and advocate for their community, clients, colleagues, and professions. Students use research to examine the current trends and issues of the profession and identify how community, national, and international issues affect human services professions. Students also gain an understanding of the processes of advocacy and social change. Students continue to enhance their professional development plans by identifying specific goals for professional involvement and service.

     

  
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    HUMN 6701 - Culture and Psychology


    (5 cr.) Students in this course explore the cultural components, research, and theory of cross-cultural psychology. In addition to the previously listed goals, the focus of this course is on the impact that culture has on the field of psychology around the world. The scope of this course is broad, with the core theme being cross-cultural psychology (focusing on cultures representing different parts of the world) and comparing cultural influence on human psychology. Many of the topics addressed in the course are related to human development. Additionally, interactions between culture and social behaviors, health, mental health, and mental illnesses are emphasized throughout this course.
  
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    HUMN 6741 - Psychology of Terrorism


    (5 cr.) Students in this course examine the history, philosophy, and techniques of terrorism as well as countermeasures to terroristic threats to public safety. Topics include aspects of international and domestic terrorism with an emphasis on terrorism’s roots, viewed from the broadest possible political, sociological, and cultural perspectives; factors and catalysts attributed to the terrorism phenomenon—including poverty, psychology (e.g., motivational factors, antisocial behaviors), social injustice, oppression, and religion; and the impact of media and technology in aiding and countering terroristic activities.

     

  
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    HUMN 6810 - Fundamentals of Law and Public Policy


    (5 cr.) Legal decisions and the law have an impact on the creation of public policy. Students in this course explore the relationship between law and public policy and the significance of court decisions on law and public policy. They examine the role of administrative agencies in the creation and execution of law and public policy and the role of the courts in resolving challenges to agency rulemaking; conflicts between executive and legislative branches of government; and conflicts between and among federal, state, and local laws. Students apply fundamental legal concepts and processes to the creation and execution of law and public policy.
  
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    HUMN 6811 - Community Psychology


    (5 cr.) In this course, students are introduced to the basic concepts and practice of community psychology. Guiding values and assumptions of the field, basic ecological concepts, and models of intervention are examined. Topics include diversity in community psychology, social change, primary and secondary prevention, community mental health, empowerment, stress, and resiliency.

     

  
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    HUMN 8000 - Foundations of Graduate Study in Human Services


    (1 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence.
  
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    HUMN 8008 - Foundations for Doctoral Study


    (6 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence. Major assignments include the preparation of the Professional Development Plan, program of study, and a sample KAM Learning Agreement. Note: Students are required to take this course immediately upon enrollment, and must successfully complete it before proceeding with KAMs or coursework
  
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    HUMN 8010 - Promoting Population Health


    (5 cr.) Population health is an evolving field with the end goal to prevent and control threatening public health issues. In this course, students explore the social foundations for public health and work toward developing the leadership and research skills needed to effectively organize and conduct population-based disease prevention and health promotion programs. Students engage in formative assignments and discussions on social history of public health; determinants and risk factors for population health; policy analysis and advocacy; coalition building, alliances, and consortiums; constituency and community mobilization; media communications; social marketing; community education strategies; and diverse populations as well as those with disproportionate disease burdens. Though a final project, students gain a firm understanding of how to evaluate outcomes of population-based policies and health programs.
  
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    HUMN 8050 - Global Health and Issues in Disease Prevention


    (5 cr.)  

    This course provides an in-depth review of how population-based strategies are used in the prevention of disease and disability. Students explore the topics of population health and disease prevention from the perspective of understanding the determinants of health. Using a cross-disciplinary approach, students examine how economics, social factors, health policy, urbanization, globalization, the environment, and other factors influence disease. Students consider how research in disease prevention, health determinants, and population health applies to public and community health efforts.

  
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    HUMN 8110 - Advanced Social Work Theory and Practice


    (5 cr.) Population health is an evolving field with the end goal to prevent and control threatening public health issues. In this course, students explore the social foundations for public health and work toward developing the leadership and research skills needed to effectively organize and conduct population-based disease prevention and health promotion programs. Students engage in formative assignments and discussions on social history of public health; determinants and risk factors for population health; policy analysis and advocacy; coalition building, alliances, and consortiums; constituency and community mobilization; media communications; social marketing; community education strategies; and diverse populations as well as those with disproportionate disease burdens. Though a final project, students gain a firm understanding of how to evaluate outcomes of population-based policies and health programs.
  
