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    Walden University
   
 
  Jul 26, 2017
 
 
    
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2012-2013 Walden University Catalog (September 2012) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    NURS 4010 - Family, Community, and Population-Based Care


    (7 cr.) An important consideration for nurses who care for patients in the community or in their homes is to understand the culture and environment in which the patient resides. In this course, students learn applications for theories and concepts from nursing and public health sciences in assessing health status and preventing and controlling disease in families, aggregates, and communities. They analyze and discuss the use of epidemiological and community assessment techniques to examine populations at risk, health promotion, and levels of disease prevention, with special emphasis on ethnically diverse and vulnerable populations. Students also consider major local, state, and national health issues, including mental health and substance abuse and related co-morbidities, re-emergence of infectious and communicable diseases, environmental and occupational health hazards, bioterrorism, emergency preparedness, and disaster response. Students apply knowledge and gain practical experience through a 45-hour practicum experience in a community/population-based healthcare setting.
      (Prerequisite(s): NURS 4005.)
  
  •  

    NURS 4011 - Family, Community, and Population-Based Care


    (7 cr.) The focus of this course is on application of theories and concepts from nursing and public health sciences in assessing health status and preventing and controlling disease in families, aggregates, and communities as clients. The use of epidemiological and community assessment techniques to examine populations at risk, health promotion, and levels of disease prevention with special emphasis on ethnically diverse and vulnerable populations are incorporated. Major local, state, and national health issues are considered including mental health and substance abuse and related co-morbidities; re-emergence of infectious and communicable diseases; environmental and occupational health hazards; bioterrorism; emergency preparedness, and disaster response. This course includes a 45-hour virtual, online population-based practicum with no required preceptors or travel.
  
  •  

    NURS 4015 - Public and Global Health


    (5 cr.) Through this course, students widen their perspectives of promoting health and preventing disease as they examine health issues that transcend national borders, class, race, ethnicity, and culture. Students discuss the role of the nurse in preserving and promoting health among diverse populations as well as their role in illness prevention and health promotion, protection, and maintenance of targeted populations. They also explore principles of epidemiology and the influencing sociopolitical factors that impact health and well-being of humankind. Students engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of content on topical issues, such as infant mortality rates in the United States and abroad, infectious or communicable disease, implications of global climate change on health, among others. Finally, students consider and reflect on the nurse’s role as a leader in transforming the future of the world’s health.
      (Prerequisite(s): NURS 4010.)
  
  •  

    NURS 4020 - Leadership Competencies in Nursing and Healthcare


    (7 cr.) Contemporary nurses who wish to influence the current healthcare system must equip themselves with the knowledge and competencies to lead in times of pressure, constant change, and innovation. Students in this course work toward gaining these skills and increasing self-awareness in the context of organizational challenges and individual motivation. They also learn skills and techniques in team building; strengthening interpersonal, communication, and interdisciplinary effectiveness; shaping a preferred future for nursing; translating strategic vision into action; and implementing and managing organizational change. Students apply course concepts through case studies, self-assessments and 360-degree feedback, and a 45-hour practicum in a selected clinical setting. Through this practicum experience, students gain professional knowledge from top-level leaders in nursing and healthcare.
      (Prerequisite(s): NURS 4015.)
  
  •  

    NURS 4021 - Leadership Competencies in Nursing and Health Care


    (7 cr.) This course will focus on building the knowledge and key competencies essential to successful leadership and influence in an evolving health care delivery system. The course emphasizes increasing self-awareness in the context of organizational challenges and individual motivation; distinguishing leadership from management; team building; strengthening interpersonal communication, and interdisciplinary effectiveness; shaping a preferred future for nursing; translating strategic vision into action; as well as developing skills in implementing and managing organizational change. Specific learning opportunities include case studies; a battery of self-assessments and 360-degree feedback instruments and exposure to top-level leaders in nursing and health care. This course includes a 45-hour virtual, online leadership practicum with no required preceptors or travel.
  
  •  

    NURS 5501 - Introduction to Statistics and Applied Research Methods


    (4 sem. cr.) Students in this course are provided with an introductory understanding of elementary statistics for social scientists as well as an introduction to social science research. Statistical methods include computation and analysis of frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, understanding of basic probability, and understanding of the normal curve, as well as conceptual understanding of effect sizes, probability value, and the correlation coefficient. Research methods include understanding basic language associated with research, such as the difference between theory and hypothesis, the nature of variables, and different research designs. Students learn to read research critically. Note: This course is for semester-based master’s-level students.
  
  •  

    NURS 6000 - Success Strategies in the Master of Science Program in Nursing Online Environment


    (1 sem. cr.) This course introduces students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and social change agents. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in nursing.
  
  •  

    NURS 6001 - Foundations for Graduate Study


    (1 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. The course will also provide a foundation for the student’s academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Course assignments focus on the practical application of writing and critical-thinking skills and the integration of professional practice with professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in nursing.  
  
  •  

    NURS 6006 - Issues and Trends in Nursing


    (4 sem. cr.) An overview of the evolution of nursing as a profession and its relationship to the changes in organization, structure, and function of the U.S. healthcare delivery system is provided in this course. Students examine and discuss major issues and trends in nursing and healthcare. They also consider the influence of socioeconomic, ethical, legal, and political variables as well as professional values on contemporary nursing practice. Students conduct a literature review, which they use to analyze and summarize contemporary diversity issues in the workplace. They also engage in additional application-based assignments on a variety of topics, such as the nursing shortage, professional practice, licensing, and legal and ethical issues.
  
  •  

    NURS 6010 - Advancing Nursing Through Inquiry and Research


    (4 sem. cr.) Contemporary nursing practice now often involves conducting research to learn the most recent trends and effective practices to treat patients. Students in this course focus on the steps of the research process. They explore qualitative and quantitative methods and gain a foundation for evidence-based practice through inquiry and critical analysis of scholarly literature. Students also examine strategies for using research effectively in a variety of situations. Through a collaborative project, students critically investigate and share information on current nursing issues.
  
  •  

    NURS 6015 - Information and Healthcare Technologies Applied to Nursing Practice


    (4 sem. cr.) The rise of technological evolution and innovation continues to change approaches and practices in healthcare; therefore, nursing professionals should understand how to harness technology in ways to improve delivery and care. In this course, students learn how professionals use information technologies and systems to support decision making in nursing practice, administration, research, and education. They examine information sources used as tools, such as listservs, the Internet, e-mail, and databases. Students consider advances in technology that support the delivery of services as well as the collection, storage, and retrieval of information. They also examine and discuss ethical and legal issues that impact the use of technology in healthcare. Students engage in a team project through which they assess a current issue in nursing, focusing on the impact of information technology.
  
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    NURS 6022 - Topics in Clinical Nursing


    (4 sem. cr.) Major acute and chronic health problems and leading causes of death across the lifespan, including etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and implications for treatment and disease management are highlighted in this course. Consideration is given to the relationship of genetics and genomics to health and illness, infection-control issues such as drug-resistant organisms, accidents/injuries, common geriatric syndromes, palliative and end-of-life care, as well as complementary and alternative therapies. Development of a framework for nursing interventions is emphasized.
  