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    HUMN 8111 - Leadership and Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Successful organizations in a rapidly changing and complex world require leaders who embrace change and are able to engage others in change. In this course, students use traditional literature, current articles, and interactive media to explore the qualities, characteristics, and skills of effective leaders as well as the theories, models, and relationships between leadership and organizational change. They assess the ethical issues and standards as well as the opportunities and challenges related to leading diverse organizations through change. Students also examine how current leaders employ leadership and organizational change to contribute to social change, and they consider how to use these lessons to make further positive changes within an organization or their own community.
  
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    HUMN 8115 - Social, Behavioral, and Cultural Factors in Public Health


    (4 cr.) In this course, students identify and analyze the major social, behavioral, and cultural variables and issues that affect the health of populations, including community, gender, age, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, environment, and behavioral risks. Students also explore research, theoretical, and conceptual frameworks from the social and behavioral sciences. They apply these frameworks and other theories presented in the course to intervention strategies or program initiatives that address current public health problems and reduce health disparities. Through a final paper and critique, students demonstrate their understanding of content presented in the course, share ideas and perspectives, and provide feedback to peers.
  
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    HUMN 8120 - Current Research in Social Change: Criminal Justice


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8127 - Biostatistics


    (4 cr.) Students in this course address the application and interpretation of biostatistics in public health research and practice, including descriptive methodologies, statistical inference and probability, analysis of variance, and simple linear regression. Students are introduced to a statistical computer package such as SPSS.
  
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    HUMN 8129 - Communications, Marketing, and Public Relations for Public Health Leaders


    (5 cr.)  

    This course provides an overview of marketing and public relations principles as they relate to public health, highlighting theoretical concepts that are commonly used in health communications research. Topics include using social marketing techniques, promoting health literacy, developing community partnerships, and creating culturally sensitive and appropriate promotional materials. Students focus on using social media to identify and advance public health interests and ethical principles. Through case studies, students examine how they can use marketing practices to translate health research into social action and behavioral change.

  
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    HUMN 8130 - Professional Practice and Social Change: Criminal Justice


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8145 - Crisis Management


    (5 cr.) In this course, counselor educators learn the fundamentals of crisis management and crisis leadership. In addition, students develop an understanding of the theories and models related to crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events. Students also learn about ethical, legal, and diversity considerations in crisis and trauma response. By the end of the course, students understand models for training and supporting other counselors in the areas of crisis response applicable to community, national, and international crises. Furthermore, students develop a crisis management plan for their own community.
  
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    HUMN 8146 - Epidemiology


    (4 cr.) Public health officials frequently use epidemiologic research to develop educational strategies and intervention programs to improve the overall health of communities. Using an epidemiological approach, students in this course examine the incidence, prevalence, and patterns of disease and injury in populations and learn how to apply these concepts to the control of public health problems. Students identify key sources of data for epidemiological purposes and address principles and limitations of public health screening programs. They also learn to calculate basic epidemiological measures and draw appropriate inferences from epidemiological data and reports. Through this course, students gain a deeper understanding of the various research designs and methodologies professionals use in public health research. (Prerequisite(s): HUMN 8127.)
  
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    HUMN 8150 - History and Development of Human Services


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with a doctoral foundation in the history and development of the various human services professions. Students engage in coursework that integrates content from various specializations, in areas such as counseling, social work, psychology, family studies, and criminal justice. Examining both the strengths and weaknesses of the human services delivery systems, students review the origins of the profession as well as its various responses to the changing needs of society. Through critical literature reviews related to research, policy, and practice; discussions about human services and contemporary society; and practical assignments, students begin to develop their identities as leaders, researchers, and informants in the area of human services. Students focus on the competencies and ethics of human services professionals.
  
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    HUMN 8151 - Human Services Theory, Research, and Practice


    (5 cr.) Understanding the connection among theory, research, and practice is a vital skill for human services scholar-practitioners. In this course, students critically review traditional and contemporary theories in human services and how they inform practice. In addition, students examine the strengths and weaknesses of the existing body of research in serving a dynamic society, placing special emphasis on cultural bias and traditional theory. Throughout the course, students review how theories and research studies apply to communities, individuals, problems, and policies. Students culminate their study with the development of a conceptual framework in which they address a critical issue in human services practice.
  
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    HUMN 8152 - Human Services Administration


    (5 cr.) Diminishing resources compound societal challenges facing contemporary human services agencies. In this course, students examine the core competencies required of human service administrators to address these challenges and make a greater difference in the communities they serve. Students discuss a broad range of skills and innovative approaches, including cross-agency collaboration, stakeholder communication, supervision of people and processes, creation and implementation of policies, and strategic planning and management. Through course discussions and practical applications, students demonstrate knowledge and skills of human services administration, which they can translate into current work environments.
  
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    HUMN 8165 - Environmental Health


    (4 cr.) Students in this course are offered a comprehensive overview of environmental factors that affect the health and safety of a community. Students examine causal links between chemical, physical, and biological hazards in the environment and their impact on health. They also explore the genetic, physiologic, and psychosocial factors that influence environmentally compromised health outcomes. Students investigate environmental risk assessment methods; strategies for effective management and control of environmental exposures; and legal, regulatory, and ethical considerations at the federal, state, and local levels. Using theories and methods presented in the course, students assess current solutions and consider new ways to address environmental threats, such as waste, water, air, vectors, and global warming as well as issues related to bioterrorism and disaster preparedness and management.
  
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    HUMN 8200 - Organizing Community Action for Health Promotion and Education


    (5 cr.) There are many task forces, coalitions, and consortiums in place to promote health and prevent disease. But groups such as these require individuals who know how to effectively organize and lead community-based efforts. Students in this course explore the skills and methods leaders use to organize communities, interagency collaborative efforts, and work sites for collective action regarding health promotion and education. Students analyze risk factors at the community, work-site, local, state, national, and international levels. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, students assess the needs and capacities of communities for health-related initiatives. They also synthesize course content to evaluate an existing collaborative community organization strategy and propose new methods and processes for team building in community health programs. (Prerequisite(s): Foundation and core courses.)
  
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    HUMN 8201 - Intellectual Traditions of Public Policy and Public Administration


    (4 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to gain a scholarly perspective on public policy and administration that traces major theories associated with the field and the political, social, and economic context within which these theories developed. Students explore and assess the historical and contemporary roles and relationships of the public and nonprofit sectors in the United States. They examine the “layers of government” and their interdependence between local municipalities, county, state, and federal levels. Students employ doctoral-level skills, including research, analysis, and scholarly writing, to analyze and explicate ongoing controversies and debates in the field; through these assignments, students develop new perspectives and recommendations in the field as well as contribute to their own professional development.
  
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    HUMN 8202 - Introduction to Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling


    (5 cr.) Counselors seeking to work with couples and families must understand the changing landscape of family dynamics and the diverse perspectives through which they must practice. Students in this course are introduced to the specialty area of marriage, couple, and family counseling and provides an orientation to professional organizations, preparation standards, credentials relevant to the specialty area, and legal and ethical issues. Students explore the history, philosophy, and trends in marriage, couple, and family counseling and examine a variety of theoretical perspectives, techniques, and related concepts, such as systems, family development, wellness, and family life cycle. Through topical literature, case studies, and shared experiences, students assess societal trends and treatment issues related to working with multicultural and diverse family systems. They also consider future trends and potential challenges in the field.
  
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    HUMN 8213 - Strategic Talent Management and Development


    (5 cr.) Successful organizations and businesses know that an effective way to achieve goals is to align business strategies with workforce talent. Students in this course learn how to leverage people in organizations to achieve business success and how to leverage business strategy to foster individual growth. They explore and discuss a variety of topics, including talent acquisition and retention, workforce and succession planning, organizational communication, leadership, and performance management. Students apply concepts as they prepare a strategic talent management and development audit as well as an overall talent management and development strategy.
  