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    NURS 6025 - Managing a Continuum of Care for Positive Patient Outcomes


    (4 sem. cr.) While the current healthcare system is inundated with the needs of aging patients with chronic disease, providers are seeking ways to advance patient outcomes management and promote initiatives that will improve the long-term health of the population. In this course, students explore concepts related to the management of disease and the prevention of further disability. They identify the impact of cultural, social, political, legal, and environmental factors on providing a continuum of care. Using an evidence-based approach, students also evaluate a variety of topics that address documentation, evaluation, and quality outcome standards. Students apply methods, tools, and standards learned in the course to the development of care/case management plans. Through these projects, students reflect on nurses’ role in achieving positive outcomes for individuals, groups, and communities.
  
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    NURS 6030 - The Practice of Population-Based Care


    (4 sem. cr.) The primary goal of public/community health nursing is to maintain and improve the general health of populations through promoting and assisting populations in making positive changes in behavior. In this course, students take an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the practice of population-based care. They examine concepts of health, levels of prevention, epidemiology of wellness, global health issues, and control of health problems as well as principles of interdisciplinary care. Students learn and apply methods to plan, intervene, and evaluate care in communities. They also examine integrative approaches to working with groups in the community to positively impact health behaviors. Additionally, students engage in a group project in which they review and synthesize literature on a health problem and target population and then investigate an appropriate intervention program.
  
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    NURS 6050 - Policy and Advocacy for Improving Population Health


    (5 cr.) In today’s rapidly changing healthcare delivery system, decisions made within the political arena impact the future of healthcare systems and the populations that healthcare professionals serve. In this course, students examine healthcare reform and its impact on healthcare delivery, population health, and nursing practice. They evaluate policies that influence the structure, financing, and quality in healthcare and examine healthcare delivery from a global perspective. Through discussions, case studies, and other activities, students examine the effects of legal and regulatory processes on nursing practice, healthcare delivery, and population health outcomes. Students also examine ways to advocate for promotion and preservation of population health and gain the necessary skills to influence policy and support changes effected by the passing of new healthcare reform legislation.
  
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    NURS 6051 - Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology


    (5 cr.) Evidence-based practice is an essential nurse competency that supports the provision of effective and efficient care. Through team projects and individual applications, students learn how to organize, evaluate, and use health information and knowledge to critically appraise and use information technology to enhance evidence-based practice. Students also apply evidence-based practice to improve advanced nursing practice and healthcare outcomes across organization, public-health, and consumer-health settings.
  
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    NURS 6052 - Essentials of Evidence-Based Practice


    (5 cr.) Nurses base practice on sound and tested evidence to ensure the safety, high quality, and cost-effectiveness of patient care. This course provides students the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the development and relationship of nursing theory, research, and practice. Through a variety of online activities and coursework, students explore the role of nursing theory in both research and practice. They examine research literature to differentiate and critique various research designs, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method models; appraise statistical data; and analyze evidence. Acquired knowledge helps students to critically evaluate research to make decisions about use of findings to enhance practice.
  
  •  

    NURS 6053 - Interprofessional Organizational and Systems Leadership


    (5 cr.) Students in this course prepare to exercise leadership through which they can help to ensure their organization is able to adapt and flourish in the ever-changing world of healthcare. Students explore the impact of healthcare system changes on transforming the nursing profession. They examine and discuss theories related to leadership and management and learn about empowerment strategies that assist master’s-prepared nurses to assume and succeed in leadership roles. Students engage in course assignments that focus on real-world nursing practice applications of theory.
  
  •  

    NURS 6101 - Policy and Politics in Nursing and Healthcare


    (3 sem. cr.) An important responsibility in the nursing profession is to stay current on factors changing the healthcare delivery system so that individual goals and practices align to overarching healthcare needs. In this course, students engage in a critical analysis of socioeconomic, political, legal, ethical, and global factors that affect nursing and healthcare delivery. Through written and case study applications, students examine issues of cost, quality, and access with emphasis on healthcare reform, including financing and payment systems, delivery models, health information management, and the integration of healthcare services to affect safety and quality. Students also explore inter-professional practice issues as well as nursing’s involvement in health policy and advocacy.
  
  •  

    NURS 6110 - The Nurse Leader: New Perspectives on the Profession


    (3 sem. cr.) Nurses who assume leadership roles in healthcare must understand various change and management theories, be ready to adapt to constantly evolving work settings and cultures, and lead others by positive example. In this course, students examine and discuss the impact that changes in healthcare systems have on transforming the nursing profession as well the opportunities for leadership resulting from such change. They also assess a variety of theories related to leadership and management. Students engage in activities designed to provide practical application of content on topics such as followership, current situations in practice that require change, strategies to reduce resistance to change, and the development of leadership attributes. Through this course, students have the opportunity to learn strategies and gain skills for becoming empowered as well as for acquiring and sustaining leadership roles in nursing.
  
  •  

    NURS 6125 - Integrating Theory and Research for Evidence-Based Practice


    (3 sem. cr.) In this course, students are provided with an overview of the development of nursing theory, research, and practice. They learn the process by which practitioners critically appraise and translate theory and research into evidence-based practice in the development of clinical outcomes. Students build on foundational statistics concepts and skills as they explore the practical use of diverse research methods and associated statistical techniques. Students employ course concepts as they engage in evidence-based practice applications, such as basic analyses of quantitative and qualitative data and critiquing a qualitative or quantitative study. 
  
  •  

    NURS 6150 - Promoting and Preserving Health in a Diverse Society


    (3 sem. cr.) Prevention of illness and promotion of a healthy lifestyle leads to improved quality of life and are often more cost effective than treatment or intervention. Students in this course explore health improvement and disease management/prevention initiatives intended to promote healthy societies worldwide. They examine the effects of social, political, and environmental conditions in relation to healthcare access, quality of care, and cultural relevance. Students also examine the contributions of nurse leaders who work to improve health in society. Using these examples as well as theories learned in the course, students research a contemporary health issue, develop and explicate a community health project, and describe the models or process they would use to evaluate their project for efficacy.
  
  •  

    NURS 6200 - The Nurse Administrator: Leading and Managing for Excellence


    (4 sem. cr.) The primary goal of leaders in nursing is to achieve excellence in the delivery of patient services. In this course, students work toward gaining the knowledge and skills required to lead and manage in the nursing profession. They examine organizational, managerial, and leadership theories, and they discuss standards of practice for nursing administration. They also examine roles and responsibilities, quality improvements, strategic planning and management, regulations, and the function of information systems. Students observe practical applications in nursing administration through field experiences in practice settings. They also sharpen writing and critical-thinking skills through application-based writing assignments, such as a business plan proposal, journal entries, and a reflection from the perspective of a nurse administrator.
  
  •  

    NURS 6201 - Leadership in Nursing and Healthcare


    (5 cr.) This course sets the foundational stage for the Leadership and Management specialty track. Students focus on theoretical and practical aspects of leadership and management functions in healthcare administration, and they discuss standards of practice for nursing administration. They explore a range of topics, including roles and responsibilities, quality improvements, strategic planning and management, regulations, accreditation, and information systems. Through this course, students learn the goals of the nurse leader, including ways to facilitate efficient, quality healthcare delivery to achieve excellence in patient care and services.
  
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    NURS 6210 - Healthcare Finance and Budgeting


    (4 sem. cr.) In this course, students explore applications of financial principles in developing, budgeting, and managing resources. Students analyze budgeting processes used in healthcare settings, budgeting models and information systems, nurse administrator responsibilities in finance and budgeting, and the impact of private and public policies. They also examine budget and resource decisions that contribute to the achievement of organizational and nursing service outcomes. Students engage in field experiences in which they observe individuals in practice settings who are involved in key financial activities. Additionally, students gain hands-on experience developing financial elements of a business plan for an organization, including a financial statement, revenue and volume projections, reimbursement codes and rates, among others.
  
  •  

    NURS 6211 - Finance and Economics in Healthcare Delivery


    (5 cr.) Students in this course learn about the fundamentals of finance and budgeting in healthcare delivery. They apply financial principles, such as budgeting processes used in multiple healthcare settings and the nurse administrator’s responsibilities within the context of leading and managing resources. Through these applications, students explore budget development and management of operational and capital resources. They examine the influence of private and public policies and budgeting models that effect quality outcomes within the aspect of financial planning using information systems. Students also explore budget and resource decisions contributing to the achievement of organizational outcomes within the context of providing efficient and cost-effective quality care.
  
  •  

    NURS 6220 - Human Resource Management


    (4 sem. cr.) One of the most important skills in the healthcare industry is the ability to manage the individuals who provide service and deliver care. Students in this course examine the roles and responsibilities of nurse administrators in human resource management. They explore and discuss current legal, ethical, professional, and practice policies and standards as well as the role of technology to support human resource functions. They also examine strategies that support positive organizational and nursing-service goals. Additionally, students observe human resource administrators within a healthcare organization to observe how they provide support to employees and align responsibilities to the strategic goals of the organization. Students use course concepts and knowledge gained from field experiences to complete various practical-application assignments.
  
  •  

    NURS 6221 - Managing Human Resources


    (5 cr.) Nursing leadership is grounded firmly in managing our most important resource—human capital. In this course, students address nurse administrators’ role and responsibilities in human resource management. Students explore current legal, ethical, professional, and practice policies and standards, and they learn how to apply technology to human resource functions. Additionally, students learn strategies to support positive organizational and nursing service goals. They also have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the importance of staff satisfaction as well as creating collaborative and supportive partnerships within organizations.
  
  •  

    NURS 6230 - Case Study: Quality Nursing in a Complex Healthcare Organization


    (4 sem. cr.) Students in this course use a case study approach to synthesize and apply knowledge to a current nursing practice issue. Through a collaborative case study project, students use a variety of administrative strategies to achieve positive patient care delivery outcomes. They develop a comprehensive plan in the context of current nursing-service challenges, analyze and explicate a case study, and provide strategic recommendations that address the issues and challenges presented in the case. Building their professional portfolio, students apply leadership and management theory and strategy to the design of their own case study created for use as a leadership development exercise. Students also review the work of their peers, share perspectives, and provide feedback.
  
  •  

    NURS 6231 - Healthcare Systems and Quality Outcomes


    (5 cr.) The development of leadership strategies and competencies that support the healthcare organizational delivery of quality care is imperative to quality outcomes within healthcare systems. In this course, students use a systems approach to explore the organizational structures that impact healthcare quality and, ultimately, positive patient outcomes. Students learn how interdisciplinary collaboration is important to the development of quality management structures, gaining an understanding of how quality improvement is a strategic mandate. Engaging in conceptual and application-based assignments, students focus on clinical and service quality planning, control and improvement initiatives, models and tools for process improvement, and the importance and use of metrics in daily operations.
  
  •  

    NURS 6241 - Strategic Planning in Healthcare Organizations


    (5 cr.) Nurse administrators in healthcare organizations must be aware of and integrate strategic organizational goals. Students in this course use an interdisciplinary case study approach to examine nursing administrative practice issues as they relate to the strategic planning process. Students apply leadership and management principles, concepts, and theory to strategic issues within the case study format. Through these applications, students learn to use a variety of administrative strategies within the context of supportive and collaborative interdisciplinary relationships to achieve positive patient care delivery outcomes that effect positive social change in patient communities.
  
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    NURS 6300 - Student-Centered Learning in Nursing Education


    (3 sem. cr.) A major goal of nurse educators is to recognize students’ individual and collective needs to create a supportive learning environment. In this course, students explore the theories and principles associated with the diverse learning needs of adults as well as effective strategies to meet these needs. Students examine and discuss a variety of topics, including socialization, motivation, critical thinking, learning styles, and the impact of societal values on the learning environment. They also examine the unique needs of nontraditional, international, educationally disadvantaged, and physically challenged students. Students apply content through the critical analysis and summary of an adult learning plan designed to overcome learning barriers.
  
  •  

    NURS 6301 - Advanced Pathopharmacology


    Advanced practice nurses must have a solid foundation in the concepts and principles of drug therapy in relation to a variety of patient groups. In this course, students integrate and compare pharmacological categories, such as indications, therapeutic and/or adverse effects, monitoring, doses, and common drug interactions. They learn to assess, diagnose, plan, and evaluate appropriate pharmacological treatment in advanced clinical nursing practice. Students also have the opportunity to analyze case studies and apply knowledge of pharmacotherapeutics to specific real-world clinical cases.
  
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    NURS 6310 - Teaching Strategies for Nurse Educators


    (3 sem. cr.) Student success often depends on a supportive learning environment and strategic teaching tactics. In this course, students learn the theories and principles that support a variety of evidence-based teaching strategies. They examine personal and professional teacher attributes that demonstrate positive role-modeling. They also explore and discuss a toolbox of instructional strategies, effective communication and reflective-thinking techniques, student interactions, and student engagement. Students complete assignments designed to provide practical application of content in areas such as lesson planning, needs assessments and learning objectives, strategies and resources, and evaluation planning.
  
  •  

    NURS 6320 - Integrating Technology Into Nursing Education


    (3 sem. cr.) Contemporary nurse educators often use current and evolving technology to enhance student learning. Students in this course assess technological applications that educators use in teaching/learning environments in nursing, including technologies that support tracking student assignments and participation, outcomes assessment, and grading. They explore the function of media, multimedia, computer-based technologies, models, and simulations;  processes for evaluating and selecting technology; and distance and online education modalities. Additionally, students explore the use of online information resources, presentation systems, and information storage systems, and they assess the integration of technology with texts and printed materials. Students demonstrate their understanding of technology integration through the development of an online course and an evaluation plan designed to assess the potential efficacy of the course.
  
  •  

    NURS 6321 - Curriculum Development, Assessment, and Evaluation


    (5 cr.) The educational environment is influenced by social, economic, regulatory, and technological transformations. Students in this course learn the theoretical processes that drive curriculum development, assessment, and evaluation. They also focus on curriculum components, which include societal, professional, and educational trends that affect nursing education curricula in the current environment.
  
  •  

    NURS 6330 - Curriculum Development, Assessment, and Evaluation


    (3 sem. cr.) A wide array of factors, including social, economic, regulatory, and technological transformations, impact the current educational environment. Therefore, nursing education curricula must be relevant and meet the health and nursing needs of society. Students in this course learn about curriculum development and the many processes that contribute to it. They explore the philosophical foundations of curriculum development; curriculum components; societal, professional, and educational trends; frameworks, competencies, and outcomes; organizational constraints; and selection of learning activities. Students also define the processes of curriculum assessment and evaluation in the context of program, course, and student outcomes. They apply course concepts and theory to the development of a syllabus or course outline. Through this course, students work toward attaining the skills required to develop curricula that address the nursing needs of society, support standards of practice, and prepare graduates for practice in diverse settings.
  