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    HUMN 8215 - Lifespan Development


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an advanced overview of human development through the lifespan, including prenatal, childhood, adolescent, adult, and late-adult phases. Students examine and apply basic processes and theories to developmental milestones that occur within these phases of development. They explore factors of heredity and environmental elements on human development, and they consider ethical issues, research considerations, and global perspectives as they assess strategies to promote optimal development. Students also engage in coursework and discussions that highlight themes of diversity and social change.
  
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    HUMN 8220 - Current Research in Human Development: Criminal Justice


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8230 - Professional Practice and Human Development: Criminal Justice


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8240 - Human Motivation


    (5 cr.) This course provides an overview of physiological, psychological, and social aspects in the study of motivation and includes an exploration of historical and contemporary theories and perspectives. The course emphasizes both conceptual understanding of theories associated with motivation and their applications to personal, professional, and social issues. Major topics include physiological, learned, cognitive, and emotional aspects of motivation. Themes of diversity are threaded throughout the course.
  
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    HUMN 8306 - Ethics and Legal Issues in Counseling


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an introduction to the field of professional counseling and the foundations of counseling. Students explore the history, philosophy, cultural dynamics, and trends in professional counseling. They examine consultation as well as client and counselor advocacy, focusing on the counselor’s role as social change agent. Students also examine and apply ethical standards of the counseling profession, including the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics and counselor ethical decision-making processes. Through a final reflective project designed to influence their future ethical framework, students define their ethical perspectives, including influences, values, and goals.
  
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    HUMN 8319 - Terrorism: A Systemic Approach for Emergency Preparedness


    (5 cr.) Terrorism continues to be a constant threat to the American public, facilitating the need for accurate information, organized resources, and established approaches to respond to emergencies and keep the public informed. Students in this course examine terrorism and related public policy on a local, national, and international level. They also assess the need and function of systemic approaches for emergency preparedness. Students explore and discuss topical issues, such as terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyberterrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Using analytic skills and tools, students assess recommendations that policy makers use in decisions to prevent or respond to terrorism. They also gain hands-on experience initiating the development and/or analysis of a terrorism-preparedness infrastructure.
  
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    HUMN 8320 - Current Research in Organizational and Social Systems: Criminal Justice


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8327 - Research and Program Evaluation


    (5 cr.) This course introduces students to evaluation research and provides students with a foundation in the design of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches to counseling research and evaluation. Students learn the strengths and limitations of each method and under what circumstances each approach would be the most appropriate research design. Students learn how to identify a topic for research, how to conduct a literature search, and the importance of scholarly writing. Other topics include the history and theory underlying program evaluation, approaches to evaluation, procedures and techniques for entering a group for which one would provide evaluation services, and techniques used to perform the evaluation, strategies for getting gatekeepers to be invested in the development of the research and in the outcomes, demonstration of program effectiveness, and dissemination of results to stakeholders. Students learn to write a research proposal, addressing the following key elements: researching, writing an introduction, stating a purpose for the study, identifying research questions and hypotheses, using theory, defining the significance of the study, and collecting and analyzing data. Students are exposed to legal and ethical issues associated with human subjects’ protection.
  
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    HUMN 8330 - Professional Practice and Organizational and Social Systems: Criminal Justice


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8337 - Techniques in Counseling


    (5 cr.) Students in this course focus on developing counseling techniques and skills. They practice and receive feedback on their demonstration of techniques and skills such as opening and closing a counseling session, attending, paraphrasing, confrontation, self-disclosure and many others including the use of creative techniques. Students also evaluate the appropriate use of counseling techniques and skills. Note: In addition to the course materials listed by the university bookstore, students are required to have access to a video recording device, which they begin using during the second week of class and four more times throughout the term. Note: This course also requires that students have access to a video recording device, a tripod, and an audio recording device, which they will begin using the first week of class.
  
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    HUMN 8338 - Crisis, Trauma, and Disaster Response


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the personal and systemic impact of crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events on individuals, couples, families, and communities. Students examine theories and response models as they relate to sexual trauma, crisis in individuals and families, crisis in the community, and crisis in the nation and in the world. They explore and discuss topics related to counselor competencies, vicarious trauma and counter transference, specific diagnoses, and advocacy. Students also engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of crisis assessment. Through contemporary articles and case studies, they consider and discuss cultural, legal, and ethical issues related to crisis, trauma, and disaster events and response.
  