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    NURS 6331 - Teaching Learning Strategies: Integrating Technology Into Nursing Education


    (5 cr.) In this course, students explore ways to use technology successfully and design effective teaching strategies to meet diverse learning needs. Students engage in producing innovative teaching approaches that use a variety of teaching methods, including adapting technology for multiples learning styles. Students write learning objectives using Bloom’s Taxonomy that meet unique needs of nontraditional, international, educationally disadvantaged, and physically challenged learners.
  
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    NURS 6340 - The Nurse Educator: Roles, Responsibilities, and Relationships


    (4 sem. cr.) The goal of nurses, in all settings, is to be effective educators who guide and facilitate learning and contribute to the educational goals of the organizations in which they work. Students in this course explore the significance of the educator role as it applies to diverse settings, and they assess associated responsibilities and relationships. They examine concepts related to being change agents and leaders, role socialization, legal and ethical expectations, and professional development. They also explore and discuss nurse educator responsibilities, such as balancing role demands, using evidence to improve teaching, promoting scholarship related to teaching, developing partnerships, and engaging in collaboration and advocacy. Using knowledge gained in previous courses as well as concepts presented in this course, students demonstrate their understanding through various application-based exercises. They also observe the role of a nurse educator in a practice setting and record their learning experiences through journal assignments.
  
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    NURS 6341 - Specialty in Clinical Nursing


    (5 cr.) In today’s complex healthcare arena there is increased patient acuity and a growing need for better-educated nurses at the bedside. Nurse educators must possess advanced clinical knowledge to teach complex clinical content effectively, including selecting a focus to advance their knowledge in a clinical specialty. Students advance their clinical knowledge in a selected specialty to prepare them to fulfill the role of the nurse educator.
  
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    NURS 6351 - Role of the Nurse Educator


    (5 cr.) Nursing education students in this course explore the roles of the nurse educator, including providers of care, staff developers, clinical educators, and academic educators. Through the practicum experience, students translate and apply theoretical principles from their advanced clinical specialty of providing direct care to patients as well as in their practice of teaching. Students work toward solving real-world problems, with the assistance of their preceptors, in a clinical setting as well as with teaching projects in a classroom setting, patient setting, and staff-development setting. They also present the results of their project in the workplace and in the online classroom. Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.
  
  •  

    NURS 6400 - Informatics in Nursing and Healthcare


    (4 sem. cr.) In this course, students establish the foundational knowledge for understanding and practicing nursing informatics in healthcare settings. Students learn about core and supporting models and theories for nursing informatics as well as its foundation in science. They explore the use of information technology to support decisions that promote safety and quality in patient-centered care, and they assess concerns about protecting information and system integrity. Students engage in practical assignments through which they become familiar with various informatics-related functions and their impact on nurses in healthcare. They also summarize and reflect on their learning experiences.
  
  •  

    NURS 6401 - Informatics in Nursing and Healthcare


    (5 cr.) Nursing informatics is a rapidly evolving discipline that impacts all areas of nursing practice. Students in this course establish foundational knowledge for understanding and practicing nursing informatics in healthcare settings. Students explore models and theories that support nursing informatics and examine the use of information technology in support of decisions that promote safety and quality in patient-centered care. They also differentiate concerns about information protection and system integrity. Using concepts learned in the course, students engage in assignments through which they focus on nursing practice in healthcare applications, thus acquiring necessary skills to improve the management of healthcare through informatics nursing practice.
  
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    NURS 6410 - Information and Knowledge Management


    (4 sem. cr.) Healthcare professionals must have the knowledge and skills to make data-based decisions that lead to effective practice and improved patient care. Students in this course examine database systems as a foundation for studying concepts of data modeling, techniques of data definition, and data manipulation. They explore concepts of information and knowledge management with emphasis on application to the practice setting. Students discuss a variety of topics, such as information management in practice, data modeling, maximizing database performance, and human error in decision making, among others. They also engage in an integrative, collaborative project through which they investigate a current nursing or healthcare issue, plan and build a relational database to address the issue, and assess and provide feedback on plans presented by peers.
  
  •  

    NURS 6411 - Information and Knowledge Management


    (5 cr.) Effectively managing healthcare data is essential to the practice of nursing informatics. In this course, students examine database systems, including database design and manipulation. Students also explore concepts of information and knowledge management in the healthcare practice setting. Course assignments provide students with the opportunity to work efficiently in teams and build essential skills to execute database design. Through this course, students examine nursing’s contributions to knowledge management in healthcare organizations.
  
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    NURS 6420 - Supporting Workflow in Healthcare Systems


    (4 sem. cr.) Nurse informaticists must understand the flow of nursing work to develop information systems that provide effective support and usability. In this course, students examine the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of electronic information systems in healthcare. They compare, contrast, and critique methods of systems design and devote special attention to workflow modeling. They also engage in a variety of assignments to gain an understanding of the various workflow issues that impact the role of a nurse informatician, such as observing or interviewing healthcare professionals, developing a needs assessment plan, creating a model of a problematic workflow, and redesigning the workflow using a case approach.
  
  •  

    NURS 6421 - Supporting Workflow in Healthcare Systems


    (5 cr.) Effective knowledge and information flow is critical in the coordination of patient care. Nurses are at the center of care coordination for patients and informatics nurses are central to the design and development of information systems that support workflow in nursing practice. Students in this course examine the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of electronic information systems in healthcare systems. They compare, contrast and critique methods of system design. Students also focus on workflow modeling, including assessment of current state workflow and the design of future state workflow, and they examine workflow design best practices to support the implementation and optimization of electronic health records.
  
  •  

    NURS 6430 - Project Management: Healthcare Information Technology


    (4 sem. cr.) The field of health informatics requires leaders who have the knowledge and skill to oversee all types of projects, from product or service conception through delivery to stakeholders; such knowledge requires an understanding of multiple core areas of management, such as scope, time, and quality management, among others. Students in this course explore the theory and practice of how to manage health information technology projects. Students learn how to plan, schedule, and control healthcare informatics projects. They consider hypothetical scenarios and professional experiences as they discuss project management specifics, such as managing risk, controlling changes in scope, and handling budget issues. Students use project management software to build a project schedule, and they engage in an integrative team project scenario, including all the major elements and challenges of a healthcare informatics project in the real world.
  
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    NURS 6431 - System Design, Planning, and Evaluation


    (5 cr.) Healthcare policy, including the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (2009) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (1996), mandates that electronic documentation systems are secure and effective. In this course, students explore systems security and evaluation methods. Through discussion of real-world practice that includes public health and community-based settings, students evaluate the impact of redesigned workflows to the larger system design and throughout the organization. Students create a plan for system design and system evaluation. Through team projects and individual applications, they build skills and confidence that support collaborative, interdisciplinary system design to improve the effectiveness of care. Note: Students participate in a 72-hour practicum experience.
  
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    NURS 6441 - Project Management: Healthcare Information Technology


    (5 cr.) Healthcare information technology and the implementation of electronic health records are foundational practices critical for success in project management. In this course, students learn the theory of health information technology project management and apply it to real-world experiences. Using project management software, students create a project management plan and schedule, and they control and close tasks related to a health informatics project. Through team projects and individual applications, students build skills and confidence that support the implementation of healthcare information technology to improve the quality of care and patient outcomes.


  
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    NURS 6500 - Capstone Synthesis: Practicum I


    (3 sem. cr.) Students in the practicum are provided with the opportunity to engage in a supervised experience that integrates theory and research with practice. With guidance and support from their preceptor and instructor, students apply theory to better understand a specialization role in the context of an organization, formulate and achieve individualized learning objectives, and initiate a project conceptualized in collaboration with their preceptor in agreement with the instructor. The practicum (NURS 6500 and NURS 6510) requires a minimum of 125 total hours, which students record in their time log. Students also complete a cumulative journal in which they provide evidence-based or theory-based analyses of activities, issues, or problems that occur during their experience.
  
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    NURS 6501 - Advanced Pathophysiology


    (5 cr.) Advanced practice nurses must be equipped with an in-depth understanding of pathophysiological disease processes across the lifespan. In this course, students focus on understanding the bio-physiological processes, the deviations from these processes, and an in-depth examination of the scientific concepts related to the biology of disease processes. Advanced practice nursing students learn how normal organ systems function and how organ systems are interrelated to help the body maintain homeostasis. Through knowledge of pathophysiological disease processes, students gain the information needed to develop appropriate treatment plans for patients across the life span. Students explore a variety of topics, such as immunity, inflammation, cancer genetics, and cardiovascular disease. They also examine a range of disease processes, including hematologic, renal, neurologic, gastrointestinal, and reproductive disorders.
  
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    NURS 6510 - Capstone Synthesis: Practicum II


    (3 sem. cr.) This course is a continuation of students’ practicum experience and coursework started in NURS 6500. Students bring closure to their work on real-world problems, which they developed with their preceptors earlier in their experience. They also evaluate and complete their practicum project and present it to their work site and in the online classroom. The practicum (NURS 6500 and NURS 6510) requires a minimum of 125 total hours, which students record in their time log. Students continue work on their cumulative journal, which provides evidence-based or theory-based analyses of activities, issues, or problems that occur during their experience.
  
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    NURS 6511 - Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning


    (5 cr.) The physical and emotional well-being of patients and families can be complex and multifaceted. Advanced practice nurses need to have the knowledge and ability to provide safe, competent, and comprehensive physical health assessments to develop appropriate treatment plans. Students in this course focus on concepts and assessment skills to care for patients across the lifespan. They learn to use diagnostic reasoning, advanced communication and physical assessment skills to identify changes in health patterns, from conception to geriatrics. Students also use a systematic approach through which they focus on the assessment of patients with acute and chronic health problems. They engage in course assignments that emphasize health promotion, disease prevention, and health maintenance across the lifespan.
  
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    NURS 6521 - Advanced Pharmacology


    (5 cr.) A solid foundation in the concepts and principles of drug therapy across the lifespan is essential to the work of advanced practice nurses. The principles and concepts of pharmacologic therapy incorporate biology, physiology, pathophysiology, and chemistry are the foundations of nursing care. Students in this course comprehensively focus on the pathophysiological dynamic processes that occur in health and illness across the lifespan and related pharmacologic therapies. They explore a range of topics, including advanced concepts of the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of broad drug categories and their therapeutic implications to clinical nursing practice. Through this course, students prepare to examine complex decisions in the management and treatment of acute and chronic diseases across the lifespan.
  
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    NURS 6531 - Primary Care of Adults Across the Lifespan


    (5 cr.)  In this course, students learn how nurse practitioners master the art and science of clinical decision making among adult populations. Students focus on the diagnosis and management of primary healthcare needs and problems of the adult and elderly adult. They engage in a variety of course assignments that focus on physical and behavioral disease processes central to diagnosing illnesses as well as planning, implementing, and evaluating therapeutic treatment programs for acute illnesses commonly encountered in a primary healthcare setting. Students gain confidence in clinical experiences in a primary healthcare setting where they learn to plan, implement, and evaluate therapeutic regimens for adult patients with common acute and chronic illnesses.   Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.
  
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    NURS 6540 - Primary Care of Frail Elders


    (5 cr.) The frail elderly are a subpopulation characterized by inactivity and weight loss. In this course, students focus on the complex healthcare and management needs of the frail elderly by advanced nurse practitioners in community settings. Students learn to plan, implement, and evaluate therapeutic regimens through the analysis of case studies and the actual care of frail elderly in various settings. Additionally, students examine content related to end-of-life care and caregiver issues to gain the knowledge and sensibilities needed to implement positive change for the quality of life available to this vulnerable population. Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.
  
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    NURS 6541 - Primary Care of Adolescents and Children


    (5 cr.) How can a nurse practitioner master the art and science of clinical decision making among pediatric populations? This course provides students with the opportunity to answer this question as they examine content related to the primary healthcare of children and adolescents while focusing on common health problems. Students learn how to identify, diagnose, and manage these problems. They also gain confidence in clinical experience in a primary healthcare setting that provides opportunities to assess, diagnose, plan, implement, and evaluate therapeutic regimens for acute and chronic illnesses commonly found in children and adolescents. Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.
  
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    NURS 6551 - Primary Care of Women


    (5 cr.) How can a nurse practitioner decide what is important to focus on in a 15- to 30-minute appointment with a woman seeking primary care? Students in this course gain opportunities to teach and promote wellness in women through the process of screening for commonly seen in gynecological disorders. Students learn to analyze data to interpret results for the benefit of women seeking assistance with planning healthy lifestyle behaviors. They also gain clinical experience in a primary healthcare setting that provides opportunities to increase competence in diagnosis, treatment, referrals, or follow-up care with a concentration on improving patient outcomes. Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.
  
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    NURS 6561 - Direct Care Roles in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Across the Lifespan


    (5 cr.) Taking a broader view of the comprehensive perspectives of health in a community is imperative for an advanced practice nurse. Students in this course focus on health-related behaviors that impact the health and wellness of individuals across their lifespan. Students examine how nutrition, exercise, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle relate to common diseases. Through case studies and a group project, students complete risk assessments, diagnose health problems directly related to risky lifestyles, and implement and evaluate various behavioral and therapeutic measures to reduce the negative behavior and improve lifestyles. Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.
  
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    NURS 6600 - Capstone Synthesis Practicum


    (5 cr.) Students in this course apply the MSN curriculum experience by translating knowledge into practice by designing, developing, and implementing a project in a professional healthcare setting. By using the culmination of learning, students gain the opportunity effect positive social change within the healthcare delivery environment in the roles of change agent and nurse. The result of the practicum experience provides students with an experience through which they develop their passion as a practitioner while enhancing the nurse role as an advocate for social change within the context of a scholarly presence. Note: This course requires a minimum of 144 practicum hours.
  
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    NURS 8000 - Foundations and Essentials of Doctoral Study in Nursing


    (1 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and are provided with a foundation for professional development in doctoral nursing practice. Students learn professional standards and end-of-program expectations. They engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students also explore the essentials of being a Walden doctoral student; past, present, and future similarities and differences between the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and a Ph.D. in nursing, relevant professional and specialty standards of doctoral-level nursing practice, intra- and interprofessional collaboration, and the process of the DNP project.