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    HUMN 8346 - Child and Adolescent Counseling


    (5 cr.) This course provides students with an overview of empirically supported theories and techniques for working with children and adolescents in the counseling process. The course is designed to enhance students’ theoretical and practical understanding of the systemic interplay among children, adolescents, families, and the stakeholders in their lives. Emphasis is given to a family systems view of intervention, with specific attention to developmental, cognitive, behavioral, educational, multicultural, and environmental issues. Students will be exposed to a distinct group of empirically supported interventions aimed at improving individual and family functioning. Legal and ethical issues related to counseling children and adolescents will be explored.
  
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    HUMN 8350 - Historical and Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice


    (5 cr.) Decision and policymakers must possess a fundamental understanding of crime theory, including the history of crime development, to be able to address knowledgeably and effectively modern issues of crime. In this course, students explore the evolution of crime and punishment, including lone criminals to worldwide syndicates, using the scientific rigor built into selected readings, peer discussions, and practical assignments. They examine the philosophy of community and problem-oriented policing, transnational crime, terrorism, and the new nexus between them. Employing quantitative and qualitative research methods, students continue their assessment of contemporary issues of crime.  They also learn to use existing information to consider new methods of addressing crime. This course provides students who are current leaders, or those hoping to enter a leadership role, with a framework upon which to build the knowledge and depth of understanding to assess and manage the opportunities, innovations, and challenges in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8351 - Policy Analysis in the Criminal Justice System


    (5 cr.) Criminal justice professionals must understand the various factors that influence the development of criminal justice policy, and how to evaluate whether existing policy meets its objectives. In this course, students will examine the principles of policy analysis and the role that scientific information plays in the development of criminal justice policy. Topics explored include policing, corrections, and sentencing; juvenile justice; the relationship among drugs, race, and crime; deterrence as a crime control policy; and the use of public registries. Through further analysis of criminal justice policies, students determine how these policies have changed over time, gaining insight into possible future trends of policy development and analysis.
  
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    HUMN 8352 - Leadership: Putting Theory Into Practice in Criminal Justice Administration


    (5 cr.) There are many challenges plaguing the criminal justice system, from economic hardship to growing threats of terrorism. Leaders in the system must be adept in problem-solving, and they must possess the ability to think critically and proactively. Through this course, students are introduced to the problems that currently confront the criminal justice system administration as well as problems predicted for the future. Students prepare to lead efforts to address these challenges by engaging in practical assignments focusing on powerful models for strategic, critical, and reflective thinking. Students also engage in discussions about the major components of effective justice administration, including organizational thought and theory, leadership, human capital, policy development and implementation, and collaboration with other public safety and community organizations.
  
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    HUMN 8353 - Forensic Applications in Community Settings


    (5 cr.) Professionals must devote considerable attention to forensic psychology perspectives and approaches to address issues such as the overpopulation of prisons; decrease in healthcare availability; and cases in which courts remand treatment in community settings. Students in this course examine forensic psychology theories and perspectives, and then they apply these concepts to various community settings. They engage in practical assignments and topical readings that focus on working with offenders upon re-entry to the community and offenders who receive nonincarceration community placements. In addition, students explore less-common applications, such as restorative justice and community crime prevention. They also analyze the impact of personal perspectives and setting on the application of forensic psychology.
  
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    HUMN 8356 - Theories and Techniques in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling


    (5 cr.) This course provides students with an advanced understanding of theories and techniques for working with couples, marriages, and families. The focus of this course is on empirically supported treatments and techniques for addressing prevention, intervention, development, and wellness of marriages, couples, and families. Systemic implications for conceptualization, assessment, treatment planning, and interventions will be addressed. Students will be exposed to procedures for critically evaluating relevant research and to methods for applying findings to their counseling with these groups. Methods of adapting models to meet the needs of a diverse society as well as legal and ethical issues related to working in this specialty area will be explored.
  