    The DNP program requires that all students complete The Measured Success Writing Assessment during the first course in the program, NURS 8000. This assessment is a computer-based evaluation where students write an essay online to determine “writing readiness” at the doctoral level. An outside vendor provides an automated evaluation of the student’s writing sample. The assessment is cost-free to students. The writing assessment provides a holistic score of 1–6, as well as scores for five analytical writing categories. The categories include: focus/meaning, content development, organization, language/style, and mechanics/conventions. Students who do not demonstrate writing readiness are encouraged to enroll in WCSS 6000N - Graduate Writing: Evaluative and Persuasive Composition Skills. The course provides students with the written communication tools necessary to complete longer writing projects that necessitate a persuasive academic voice. There is no cost to the student for this course.

  
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    NURS 8100 - Healthcare Policy and Advocacy


    (5 cr.) Many economic, financial, and political factors influence the delivery of healthcare, making healthcare reform a challenging  task. In this course, students examine these factors, challenges, and consider policy reform through legal, regulatory, ethical, societal, and organizational contexts. They examine the political and policy process, including agenda setting, stakeholder analysis, and application of policy analysis frameworks. Students also explore the importance of interprofessional collaboration in improving health outcomes through the policy process and advocacy for development and implementation of nursing and healthcare policies in organizations at the local, state, national, and international levels. Students engage in written analyses through which they develop new policies and critically evaluate existing policies though policy analysis frameworks.
  
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    NURS 8110 - Theoretical and Scientific Foundations for Nursing Practice


    (5 cr.) In this course, students focus on the integration of scientific, philosophical, and theoretical concepts as the basis for the highest level of nursing practice. They examine the scientific underpinnings for nursing practice, including bio-behavioral, pathophysiological, psychosocial, and environmental sciences, and they explore the interrelationship among knowledge, research, and practice. Students also explore and discuss clinical inquiry, ethical issues, and models of evidence-based practice. Considering various philosophies, students describe their own philosophy of nursing. They also apply course concepts to a variety of practical assignments, including a literature review, concept map, and evaluation of current clinical practice problems, among others.

     

  
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    NURS 8200 - Methods for Evidence-Based Practice


    (5 cr.) The focus of this course is the integration of scientific, philosophical, and theoretical concepts as the basis for the highest level of nursing practice. The scientific underpinnings for nursing practice including bio-behavioral, pathophysiological, psychosocial, and environmental sciences are examined. The interrelationship between knowledge, research, and practice is explored. Clinical inquiry, ethical issues, and models of evidence-based practice are presented.
  
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    NURS 8210 - Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Through Technology


    (5 cr.) When used effectively, information technology can support generation of new knowledge and emerging information technologies. In this course, students examine the critical appraisal and use of information technology in advanced nursing practice. Students work toward gaining the skills and knowledge to process and manage information systems/technology resources in consumer, clinical, and public health settings. Students engage in a variety of discussions and assignments designed to provide practical application of content on topics including retrieval and critical analysis of digital data to support healthcare quality improvement; electronic health records integration and evaluation; and Web-based learning and intervention tools to support and improve patient care. They also explore ethical, regulatory, and legal issues as well as the healthcare standards and principles for selecting and evaluating information systems and patient care technology.
  
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    NURS 8300 - Organizational and Systems Leadership for Quality Improvement


    (5 cr.) In this course, students consider the importance of developing leadership strategies and competencies specific to healthcare organizations and systems for quality improvement. Students focus on understanding the unique organizational structures and behaviors that impact organizational performance. They explore and discuss the roles and responsibilities of leaders, managers, and administrators within healthcare organizations from the macro (organization-wide) perspective and micro (individual and team performance) perspective. They also examine key organizational theories, principles, and concepts, including mission, vision, values, and strategic and operational planning in relation to achieving the effective and efficient delivery of safe healthcare services. Additionally, students consider the goal of managing outcomes through data analysis as well as through knowledge and skills based on contemporary theory and research, including  motivation, communication, teamwork, leadership style, power, change, quality management, coalition building, negotiation, and conflict management. Applying course concepts, students engage in self-evaluation and consider ways to develop leadership skills and self-awareness.
  
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    NURS 8310 - Epidemiology and Population Health


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with an overview of epidemiologic methodology in the study of the distribution and etiology of disease and health-related conditions in human populations. Students examine important study designs and discuss the strengths and weaknesses inherent in each. They explore and discuss select global problems, such as infectious diseases, bioterrorism attacks, and effects of disasters and emergencies, and they apply epidemiologic and biostatistical methods to study factors related to aggregate, population, and individual health. Additionally, students work toward gaining cultural sensitivity and an interprofessional approach to caring for diverse populations at risk to ensure access to care.
  
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    NURS 8400 - Evidence-Based Practice I: Assessment and Design


    (5 cr.) In this course, students focus on the competencies required of the healthcare professional in planning for the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion and disease prevention initiatives. They explore and discuss strategic approaches to planning, implementation, and evaluation, including cost-benefit analysis. Preparing for their DNP project, students select a faculty mentor and develop portfolio evidence through an integrative critical review of literature, which leads them to identify a clinical/practice question. Note: This is a 5-credit course (4 didactic credits, 1 clinical credit). Clinical hours have a 1:6 ratio (credit/clinical), resulting in 72 clinical hours.
  
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    NURS 8410 - Best Practices In Nursing Specialties


    (5 cr.) A scholarly inquiry of key concepts in nursing is presented in this course. Students analyze best practices and evolving issues in their nursing areas of practice. They explore advanced specialty practice problems through a guided initial review of literature. Students develop a program or project to address clinical/practice questions under the guidance of an approved clinical mentor. Students generate a portfolio evidence plan to address clinical/practice questions related to issues such as program planning, practice change, consultation, quality improvement projects, pilot study proposals, and Institutional Review Board (IRB) approvals. Note: This is a 5-credit course (4 didactic credits, 1 clinical credit). Clinical hours have a 1:6 ratio (credit/clinical), resulting in 72 clinical hours.
  
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    NURS 8500 - Evidence-Based Practice II: Planning and Implementation


    (3 cr.) In this DNP practicum course, students focus on planning and implementing a program/project design to address their clinical/practice questions; students complete work under the guidance of an approved clinical mentor. Generating practicum portfolio evidence, students complete a systematic review that drills down to the evidence regarding their clinical/practice question and resulting findings, conclusions, and recommendations. Note:  This 3-credit practicum course has a 1:6 ratio of credit to clinical hours, resulting in 216 clinical hours.
  
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    NURS 8510 - Evidence-Based Practice III: Implementation, Evaluation, and Dissemination


    (3 cr.) This DNP practicum course will focus on evaluation and dissemination of a program/project design to intervene with clinical/practice questions under the guidance of an approved clinical mentor.

    As a practicum course, the course is designed with 3 credits at a 1:6 ratio = 216 clinical hours. Additionally, the student will generate practicum portfolio evidence: Submission of scholarly article for refereed publication and/or actual presentation (podium) and completed portfolio requirements (resume, self-evaluation, and reflection).

  
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    NURS 8600 - DNP Field Experience


    (1 cr.) Students may take the DNP Field Experience course up to six times based on practicum hours attained prior to DNP admission. Students generate practicum portfolio evidence: Submission of a scholarly article for refereed publication and/or actual presentation (podium) and completed portfolio requirements. This 1-credit practicum course has a 1:6 ratio of credit to practicum hours, resulting in 72 practicum hours.
  
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    PHIL 1001 - Introduction to Philosophy


    (5 cr.) Philosophy is a way to explore and process complex issues in life through different perspectives. This course provides students the opportunity to think about their values, their knowledge and belief systems, their lives, and their place in the world. Students learn about concepts of logic, ethics, metaphysics, reality and truth, and political philosophy. They explore the history of philosophy in the context of important contemporary issues and positions. Through this exploration, combined with self-reflection, students learn to ground their personal philosophies in traditions of philosophical reasoning.
      (Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1001.)
  
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    PHIL 2001 - Ethics


    (5 cr.) Students are introduced to the nature and foundations of moral judgments and applications to contemporary moral issues in this course. Students explore an overview of ethical constraints from the prevailing philosophical and religious perspectives. Using a range of moral theories, students assess their beliefs, values, and perspectives on various ethical scenarios. Through this course, students gain the knowledge needed to formulate solutions to problems of professional and private life against the backdrop of ethical theory.
      (Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1001.)
  
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    PHIL 3010 - Science and Spirituality


    (5 cr.) Students in this course investigate the human experience as understood through science, spiritual traditions, and contemporary thinking. They analyze the roles of evolutionary psychology, social psychology, science, and spirituality as they relate to human beliefs and experiences, such as happiness and love. Through a range of conceptual and applied assignments, students gain an understanding of historical and religious traditions and scientific theories as well as the theories and arguments of leading scientific and religious thinkers. Students also learn to determine the separateness or duality of science and spirituality.
      (Prerequisite(s): COMM 1001.)
  
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    PHSC 1001 - Earth Science


    (5 cr.) Students are introduced to the major concepts in astronomy, meteorology, and geology with selected examples of interrelationships in this course. Students explore Earth’s air, water, and physical processes as they shape the physical world. They engage in assignments that emphasize the relationship of the study of Earth sciences to the world in which they live, such as an evaluation of the world’s energy and environmental problems. Through such assignments, students develop and demonstrate an understanding of fundamental scientific principles. They also gain the knowledge needed to understand and express major issues that affect the health of their community. Additionally, students develop an appreciation for the natural processes that occur on Earth and how they impact and affect the natural world.
      (Prerequisite(s): MATH 1001 or MATH 1002 or MATH 1030 or MATH 1040.)
  
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    POLI 1001 - American Government and Politics


    (5 cr.) The air we breathe, the water we drink, and the protection of our lives and property all are affected by the actions of local, regional, and national levels of government. This course introduces students to the workings of the American government and the roles, rights, and responsibilities of citizens. Students explore the constitutional foundations and major institutions of American government demonstrated through the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. They engage in a range of assignments, such as an analysis on Supreme Court decisions, to gain an understanding of how the American government functions, including the roles of political parties, elections, voting, and interest groups, as well as how the United States formulates and implements public policy.
      (Prerequisite(s): COMM 1001.)
  
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    PPA 8830 - Current Issues in Homeland Security


    (5 cr.) Since its inception, the Department of Homeland Security has profoundly impacted public policy and administration. This course examines homeland security history, concepts, policies, and strategies of prevention and response. Topics include ethical issues, telecommunications, technology, threat assessment, contingency planning, and risk management. Students apply fundamental concepts and principles of homeland security to case studies and current issues.
  
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    PPPA 6350 - Historical and Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice


    (5 cr.) This course looks at the evolution of crime—from lone criminals to worldwide syndicates—using the scientific rigor built into the selected readings and discussions. Among the topics examined are the philosophy of community- and problem-oriented policing, transnational crime, terrorism, and the new nexus between them. The course equips current and future leaders with the knowledge and depth of understanding to assess and manage the opportunities, innovations, and challenges in their profession.
  
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    PPPA 6351 - Policy Analysis in the Criminal Justice System


    (5 cr.) This course reviews key court decisions and explores the tension between constitutionally guaranteed individual rights and crime-prevention and public-safety efforts. The course also covers policy analysis and planning in the criminal justice field, and offers an understanding of the policy context in which the criminal justice system functions.
  
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    PPPA 6352 - Leadership: Putting Theory Into Practice in Criminal Justice Administration


    (5 cr.) This course introduces students to the problems that currently confront the administration of the criminal justice system, as well as problems predicted for the future. So that students are prepared to lead efforts to address these challenges, this course offers powerful models for strategic, critical, and reflective thinking. This course also immerses students in discussion about the major components of effective justice administration: organizational thought and theory, leadership, human capital, policy development and implementation, and collaboration with other public safety and community organizations.
  
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    PPPA 7201 - Strategic Planning: Collaboration, Cooperation, and Coordination


    (5 cr.) In an increasingly complex world, leaders and managers in public, private, and nonprofit organizations need to be strategic in planning and creating effective, collaborative programs and services. This course explores the role and process of strategic planning with an emphasis on collaboration, cooperation, and coordination within and among organizations. Students apply these concepts to real-life situations and organizations. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 7311).
  
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    PPPA 7202 - Ethics and Social Justice


    (5 cr.) Ethics is a foundational element of leadership. Leaders face increasingly complex social and political challenges as they seek to meet the needs of diverse constituents. This course explores ethics and social justice related to economic disparity, power, and privilege. Students use demographic data, current social trends, and themes to understand, analyze, and address ethical and social justice issues that impact service delivery in a global community. (Prerequisite(s): EDUC 7311).
  
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    PPPA 8000 - Foundations for Doctoral Study


    (1 cr.) Students in this course are introduced to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. Students work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. They assess the relationship of mission and vision to professional goals and develop a program of study and strategies for online success. Students also explore resources used throughout the program, such as the online Walden University Library. Students engage in course assignments focused on the practical application of professional writing, critical-thinking skills, and the promotion of professional and academic excellence as they relate to practice in public policy and administration. Note: For course-based program
  
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    PPPA 8002 - Writing a Quality KAM Demonstration


    (2 cr.) This course covers the structure of the KAM and the research and writing techniques needed for the successful development of a KAM. In this course, students develop a draft Learning Agreement for their first KAM, under an instructor’s guidance.
  
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    PPPA 8008 - Foundations for Doctoral Study


    (6 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Walden University and to the requirements for successful participation in an online curriculum. It provides a foundation for academic and professional success as a scholar-practitioner and social change agent. Course assignments focus on practical application of writing and critical thinking skills and promote professional and academic excellence. Major assignments include the preparation of the Professional Development Plan, program of study, and a sample KAM Learning Agreement. Note: Students in selected doctoral programs and specializations are required to take this course immediately upon enrollment, and must successfully complete it before proceeding with KAMs or coursework.
  
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    PPPA 8105 - Managing at the Boundaries: Creative Thinking for Social Change


    (6 cr.) Increasingly, the boundaries between governmental levels and sectors have become blurred, requiring leaders and managers to take critical action where these bodies intersect. In this course, students examine the historical and contemporary patterns of interaction between levels of government as well as among the public, private, and nonprofit sectors in the United States. They assess the communications and interactions of stakeholders within a community to learn how these figures handle current issues of social concern. Students also investigate and analyze each socioeconomic sector, including practices and standards; incorporate methods of cross-sector collaboration; and employ their analysis to address an issue or challenge within their own community, lending to positive social change.
  