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    HUMN 8361 - Human Sexuality


    (5 cr.) This course provides students with framework for understanding human sexuality in the context of couple, marriage, and family counseling. This course explores empirically supported counseling approaches related to sexual functioning, intimacy, gender, and sexual orientation. Students are exposed to a systemic framework for understanding the role and impact of sexuality on couples, marriages, and families. Students will explore specific topics related to issues of sexual diversity, gender identity, sexual offending, trauma, and victimization. Legal and ethical issues related to addressing sexuality in counseling are addressed.
  
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    HUMN 8390 - Strategic Context of Public Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Students in this course engage in a collaborative study of the changing strategic context of public administration. Students apply a systems perspective to construct a public enterprise “mental” model of a public organization to understand the strategic context for practical action and the stakeholder relations involved. Students demonstrate their knowledge of the interrelated flows of money, knowledge, and influence, as they weave these elements in their model. They engage in readings and practical assignments that emphasize management and leadership in a time of unprecedented and unpredictable change. Students also work toward developing professional-action habits for pragmatic-action learning in the practice of public administration.
  
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    HUMN 8392 - The Language of Leadership


    (5 cr.) In today’s complex environment, leaders engaged in shaping public policy must know how to use the emotional as well as the intellectual power of language to motivate, inspire, and competently manage their organizations. Dynamic leadership requires understanding and use of techniques that affect both conscious and unconscious influences on human behavior. Effective communication connects at many different levels. This course provides students both theoretical and practical information demonstrating the necessary components for making such connections and shows them why stories, symbols, and metaphors are an essential element in the language of leadership.

     

  
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    HUMN 8400 - Public Health Leadership and Systems Thinking


    (5 cr.)  

    This course focuses on leadership models and theories, the core principles of public health leadership, and the application of systems thinking to public health. Students examine how to create strategies and solutions that efficiently utilize public health and healthcare resources. Students discuss descriptive and prescriptive systems, focusing on the application of these processes to current public health issues and challenges at the organizational and community levels.

  
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    HUMN 8401 - Trauma, Crisis, and Stress With Military Personnel


    (5 cr.) The specific focus of this course is on combat trauma, crisis, and stress experiences and responses of military personnel—both wartime and post-war. Students develop an understanding of the short-term and long-term impact of post-traumatic stress and vicarious trauma. In addition to focusing on how combat and wartime experiences impact individual military personnel, students also explore the effects on families. As a result, students will be better prepared to provide services and mental health support to military personnel dealing with trauma, crisis, and stress.
  
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    HUMN 8402 - Working with Military Spouses, Families, and Children


    (5 cr.) The nature of military work responsibilities impacts not only military personnel but their families as well. Frequent family relocations, extensive deployments, parent-child separation, and high-risk jobs all contribute to unique family dynamics. This course is designed to educate students about the experience and unique support needs of military personnel and their families.
     
  
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    HUMN 8403 - Military Culture


    (5 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of military culture. The focus of this course is on understanding the world of work for military personnel; the sociocultural identity development of military personnel; the experience of military families; support for military personnel and their families; and socioeconomic and other lifestyle challenges for military personnel. As a result of this course, students will be more informed about the mental health and social support needs of these populations.
  
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    HUMN 8404 - Advanced Customized Experience A


    (5 cr.) The Advanced Customized Study Course (ACSC) is an optional strategy for selected students who have already completed their general course work and one of their specialization courses to complete the equivalent of the final two out of the three required courses for a program specialization. This option makes it possible for students to do advanced research in the current literature and to focus on specific areas of interest to them that are not necessarily covered in as much detail in standard specialization course work. Students in this option will complete two quarters and produce a customized study of approximately 60 to 70 pages that highlights the theoretical background and current status of an issue of interest to them, as well as how their knowledge applies in the field. The student’s research and work developed in this study can be used as background material for the student’s dissertation study.
  
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    HUMN 8405 - Ethics and Social Justice


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. In this course, students examine the philosophy of ethics as well as responsibility and social justice—basic tenets of public service. Students explore the complex social, political, and related ethical challenges leaders face as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. They examine ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students also assess demographic data and current social trends and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community. Applying concepts presented in the course, students engage in an in-depth assessment of an emerging or persistent ethical or social justice issue, through which they demonstrate their ability to make recommendations for improvement or change.
  
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    HUMN 8406 - Advanced Customized Experience B


    (5 cr.) The Advanced Customized Study Course (ACSC) is an optional strategy for selected students who have already completed their general course work and one of their specialization courses to complete the equivalent of the final two out of the three required courses for a program specialization.  This option makes it possible for students to do advanced research in the current literature and to focus on specific areas of interest to them that are not necessarily covered in as much detail in standard specialization course work. Students in this option will complete two quarters and produce a customized study of approximately 60 to 70 pages that highlights the theoretical background and current status of an issue of interest to them, as well as how their knowledge applies in the field. The student’s research and work developed in this study can be used as background material for the student’s dissertation study.
  
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    HUMN 8420 - Organizational Management and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Public and nonprofit leaders in all areas of public administration require a thorough understanding of the expectations of their roles as leaders and managers of diverse and complex organizations. Students use theoretical and applied perspectives from which they study the intricacies of these roles, including the distinction between leadership and management, organizational culture, change management, systems theories, and organizational development. Students gain a practical understanding of these topics through the application of principles and concepts to public, private, and nonprofit organizational settings.
  
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    HUMN 8431 - Finance and Budgeting for the Public Sector


    (5 cr.) Sound financial practices are crucial to managing scarce funds in both public and nonprofit operations. Students in this course examine finance and budgeting concepts, policies, and practices related to organizations as well as the fiscal climate within which they operate. They assess theories for motivating major fiscal-policy debates, and they explore and discuss auditing practices, tax systems, financial management, budgetary reform, financial technology systems, the use of dashboards for financial reporting, and the impact of globalization on finance and budget. Students read and analyze budgets, financial statements, and reports. They contextualize their learning as they apply knowledge gained from their analysis to develop a new budget and financial plan for either a public or private organization.
  
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    HUMN 8451 - Public Policy Analysis


    (5 cr.) Contemporary public administrators work in a dynamic, partisan environment with unprecedented access to public policy data—conditions leading to extraordinary opportunities and, often times, severe constraints. Students in this course thoroughly examine key stakeholders involved in the public policy process and devote special attention to their function, impact, and constraint on policy development. In addition, students explore professional ethics related to the role of the policy analyst and consider the significant social outcomes of public policy. They examine the theories and strategies used by policy makers and policy analysts to develop, implement, execute, evaluate, and promulgate public policy. They also assess the impact and consequences of public policy and evaluate it though a social justice framework. Using critical-thinking and communication skills, students craft a policy memorandum regarding a current public policy problem, for which they consider and evaluate competing policy alternatives.
  
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    HUMN 8461 - Public Sector Economics


    (5 cr.) Considering recent and persistent economic uncertainty and shifting economic trends in the global market, administrators in government organizations need to understand underlying economic concepts, issues, and trends in the public sector. In this course, students explore public sector economics at the local, state, and national levels. They examine the role of the government in the market economy, including the government’s redistributive role; factors affecting the economy; sources of government revenue; the relationship of public goods and the economy; programs and services funded by the government; alternative forms of delivery of programs and services; and the interaction and interconnectedness of the U.S. and global economy. Students apply concepts, processes, and systems related to public sector economics to a specific government program or service.
  
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    HUMN 8465 - Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination


    (5 cr.) In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public and nonprofit organizations plan strategies to fulfill the organizational mission and enhance stakeholder satisfaction. Students in this course explore the role and process of strategic planning, including collaboration, cooperation, and coordination. They also examine the benefits, challenges, and pitfalls of strategic planning, in addition to the impact of globalization. Students apply these concepts to real-life scenarios and develop a strategic plan for a nonprofit or public organization.
  
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    HUMN 8510 - Theories and Models of Human Behavior for Professional Practice


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8511 - Treatment of Forensic Populations


    (5 cr.) This course provides students with the basic knowledge necessary to evaluate and subsequently treat many different forensic populations. Various forensic populations such as sex offenders, substance abusers, victims of crime, and employee assistance to law enforcement personnel will be covered. The use of traditional forms of intervention, such as individual and group psychotherapy, as well as recent developments in intervention, such as restorative justice, will be addressed.
  