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    PPPA 8111 - Leadership and Organizational Change


    (5 cr.) Successful organizations in a rapidly changing and complex world require leaders who embrace change and are able to engage others in change. In this course, students use traditional literature, current articles, and interactive media to explore the qualities, characteristics, and skills of effective leaders as well as the theories, models, and relationships between leadership and organizational change. They assess the ethical issues and standards as well as the opportunities and challenges related to leading diverse organizations through change. Students also examine how current leaders employ leadership and organizational change to contribute to social change, and they consider how to use these lessons to make further positive changes within an organization or their own community.
  
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    PPPA 8112 - Governance and Public Policy


    (5 cr.) Democratic principles are the foundation of modern life. The course provides students with an overview of democratic governance in public administration, public policy, or nonprofit or nongovernmental organizations in modern society. Students examine the theoretical underpinnings of democratic governance and public policy in their chosen area of specialization necessary for doctoral-level research. Students examine the context in which public and nonprofit leaders function and the social institutions that influence public policy and guide administrative decision making. Students also review fundamental theories of governance, research current literature on a specialized topic, and apply best practices as they relate concepts to complete practical application assignments and a final case scenario project.
  
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    PPPA 8115 - Writing a Quality Prospectus


    (5 cr.) The prospectus a brief paper, typically 15–20 pages in length, which helps students organize, delineate, and make decisions regarding their doctoral study and appropriate research methodology. Students create a prospectus to establish the background for the problem statement; the problem statement itself; a survey of the relevant literature (typically 25–75 references); and a research, implementation, and evaluation plan for the solution of the problem. Students in this five-credit course focus specifically on the process of writing the dissertation prospectus. They employ their preliminary research plan to develop a problem statement for their dissertation. Students further refine the problem statement and carry out the planning and the library research that lends to the formulation of a dissertation prospectus.
  
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    PPPA 8175 - Health Policy and Management


    (5 cr.) Methods for influencing and improving health outcomes of individuals and populations are at the forefront of health policy and management. With this in mind, the Department of Health and Human Services launched a national, comprehensive plan—Healthy People 2010—designed to promote health and prevent disease. Students in this course expand on these goals to develop a solid foundation for understanding the need for effective health policy and management and the role of the public health professional charged with influencing local, state, and federal policy. Students identify and assess components of organization, financing, and delivery of health services and systems in the United States. They engage in a variety of contextual and practical assignments focused on management theories, policy processes, systems thinking, strategic planning and partnerships, quality and performance improvement, leadership, and organizational behavior. Students also consider the impact of global trends on public health practice, policy, and systems.
  
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    PPPA 8200 - Intellectual Traditions of Public Policy and Public Administration


    (4 cr.) In this course, students have the opportunity to gain a scholarly perspective on public policy and administration that traces major theories associated with the field and the political, social, and economic context within which these theories developed. Students explore and assess the historical and contemporary roles and relationships of the public and nonprofit sectors in the United States. They examine the “layers of government” and their interdependence between local municipalities, county, state, and federal levels. Students employ doctoral-level skills, including research, analysis, and scholarly-writing, to analyze and explicate ongoing controversies and debates in the field; through these assignments, students develop new perspectives and recommendations in the field as well as contribute to their own professional development.
  
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    PPPA 8250 - U.S. and International Healthcare Systems


    (5 cr.) This course examines international healthcare system reform. Focus is given to the influence of corporate and governmental agencies in the delivery and financing of health services and the legal issues confronting healthcare institutions. The course also explores fiscal and public policy forces on national and international health systems and investigates the opportunities and challenges facing the management of community-based healthcare organizations.
  
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    PPPA 8305 - Professional Leadership and Ethics


    (4 cr.) The integrity of an organization depends on the ethical framework through which its leaders make decisions and solve problems. In this course, students have the opportunity to develop skills to act as professionals who employ theoretical knowledge to further democracy and social change through ethical, well-planned decision making. Students examine contemporary ethical issues of public and nonprofit sectors, and they learn why ethics is vital to the leadership role. They use conceptual tools to clarify moral dilemmas and analyze individual decision-making strategies and organizational programs from an ethical perspective. Students also engage in a final course project in which they apply concepts presented in the course to real-world ethical challenges.
  
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    PPPA 8320 - Public Policy Implications of Terrorism Legislation and Policies


    (5 cr.) Students in this course are provided with the opportunity to develop a broad perspective on the history of the U.S. Patriot Act, terroristic legislation and immigration laws, and their policy implications on law enforcement, governmental entities, organizations, and individuals. Students gain a foundation to build the skills that public administrators and public policy analysts use to draft and implement public policy and enforce and/or respond to potential terroristic threats while simultaneously upholding and protecting constitutional freedoms. Students examine topics through a wide variety of resources, including contemporary texts, websites, case studies, and material representing international, national, and local governments and organizations. They critically review and analyze the U.S. Patriot Act and similar terroristic 297 legislation and policies, and they participate in discussions about these laws and their implications on U.S. constitutional freedoms.
  
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    PPPA 8321 - Terrorism: A Systemic Approach for Emergency Preparedness


    (5 cr.) Terrorism continues to be a constant threat to the American public, facilitating the need for accurate information, organized resources, and established approaches to respond to emergencies and keep the public informed. Students in this course examine terrorism and related public policy on a local, national, and international level. They also assess the need and function of systemic approaches for emergency preparedness. Students explore and discuss topical issues, such as terrorism and public health, bioterrorism, biosecurity, cyberterrorism, risk assessment, implications for public health, and components of a systemic preparedness infrastructure. Using analytic skills and tools, students assess recommendations that policy makers use in decisions to prevent or respond to terrorism. They also gain hands-on experience initiating the development and/or analysis of a terrorism-preparedness infrastructure.
  
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    PPPA 8322 - Critical Incident Planning and Leadership


    (5 cr.) Who is responsible for emergency management and what elements should be included in an emergency management plan? Students in this course have the opportunity to answer such questions as they examine the principles of emergency planning, selection of leaders, specialized planning (e.g., schools, tourism), mutual aid, and leadership theories. Students analyze case studies, identifying weaknesses in current methods as well as potential solutions. Through this analysis, students develop new strategies and perspectives in regard to responding to and planning for critical incidents. This course provides a basic foundation for public administrators or students planning to enter the field of public administration to develop a critical incident plan and gain a thorough understanding of leadership models and methods.
  
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    PPPA 8330 - Holding Up the Mirror: Understanding Different Cultures and Increasing Global Consciousness


    (5 cr.) Professionals in all areas of public policy and administration work with individuals and organizations of different cultures on a daily basis; therefore, global consciousness is vital to effective communication and interaction in the field. In this course, students explore and analyze the cultural values and styles of communication, reasoning, and leadership unique to their home culture. Students apply these concepts to better understand the people, values, and policies of other cultures. They also identify and become familiar with challenges that American nonprofit organizations face as they work internationally or cross-culturally within the United States. Sharpening critical-thinking skills, students research and assess an organization within their own community that has international links; through this assessment, students gain further awareness of different cultures and the importance of cross-cultural ties. (Prerequisites: A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly advised.) (Prerequisite(s): A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly advised.)
  
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    PPPA 8331 - Crossing Borders: U.S. and International NGO Organizational Cultures and Environments


    (5 cr.) In this course, students study in depth the cultures, structures, and activities of NGOs in select countries and compare their activities, organizational cultures, structures, and working environments with nonprofits in the United States. (Prerequisite(s): A course or direct experience in nonprofit management is strongly advised.)
 

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