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    HUMN 8512 - Theories and Models of Human Behavior for Professional Practice: Criminal Justice


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8513 - Juvenile Justice, Delinquency, and Development


    (5 cr.) In this course, students focus on the various aspects of the juvenile justice system and the population that it serves. As such, the course provides students with an overview of development theories, such as biological, cognitive, social-emotional, and social. Students apply these theories to cases of juvenile delinquency to determine appropriate prevention, treatment, and intervention strategies. They examine juvenile justice codes, case law, and effective methods for reporting offenses. Students also explore the changing landscape of the juvenile justice field based on current research of its population. Using theories presented in the course, students develop a delinquency-prevention or treatment program for their community, focusing on the underlying goal of social justice and change.
  
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    HUMN 8514 - Theories and Models of Human Behavior for Professional Practice: Human Services Administration


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8515 - Theories and Models of Human Behavior for Professional Practice: Counseling


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8516 - Theories and Models of Human Behavior for Professional Practice: Social Policy Analysis and Planning


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8517 - Theories and Models of Human Behavior for Professional Practice: Clinical Social Work


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8518 - Theories and Models of Human Behavior for Professional Practice


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8520 - Contextual Evaluation of Contemporary Theories and Models in Human Services


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8522 - Contextual Evaluation of Contemporary Theories and Models in Human Services: Criminal Justice


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8524 - Contextual Evaluation of Contemporary Theories and Models in Human Services: Human Services Administration


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8525 - Contextual Evaluation of Contemporary Theories and Models in Human Services: Counseling


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8526 - Contextual Evaluation of Contemporary Theories and Models in Human Services: Social Policy Analysis and Planning


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8527 - Contextual Evaluation of Contemporary Theories and Models in Human Services: Clinical Social Work


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8528 - Contextual Evaluation of Contemporary Theories and Models in Human Services: Family Studies and Intervention Strategies


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8529 - Forensic Application in Community Settings


    (5 cr.) This course is directed at the application of forensic psychology to various community settings. An emphasis is placed on working with offenders upon re-entry to the community and offenders who receive nonincarceration community placements. However, this course also explores less-common applications, such as restorative justice and community crime prevention.
     
  
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    HUMN 8530 - Integrating Theory and Practice in Human Services


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8532 - Integrating Theory and Practice in Human Services: Criminal Justice


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8534 - Integrating Theory and Practice in Human Services: Human Services Administration


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8535 - Integrating Theory and Practice in Human Services: Counseling


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8536 - Integrating Theory and Practice in Human Services: Social Policy Analysis and Planning


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8537 - Integrating Theory and Practice in Human Services: Clinical Social Work


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8538 - Integrating Theory and Practice in Human Services: Family Studies and Intervention Strategies


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8550 - Preparing for Dissertation


    (5 cr.) This course is focused specifically on the process of writing the dissertation prospectus. Students will use their preliminary research plan, developed previously, and develop a problem statement, to be used in the dissertation. They will further refine the problem statement and carry out the planning and the library research that will bring them to the formulation of a dissertation prospectus. The prospectus is a brief paper, typically 15–20 pages in length, that lays out the background for the problem statement, the problem statement itself, a survey of the relevant literature, typically 25–75 references, and a research, implementation, and evaluation plan for the solution of the problem.
  
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    HUMN 8610 - Advanced Theories of Intervention in Human Services


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8612 - Advanced Theories of Intervention in Human Services: Criminal Justice


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8614 - Advanced Theories of Intervention in Human Services: Human Services Administration


    (5 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8615 - Advanced Theories of Intervention in Human Services: Counseling


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
  
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    HUMN 8616 - Advanced Theories of Intervention in Human Services: Social Policy Analysis and Planning


    (4 cr.) This course for doctoral students has no specific course description due to the flexibility inherent in the Knowledge Area Module (KAM) learning model, which allows students to develop expertise in their area of interest through an individualized program. The number of KAMs required varies by program, but each KAM culminates in a scholarly paper comprising three segments: Breadth, Depth, and Application. Through the KAM process, students will apply what they have learned to meet a need in their profession.
 

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